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Quantum Information Can be Negative

timothy posted about 9 years ago | from the you-are-now-dumber dept.

Math 445

nerdlygirl writes "In a development that would probably even puzzle Claude Shannon, information can be negative -- at least when the information is quantum. The discovery, by Horodecki, Oppenheim, and Winter, appears in the current edition of the leading journal Nature. If I tell you negative information, you'll know less. Apparently, researchers hope to use this to gain deeper insights into phenomena such as quantum teleportation and computation, as well as the very structure of the quantum world. More details can be found here and here A popular account of the article can be found on Oppenheim's homepage, and a free version of the article can be found in the arxiv for those of us without subscriptions to Nature."

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This is not news (3, Funny)

denissmith (31123) | about 9 years ago | (#13274292)

Karl Rove has known this for years.

Re:This is not news (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274339)

Damn. Beat me to it. ;)

Re:This is not news (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274358)

Congratulations! You are completely clueless and have fallen for the lies. Have a nice day!

Re:This is not news (0, Offtopic)

jdray (645332) | about 9 years ago | (#13274371)

Choose your favorite punchline:

a) Ah, so that's what's been coming out of the White House all this time.

b) If I commit, is it really a rollback?

YOU DID IT! (0, Troll)

FIRST BUSH BASH! (897588) | about 9 years ago | (#13274392)

Congratulations! You were the first person to bash the Bush administration in this article. Double points for it being a first post. Your are at the top of the field of Bush administration bashers evidenced by your ability to do so in an article about quantum mechanics. Kudos.

Re:This is not news (3, Informative)

sratbot (906134) | about 9 years ago | (#13274481)

FTFA: "It sometimes seems that we become more ignorant after talking to certain individuals. Perhaps they are saying things which are confusing or untrue. Well, after getting negative information, you know less. But not in the same sense as someone who tells you lies are tries to bamboozle you. Remember, that we don't worry about the quality of information (whether it is true or false for example). We just concern ourselves with how much there is. So, if we know less after receiving negative information, the amount of information we have must actually go down. This obviously cannot happen classically, but let me try to explain why it can happen quantumly."

I was expecting a Fox News joke... (0, Offtopic)

the_skywise (189793) | about 9 years ago | (#13274497)

But that just about matches my expectations...

nope (3, Funny)

cain (14472) | about 9 years ago | (#13274293)

No it can't.

Yes it can (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274380)

This article is not bogus.

The concept of a "quantum eraser" is not a new one. Consider the classic double-slit experiment, where electrons are shot at a double slit and form an interference pattern on a screen which corresponds to the probability distribution of the particle's position. If you were to place detectors so that you knew which slit the particle went through, the interference pattern would disappear-- that is, there would be no uncertainty in the position (because obviously, you know which slit it went through). This is intuitive if you consider the interference pattern to be a probability distribution.

However, if you were to place a 50/50 beam splitter in front of the detectors, the interference pattern would reappear! By destryong the which-path information, the interference pattern (uncertainty) is restored. Bizarre, but true.

Google "quantum eraser" for more info.

Obe-Wan has known it for years. (1)

phreakhead (881388) | about 9 years ago | (#13274456)

This is not the information you're looking for.

Re:nope (1)

thegrassyknowl (762218) | about 9 years ago | (#13274459)

I feel dumber for having read your post.

Although, this just goes to prove the point I always made when I was sitting through mind numbingly boring lectures given by stupid people in the past... "i feel dumber for having sat through that". Now I knot that I wasn't just imagining it!

Finally, a matter I can speak on with authority... (5, Funny)

Skyshadow (508) | about 9 years ago | (#13274294)

I've been studying negative information for years. I consider myself somewhat of an expert on the subject, actually.

Initially, I believed that negative information was an abstract math concept, but after a significant amount of additional study I've determined rather conclusively that it exists in our frame of reference and that the effects are actually easy to detect. The trick is to *locate* some of this negative information. Fortunately, I've managed to work that out as well -- I'm not publishing for a few months yet, but I figure I'm far enough along to spill some of the beans:

Experiencing negative inforamtion is all about occupying a point in space and time which intersects with the negative information stream. This was initially tricky, but through months of tireless research I've worked out the optimal conditions: I find that your best chance of encountering it is roughly around 1 AM when you're at the bar with your friends after a long night of drinking and one of them says something along the lines of, "Awright! Time for some shots!"

