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Time-in-Space Record Broken

CmdrTaco posted more than 9 years ago | from the and-you-thought-you-had-a-rough-couple-of-years dept.

Space 325

NoFrance writes "Russian cosmonaut, Sergei Krikalev has taken the record for most time spent in space away from fellow Russian Sergei Avdeyev. At 748 days in space, Krikalev has an impressive list of accomplishments to his name, including : back-to-back 6 month tours on mir, he flew on the first joint US-Russian space shuttle mission, and a member of the first crew to live on ISS. He is currently commander of the ISS in a six-month stint that began on 14 April. Most impressive is his ability to deal with the physical hardships in space. In space most people lose around 1.5% of their bone mass per month, even with a disciplined exercise regime. And growing the bone mass lost from a 6 month stint back, can take a long time."

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748 days? (4, Interesting)

slavemowgli (585321) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331012)

748 days? Wow. Think about that - it's more than two years. Quite an accomplishment indeed.

Out of curiosity, what's the record amount of time spent in space by a US-American astronaut?

Re:748 days? (4, Funny)

AccUser (191555) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331059)

what's the record amount of time spent in space by a US-American?

What? Including abductees?

Re:748 days? (4, Funny)

slavemowgli (585321) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331136)

If there is proof (or at least conclusive evidence) that they were indeed abducted, sure. :)

Re:748 days? (3, Funny)

eln (21727) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331173)

Elvis has been in space for almost 30 years!

Re:748 days? (3, Informative)

cblanc (907387) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331087)

Yeah, I wonder how they prepare themselves psychologically for such a journey. As for the record amount of time spent in space by an American astronaut is Shannon Lucid with 188 days

Consecutive vs. total days in space (1)

benhocking (724439) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331178)

Shannon Lucid spent 188 consecutive days in space (as compared to 366 consecutive days for cosmonauts Vladimir Titov and Musa Manarov). I, too, am curious for our current record holders for most number of total days in space.

Re:748 days? (2, Informative)

slavemowgli (585321) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331201)

Thanks, but this is the record for the most time spent in space cumulatively - if I understand correctly, Lucid's record 188 days were a single stay. :)

Oh, and out of curiosity (sorry for going off-topic here), how'd you manage to post a score 0 comment without either being AC or getting modded down? o.o

Re:748 days? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331334)

Oh, and out of curiosity (sorry for going off-topic here), how'd you manage to post a score 0 comment without either being AC or getting modded down? o.o

bad karma. your comments start at 2 because you have good karma.

Re:748 days? (5, Funny)

oringo (848629) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331109)

From TFA: Most impressive is his ability to deal with the physical hardships in space.

Nah...All you need is a playboy subscription.

Re:748 days? (4, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331159)

> From TFA: Most impressive is his ability to deal with the physical hardships in space.
>
> Nah...All you need is a playboy subscription.

...because (at least in male test subjects) physical hardship is inversely proportional to bone mass.

Re:748 days? (0, Redundant)

skarphace (812333) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331270)

Don't you mean boner mass?

Re:748 days? (1)

Karma_fucker_sucker (898393) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331166)

That brings up an interesting question.

Is sperm processed the same as urine? And how pleasurable is the urine funnel?

just something that your post brought in my sick little perverted head.

Re:748 days? (4, Interesting)

Rei (128717) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331111)

Think about that - it's more than two years

And he's gained 2 milliseconds compared to people on the ground! :) Assuming I'm doing the math right here...

Re:748 days? (2, Informative)

daniil (775990) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331227)

According to Space Today [spacetoday.org] , the U.S. space endurance record holder is former ISS commander Michael Foale, with a total of 375 days spent in space (note that it's the record for cumulative time spent in space. The longest time spent in space on a single mission is 438 days).

Forgive me... (4, Funny)

hamfactorial (857057) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331015)

In Soviet space, bone loses you!

