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Bacteria Used to Create Nanowires

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the high-tech-beekeeping dept.

Biotech 188

FnH writes "Derek Lovley and his colleagues of the University of Massachusetts discovered that the Geobacter bacteria is capable of producing nanowires. The bacteria is normally used to clean up toxic waste. Geobacter does not use oxygen, but metal as its source for power. This probably explains the 3nm to 5nm nanowires it excretes while working. What metal the nanowires are made of is not yet known, but the genetic code responsible for their creation is. This opens up the possibility of modifying the bacteria to create nanowires on chips."

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FIRST HORSE (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277231)

I AM A HORSE!

jizz and chips (1)

Fecal Troll Matter (445929) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277236)

The British are so weird.

Re:FIRST HORSE (1)

utnow (808790) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277387)

I am a bannanna! My anus is bleeding!

ASFR Successfully Trained Students (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277234)

The ASFR (American Schools For Retards) has successfully trained its mentally challenged students to successfully use doors. Crapby, the Redmond district principal, answered our interviewer's questions.

Interviewer: So Mr. Crapby, tell us how you managed to accomplish the amazing feat.
Crapby: It wasn't easy, our students are pretty dumb. The last few months had almost NO success.
Interviewer: Could you tell us what happened during those last few months?
Crapby: The retards just kept slamming their bodies into the doors, without stopping. We showed them how to do it over and over, but they just kept slamming into the door!
Interviewer: So what made this month different?
Crapby: Well, I finally had an idea to get rid of the doors with the turn handles and replace them with push doors. So the retards could slam into the door and it would open!
Interviewer: Amazing!! Well we're done interviewing.


For those of you who don't know what the ASFR does or if it exists we'll tell you!
The ASFR attempts to educate extremely mentally challenged retards.Their schools exist in Oregon and Washington. To learn more visit their webpage: ASFR Homepage [slashdot.org] .

Nothing to say... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277237)

...I have

Dupe (5, Informative)

SlashEdsDoYourJobs (905360) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277239)

Dupe [slashdot.org] .

Re:Dupe (0, Offtopic)

john-gal (823997) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277430)

Darn you SlashEdsDoYourJob. The moment I read the article title, I knew this was a dupe but wanted to confirm my hunch. Did a quick search using Google and rushed back here to post the link. And here I find the first comment (at least the first comment visible to me) pointing to the original post. I hope you are happy. By the way, do you realize that if the Slashdot editors did their jobs, you would not have that nick?
Mods, I hope this post get a good mod as I did not post a duplicate dupe comment even after I took the pains to do a Google search to confirm that this post is indeed a dupe.
PS: The word that I got to type in to confirm that I am not a script was 'grieve'. How apt.
--
I have no sig..*sigh*

I guess... (-1, Offtopic)

WindozeSux (857211) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277241)

oxigen

The editor's didn't have their coffee this morning.

Re:I guess... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277255)

editor's

And neither have you, it seems. :)

Re:I guess... (-1, Offtopic)

mariox19 (632969) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277256)

Nevermind the caffeine -- maybe his brain needs more oxygen.

Re:I guess... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277305)

Additionally, the "it's" should be "its".

Re:I guess... (-1, Offtopic)

jridley (9305) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277323)

Not to mention:
metal as it's source for power.

it's is a contraction of "it is", therefore:
[uses] metal as [it is] source for power.

Of course, that leads to:
The editor's didn't have their coffee this morning.

The editor's WHAT didn't have coffee?

That probably should be source OF power, as long as we're picking nits.

Knowing the english language isn't really a requirement for the job of Slashdot editor. That's been apparent for quite a long time now.

Actually, I don't think the "editors" are editors at all. They sift through the submissions pile, and accept stories, seemingly at random. They don't really seem to actually even read slashdot themselves; just look at the number of duplicate articles. They certainly don't spell- or grammar-check the articles.

But I'm about done with slashdot anyway. It's getting to be rare that I see an article that I haven't already seen elsewhere. Heck, a couple of times lately NPR has scooped slashdot on technology news. If you read the register and another couple of tech sites, it's almost guaranteed that you will not see anything new on slashdot.

It doesn't use Oxigen... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277242)

But does it use Oxygen?