Bang! Negative information. What happened after that? How did I get home? All lost in the quantum flow, never to be accurately described by anyone involved (except, occasionally and for reasons I still haven't managed to factor into my equations, the bouncer and the police). I assume the headaches and liver damage are just a nominal side effect.

Re:Finally, a matter I can speak on with authority (1)

Eightyford (893696) | about 9 years ago | (#13274351)

Heh, and here I was all excited to hear about some breakthrough science, when negative information is nothing more than my brain trying to forget all the uglies.

Re:Finally, a matter I can speak on with authority (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274366)

1 am?! wtf did your mommy call you on your mobile to come home or what?!

The real question is... (1)

theantipop (803016) | about 9 years ago | (#13274476)

will this hold up in court? Seriously. Please forward your thoughts to my lawyer ASAP.

Best place for negative information (2, Funny)

Aexia (517457) | about 9 years ago | (#13274527)

Browse at -1

I already knew this (2, Funny)

77Punker (673758) | about 9 years ago | (#13274295)

If I tell you negative information, you'll know less. Sounds like what happened in that mind numbing English class I had to take last semester.

when you asked me to take the trash out (3, Funny)

mrsbrisby (60242) | about 9 years ago | (#13274296)

it was negative information so I forgot how to get my socks in the dirty clothes.

True (5, Funny)

M.C. Hampster (541262) | about 9 years ago | (#13274297)

After trying to read those articles, I do feel like I know less.

Re:True (1)

SlashEdsDoYourJobs (905360) | about 9 years ago | (#13274337)

Don't be so negative!

Negative Information (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274369)

You should try browsing at -1 sometime! You'll wish you knew less...

File not Found (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274302)

404-File Not Found
Now THAT'S negative quantum... information.

What next, negative intelligence? (2, Funny)

Zarel (900479) | about 9 years ago | (#13274303)

Considering some of the posters here, I wouldn't be surprised if that were discovered.

Re:What next, negative intelligence? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274341)

Your post is definitely proves the concept of negative humor.

negative information! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274304)

somebody must have commented some negative information here because I don't see anything!

kind of like /. comments (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274305)

sometimes after reading /. comments i feel like i know less.

Education (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274306)

I guess this is the answer to a previous Slashdot article about why public education in the US is bad.

-5: interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274307)

fp

When I was in high school (4, Funny)

multiplexo (27356) | about 9 years ago | (#13274311)

a friend and I used to joke that there were people who gave off destructive mental interference waves. Sitting next to these people would result in a decrease in brain function because their brainwaves were 180 degrees out of phase than the brainwaves of normal people, thus cancelling them out and creating a thought-free zone.

Of course negative information is cool, but it would be even cooler if you could combine negative information and positive information to produce a huge explosion.

Re:When I was in high school (4, Funny)

Skyshadow (508) | about 9 years ago | (#13274363)

a friend and I used to joke that there were people who gave off destructive mental interference waves. Sitting next to these people would result in a decrease in brain function

Maybe things have changed in the last 10 years, but back when I was in high school we called these people "girls".

Re:When I was in high school (5, Funny)

QuantaStarFire (902219) | about 9 years ago | (#13274441)

Maybe things have changed in the last 10 years, but back when I was in high school we called these people "girls".

Actually, proximity to girls caused higher brain functions to be transferred to an area just below the waist. You could still technically think, but it was limited in scope.

Re:When I was in high school (1)

QuantaStarFire (902219) | about 9 years ago | (#13274398)

Of course negative information is cool, but it would be even cooler if you could combine negative information and positive information to produce a huge explosion.

Who says it doesn't? You may have inadvertantly figured out what causes spontaneous combustion.

Re:When I was in high school (4, Funny)

Cutterex (787660) | about 9 years ago | (#13274494)

"By looking at the 3D map, you can see an unmistakable cone of ignorance."

Re:When I was in high school (1)

QuantaStarFire (902219) | about 9 years ago | (#13274557)

Put it away! Put it away!