Re:Forgive me... (2, Interesting)

Feminist-Mom (816033) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331077)

Remember in "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress", if an earthling spent a few months on Luna then the could never return. (Unless they did some special kind of centrifuged exercising.) Apparently Heinlein wasn't quite right.

Re:Forgive me... (1)

Dorsai42 (738671) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331133)

Maybe not, but his SF is of the highest order.

Re:Forgive me... (1)

PakProtector (115173) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331146)

Mike will probably be around to correct us both in a little bit, but as I recall, in reality, there are several health hazards that come about from staying in such a low gravitational field for so long -- bone loss is prime among them. They're the reasons Astronauts have to do such strenuous exercises in space.

Heinlein just overestimated exactly how bad those effects would be, but I have no doubt he was probably right for what would happen for someone raised in 1/6th Gee trying to get around in a 1 G field, i.e. Lunie on Terra.

It would not be pleasant, if my experience having a seizure (and thus loss of function of the limbs) is anything similar.

Re:Forgive me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331164)

After 700 days in space with no babes, I bet his bone got quite a workout! No wonder it lost mass. I bet the American astronaut's main problem is a sore ass.

Re:Forgive me... (1)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331120)

Oh My God!
They're Not Even Human!

No (1)

sawyerslim (592773) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331124)

We can't anymore.

In Soviet Russia... (-1, Redundant)

Pxtl (151020) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331017)

Bone grows YOU!

How many (4, Funny)

anandpur (303114) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331022)

Frequent Flyer miles he accumulated?

Re:How many (1)

fizzup (788545) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331069)

He's got soooooo many, they're going to let him stay in space until October. For free!

Re:How many (4, Funny)

grozzie2 (698656) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331151)

It's irrelavent. His miles are in the wrong mileage program, a combination of nasa and the russian space agency. The russian agency has no space available for cashing in miles over the next few years, all flights are booked full. Nasa has grounded it's fleet yet again.

When choosing your mileage program, it's very important to check that it's one where you can actually cash the miles in for travel, there's a bunch of them that have so many rules/restrictions that it's not worth the hassle. This fella obviously made the wrong choice for collecting miles. Then again, it's not like he had a variety of carriers to chose from when booking flights to MIR and ISS...

Re:How many (1)

Dorsai42 (738671) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331303)

Maybe he can trade miles with Tom Hanks.

Re:How many (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331338)

All of them.

How long? (1)

ucahg (898110) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331023)

And growing the bone mass lost from a 6 month stint back, can take a long time.

I hate comments like that. Immediately I want to know how long, but all I know is that it's the ever-subjective "a long time". Gee, thanks.

(wow that sounds really negative.. it's not actually *thaat* important to me... oh well)

Re:How long? (4, Funny)

wolfgang_spangler (40539) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331100)

And growing the bone mass lost from a 6 month stint back, can take a long time.

I hate comments like that. Immediately I want to know how long, but all I know is that it's the ever-subjective "a long time". Gee, thanks.


From TFA

"And it takes a good long time to get it back," says Buckey, adding that it can take years to recover the bone mass lost from a six-month stay in orbit. Researchers are also not sure whether the quality of the new bone matches that of the bone mass lost, he told New Scientist.

Argh! The..strain...of..finding..this..infor..mation.... over..whelming......
*gasp*

Re:How long? (1)

yossarian dent (828672) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331105)

Personally, I'd just settle for commas, not being put where they don't belong.

Yeah, well... (4, Funny)

daniil (775990) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331024)

What he doesn't know is, in the meantime, I ate his children.

(And Sergei, man, I'm so sorry you had to hear about it like this...)

Re:Yeah, well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331058)

I thought I smelled something weird cooking up while I was bangning his wife.

*whew* (4, Funny)

Phoenixhunter (588958) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331026)

I thought there was a problem with the space-time continuum.

Re:*whew* (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331200)

I thought there was a problem with the space-time continuum.

Nope, it's a problem with living in Russia. You think he's crazy? He's nice and safe up there, much better than being on the ground with all those thugs [sfgate.com] running around the country.