The bacteria "link up" with each other (5, Interesting)

ReformedExCon (897248) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277243)

According to the article, the bacteria seem to produce these tiny wires which then carry electrical signals across large meshes of bacteria-produced wires. It would be interesting to see what sort of emergent behavior, if any, would arise from very large meshes of these wires and bacteria.

Re:The bacteria "link up" with each other (4, Informative)

k98sven (324383) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277333)

No, they don't carry signals. (What signals would there be to carry?)

The reduction of metal (iron) in a geobacter metallireducens bacteria functions as little more than an electron sink for getting rid of electrons at the end of the respiratory chain.

Fe3+ (metal ion from the environment) + 3 e- --> Fe (metal)

There are other bacteria which turn nitrate into nitrogen and sulphur into H2S (smelly bastards!), among others.

We humans (and our relatives) do this using oxygen:
O2 (oxygen from the environment) + 4 e- + 4H+ --> 2 H2O (water)

There's nothing particularily surprizing about the fact that it produces metal. Nor is it terribly surprizing that the metal comes out as a long strand. Respiration is a rather continuous process, after all!

So no signalling. (And what could they possibly signal anyway?) But that doesn't mean there couldn't be benefits for the bacteria to have its metal threads connected. It might help ground any excess negative charge on the resulting metal, aiding the respiration process.

Re:The bacteria "link up" with each other (2, Interesting)

ReformedExCon (897248) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277343)

Thank you for the expanded information.

The original basis for my post was this quote:

quote
Patrinos said the bacteria may organize to form minipower grids in the soil by linking up via the nanowires. /quote

Born from "Star Trek"... (4, Interesting)

cnelzie (451984) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277646)

...the post you were responding to is.

    "It would be just like that one Star Trek Episode where Wesley was doing this experiment with Nanobots that networked together and formed a rudimentary, then more evolved Artificial Intelligence. They like took over Lt. Cmdr. Data and then took over the ship and all they wanted was a chance to have a place of their own, that they could turn into grey ooze." ...or...

    "It could be just like that one Star Trek Episode where there was this terraforming project going on at this lifeless rock and the Enterprise was sent to investigate some terrible disasters that were happening there. It turns out that there were this mircoscopic silicone based lifeforms living in the sands on this planet and they were like, getting killed by the terraforming process. Anyway, the leader of the terraforming colony knew what was going on, he just didn't want to admit that he was killing little silicone sand creatures. The silicone sand creatures networked together and started being all bad-ass as they increased in capability and inteligent as they joined together, kinda like the Constructicons from The Transformers television series, that was cool, you know? So, anyway, these bacteria might be doing the same thing!"

    Anyway, I have to blame Star Trek. While the series has been known to inspire tons of people to do great things, it's pseudo-science has done some harm as people assume that what happens in a Science Fantasy show can happen in real life.

    No hatin' to the original poster, btw. I am just saying.

Re:The bacteria "link up" with each other (2, Interesting)

Zen Punk (785385) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277379)

Actually, you just made that up. Way to read what isn't there. This qoute might have been the foundation for your extrapolation:

The ability of the bacteria to link their nanowires has been observed in Lovley's lab. The hairlike wires emanating from the bacteria had been seen previously, but their conducting function was discovered via atomic-force microscope techniques.



Or perhaps this:

Patrinos said the bacteria may organize to form minipower grids in the soil by linking up via the nanowires.


I have no idea what is meant by a "minipower grid" nor what the bacteria in question may be "linking up" to.

It isn't clear whether he means that a single bacterium can link its own wires together or that several bacteria can link their own respective wires together. Nowhere in the text, however, does it imply that the bacteria send signals of any kind through these wires.

Re:The bacteria "link up" with each other (1)

ReformedExCon (897248) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277418)

I admit I did take some license with the quotes you mentioned. Namely, I tried to understand what it meant.

If the first one says that bacteria (plural) "link their nanowires", and the second quote says that they "may...form minipower grid(s)", then yes, I would extrapolate that they are talking about interconnected meshes of these wires which carry "power".

Which, if you take a look at my original post (I'll quote it for you)

quote
the bacteria seem to produce these tiny wires which then carry electrical signals across large meshes of bacteria-produced wires /quote

There is one jump in logic that I made and that is that I seem to claim that this is an actual behavior of the bacteria. However, to say that I made it up is a gross mischaracterization and misreading of my post.

