×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Blu-Ray to Include New Copy Protection

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the just-what-we-needed dept.

Media 536

Lord Haha writes "In an announcement (warning: links to a PDF) last night, the Blu-ray Disc Association, led by Sony, representing one of two competing high-definition DVD formats (the other being HD-DVD, led by Toshiba), stated it will simultaneously embrace digital watermarking, programmable cryptography, and a self-destruct code for Blu-ray disc players. Will this be the continuation of the trend into more and more restrictive DRM? Or something that will fade away like Betamax Tapes? Two articles on the topic can be found at Tom's Hardware and PC World."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

536 comments

GNAA outreach program hailed as an overwhelming (0, Troll)

Xizer (794030) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289209)

GNAA outreach program hailed as an overwhelming success.
GNAA outreach program hailed as an overwhelming success.
Impi - GNAA PR Department, South Africa.

In a bold move to bridge cultural divides and to promote racial and sexual tolerance, GNAA president timecop, NAACP president Kweisi Mfumeq and the distributors and broadcasters of popular Naruto [tv-tokyo.co.jp] anime series embarked on an ambitious project to achieve these noble objectives.

The vehicle selected was the anime series Naruto. In collusion with the distributors on this series, it was agreed to not broadcast episode 146 for the week of August 1st to August 7th, 2005.

timecop proposed and executed the plan to provide an alternative viewing experience, which was aimed at reaching out to the targeted population, and bringing about the achievement of the goals of this project.

Spokesman for Nielsen Media Research Company, Armands Leimanis, estimated that 77439 people downloaded the torrent, which actually was the movie Gay Niggers from Outer Space [imdb.com] masterfully disguised as Naruto 146. "Never in the history of mass media marketing has something been so successfully marketed on such a large scale in such a short period of time. timecop has succeeded in accomplishing what marketing gurus around the globe have been trying to do for decades. This is truly genius in motion."

timecop was unavailable for comment as he was on an expedition to photograph spiders.

Dattebayo [yhbt.mine.nu] , in a fit of rage at being excluded from this glorious endeavor, flipped out and made the channel #db on rizon.net +i (invite only) and +k (key). This led to the mass suicide of an estimated 16% of the Naruto viewing population. This is believed to be the single most damaging factor in limiting the distribution of GNFOS to the magical 100,000 leeches. NCAAP president Kweisi Mfumeq condemned Dattebayo's actions and compared them to the KKK and gay bashing organizations.

About Dattebayo and #db on Rizon:

#db is a neo-fascist translating group who foists its misguided translations of Naruto on the unsuspecting and naïve fans of this anime series, in an attempt to promote their own nefarious agendas.

About Gayniggers from Outer Space:

Overview
Sponsored by Carlsberg Pilsner
Produced by GayJack Movies
Distributed by WorldWide GayMovies
Dino De Laurentus & Raymond Hansen Present
A Lindberg & Kristensen Production

"The Universe. Its mighty power. Its evolutionary force, not to be stopped by anyone. In its beauty, this, this is a happy place to stay, filled with harmony and cosmic joy. A free place, where men can express themselves, and be as when they were born. All of this is, because someone cares. Because someone looks after us. When we sleep, when we play. When we act natural. This is a movie about those who risk life, and partners, to guarantee living in a wonderful and free universe. This is a movie about the Gayniggers From Outer Space. The Gayniggers come from the planet Anus, in the 8th Sun System, far far away from here. They are much, much more intelligent than any other creature in the Universe. The most fascinating thing about them is that they, with the help of their super intelligence, and their highly developed telepathic system, Braintapping, will be able to create a world, a society, a perfect world to live in without the presence of women. A MALE ONLY WORLD."

Starring
Coco P. Dalbert as ArmInAss
Sammy Saloman as Capt. B. Dick
Gerald F. Hail as D. Ildo
Gbartokai Dakinah as Sgt. Shaved Balls
Konrad Fields as Mr. Schwul
Johnny Conny & Tony Thomas as The Gay Ambassador

About GNAA:
GNAA (GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA) is the first organization which gathers GAY NIGGERS from all over America and abroad for one common goal - being GAY NIGGERS.

Are you GAY [klerck.org] ?
Are you a NIGGER [mugshots.org] ?
Are you a GAY NIGGER [gay-sex-access.com] ?

If you answered "Yes" to all of the above questions, then GNAA (GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA) might be exactly what you've been looking for!
Join GNAA (GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA) today, and enjoy all the benefits of being a full-time GNAA member.
GNAA (GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA) is the fastest-growing GAY NIGGER community with THOUSANDS of members all over United States of America and the World! You, too, can be a part of GNAA if you join today!

Why not? It's quick and easy - only 3 simple steps!
  • First, you have to obtain a copy of GAYNIGGERS FROM OUTER SPACE THE MOVIE [imdb.com] and watch it. You can download the movie [idge.net] (~130mb) using BitTorrent.
  • Second, you need to succeed in posting a GNAA First Post [wikipedia.org] on slashdot.org [slashdot.org] , a popular "news for trolls" website.
  • Third, you need to join the official GNAA irc channel #GNAA on irc.gnaa.us, and apply for membership.
Talk to one of the ops or any of the other members in the channel to sign up today! Upon submitting your application, you will be required to submit links to your successful First Post, and you will be tested on your knowledge of GAYNIGGERS FROM OUTER SPACE.

If you are having trouble locating #GNAA, the official GAY NIGGER ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA irc channel, you might be on a wrong irc network. The correct network is NiggerNET, and you can connect to irc.gnaa.us as our official server. Follow this link [irc] if you are using an irc client such as mIRC.

If you have mod points and would like to support GNAA, please moderate this post up.