ISS Sweet ISS

Re:*whew* (2, Funny)

yurivish (902527) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331207)

Well, eddy is in the time-space continuum...

One of the little known side effects... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331032)

Causes spacemen to insert random commas at odd places and leads to poor sentence structure.

Re:One of the little known side effects... (1)

OnTheWay (529387) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331329)

Yes. I thought at first that he had spent 748 days in space *away* from fellow Russian Sergei Avdeyev, then I re-read the sentence and I see that "taken away the record from" was the intended meaning.

Let's see which shuttle picks the cosmonaut up from the ISS. Err, I mean picks up the cosmonaut from the ISS.

He was seen here (-1, Offtopic)

ThreePieceSnowman (907931) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331034)

Trying to pick up women [overheardintheuk.com] . Hope he got some.

Re:He was seen here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331135)

Do piss off, you and your website, there's a good lad.

10m+ (2, Interesting)

rd4tech (711615) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331037)

Many space-farers go through a syndrome similar to depression after the novelty and excitement of the first few weeks in space wears off. It is marked by fatigue, lack of motivation, irritability, and problems sleeping.

They better make those soon-to-be-here flight to moon & mars entertaining, otherwise, they might get sued by guys who are able to pay 10+ milion for a vacation :)

Re:10m+ (0)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331096)

Methinks that "Space Depression" may have one or two things to do with the exceedingly cramped spaces. I mean, road trips are fun and all, but I'd go crazy too if I had to stay in the car for two years!

Any sort of mission to Mars would HAVE to be a bit more spacious than today's craft. Which means we need bigger boosters to get it there. Which then suggests the use of something nuclear such as NTR, Orion, or MPDT.

Re:10m+ (1)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331145)

considering the protest from the left over cassini's tiny neclear fuel. unlikey.

Re:10m+ (2)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331262)

Unfortunate for the left-wing nut jobs, they're just going to have to deal with it. Cassini flew, as will Prometheus. Not to mention the Viking, Pioneer, and Mars Explorer probes. (The Mars explorer bots had Radioisotope heaters on board.)

In space you live and die by the amount of power available to you. Solar does a reasonable job for very small craft all the way out to Jupiter. For larger craft or longer distances, you NEED to get power from somewhere. Nuclear fission can provide that power.

Re:10m+ (1)

merlin_jim (302773) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331230)

Any sort of mission to Mars would HAVE to be a bit more spacious than today's craft. Which means we need bigger boosters to get it there.

I would just like to point out that more empty space on a craft is just that; empty. Sure you gotta build a bigger hull and you gotta carry up a few extra liters of air. But there's a nice volume to mass ratio going on here; double the mass to quadruple the volume, that sort of thing... and any volume you add this way doesn't have to have any equipment in it!

But I agree. Orion is the answer.

Re:10m+ (3, Insightful)

grozzie2 (698656) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331263)

How about we exclude you from the candidate list of folks to go, and restrict it to people that _can_ deal with the claustriphobic conditions. Makes much more sense to choose crew capable of operating within the mission parameters, rather than change the mission parameters to fit a crew.

Re:10m+ (1)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331323)

"Heh...heh...heh...they think I'm crazy. But I know better. It is not I who am crazy. It is not I who am mad! Didn'tcha hear 'em? Didn'tcha see the CROWDS? Oh my beloved ice cream bar... "

According to Ren & Stimpy, it is zero-G that causes Space Madness.

Don't push the button.

space-farer syndrome ? (1)

protolith (619345) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331163)

That sounds like SPACE MADDNESS !!! to me...

How long before he tries to eat a bar of soap?

Re:10m+ (1)

Dausha (546002) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331179)

The call that culture shock--that is, the syndrome spacemen experience.

Worker's comp lawsuit? (3, Interesting)

defile (1059) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331040)

Actually, do astronauts get plain vanilla worker's comp like the rest of us here in the states, or does NASA have some custom designed insurance policy?