Re:When I was in high school (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274506)

if you could combine negative information and positive information to produce a huge explosion.

Unfortunately, the only thing this combination has ever produced based on my studies, are politicians, used car salesmen, and of course, SCO.

(-2)+(-3)=+1 (2, Funny)

djupedal (584558) | about 9 years ago | (#13274312)

If I tell you negative information, you'll know less.

So, if two people tell me negative information, I'll know more?

Re:(-2)+(-3)=+1 (5, Funny)

Persol (719185) | about 9 years ago | (#13274345)

(-2)+(-3)=+1

I think you've hit the lower limit already....

Re:(-2)+(-3)=+1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274355)

(-2)+(-3)= -5

Looks like they already got to you

Re:(-2)+(-3)=+1 (1)

r2tincan (893666) | about 9 years ago | (#13274360)

Wouldn't that be -5? :/

Re:(-2)+(-3)=+1 (1)

Punboy (737239) | about 9 years ago | (#13274383)

He confused his addition with multiplication.

(-2)(-3) = 6
(-2) + (-3) = -5

Re:(-2)+(-3)=+1 (4, Funny)

saigon_from_europe (741782) | about 9 years ago | (#13274372)

(-2)+(-3)=+1

You have obviously received a lot of negative information before you started writing this 'math'.

Re:(-2)+(-3)=+1 (1)

mcc (14761) | about 9 years ago | (#13274448)

You have obviously received a lot of negative information before you started writing this 'math'.

Either that or he is working in the modular arithmetic group of order 6.

But that isn't even a field, so I don't know why he'd be doing that.

Re:(-2)+(-3)=+1 (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274388)

Ummm...

(-2)+(-3)=

-5 ...you'll just know far less.

Now, if two people containing negative information multiply...

(-2)*(-3)

The result is positive. +6.

This provides a ray of hope for the observation that, "only stupid people are breeding", as noted by the famous song (not that famous, I guess. Cannot recall the song or artist). Eventually, things will come full circle.

Re:(-2)+(-3)=+1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274408)

Harvey Danger - Flagpole Sitta

Memory loss due to negative information?

Re:(-2)+(-3)=+1 (1)

koreaman (835838) | about 9 years ago | (#13274413)

Flagpole Sitta -- Harvey Danger
hope this helps.

Of course (2, Funny)

jpardey (569633) | about 9 years ago | (#13274499)

The truth of the Time Cube surrounds even the most educated stupid researches of us. -(1) + -(1) = +(A North American).

That's Intuitive (2, Funny)

AdroitOneX (711013) | about 9 years ago | (#13274315)

If I tell you negative information, you'll know less.

I experience this almost everytime I speak to my boss.

Re:That's Intuitive (1)

baylanger (780885) | about 9 years ago | (#13274395)

It does get worse the higher in the company you go!

Nothing new here... (1)

gatekeep (122108) | about 9 years ago | (#13274316)

"If I tell you negative information, you'll know less."

This is nothing new, the effect is known as 'the dumbening.' It can be easily reproduced in the home by watching Harold & Kumar go to White Castle. Watch that movie, and I guarantee you'll know less!

Guh! (0, Redundant)

HawaiianMayan (550426) | about 9 years ago | (#13274318)

Have you never heard of Entertainment Weekly? It must be full of negative quantum information, because reading it definitely make you dumber.

Affects black holes! (4, Interesting)

sconeu (64226) | about 9 years ago | (#13274320)


Since a black hole's entropy is directly proportional to it's information content, this, if true, would have an effect on black holes.

If I recall correctly (and I may not -- my physics isn't what it used to be), the amount of information contained by a black hole is directly proportional to its surface area -- specifically, I believe that the total number of bits contained is equal to 1/4 of its surface area as measured in Planck units.

Now, if information can be negative, that would provide another method of shrinking a black hole, in addition to Hawking radiation.

Sounds Familiar... (1)

r2tincan (893666) | about 9 years ago | (#13274322)

I wonder if Mohammed Saeed al-Sahaf [welovethei...nister.com] was a quantum physisist.