.________________________________________________.
| ______________________________________._a,____ | Press contact:
| _______a_._______a_______aj#0s_____aWY!400.___ | Gary Niger
| __ad#7!!*P____a.d#0a____#!-_#0i___.#!__W#0#___ | gary_niger@gnaa.us [mailto]
| _j#'_.00#,___4#dP_"#,__j#,__0#Wi___*00P!_"#L,_ | GNAA Corporate Headquarters
| _"#ga#9!01___"#01__40,_"4Lj#!_4#g_________"01_ | 143 Rolloffle Avenue
| ________"#,___*@`__-N#____`___-!^_____________ | Tarzana, California 91356
| _________#1__________?________________________ |
| _________j1___________________________________ | All other inquiries:
| ____a,___jk_GAY_NIGGER_ASSOCIATION_OF_AMERICA_ | Enid Al-Punjabi
| ____!4yaa#l___________________________________ | enid_al_punjabi@gnaa.us [mailto]
| ______-"!^____________________________________ | GNAA World Headquarters
` _______________________________________________' 160-0023 Japan Tokyo-to Shinjuku-ku Nishi-Shinjuku 3-20-2

Copyright (c) 2003-2005 Gay Nigger Association of America [www.gnaa.us]

self-destruct code (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289210)

Self-destruct code? What the FUCK?

Re:self-destruct code (2, Insightful)

Rei (128717) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289387)

Could be neat for a promotional - "This Mission Impossible "Collector's Edition" Promotional Disc will self destruct in five seconds..."

Assumedly the means to destroy content is in case they think it was copied illegally. If that's the case, in reality, it'll most often destroy the discs of those doing nothing wrong. No matter how they try, they can't keep people from the raw data; it's essentially impossible. If it comes down to it, even if the video signal ends up analog straight out of the decryption chip, people can still tempest the chip to see what ops it's running.

People who are going to duplicate/rip the discs are going to do it *right*, not in a way that gets their disc destroyed. And once it's in a non-restricted format, it can flow freely across the net. I.e., it only needs to get ripped once.

Scary. very scary. (5, Interesting)

robyannetta (820243) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289211)

Quoth the article at Tom's Hardware, The third part of the announcement that is perhaps most surprising, is Blu-ray's adoption of a third DRM technique ... what it calls "BD+," described as "a Blu-ray Disc specific programmable renewability enhancement that gives content providers an additional means to respond to organized attacks on the security system by allowing dynamic updates of compromised code."

I take this to say "We concede all control over this device to the **AA."

Am I the only one that finds this disturbing? Isn't this a violation of fair use? Will the public buy a player with BD+ in it?

Re:Scary. very scary. (5, Interesting)

garcia (6573) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289261)

That isn't disturbing at all, this is:

This controversial technology would require that disc players maintain permanent connections to content providers via the Internet, making it possible for discs that fail a security check to trigger a notification process, enabling the provider to send the player a sort of "self-destruct code." This code would come in the form of a flash ROM "update" that would actually render the player useless, perhaps unless and until it is taken to a repair shop for reprogramming.

That's stepping a little too far over the bounds of protecting *your* content. If you destroy *my* hardware you have invaded my private space which is unacceptable.

Re:Scary. very scary. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289338)

Hey, if it makes people turn away from the crap they try to push on us anymore and go to books instead, I'm all for it.

Re:Scary. very scary. (1)

Qzukk (229616) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289454)

Don't be too hasty, they're already working on books that can only be read three times.

Re:Scary. very scary. (1)

glindsey (73730) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289372)

Agreed... wouldn't this be criminally prosecutable? In the infamous "Black Sunday" case when DirecTV self-destructed a bunch of pirated access cards, those cards were the property of DirecTV so they were allowed to do with them as they pleased. But if we purchase our own hardware, they'll be allowed to destroy it? What if the provider is hacked, and some script kiddie sends out death codes to millions of players worldwide?

Damn, and I was getting excited about Blu-Ray, too...

Re:Scary. very scary. (3, Interesting)

IntergalacticWalrus (720648) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289471)

"But if we purchase our own hardware, they'll be allowed to destroy it?"

Ha ha silly you. You don't purchase your own hardware, you rent it from them for an unlimited amount of time.

Re:Scary. very scary. (2, Insightful)

jdunlevy (187745) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289380)

Sounds like just the sort of "feature" that could keep consumers from embracing the format...

Re:Scary. very scary. (4, Interesting)

mcg1969 (237263) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289412)

This controversial technology would require that disc players maintain permanent connections to content providers via the Internet,

This would be distrurbing if it were correct. Over at the AVS Forum [avsforum.com] we have been discussing these formats for some time, and representatives of BOTH sides have specifically stated that no internet connection will ever be needed on a standalone player to play a disc.

There have been a number of questions about the viability of BD+ raised, but the notion that standalone players will require Internet connections has been beaten down so many times it's just not funny anymore.

Now having said that, apparently PC-based players will require periodic key renewal. But even these won't require permanent Internet connections. And this is true for BOTH HD formats, because it is part of the AACS standard.

I remember this... (4, Informative)

Danse (1026) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289432)

Reminds me of the old Divx players that they tried to foist on us several years back, when DVD players were just starting to become popular. They had to be connected to a phone jack so they could phone home and let their masters know what you were up to. Ok, they didn't self-destruct, but the potential was there. I was elated to see that crappy technology flop. I remember a Circuit City sales guy trying to sell me one. He failed miserably when trying to explain how it was better for me to have discs that would expire and a player that would inform on me.

Re:Scary. very scary. (1)

cliffski (65094) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289465)

who on planet earth would buy this?
I cant even imagine better picture quality than current DVD. why exactly would I want this new format?
Im pissed as it is about the unskippable shit in DVDs, if this new format does away with that, great. otherwise, I dont really see the point.
There comes a level of quality where my human-basic eyeballs dont regsiter anything better.

Re:Scary. very scary. (2, Insightful)

iminplaya (723125) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289484)

This controversial technology would require that disc players maintain permanent connections to content providers via the Internet...

At our expense...of course. This will do wonders for those on dial up. In addition to being made as dumb as TV, the internet will become the world's biggest dongle, which will be required to operate any electronic device. It will become our new electronic tracking collar, like they use for those under house arrest. If you like premade entertainment, you'd better stock up now and learn how to keep all your old equipment in good repair.