Air Force officers, mostly (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331211)

Their dependents mostly get to keep the benefits they had, minus the paycheck.

Servicemen and women can sign up for cheap AD&D insurance, even though they are about to leave for war (or space).

Civilians who sign on get the Federal Gov insurance and bennies, which aren't as nice but it's still there.

Re:Worker's comp lawsuit? (5, Funny)

Stone Cold Troll (894857) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331272)

Neither. There's a click-through EULA in the shuttle's boot sequence.

artificial gravity (1)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331042)

i have to wonder why a simple system hasn't been impemented yet?

Re:artificial gravity (1)

roguenine19 (901001) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331097)

i have to wonder why a simple system hasn't been impemented yet? I believe it has to do with the relatively small size (and possibly shape) of the ISS. Making it rotate wouldn't generate nearly enough gravity, and it wouldn't be uniform.

Because... (1)

Iscariot_ (166362) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331108)

Because the engery required to do this would be ENORMOUS and very costly to implement.

Re:artificial gravity (3, Informative)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331257)

There is no simple artificial gravity solution.

I'm sure every slashdotter has seen multiple sci-fi examples of a huge spinning doohickey that replaces gravity with centrifugal[1] force.

Four problems I can see:

1) If the radial arm is too short, there are tons of biological side effects. Coriolis forces and angular momentum are the two major factors causing these side effects, which can be mediated by intermittent spinning.

2) An engineering nightmare, especially if done intermittenly.

3) A logistical nightmare. If the radial arm is long enough to prevent the side effects, construction and maintenace service would, I believe, be beyond acceptable costs.

4) Would make impossible all the long-term zero-g experiments we need to continue doing.

However, there is currently renewed research into the idea. I was able to find an entry for the Mars Gravity Biosatellite in Wikipedia, but there is not much information there.

Anyone know more info (such as projected launch date) about the MGBS or other artificial gravity experiments?

[1] Yeah, yeah, it doesn't really exist. But it's a useful term.

Artificial Gravity (1)

Skynet (37427) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331056)

Will artificial gravity negate the effects of zero-grav on bone density?

Re:Artificial Gravity (1)

slavemowgli (585321) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331084)

If it's comparable in level to Earth's "regular" gravity, then I'd say, yes, it would. IANARS (I Am Not A Rocket Scientist), of course, but I can't see a reason why it wouldn't. Gravity is gravity, so assuming that it's only the lack of gravity that contributes to bone density loss (as opposed to the lack of other effects present on Earth but not in space), it should be possible to compensate for this using artificial gravity.

Re:Artificial Gravity (1)

crownrai (713377) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331086)

Sure it will. But isn't the whole point of the ISS to perform tests in (near)zero gravity.

Re:Artificial Gravity (2, Funny)

Dr. Evil (3501) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331114)

It would be an easy experiment. Put somebody in a small room for 6 months and make them execute similar tasks as an astronaut.

Or... take a sampling of Slashdot readers.

Re:Artificial Gravity (5, Informative)

Cyclotron_Boy (708254) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331214)

Centripetal-force-generated artificial gravity systems, like those envitioned by Arthur C. Clarke shown in the film 2001 [imdb.com] , have been studied by NASA and the Air Force for decades [spacefuture.com] . Basically, it would require a structure of a few hundred meters radius rotating at a few rpm. The scale of such a habitat would be enormous, and the cost associated has not been shown to be warranted as of yet. However, the commercialization of space will probably bring about such an innovation out of necessity (for comfort).
Links here [ibiblio.org] , here [regentsprep.org] , and here [hypertextbook.com] .

question (1)

PW2 (410411) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331057)

Where does the bone mass go to? Do they have calcium suppliments on the IIS? My pet bird can lose bone mass too if she lays too many eggs and doesn't get enough calcium back. I can't imagine what being in space would do to the poor egg laying bird

Calcium suppliments don't help (4, Informative)

everphilski (877346) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331117)

Calcium suppliments don't help. The problem is your body realises that you have too much muscle mass and that you are too strong for microgravity, so it stops reinforcing your bones until it percieves a need to strengthen your bones. It's not a lack of available calcium. It is the exact same phenomenon that plagues people on bedrest. Even though they are given the best food and nutrition available when they are off bedrest they are weak and frail.