Re:The bacteria "link up" with each other (1)

Zen Punk (785385) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277465)

However, to say that I made it up is a gross mischaracterization and misreading of my post.

Yes, I'd have to agree. I didn't mean it as a slight. This article is rather vague and offers little insight as to what has actually been discovered and what its significance is. Coming to an inaccurate conclusion as a result of trying to parse it is understandable.

Re:The bacteria "link up" with each other (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277591)

Jesus saved me from my past. He can save you as well.

We just got off the phone. He said your past won't affect me, so I'm in the clear there.

Re:The bacteria "link up" with each other (-1, Offtopic)

ZorbaTHut (126196) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277608)

I don't know the details, but I can guarantee it will involve a hard-nosed ex-cop, a beautiful reporter, a spunky sidekick of some kind, and a last-minute saving of the world thanks to some contrived quality of humanity, like, for example, love.

We'd better throw a dog in there too. Everyone likes dogs.

Hello Intel (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277245)

Hello Intel, that looks like a nice nano chip design...

for me to poop on.

Re:Hello Intel (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277252)

damn! Nice one!

I spent 5 minutes trying to think of a good poop joke too!

oxigen? (1, Informative)

EvilMonkeySlayer (826044) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277246)

Derek Lovley and his colleagues of the University of Massachusetts discovered that the Geobacter bacteria is capable of producing nanowires. The bacteria is normally used to clean up toxic waste. Geobacter does not use oxigen, but metal as it's source for power. This probably explains the 3nm to 5nm nanowires it excretes while working. What metal the nanowires are made of is not yet known, but the genetic code responsible for their creation is. This opens up the possibility of modifying the bacteria to create nanowires on chips.

Ah, carrying on the great /. tradition. Never use spellcheck, to the extreme!

Re:oxigen? (1, Informative)

gkuz (706134) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277259)

as it's source for power

Never use spell check, and never learn elementary-school English grammar, either.

Re:oxigen? (-1, Offtopic)

EvilMonkeySlayer (826044) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277266)

Hey I have a valid excuse, I posted in the rush.. *cough*

Hey look! A flying monkey!

Re:oxigen? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277350)

That is a correct use of a possessive apostrophe, it is not a contraction of "it is".

Re:oxigen? (0, Offtopic)

Oscar_Wilde (170568) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277400)

That is a correct use of a possessive apostrophe, it is not a contraction of "it is".
 
Can you provide a reference for that?
 
From the Oxford American Dictionaries:
it's

contraction of
  • it is : it's my fault.
  • it has : it's been a hot day.
and
its

possessive adjective belonging to or associated with a thing previously mentioned or easily identified : turn the camera on its side | he chose the area for its atmosphere.
  • belonging to or associated with a child or animal of unspecified sex : a baby in its mother's womb.
USAGE Its is the possessive form of: it.
I can't find a reference for it's not being a contraction.

Re:oxigen? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277496)

In the case that 'It' is a proper noun, the correct possessive form would be "It's".

Cousin It's hair is very long.

Re:oxigen? (1, Insightful)

Oscar_Wilde (170568) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277734)

True, but that is a special case (and not the case earlier in this thread).

Re:oxigen? (-1, Offtopic)

strider44 (650833) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277357)

I love your use of commas Master Grammatist.

Re:oxigen? (-1, Offtopic)

johnnydiabetic (841535) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277471)

Enough. People make mistakes. You people are too damned critical.

Re:oxigen? (-1, Offtopic)

SimilarityEngine (892055) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277352)

It's okay, it's logically sound: geobacter does not use "oxigen", nor indeed does anything else. Also, fire-breathing vampires don't have eyes.

Re:oxigen? (0, Offtopic)

reklusband (862215) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277757)

I'm a fire breathing vampire with 3 eyes. Way to talk out of your ass!

Nothing (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277249)

Is everybody happy ?

Oxigen (-1, Redundant)

xendex (833890) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277250)

Never heard of it, it must be a new element....

Re:Oxigen (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277287)

It's probably one of those British spellings. Like 'spelt', 'whilst', 'kerb', and a bunch of other meaningless words.

I rule (1)

Kawahee (901497) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277253)

I rule. I have IE7 beta, because I can afford MSDN. Linux n00bs can't. Ha.