That's stepping a little too far over the bounds of protecting *your* content.

They have been doing that since 1710.

If you destroy *my* hardware you have invaded my private space which is unacceptable.

Your society will claim "self-defense", and most people will go along. The thugs will smash you printing press and burn your books to maintain their power, and you will like it.

Re:Scary. very scary. (1)

NerdBuster (831349) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289270)

Unfortunately, the public will buy these because they won't even know it exists until its too late. You're not going to see CNN carry this story....so only nerds like us will see it coming :(

No such thing (2, Informative)

volpe (58112) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289284)

There's no such thing as a "violation of fair use". "Fair Use" isn't a right guaranteed to you. It's a principle that exonerates you, under specific circumstances, from what would otherwise be a violation of someone else's copyright.

Re:No such thing (2, Informative)

interiot (50685) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289344)

Perhaps 17 USC 107 [findlaw.com] has something to say about that?
the fair use of a copyrighted work, including [blah blah blah] is not an infringement of copyright.
No, it's not in the Bill of Rights. Yes, it's an actual law that says you never infringed in the first place. No, it's not a get-out-of-jail-free card that you can use once you show up in court.

Re:No such thing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289437)

You say that "fair use" it's a form of protection, granted to us by law? Why golly gee whillikers... That sounds like a *RIGHT* to me!

Maybe you think that The Voting Rights Act of 1965 was improperly titled!

Re:Scary. very scary. (1)

KillShill (877105) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289315)

the public will do whatever the tv and media tell them to do.

they've been buying DRM (and otherwise) crippled devices for years. they totally screwed over the DAT standard because of blocking EVEN LEGITIMATE copying.

**ck off and die you sons of bit**es! we're sick and tired of being bent over, now it's your turn.

boston strangler indeed.

Re:Scary. very scary. (0, Flamebait)

badmammajamma (171260) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289345)

"they've been buying DRM (and otherwise) crippled devices for years."

Yes, the iPod being a shining example.

Re:Scary. very scary. (1)

pete6677 (681676) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289430)

There are a couple of reasons why people are accepting of the iPod DRM: First, it's not very restrictive. People can still do what they want to do with their music for the most part. Second, Apple is selling the tracks at what most people consider a reasonable cost. If the iTunes store were selling whole albums that had 2 good songs plus 10 filler songs for $20 and they could only be played on one device, the iPod would have failed miserably.

To look at it another way, not too many people try to counterfeit bus passes and subway tokens even though it wouldn't be too hard. The risk vs. reward ratio is not in their favor. What would they have to gain from it? Saving $2 at a time isn't enough motivation.

I see the future of DRM schemes being like this, those that impose unreasonable and cumbersome restrictions will die, but users will be willing to accept reasonable restrictions to get the content they want.

Re:Scary. very scary. (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289472)

But it still plays non-DRMed files and that's all I need, and the iTunes software will import CDs into WAV, AIFF, MP3 and unencrypted AAC. iPod DRM is only for files purchased from iTMS or Audible, it wasn't like Sony a couple years ago where all files had to be transcoded into a DRM'ed file to work.

Re:Scary. very scary. (1)

nutshell42 (557890) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289317)

Am I the only one that finds this disturbing?

No

Isn't this a violation of fair use?

Well there's no law that says they have to make it possible that you actually exercise your rights.

Will the public buy a player with BD+ in it?

Makes no difference. An article I've read about BD+ (on the Register iirc) said it's just some "features" of the drm mechanism, that Blu-ray and HD-DVD have in common, rebranded to dazzle the **AA execs. So, whoever wins we get screwed. Any similarities to US presidential elections are purely coincidential.

Don't worry... (1)

sterno (16320) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289450)

Blu-ray appears to have developed its own approach--in some cases, proprietary--to each of these three technologies

Time and time again we've seen these "proprietary" techniques developed, and invariably, propriertary means it has a questionable design, buggy implementation, and inadequate testing. So invariably some clever hacker will figure out how to circumvent it and make it all a moot point.

Aside from that, fine, if they want to rig up my PS3 to blow up when I put in a bad disc, go right ahead. I just won't buy a PS3, or the movies that go with it. Gee, I won't be able to watch movies in high def. Well as it turns out, good movies play just as well on my 27" low def Magnavox without surround sound hooked up as they play on a wall encompassing high def with 7.1 surround.

Eventually these media companies will figure out that we can keep ourselves entertained for free via the Internet. That we don't need them, and if they want to sell us stuff and make it easy for us to watch it, we probably will. But if they try to make it hard, then we'll just ignore them.

Re:Scary. very scary. (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289499)

Am I the only one that finds this disturbing? Isn't this a violation of fair use? Will the public buy a player with BD+ in it?

It appears that Fair Use is becoming a thing of the past. As to the public, the only thing I have faith in is the fact that once the book is finally closed on such archaic notions, they'll all wake up and go "Hey, who f*cked us over?"

Sounds like mission impossible (5, Funny)

aaronsb (138360) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289217)

This disc (and player) will self destruct in 5 seconds.

Re:Sounds like mission impossible (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289265)

This disc (and player) will self destruct in 5 seconds.

So will support for this format.

Re:Sounds like mission impossible (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289297)

Who the fuck is ScuttleMonkey?!

I don't think so.. (4, Interesting)

Ckwop (707653) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289220)

The life of hardware manufacturer is tough. You need enough DRM to convince copyright owners to develop/author for your platform yet it's DRM needs to be flawed enough so Joe Six-pack can easily circumvent it.

The former insures there's enough content on your platform to make it an enticing to a consumer. The latter makes your platform doubly as enticing because your customers don't have to spend an insane amount of money getting a large body of content for your platform; they'll just copy it.

The problem is that Sony just can't make the DRM flawed enough to capture public interest because their media division just wont stand for it. So once again, someone else will come along and give the public what they want: media that's easily copied.