-everphilski-

Re:question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331130)

The calcium is excreted as waste because, without gravity putting stress on your bones, your body figures they don't need to be as strong. That's why they mentioned the excersize routine - need to put stress on the bones & muscles so that they don't deteriorate any more. Calcium supplements alone won't work because your body doesn't figure it needs it, so won't absorb it.

Re:question (1)

Otter (3800) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331248)

Bone is continuously being remodeled; degraded by osteoclasts and rebuilt by osteoblasts. The bone loss in zero-g is the same as in osteoporotic women, where bone is torn up and excreted faster than it's rebuilt. Just taking calcium won't help.

If you've ever met Mrs. Krikalev... (5, Funny)

FlameTroll (901932) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331072)

Then you would understand just how short a time 748 days in space truly is.

Re:If you've ever met Mrs. Krikalev... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331157)

That's Mrs. Krikaleva. Russian names change depending on gender. /pedantic

quick question.. (1)

joper90 (669321) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331073)

erm.. when and how is he going to get back?
Did he just not miss the last bus?

This is just astounding (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331076)

Considering that the amenities on Mir and ISS make a World War II era submarine look like a 5-star hotel.

Re:This is just astounding (2, Funny)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331234)

Considering that the amenities on Mir and ISS make a World War II era submarine look like a 5-star hotel.

Yeah, but the amenities in Russia make ISS look like a 5-star hotel and a submarine look like Club Med.

That's nothing (1, Funny)

Psionicist (561330) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331082)

I've been in cyberspace for decades from my parents basement.

What's he got against the other Sergei? (5, Funny)

glen604 (750214) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331090)

"Sergei Krikalev has taken the record for most time spent in space away from fellow Russian Sergei Avdeyev"
Man- that Sergei Avdeyev must be pretty annoying if Sergei K has to go to space to stay away from him.

Re:What's he got against the other Sergei? (1)

Infinityis (807294) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331279)

You know, with a name like that, I wouldn't be surprised if /. accepted the article simply because it was Google related. "Google to provide WiFi in space, according to founder"

Family Guy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331094)

I wish I had no bones!

Re:Family Guy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331249)

Riding on a bus Riding on a bus Sitting next to bums There's an open seat Hope that isn't pee

New Superman. (0)

Jeet81 (613099) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331113)

We have a new Superman now ... Sergei Krikalev.. Jokes aside but that really is impressive.

In flight movies.. (1)

modi123 (750470) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331123)

They say the depression sets in post the first two weeks of space-novelty, and I can tell you why. "Freddy Got Fingered" was only fun the first 15 times, but after that - ugg!

Seriously, I wonder what they do for entertainment? Lan parties? MMORPGs? Can bit torrent stream shows to them? Any answers would be welcomed!

Mars Or Bust... (0, Troll)

creimer (824291) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331127)

I think this might be the first guy to lead a team to Mars since he knows what to expect while in space. Although he might want to play Russian Roulette if all his crew members are whining Americans who can't understand why the ship to Mars has no warp drive.

Clone the Fellow (1)

truckaxle (883149) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331313)

I say sample this guy's DNA or lets clone him. He will be way to old to go to Mars. He could the basis of a "founding event" for a space fairing subspecies.

Gosh, and I thought... (1)

gardyloo (512791) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331132)

I was a hit at parties!

Long term health effects (1)

8127972 (73495) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331134)

"And growing the bone mass lost from a 6 month stint back, can take a long time."

He would be the perfect person to study the health effects of long term space travel. That way humans would not only know what to expect on a trip to say Mars, but humans perhaps could come up with ways to counteract any sort of negative effects that space travel has on the human body.