Finally, an explanation for... (1)

currivan (654314) | about 9 years ago | (#13274323)

Finally, an explanation for those John 3:16 signs.

Clarify? (2, Funny)

goldberry (887347) | about 9 years ago | (#13274401)

What exactly do you mean by this?

Ouch! (1)

Eightyford (893696) | about 9 years ago | (#13274324)

"In the quantum world, there are things we just cannot know, no matter how clever we are. For example, we cannot know both the position and momentum of a small particle exactly. One can also have situations where someone knows more than everything. This is known as quantum 'entanglement', and when two people share entanglement, there can be negative information. "

My brain hurts!

Re:Ouch! (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274368)

Mine does not. I processed all of it and I call the whole thing incorrect. Seriously, negative mass may (or may not) exist, but negative information is false on its face.

One needs only two.... (1)

Lord Pillage (815466) | about 9 years ago | (#13274328)

letters; T and V, in that order.

Re:One needs only two.... (1)

goldberry (887347) | about 9 years ago | (#13274483)

For most TV I would agree with you, but (as I keep trying to convince my boyfriend) there *are* intelligent programs out there if you know where to look. Most things I've seen on both the History and Discovery channels, for instance, have definitely been positive information. Even kids' programs, when watched in an unfamiliar language, can be highly enlightening. I was home sick from middle school one day and learned the word "yellow" in Spanish ("amarillo") while watching a Spanish equivalent of Sesame Street. While one must wade through an astonishing volume of crap to find worthwhile viewing material on television these days, I maintain that it is entirely possible for an intelligent person to watch intelligent TV.

Um... (1)

Junior J. Junior III (192702) | about 9 years ago | (#13274332)

If I tell you negative information, you'll know less. Apparently, researchers hope to use this to gain deeper insights into

So less really is more?

I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274342)

if incorrect knowledge can be considered as negative knowledge. For example, if I believe that the Earth is flat, I might actually be worse of compared to having no idea what the shape of the Earth is. That's because if I base certain designs on my incorrect assumption that the Earth is flat, I might actually get in trouble.

Two questions (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274344)

Does negative information want to be free?

And secondly, er, I used to know the second question, dunno what happened there.

Don't click on the 5th link! (1)

EvanED (569694) | about 9 years ago | (#13274353)

It's got negative information in it!

Bad Analogy (4, Insightful)

ravenspear (756059) | about 9 years ago | (#13274359)

If I tell you negative information, you'll know less.

I don't think that really works. You can't make someone know less by just telling them something, unless by doing so you somehow alter their brain chemistry to store less information or remove information already stored. I suspect this might be closer to the quantum idea.

Suppose you have two pieces of quantum information, one positive and one negative. The negative piece could negate the positive one which would result in 0 total pieces of information instead of 2.

However, the idea of this negative information is still kind of abstract and not that easy to understand. The quantum nature of this is key I think. It doesn't look like it extends that well to our concept of information (which would be the kind stored by the brain), at least not yet.

Re:Bad Analogy (1)

steelfood (895457) | about 9 years ago | (#13274501)

The abstract says all:

If the partial information is positive, its sender needs to communicate this number of quantum bits to the receiver; if it is negative, the sender and receiver instead gain the corresponding potential for future quantum communication.

At risk of oversimplifying, negative information is information that is not known, but soon will be. It's not unlike what we would think of as a prediction, or more accurately, a premonition.

Re:Bad Analogy (1)

orkysoft (93727) | about 9 years ago | (#13274545)

Sounds more like a prepaid phone to me...

Re:Bad Analogy (1)

jacen_sunstrider (797955) | about 9 years ago | (#13274513)

How about this: you thought that the pythagoreum theorem was a^2+b^2+c^2=d^2 (obviously incorrect). Later, you're told that it's actually simply a^2+b^2=c^2. This takes less physical memory in place of the wrong equation, and there's no reason to retain the knowledge of that incorrect equation. Therefore, the information of the correct theorem is negative information; you physically know less information when quantized.

that's all BS, but it might be correct BS

Pah.. old news. (1)

Ligur (453963) | about 9 years ago | (#13274376)

My girlfriend fed me negative information for years. Then she broke up with me because I couldn't remember her name! What a bitch!