Is there precident for this? Absolutely, Why did the Sony Playstation crush the N64? Because you can copy easily for the Playstation. Copying a cartridge is just too much hastle to be worth it. Even better it was trivial to chip a playstation so you could get loads of games for the price of a few CDs.

Rather than learning this lesson they ignored it. Before the IPod, Sony products were the market leaders in portable music. Sony could have got an Ipod like device to market first but the Sony record label were scared so it never happened: Apple did it instead. Far from being a match made in heaven, the symbiosis of Sony media and Sony technology is becoming increasingly schizophrenic and it is punishing them right where it hurts any company: their bottom line.

Simon.

Re:I don't think so.. (4, Informative)

Catamaran (106796) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289276)

I agree completely. We already know that the copy protection won't be much of an obstacle to determined pirates. Unfortunately, it will lead to consumer electronics products that are a) more expensive and b) less user friendly, with the result that consumers will stay away in droves.

It is sad to see a company like Sony Electronics hobble itself in this manner just to please Sony Studios.

All-in-all, it seems that Mike Fidler (recently Sony exec in charge of Blu-Ray, now CEO of digeo) chose a very opportune moment to abandon ship.

Re:I don't think so.. (1)

plover (150551) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289422)

I don't feel bad that Sony's plan involves hobbling themseleves. I loathe Sony simply because they've been pimping copy protection / DRM since forever.

I also don't plan to buy one. There's just so little that they're releasing on disc that I want to watch that it really doesn't make sense. (I rarely use my DVD player now.) Anyway I figure that someone will crack the protection sooner rather than later, and anything people really want to watch will hit the torrents soon enough.

What I do predict is that we'll see a repeat of the Hughes satellite TV fiasco. Remember the market for satellite TV decoders and smart cards; and Hughes sending down a smart-card self-destruct program a byte at a time in their update logic? That's what the whole "self-destruct" quote in TFA made me think of.

Regardless, the pirates are going to make their copies. And those copies are going to get redistributed. It's just that now they're going to actively piss regular customers off far more than ever. I wish them lots of luck with all that, and I hope they get everything they're due.

Re:I don't think so.. (3, Insightful)

Otter (3800) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289311)

Why did the Sony Playstation crush the N64? Because you can copy easily for the Playstation. Copying a cartridge is just too much hastle to be worth it. Even better it was trivial to chip a playstation so you could get loads of games for the price of a few CDs.

What percent of Playstation owners do you think had mod chips? I can't imagine it's significantly greater than zero.

Re:I don't think so.. (1)

MBCook (132727) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289455)

I agree completly. I don't get the origional poster's logic at all. The PS crushed the N64 because it had great games, TONS of marketing muscle (thanks to Sony), and it was cheaper to develop/produce for (CDs vs carts). I don't think it had ANYTHING to do with piracy (at least in the US, maybe overseas).

Re:I don't think so.. (1)

geekd (14774) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289476)

It was incredibly popular in Europe to buy a PS already chipped for a few (insert local currency here) more.

Re:I don't think so.. (1)

HAKdragon (193605) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289368)

Is there precident for this? Absolutely, Why did the Sony Playstation crush the N64? Because you can copy easily for the Playstation. Copying a cartridge is just too much hastle to be worth it. Even better it was trivial to chip a playstation so you could get loads of games for the price of a few CDs.

Then the Dreamcast should have beaten the shit out of the PS2 because it didn't even require a mod ship to play copied games.

Re:I don't think so.. (2, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289408)

sorry but I call BS.

if what you say was true then Sony pictures would refuse to release anything on DVD because it's too insecure and they would lose money drastically and all that other FUD and lies they trot out to distract you from seeing their gigantic pile of money that is growing out of control.

BluRay has no chance, just like how UMD has zero chance outside of the PSP and sony's SACD is a major failure (oh and that Minidisc thingy of theirs)

The format that is embraced by the China Manufacturers for their cheapo players will be the standard, just like how the porn industry told hollywood that VHS is the standard by picking it over Betamax.

They are going to have a really hard time trying to Pry current DVD out of the hands of joe public. Every one of them remembers that their VHS players have been around for 20-30 years, they will expect DVD to do the same, and honestly a good DVD on a decent plaer with a line doubler is pretty damn good looking on a HD projector on a 10 foot screen. I've seen DVD's look better than the HD superbowl broadcasts.

It's scare tactics, Sony will lose once again (oh remember the sony Bookman? that was going to revolutionize ebooks!) just like they always do.

Re:I don't think so.. (1)

FriedTurkey (761642) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289490)

Why did the Sony Playstation crush the N64? Because you can copy easily for the Playstation.

No. There were many reasons the PS1 did better than N64. Easily pirated media was probably #45,333 on the list of reasons.

It is quite self centric to think that your reason for a decision was everyone else's reason.

My friend has a unmodded Xbox (gasp). Reason for buying an Xbox? Halo.

This media will self-destruct in 5 seconds (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289232)

Doesn't anyone think that Sony is really pushing the market at this point? I mean, what with#%#%(*#^A^A^A;x00;x00NO CARRIER

Gator time (0)

ViaNRG (892147) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289237)

Now they can load "gator" code into ur firmware!

Re:Gator time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289279)

*your* firmware.

Non-sequitur (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289481)

> > ur firmware

> *your* firmware.

Hey Gramps, you're so *square*. Get with the in-crowd! It's the way all the grooviest hep-cat kids are talking nowadays.

(Cut to scene of teenagers in preppie clothes and polka-dot dresses dancing to some catchy little number.)

Sony + Proprietary (1)

R2.0 (532027) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289241)

I got 3 sentences into one of the articles and it said that BluRay will have proprietary versions of all these stated techniques. Given Sony's track record with proprietary stuff (Beta, MD, Memory sticks, etc.), I'm not going to lose much sleep.