Re:I rule (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277267)

kawahee iq--

Re:I rule (-1, Redundant)

grimJester (890090) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277572)

I'd like to be the first to welcome our new nano-wired bacteria friends to Slashdot. Enjoy your stay!

Crystal Ball Hackery (5, Interesting)

CleverNickedName (644160) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277264)

This opens up the possibility of modifying the bacteria to create nanowires on chips.

In the same was as it opens up the possibility of modifying the bacteria to code Linux kernel patches.
This certainly is cool biotech, but slapping this wild prediction on to the end of the article doesn't make it more so.

Re:Crystal Ball Hackery (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277498)

Hey, I use carbon as my source for power, and I excrete 3 cm to 5 cm wide wires of carbon up to 15 cm long or more. Maybe they can make some carbon circuits or chips out of those!

Possible cyberjack material? (1, Interesting)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277265)


Interesting read...the first thing that came to my mind when I read this is that these organic wires may be just the thing for the interface between electronics and organic tisue. One of the major problems in cybernetics is that the chemistry of the implants tends to be poisonous to the surrounding tissue, while the chemistry of the surrounding tisue tends to be corrosive to the implant. Over time, the interface degrades and must eventually be replaced. Utilizing the genetic code from these microbes to express nanowires within some of our cells may eliminate this problem and pave the way for permanent interfaces sooner than we thought.

Re:Possible cyberjack material? (5, Funny)

SlashEdsDoYourJobs (905360) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277280)

Hey, if the editors can dupe, why not you? [slashdot.org]

Re:Possible cyberjack material? (-1, Offtopic)

springbox (853816) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277452)

I blame the editors for not being positive role models

Re:Possible cyberjack material? (1, Informative)

uberchicken (121048) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277484)

Yah, I recognised it too.. not that I was in any way trawling for karma nicks.

Re:Possible cyberjack material? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277659)

dont spend all your new karma in one place

Re:Possible cyberjack material? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277560)

Hey, if the editors can dupe, why not you? [slashdot.org]


Me am funny.

For once (3, Funny)

malkavian (9512) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277270)

people would be quite correct in saying that the wiring inside their device was crap!

Re:For once (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277427)

Yes, but does it run linux?

Re:For once (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277600)

people would be quite correct in saying that the wiring inside their device was crap!
Intel users have been saying this for years about their chips with absolute accuracy.

cheers, AMD fanboy

Oh, crap (4, Funny)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277271)

This probably explains the 3nm to 5nm nanowires it excretes while working.
So... the next generation of electronics is going to be made of shit?

Re:Oh, crap (2, Funny)

imag0 (605684) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277286)

So... the next generation of electronics is going to be made of shit?

Stands to reason it will be. Heaven knows the previous couple of generations have been ;)

Re:Oh, crap (1)

Vo0k (760020) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277747)

All the booze and most of cheese, yoghurt and some more are made of bacteria and bacteria shit.
To make things more twisted, we shit dead bacteria. (THEY eat food we swallowed, and WE digest THEM to get energy, then excrete "dead shells" - they are the primary compound of the shit...)

Huh? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277275)

What in the name of fuck is "oxigen"? How does Timothy remain employed as an editor?

Re:Huh? (-1, Offtopic)

baylanger (780885) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277332)

What in the name of fuck is "oxigen"?

Timothy, once this thread is over, make sure to copy/paste it in wikipedia under "oxigen".

Re:Huh? (-1, Offtopic)

famebait (450028) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277450)

What in the name of fuck is "oxigen"?

It's a type of bait used to identify and tag the kind of people who implausably fail to anticipate that before their post is finished about 500 other readers will already have pointed out the same bleedingly obvious typo which everyone saw in the first place.

Clean up toxic... waste. (1)

baylanger (780885) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277288)

Does this mean we're closer to produce a green CPU? If you think so, can we really call it green if its full of bacterias?

Re:Clean up toxic... waste. (1)

koi88 (640490) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277299)


If you think so, can we really call it green if its full of bacterias?

And when you turn on the power, you fry millions of innocent, helpful little creatures?

Re:Clean up toxic... waste. (1)

Zen Punk (785385) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277321)

The word 'bacteria' is plural. The singular form of 'bacteria' is 'bacterium.'

Re:Clean up toxic... waste. (-1, Offtopic)

baylanger (780885) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277362)

The word 'bacteria' is plural. The singular form of 'bacteria' is 'bacterium.'