Only fooling themselves (2, Funny)

Robotbeat (461248) | about 9 years ago | (#13274386)

"Apparently, researchers hope to use this to gain deeper insights..."

Taking into consideration the sentence before that, it seems like the hope of those researchers is unfounded... Irony.

Old philosophy, revisited... (2, Funny)

gmuslera (3436) | about 9 years ago | (#13274387)

"One thing only I know, and that is that I know less than nothing" - Socratum

That explains it! (2, Funny)

St. Vitus (26355) | about 9 years ago | (#13274397)

If I tell you negative information, you'll know less.

So, American television programming has been giving us negative information
for decades now....

Yeah, okay. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274402)

Quantum theorists need to stop smoking pot and look at the world around them. You can't have negative information, seeing something occur doesn't change the outcome, oh and the earth is square.

is it like when... (1)

Abstract_Me (799786) | about 9 years ago | (#13274404)

Is it like when you talk to somebody and they make a comment/statement soooo stupid that you actually lose IQ hearing it?

Oh, man! I wonder how many /.-ers will get this :) (1, Insightful)

Mac Degger (576336) | about 9 years ago | (#13274407)

First off, QM isn't the easiest subject; even experts say that if you say you understand QM (as oposed to just apply it) you're lying.

So first off you need an understanding of QM (it's statistical information, so screw the Kopenhagen interpretation :P). Then you need to understand the concept of information, in the context of QM. After that you need to know what's meant by /positive/, in the context of information and in the context of how a Quantum Mechanic would apply that. And then you'd need to read the papers and grok what negative quantum information means.

Shit, I'm getting to my third year of applied physics, and I'm just grokking the basics of QM, let alone the concept of 'information' (let alone positive or negative) in QM :)

Or is that just the wave function? (1)

argent (18001) | about 9 years ago | (#13274505)

If you absorb enough negative information, will that collapse your head?

you'll know less (2, Funny)

big whiffer (906132) | about 9 years ago | (#13274414)

What you've just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever heard. At no point in your rambling, incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. I award you no points, and may God have mercy on your soul.

I get it now... (1)

Dunbal (464142) | about 9 years ago | (#13274417)

That explains all those lecturers I had that would put me to sleep instantly...and I would wake up a few hours later completely clueless until I had a few beers...

Not new (1)

jafiwam (310805) | about 9 years ago | (#13274418)

"If it weren't for my horse, I wouldn't have spent that year in college."

That, plus any other saying that makes the listener dumber.

This explains the Creationist/ID movement (3, Funny)

Dimensio (311070) | about 9 years ago | (#13274419)

All this time I wondered how so many people could be so stupid as to believe the mountains of bullshit pushed by the creationist movement, and this explains it!

As information regarding the field of biology -- specifically in the study of evolution -- increases, a balance must be made. As a result, the increase of information in biology causes a reaction of an equal increase of negative information with respect to the creationist movement. The more biologists figure out and the more knowledgable experts become, the dumber and more gullible the general populace must become to balance the information flow out.

Expanding the cardinality (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274423)

Negative information may be, or may not be, equivalent to expanding the set of all possible information. In that sense, you discover more of what you do not know, hence know less of the total knowledge.

This may not be what they are talking about, but this notion of expanding the cardinality of the problem by introducing new information has been a helpful analogy in other mathematical problems.

Lao Tzu figured this out millenia ago (3, Interesting)

benna (614220) | about 9 years ago | (#13274434)

He wrote, "The scholar learns something every day, the man of tao unlearns something every day, until he gets back to non-doing."

This explains SCO's press releases (1)

Trailer Trash (60756) | about 9 years ago | (#13274436)

I always feel like I know less after reading Darl's various enlightenments....

I do believe... (1)

Symbha (679466) | about 9 years ago | (#13274437)

This discovery is itself, negative information.

Quantum mechanics is already well known as... (1)

exp(pi*sqrt(163)) (613870) | about 9 years ago | (#13274447)

...having things that act like negative probabilities. For example the classic two slit experiment shows that we can make it less likely for a particle to travel from A to B even though we have increased the number of paths by which it can travel from A to B. I'm not terribly suprised, therefore, by the existence of negative information.