Re:Sony + Proprietary (1)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289272)

Blu-Ray isn't Sony though, it was co-developed by most of the hardware makers on the DVD Forum, save NEC and Toshiba, I think, which made a competing format with 40% less capacity.

if (HD-DVD == DRM) HD-DVD = DEAD; (3, Insightful)

wirehead_rick (308391) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289255)

High definition is not good enough increment in technological value to supplant present day DVD's with a crippled DRM technology.

HD-DVD will be stillborn.

People will take convenience and the facade of ownership over crippled technology any day. Just look at divx (not the Mpeg 4 technology - the rediculous pay for play disks that were stillborn).

True costs of piracy? (5, Interesting)

YankeeInExile (577704) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289258)

The thing that always frosts me, is whenever The Industry talks about piracy they always bandy about numbers like (from TFA), three billion dollars per year in lost revenue. I would really love to see their methodology.

It seems to me that, people who are going to pirate content, probably come in three basic groups

  1. Hoarders: These are the guys (gals?) who just want to fill up disc space with media they never look at, just to be able to brag on Slashdot about their gigs and gigs of DVD rips. They would never purchase the media, as that defeats their Virtual Dick Length.
  2. Povs: Want the content, but cannot afford to pay retail. They go to the flea market and get the 3-dollar knockoffs. These people probably have some budget for media, but choose to get more bang for their buck by pirating.
  3. Lookie loos:Not really interested in the content, but if it's very cheap (or free), they will take a look. They probably spend a lot of money on media, and usually want the real deal for the packaging and extras.

Has anyone ever done a study on what percentage of users of pirated content, would have purchased that content, had it not been available outside the legitimate distribution channels?

Has that study been done, and The Industry discovered that it is such a tiny fraction as to make no difference?

Of course, I can see how large-scale commercial piracy really does hurt the distribution system. If a retailer buys three dozen copies of a title for sale as the genuine article, and those three dozen copies SELL as the genuine article at retail price, but were knocked off by a Chinese plant, then that represents a true loss of revenue. What percentage of the discs sold world-wide (I know this is a serious problem in Europe and the Orient) as legitimate are really pirated?

Re:True costs of piracy? (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289303)

Has anyone ever done a study on what percentage of users of pirated content, would have purchased that content, had it not been available outside the legitimate distribution channels?

Let's see... the xxAA? HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! Yeah, right.
EFF? They *should*, but don't know if they have the budget.

Who else would do it?

Re:True costs of piracy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289359)

I would say you forgot one catagory

The cheeapass
They HAVE the money to buy whatever they want but why pay for it when it is free. If it was not free they would have bought it.

Re:True costs of piracy? (1)

pg110404 (836120) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289449)

The Industry talks about piracy they always bandy about numbers like (from TFA), three billion dollars per year in lost revenue.

The concept they seem to fail to also grasp is that perhaps most movies today lack the substance that makes a movie actually worth watching. With the eye candy and special effects, they probably think the movie will rake in kazillion buckazoids for the CG alone and plot and story be damned, but I am the only one too sophisticated for the crap that passes for movies these days?

If they're looking at lost revenue, perhaps the truth is, THEIR MOVIES SUCK!!!!! There are many movies that came out in the past few years I wished I had downloaded illegally and watched, because quite frankly I didn't think it deserved my money or my time. Wasting my computer's time to download it and a few minutes to find out it's utter SHIT and delete the file, sure, but not anymore than that.

Re:True costs of piracy? (4, Insightful)

shmlco (594907) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289468)

I'm pretty sure you forgot #4 freeloaders. Or the why should I pay for it when I can get it free crowd. (Also includes the "I'm entitled to it just because..." crowd.)

Re:True costs of piracy? (2, Interesting)

elgaard (81259) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289506)

==
The Industry talks about piracy they always bandy about numbers like (from TFA), three billion dollars per year in lost revenue. I would really love to see their methodology.
==

They probably have a more creative definition of piracy that you and me. I.e. some of the three billion dollars is the loss of you breaking the DMCA and ripping your DVD's to the harddisk instead of buying the same movies on blueray.

Self-Destruct? Not likely (4, Interesting)

TheSpoom (715771) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289264)

Eh. First off, according to the Tom's Hardware article, these players would have to be permanently connected to the internet. Where have I heard about something like that before... Perhaps from DivX [members.shaw.ca] , which required the players to be connected to a phone line to "phone home" every now and again... and I'm sure we all know how well that turned out [wired.com] .

Besides, what's to prevent a hacker from filtering out this self-destruct code from the downstream content anyway? I mean, it's not like this internet connection is protected or anything. If the content provider sends a packet to reflash the player, just don't let it get to the player. Have something in between to filter it out.

As usual, there are a bunch of fundamental flaws in DRM that will always keep coming back no matter what the content providers try to do. I see DVD Jon cracking this in a week after it's put out on the streets.

Then they'll definitely fail. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289394)

If they have to be connected to the net, I think it is a foregone conclusion that they will fail completely. Most consumers know notihng about the net, don't know how to configure a wireless router (assuming it allowed a wireless connection) or do not have a reliable wireless connection throughout their entire house. I don't. And if it requires a wire will it require a phone line connection? Probably not if it needs to connect to the net. It needs a CAT5 connection. That requires a wire. It was a huge pain just to run a wire from my room to my dad's room, and we had the luxury of hiding the wire behind heating vents in that case. But if we had needed to run a wire downstairs that would have been impossible to hide.

They'd have to be absolutely bonkers to make a DVD player that needs to be connected to the net all the time in this day and age. It's much too early to assume every room has a net connection.