Retire to Mars? (4, Interesting)

RobertB-DC (622190) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331139)

In previous discussions about a mission to Mars, the suggestion often comes up about a one-way trip -- one or more explorers who make the trip with no intention of coming back. Pioneers, really, rather than explorers.

This poor guy, who keeps getting tapped for "hey, ya think you can spend another year or so in zero-g, tovarisch?" is probably having it worse and worse when he comes back to Terra. How much of his "stamina" is due to some freak of biology, and how much comes straight from a Soviet-era "We invented it first, and better!" mindset?

If he's starting to feel those months in space when he's back on Earth, maybe Krikalev might want to take it easy in his retirement. Like, about 62% easier [caltech.edu] ? Although medical facilities on Mars might be a bit lacking, even by Soviet standards [emedicine.com] .

You've just broken the record, Sergei Avdeyev (2, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331142)

You've just broken the record for time in space, Sergei Avdeyev, what will you do now?

"I'm going to orbit Disneyland!"

Re:You've just broken the record, Sergei Avdeyev (1)

secolactico (519805) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331258)

That'd be "Luna Park". The happiest place orbiting earth.

Wow... (3, Funny)

Fred Foobar (756957) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331143)

That's not a bad uptime!

The coolest thing about zero G (1)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331144)

is that it gives you that funky village people hairdo [newscientist.com] 24/7. No wonder he keeps going back in space...

Re:The coolest thing about zero G (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331224)

What's that stranger doing in my bedroom!?

Impressive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331152)

This guy's a freakin astronomical space badass. He would be the stereotypical grisled veteran in any space movie. Must have been pretty daunting for the space newcomers aboard Discovery to meet the guy who's probably spent more time taking dumps in space then they've been training.

Perfect Slashdotter (1)

AppHack (622902) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331172)

With long stints like that without sex, he could be a slashdotter. :-)

Re:Perfect Slashdotter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331203)

I've often wondered, can an astronaught jack off in space? I'm serious - they're so closely monitored could they do it without all of mission control knowing about it? "This is Houston, we detect a short in your pants, possible fluid intrusion ..." Yeah, Houston, it's been over 700 days, I was just grinding one out.

Obl Red Dwarf quote: (4, Funny)

IainMH (176964) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331176)

RIMMER: How are we fuel-wise?
KRYTEN: Unchanged for today, sir. However, the supply situation grows
    increasingly bleak. We've recycled the water so often, it's beginning
    to taste like Dutch lager.

How do you regain bone mass? (3, Interesting)

artifex2004 (766107) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331185)

It's a simple question, I know, but if the exercise program isn't doing it, what else makes the bone mass come back?

Re:How do you regain bone mass? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331269)

what else makes the bone mass come back?

A bikini! Hay-yo! Thank you, I'm here all week!

Bone loss calculation (3, Insightful)

TildeMan (472701) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331218)

He's been in space more than two full years (24 months). So at an average loss of 1.5% per month, he now would be expected to have less than (1-0.015)^24 = 69.577614% of his original bone mass. That's not insignificant. So how much has he actually lost, and how has he been beating this?

Re:Bone loss calculation (1)

everphilski (877346) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331328)

He wasnt up there 2 years straight. Back on earth the bone mass can regen because of the strain put on the bones. But yea supposedly he does better than most at retaining his bone mass.

-everphilski-

Tee hee... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331219)

bone loss...

wow (1)

jjshoe (410772) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331267)

There is hope for people who claim to be big boned!

/. Policy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13331274)

Expect this story to be re-posted every day as new 'news that matters' until he comes down...

The Far Side (1)

Fahrvergnuugen (700293) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331326)

> people lose around 1.5% of their bone mass per month

Reminds me of my favorite far side: The boneless chicken ranch [lechatnoirboutique.com]

OH NO! (1)

xmorg (718633) | more than 9 years ago | (#13331340)

Those Commies are beating us again! Drat! Get some astronauts up to mars NOW! Lets see them beat that! HA.
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