You think it really makes more sense when English is your 3rd language? Don't get me wrong, we learn new things everyday and I'll sure remember that one... but I knew oxygen doesn't spell oxigen ;-)

Just what we need... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277297)

The microscopic world's answer to Superfish - eating metal and crapping it out in long strings.

I always said Intel chips (2, Funny)

madman101 (571954) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277301)

were crap...

Fungus (1)

jurt1235 (834677) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277356)

Eww, my chip has some greenish fungus on it.

Grep microscope (really strong one)

O no, no worry, it is some nanowiring expension set.

Metallic Excreta (1)

amodm (876842) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277306)

Reminds me of the scene from "Little Nicky" where the dog pisses off an arrow (??)

ooooooooh.........that was a painful thought !!

Geobacter infected metals (4, Interesting)

La Gris (531858) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277312)

Anyone else think of roten metals ?

Geobacter does not use oxigen, but metal as it's source for power

Now, our cars will not only rust in winter because of salted snow, but they may rot eaten by Geobacter. ;)

More seriously:
Could this bacteria be genetically engineered to eat common metals like steel, or more uncommon ones targeted at destroying military or sabotage foundrys?

Is another bio weapon on the way?

Re:Geobacter infected metals (1)

Dubpal (860472) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277380)

"Could this bacteria be genetically engineered to eat common metals like steel, or more uncommon ones targeted at destroying military or sabotage foundrys?"

I don't mean to strap on the pedantipants right off the bat, but that's a silly notion. If you'd read the article, you'd know that it's using the metals not used as an energy source, but as an electron acceptor for respiration. So no, it couldn't "eat" steel, but it might change it into something different. (most metals have many different transition states)

This stigma that bacteria are some sort of hybrid of Pac-Man and the cookie monster must end!

Re:Geobacter infected metals (1)

Adult film producer (866485) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277541)

"So no, it couldn't "eat" steel, but it might change it into something different. "

Well that's reassuring, so it will only transform my car into a pile of goo ?

Re:Geobacter infected metals (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277632)

It's not a silly notion.

They're talking about them being rust monsters. And that could seriously weaken any structure.

A high level fly over that sprays bacteria on a steel structure. Two months later, shoot holes in it using a bb gun.

It's not that unreasonable. Now, we'll have to start putting antibacterial compounds on our metal buildings/ships/guns/etc.

Re:Geobacter infected metals (2, Informative)

SimilarityEngine (892055) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277389)

Actually, geobacter is more interesting for its ability to decontaminate soil [geobacter.org] .

Re:Geobacter infected metals (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277467)

It doesn't "eat" metals. It does the exact opposite: Turns rust into iron.

Is another bio weapon on the way?

No.

Bacteria shit = wires (1)

pH03n1X (859019) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277320)

I bet this "shit" idea was funded by n+HP-invent ( n is for nanotechnology )

Bacteria making wires?! (5, Funny)

Dubpal (860472) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277335)

Don't these scientists read the news!? Wires are sooo twentieth century.
Wake me up when they finally find bacteria that use Bluetooth.

Re:Bacteria making wires?! (1)

dpilot (134227) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277627)

These are security-conscious bacteria, they'd never use bluetooth, and recognize that they don't have the necessary computing cycles to use decent wireless security.

I suppose you think they were just using wires without thinking it through?

Grammar and logic and more, oh my (1)

Ancient_Hacker (751168) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277338)

"oxygen" "its source" not "it's source" Logical leap: Chip wires, to be economically feasible are needed to be placed at a rate of many meters per second. Nanowires probably grow many powers of ten times slower than this. And one might surmise that iron interfaces very poorly to silicon.

Re:Grammar and logic and more, oh my (1)

mattyrobinson69 (751521) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277407)

one chip may be made slower, but would this mean that more chips could be made at once: my own made up numbers:

10 chips at once, 1 chip a second = 1 second for 10 chips

1000 chips at once, 1 chip every 100 seconds = 1 second for 10 chips

my maths my be off there though, and obvioulsy this is completely unfounded speculation.

Re:Grammar and logic and more, oh my (1)

SimilarityEngine (892055) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277412)

Perhaps a single bacterium would "lay cable" (snigger, sorry) very slowly, but we have potentially massive parallelism here, provided you can find a way to actually control what these organisms do. No use if they just produce a load of nano-wire-wool, obviously!