Wouldn't be interesting if.. (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289401)

each blu-ray disc (for dvds) had on it's file system a space reserved for a code block to be run by a VM on the player? This code would be loaded to decrypt the content, and you'd use a digtally signed (ala xbox) and TrusedComp platform (TCPM, ala the new x86 DRM) system to choose which CD's to load code from, and limit execution of code to just those disks. They could make players that will only play 'original' media; movies from outside their studio releases could play on it, so by definition anything else is piracy. Use this fact to completely stop the influx of burned CD ****from the analog hole*** (less quality on the conversion = different checksum = unable to hash out a code block that the player will accept (aka has to be signed with that hash in it)

This would set the stage for other manuvers on a strictly cryptographic basis. be forewarned - be forearmed.

jro / whereyou _at_ gmail.com

Re:Wouldn't be interesting if.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289475)

When preview is not enough, corrections: ...movies from outside their studio COULDN'T play on it...

strike: ...so by definition anything else is piracy...
replace with: ...so they could make really cheap players and promote them (ala the console strategy)...

sorry about that.

Re:Self-Destruct? Not likely (4, Insightful)

cbrocious (764766) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289403)

"Besides, what's to prevent a hacker from filtering out this self-destruct code from the downstream content anyway?"

I'd be willing to bet a month's salary that they are going to use public-key cryptography with a bigass key to protect it. RSA2048 will keep anyone from screwing with it. Hard-code the SSL public key, and the only way you're going to launch a man-in-the-middle attack against it is by rewriting the key.

Re:Self-Destruct? Not likely (5, Insightful)

tgrimley (585067) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289438)

Even worse: what about when hackers can start sending these self destruct packets themselves. Imagine how pissed you'd be when someone "destroys" your dvd player!

Re:Self-Destruct? Not likely (1)

interiot (50685) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289440)

Besides, what's to prevent a hacker from filtering out this self-destruct code from the downstream content anyway? I mean, it's not like this internet connection is protected or anything. If the content provider sends a packet to reflash the player, just don't let it get to the player. Have something in between to filter it out.
Public-key encryption? Anything remotely resembling SSL? (eg. something you use in your browser every day to prevent people from modifying your bank transactions done over the web)
As usual, there are a bunch of fundamental flaws in DRM that will always keep coming back no matter what the content providers try to do. I see DVD Jon cracking this in a week after it's put out on the streets.
There are a few fatal flaws, yes. The biggest flaw is that you have to hand the end-user a device which fundamentally contains the key that's used to decrypt the content they buy. In particular, software-only copyright protection is usually fairly quickly cracked, since it's not hard to put it inside a box and debug it.

HARDWARE-based DRM, on the other hand, while it does have some fatal flaws, is proving to be increasingly difficult to crack [slashdot.org] . Read that description of hacking the XBox. It's starting to get a little insane the lengths one has to go to these days to break into a box, and it'll get worse over time. It's impossible to say if manufacturers will eventually win or not, but you CAN say that over time, there will be fewer and fewer hackers who have the skill, experience, and money to get around this kind of thing.

Re:Self-Destruct? Not likely (1)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289497)

The players won't have to be connected to the Internet; the self-destruct code can be delivered on discs.

Won't work... (1)

Travelsonic (870859) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289267)

If history serves my memory correctly, this is bound to fail like all the other DRM schemes. History does after all repeat itself, and usually all it takes is either a really good hacker, or a really lucky foul-up to make the DRM go to hell.

In other news (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289278)

The sun rises, the tides fall and rise, and it becomes cold in winter.

Seriously, you knew this was going to happen. The only surprising thing here is the "self-destruct code for Blu-ray disc players". And that isn't so much surprising as sad and hilarious.

I wonder if they'll be implementing the self-destruct code in the PS3. If they do, if you thought the class action lawsuit over the DRE'ing PS2s was bad, wait until the first moment that some kind of vulnerability-- like buffer overflow in Phantasy Star Online for the Gamecube-- is found in an internet-capable PS3 game. Then watch as everyone playing that game gets targeted by a little bit of wormy executable code that triggers the Blu-Ray destruction tripwire and kills the console permanently...

Blu-Ray? no thanks! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289298)

This is a serious issue that concerns all of us and shouldn't be joked about by dilettants.

If the HD-DVD decide to go down the same slipery road as the Blu-Ray and the content lobby I'll stick to good old inexpensive DVDs.

HD-DVD has already *GONE* down that road (4, Informative)

mcc (14761) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289479)

The HD-DVD peoples published the specs on their DRM scheme months and months ago. [aacsla.com]

Meanwhile to counterpart Blu-Ray's "interesting" copy control features, at least as the standard stands, HD-DVD discs MUST CONTAIN DRM in order to be played in an HD-DVD player AT ALL. [cdfreaks.com] This is not like DVD, where CSS was an option which disc creators could choose to follow or not follow and you could just freely stick into a DVD player a DVD-R you burned. An HD-DVD drive is not allowed, by the current compliance rules, to play ANY HD-DVD disc which doesn't have a digital watermark granted directly by the central HD-DVD authority. Interestingly these watermarks include a "banned" list-- HD-DVDs keep an internal list of watermarks that have been "revoked", and every new HD-DVD printed will contain an up-to-date copy of that "revoked" list which the HD-DVD player must update every time you put in an HD-DVD. If the HD-DVD player sees a disc whose watermark has been placed on the "banned" list, it refuses to play it.

Re:Blu-Ray? no thanks! (1)

Daimando (842740) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289495)

I'll probabily end up going the same path as you do...down the classic DVD path(Got plenty of DVDs)

I'm starting a Pool (2, Funny)

ReidMaynard (161608) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289324)

How many hours after the first commercial sale of one of these "registered" blu-ray burners will a hack be announced?

I'm putting a dollar on the "25 hour" square

Greaat.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289326)

So now they'll be giving viruses the chance to take out hardware? One up for HD-DVD.

Death of Blue Ray before it even got started (4, Insightful)

Zed2K (313037) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289331)

If Blue Ray requires the device to be connected to the internet then that will spell the death of it before it even is sold anywhere. Same thing for HD-DVD. People will not want or be able to run internet connections to their tv area just to be able to play hidef dvd's. If people have to do anything more than plug it into the wall for power and plug the player into the tv and/or receiver then it won't sell.