Make sense! (1)

drzolo (760845) | about 9 years ago | (#13274450)

No really, can someone give an example of this in non meta physical world? I am having trouble understanding... idea seems very interesting... but how?

So.. (1)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | about 9 years ago | (#13274452)

So if we can figure out a way to manipulate this could we not "erase" someones memory? Isn't it possible that we already know all about this yet our memories may have been effected in some way?

I haven't RTFA (yet) but this seems one of them "If we saw invisible people would we even know?" type questions..

sounds like... (1)

ricochet81 (707864) | about 9 years ago | (#13274455)

Negative information? Doesn't that happen when one watches TV? I swear I get stupider every time I turn it on.

Negative Information? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274472)

as we know, there are known knowns; there are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns -- the ones we don't know we don't know.

Sometimes even politicians show their scientific side!

I can smell it!!! (1)

baylanger (780885) | about 9 years ago | (#13274473)

Yes, in this news room, it does smell like Microsoft... there's even some really bad smell left from Enron and a few others!

Implication on Information Theory and Probabilitie (1)

Juiblex (561985) | about 9 years ago | (#13274475)

Information is defined as -log2(p), where p is the probability of the event. E.g, in a coin toss, the probability of H(ead) or T(ail) is 0.5, so the information about this event is -log2(0.5) == 1 (i.e, 1 bit).

Negative information means that the probability p must be higher than 1... well, if this is true, then an entire new probability theory (or quantum information theory) will have to be built! A piece of information of -1 bit is informing something with probability 2.0... what does this means? An event that is doubly sure to happen? =p

Re:Implication on Information Theory and Probabili (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13274556)

When encountering p > 1, I take the reciprocal [sp] automatically. So, if p is a probability, p := 1 / p.

Negative? (1)

daviq (888445) | about 9 years ago | (#13274488)

Perhaps it's just information in a grayishy area.

24 Hour News (1)

nate nice (672391) | about 9 years ago | (#13274492)

"If I tell you negative information, you'll know less."

Anyone who watches any of the 24 hour cable news networks should know this by now. Well, they probably don't because I'm guessing it's hard to observe information loss...because you won't remember it. This is probably redundant by this point thought, huh?

good news (1)

FudRucker (866063) | about 9 years ago | (#13274502)

now if i can get the right negatve information i can finally get those awfull images of goats.cx pictures out of my mind :P

U of MD study already discovered the phenomenon (1, Offtopic)

joehill48 (634803) | about 9 years ago | (#13274519)

Negative information has been known about for some time. A study at the University of Maryland [alternet.org] revealed its existence in the media realm a couple years ago.

Fox News. The More You Watch, the Less You Know.(tm)

Math (2, Insightful)

Mark of THE CITY (97325) | about 9 years ago | (#13274522)

Would it be accurate to analogize this to antimatter, in the sense that the latter was found mathematically first, and observed later (and maybe not yet)?

Conservation of Information (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 9 years ago | (#13274543)

The question is does transmitting negative information from point A to point B cause the informantion level of A to increase? If so it would explain how universities work.

Simply put they bring in the best and brightest students, hire professors to send these students negative information in their lectures and writings, and thus the university gains information.

Keep this up for a couple of hundred years and it is quite obvious how top universities become famous as such great centers of learning.

I think Feynman thought of this first (4, Informative)

mbone (558574) | about 9 years ago | (#13274544)

I distinctly remember a lecture by Feynman at Caltech in the early 1980's where he talked about negative information (probability). I am sure I still have notes for it somewhere. Of course, you can never see negative information; any actual measurement has to have positive probility. But it can give quantum interference effects in measured quantities.

Feynman presented it as just a different way of having quantum interference, from negative probability instead of complex amplitudes.

From one of TFA... (1)

abulafia (7826) | about 9 years ago | (#13274548)

From this [cam.ac.uk] : I will mention three ways of understanding negative information. Both are just rough analogies, but they kinda make sense (hopefully).

It looks like the author's already experimenting with negative information...

Welcome... (1)

BlackSabbath (118110) | about 9 years ago | (#13274554)

...to Fox News Network.
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