Argh the bugs! (1, Funny)

RenHoek (101570) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277349)

After all the time I spend in trying to get the damn bugs OUT of my computer, now the manufacturer it factoring them right in at the start of building my computer :(

I for one... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277368)

I, for one, would like to welcome our metal-pooping bacteria.

I for one... (0)

Faw (33935) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277394)

..welcome our nano-wire excreting bacteria overlords.

New Meaning (1)

jglen490 (718849) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277396)

To all you ex-G.I.s and former college students:

This brings new meaning to the term S.O.S.

Playing God (1)

hypnoticstoat (890677) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277408)

Ho Hum, I just know this is all going to go terribly wrong and the bugs will end up eating everything made of metal and we'll be cast back into the dark ages. Spielburgh or Lucas have probably already bought the rights to the motion picture.

HELP HELP: Need experts advice!!!! (1)

baylanger (780885) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277415)

Intel in the terms of use for my new nano=bacteria-CPU wrote: DO NOT OVERCLOCK THIS CPU. IT COULD RESULT IN OVERCOOKED BACTERIA.

I decided to give it a try and, my CPU started to sweat!!! What should I do? Give water to my bacterias?

Re:HELP HELP: Need experts advice!!!! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277458)

and get a bottle of oxigen from Yntel or AMD.

Nice (2, Funny)

airjrdn (681898) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277459)

Great, now they're building the bugs into the chips on purpose? What next?

Re:Nice (1, Funny)

Griim (8798) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277500)

It's not a bug it's a featu -- oh nevermind!

damn... (1)

kwoff (516741) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277478)

How badass do you have to be to breath metal?

Bacteria in higher education... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277485)

This could open up high-paying jobs in bacteria-education. Someone has to teach them how draw out those complicated integrated circuits, and most of the bacteria in this country are woefully under-represented in our Electrical Engineering programs (with most are opting for the Life-Sciences instead). This is an issue that received far too little coverage in the main-stream press IMHO.

Re:Bacteria in higher education... (1)

Zunni (565203) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277544)

My understanding (and I'm certainly no expert) is that it follows a set path laid out by the materials it's meant to 'eat' so as long as there is a pattern that is clearly defined and seperate from the other parts of the pattern (which at nano sizes could be a struggle on it's own)it simply connects the dots.

10 years from now... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277491)

"Man, this CPU runs like CRAP!"

Cool beans (1)

Alsee (515537) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277493)

I always wanted a pet goose that lays golden eggs, but I'm willing to settle for pet bacteria that shit gold wires.

-

How did they named this bacteria?! (1)

mynickwastaken (690966) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277509)

Gremlin?!

In soviet Russia... (-1, Redundant)

squoozer (730327) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277546)

we welcome our nano-wire producing overlords.

Wait a minute something is wrong there. Damn bugs in the system again.

This is already Patented... (2, Funny)

vettemph (540399) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277558)

>
>nanowires it excretes while working.

and Microsoft will vigorously defend its patented ability to turn your PC into excrement.

These things are making... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13277639)

shit on a chip?

Carbon Nanotubes (3, Insightful)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277655)

Now all we need is a bacterium that can produce useful things made of carbon, such as nanotubes, consuming methane and releasing hydrogen in the process. Then we can all switch to fuel-cell based cars without all this perpetual kvetching over how to get the hydrogen.

Wow! Just like STNG! (1)

cmburns69 (169686) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277691)

I think we've all seen this epsiode of STNG. Remember when the nano-bots keep eating parts of the enterprise, and then become sentient? The only way to appease the macro-nano-bots was to send them off the ship somewhere/somehow.

Unfortunately for us, we have no way to offload them from our homeworld. Because of this, if we unleash this technology it can only be to our own undoing!

That is the only conceivable future of this technology!


Kent Brockman: "Professor, without knowing precisely what the danger is, would you say it's time for our viewers to crack each other's heads open and feast on the goo inside?"

Professor: "Yes I would, Kent."

I was fired from this project... (3, Funny)

vudufixit (581911) | more than 9 years ago | (#13277695)

For bringing penicillin to work! I had strep! WHERE IS THE JUSTICE IN THIS WORLD???
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