Sonys huge ego, part.....6...7? (1)

Orion83 (448477) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289335)

Man, the second these guys think they have some level of dominance they think they can do anything...
Just like what will happen with PS3 vs the XBOX2,
they loose site of market and try to control it.

Self-destructing Blu-Ray DVRs? (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289339)

I can smell massive lawsuits from State Attorney Generals a mile off ...

Seriously, this is almost as farcical as Lotus 1-2-3 introducing copy protection and spawning the Copy II Plus massive sales increase.

Re:Self-destructing Blu-Ray DVRs? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289418)

Ah, good ol' Copy II Plus. That and Locksmith were my two constant companions during high school and college. Then I got a Mac.

Wonder where I put my //e disks...not to mention my //e...

One time viewing (1)

Swamii (594522) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289341)

1. Create DVDs with self-destruct technology
2. Sell DVDs to public
3. Profit
4. After the DVD is viewed, self-destruct
5. Repeat steps 2 - 4 as necessary.

programming version (1)

Swamii (594522) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289413)

while(disc->isDestroyed)
{
    disc = new CrippledJunk();
    theMasses->purchase(disc);
    ::Profit();
    theMasses->view(disc);
    disc->selfDestruct();
}

I wonder if the Self-Destruct Code will be... (4, Funny)

FrankieBoy (452356) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289351)

KIRK: Destruct sequence one. Code one, one-A.

SPOCK: Destruct sequence number two. Code one, one-A, two-B.

SCOTT: Destruct sequence number three. Code one-B, two-B, three.

KIRK: Begin thirty second countdown. Code zero, zero, zero, destruct, zero.

Or perhaps the Futurama version (2, Funny)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289426)

George Takei: Let's take them out with us. Do you guys have a self destruct code? Like "Destruct Sequence one-A, two-B, three"--

(Bender's head explodes instantly.)

Bender: Thanks a lot, Takei! Now everybody knows!

HD-DVD is dead. (4, Interesting)

MBCook (132727) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289353)

HD-DVD is dead. It always has been (in my estimation). There is more about this new information over at Ars Techinca [arstechnica.com] .

Having this new copy protection stuff should just seal the deal (great for studios, terrible for consumers). The fact that only one manufacturer is expected to ship a HD-DVD player this year (and for $1000) doesn't bode well. Early next year Sony will be shipping the PS3 which will not only play the blueray discs, but will also play PS1/2/3 games and DVDs. All for $500 (my guess at their "high price", but even at $700 it would be a bargain compared to $1000). There will be so many PS3 sales, it would be hard to beat that installed base even if HD-DVD was in the initial X-Box 360s (now we don't even know if that will happen).

The war is over. The only people who don't know it are the HD-DVD group.

PS3 maybe not til late 06 or 07 (1)

FerretFrottage (714136) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289477)

I read last week that the PS3 release may be tied to the success of lack there of the the xbox360. If the xbox360 is slow out of the gate, the article said that the PS3 may have its US debut pushed into late 2006 or even sometime in 2007.

TANSTAAFL (2, Interesting)

Kylere (846597) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289361)

The only way this scheme is coming into my house is if they give it to me, and I can change them for bandwidth usage.

If TV/Movies are that important to you, then GAFL.

This is not going to go well (1)

MonGuSE (798397) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289375)

This controversial technology would require that disc players maintain permanent connections to content providers via the Internet, making it possible for discs that fail a security check to trigger a notification process, enabling the provider to send the player a sort of "self-destruct code." This code would come in the form of a flash ROM "update" that would actually render the player useless, perhaps unless and until it is taken to a repair shop for reprogramming.

Is it just me or does anyone else envision a virus that can actually destroy hardware? Its been a long time since hardware damage from virus's has been any concern but if something like this were actually implemented it would be all over. I can just see a piece of malware that crafts malicious packets to reply to ?software? that is running to ensure the disc is legit and wellah a dead drive. There is any number of ways that this could be abused to kill drives.

Not buyin' it (4, Insightful)

Stanistani (808333) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289384)

>a self-destruct code for Blu-ray disc players

That's waaaay over the line.

Not gonna buy it.

You think I'd let a mistake by some techie or program destroy a few hundred bucks of my hard-earned money?

I'm tired of people treating me like a thief, when I never pirate ANYTHING!

I've got lots of CDs and DVDs I already bought in the 80s and 90s, and I can always just walk along the street and whistle (or daydream).

Follow the Porn (5, Insightful)

Dhaos (697924) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289390)

All these new systems will fail for one reason: Porn.

Porn producers are very realistic, and very saavy. Do you think people are going to buy "Buttbandits 23" if they know that every time they queue it up, some manufacturer is getting a record of it?? Even those without tinfoil hats know this is a bad idea...

My prediction is that the pornographers will use a version of the high-def discs WITHOUT the phone-home feature, or will stick to DVDs.

Pornography: Saving Western Civilization since 1826.

Who is paying? (2, Insightful)

stunt_penguin (906223) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289443)

Okay, so these companies have a right to protect content that they've spent hundreds of millions of dollars creating.

However who is paying the price for all this hardware and copy protection. Permanent internet connections? Players that render themselves inoperable once a copyright violation has been detected? It might sound like a sweet deal to industry lawyers, but these machines and discs are going to be needlessly expensive and few people are going to buy into a technology that resembles a copyright minefield.

People like simple funcional things, like disks that you slot into a machine and watch movies on, not permanently internet-connected, big brother-esque machines that throw a fit and need to be repaired if you try and watch a naughty, naughty copied movie on. "Bad consumer, very baaad consumer!"

People (by which i mean the 95% of people who are happy with DVD and don't see a reason to upgrade to HD) won't buy into a new technology unless it is simple, reasonably cheap and offers a clear advantage the DVD player they bought a few years ago.

I, for one won't be buying a Blu-Ray machine. My money is on HD-DVD. A lower capacity disk yes, but probably cheaper, probably easier to make +R discs of (which is what I REALLY want them for) and probably better overall.

At the same time, I may end up downloading my HD movies from Apple through iTunes (or whatever) , which is the way things may well end up if these people don't get their s**t together.

thwy think we're stupid (1)

MajorB (903150) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289452)

These companies think we're stupid. They don't think we'd notice watermarks or stuff like that. And the sad thing is, people give these companies more power by not being involved in the technelogical aspects of thier lives. If I get a HD-DVD player ande am unable to play a video because some pansy executive takes away my privacy in the name of "ant-piracy," I will demand my money back. On a related note, I head that the players tested with Gigli discs self destructed immediately.

Oh, these will be flying off the shelves... (1)

Starker_Kull (896770) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289453)

So, if I read this right, to use this thing I'll have to have a live internet connection, and if I do something "suspicious" with it, content providers can send the "Packet 'O Death" and kill my player? And they expect me to pay them for this?

I find the studios' obsessive need to "protect" their content, well, stupid. The content will get out one way or another. I don't think early adopters of Crippleware (tm) will give positive reviews to the mainstream, who are pretty content with DVDs, and so they are already digging the grave for this format before it is even released.

One day, the idea that content is pretty easy to duplicate and hardware, is, well, HARD to duplicate will penetrate their little minds, and they might start to emphasise better/more convenient ways for people to watch content, and figure out how to make money from that. Apple's pretty good at that. They might figure out that the first time someone's player goes poof by remote control, they just lost the sales to all that fellow's friends and family. Maybe I'll even live long enough to see these realizations penetrate. Maybe.

Sigh.

easily fixed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13289464)

Don't buy 'em. All I need to see are the words "self destruct" and I'm done with it. If people don't buy the damned things because of DRM then eventually they might get the idea. Count me out.

Piracy fuels hardware sales... (4, Interesting)

Cinematique (167333) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289469)

I can't think of a single media playback device that did not enjoy a healthy kick in sales simply because it allowed a buyer to make/playback copies of original media... or from hacks which allowed the machine in question to do more than originally advertised.

Beta tapes and VHS recorders --"You mean I can go to the store, set one deck to playback on channel 3 and set the other to record channel 3, and I have a copy? Schmeet!"

Audio cassettes -- Same deal.

CD Burners -- Again, essentially the same deal.

Playstations -- I can play imported games and as a side benefit, play "backup" games? Where do I get one of these mod-chips? See: CD-Burner sales.

Dreamcast -- Homebrew games and backups? All I have to do is use a special boot-cd? I think I'll pick one up since they're so cheap. See: CD-Burner sales.

DVD Burners -- I can backup my important data plus burn movies and games? I want one!

XBOX -- Relatively shitty sales compared to the gold-standard Playstation2 'til the modders started to have fun with the internal hard drive. Drop some NES/SNES/Genesis emulators on there...

Sony PSP --Aside from the weak (IMHO) "I have one before you!" factor... probably the only thing driving sales... the ability to make it do things it didn't do out-of-the-box.

Anyone denying that the sale of almost every new format's success was riding on the possibly of pirating is damn near delusional. Maybe it isn't the deciding factor for every single person buying the widget, but it's definitely a sizable minority... if not majority.

Frankly, this time around, we're really faced with a stalemate between Hollywood and consumers. Sure, early adopters will buy whatever hits the market... but not in droves.

This time around, if the hardware makers don't follow the wishes of Hollywood, prices probably won't decline, volumes will remain flat, and Toshiba and Sony both will be faced with a format that's dead right out of the gates.

However, without laying the DRM on thick, Hollywood won't play ball with the next generation of video players. Catch-22.

It's silly not to attribute a sizable portion of the success of DVD to the cracking of CSS -- like it nor not.

They left out one security measure . . . (1)

mmell (832646) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289470)

A camera mounted in the faceplate of all Blu-Ray enabled televisions (what, you mean the thing won't require a secure monitor? Even M$ is up to speed on that one), enabling Sony executroids to monitor the activities of all people viewing their precious content.

Ahhh . . . never mind television or HDTV. I'm going to play in the big blue room outside my house later.

Conglomerates (1)

magarity (164372) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289473)

the Blu-ray Disc Association, led by Sony
 
A textbook perfect case of one division of a giant conglomerate looking out for another division. Does Toshiba have any fingers in the movie/music/whatever content business?

Nothing to see here... (1)

B11 (894359) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289483)

If the damn DVD player has to phone home everytime DRM is cracked, the platform is useless. One of the largest markets for DVDs is in portable players, handheld or installed in vehicles. How is it going to phone home installing in the back of a head rest in an Escalade? Forget it.

Plus, do they seriously expect people to take in their PS3, home theatre receivers and whatever else in for reflashing when it "self destructs?" Yeah right.

Apple wouldn't have sold half the iPods it has were it not for the fact that it plays MP3s and it isn't cumbersome to transfer your MP3s to it (legal or otherwise) and that it doesn't convert the MP3s into DRMed files or some silly nonsense. I wonder how well those "Napster" enabled players are doing? Hmmmm. I think the fabled "iPod video" will follow in its older sibling's shoe, because that's what people want. If you can't play your DVDs on it (Blu-ray or HD), people aren't going to be interested.

...move along.

Of course, you can always buy from China (2, Insightful)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289496)

where the non-protected version will be available for 1/10th the cost, and play all the Blu-Ray DVDs you want.

Point-Counterpoint: I say let 'em crash (2, Interesting)

eyeball (17206) | more than 8 years ago | (#13289504)

Good. I say we stop resisting this and let them have what they want. Let these companies create all kinds of complicated consumer-angering technology. Let people be forced into experiencing the entertainment they "buy" only how the providers want. Let the consumer be forced into restrictive pay-per-view models for movies they purchase. Make it impossible for me to let my mom borrow a DVD I "bought." Just let it all happen.

That will give the rest of the entertainment community the chance to create smaller, niche forms of entertainment, while hollywood continues its downward spiral of making worse mass appeal crap. Same for music, TV, etc.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...