Beta

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Reintroduce Megafauna to North America?

samzenpus posted more than 8 years ago | from the lions-and-tigers-and-bears dept.

Science 855

sneakers563 writes "A team of scientists is proposing reintroducing large mammals such as elephants, lions, cheetahs and wild horses to North America to replace populations lost 13,000 years ago. The scientists say that parks could be set up as breeding sanctuaries for species of large wild animals under threat in Africa and Asia, and that such ecological history parks could be major tourist attractions. 'Africa and parts of Asia are now the only places where megafauna are relatively intact, and the loss of many of these species within this century seems likely,' the team said."

cancel ×

855 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Can anybody... (2, Insightful)

zegebbers (751020) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346745)

provide some information on how this may affect existing species?

I would have thought that they might lose some of their ability to handle the effects of megafauna...

Re:Can anybody... (1)

ccarson (562931) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346774)

provide some information on how this may affect existing species?


Exactly. How many human deaths will occur due toi maulings once this is implemented.

Re:Can anybody... (1)

wed128 (722152) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346791)

Enough deaths that we won't be eating soylent green in the next 100 years because of overpopulation

Re:Can anybody... (1, Insightful)

Cat_Byte (621676) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346853)

LOL yesterday I saw this article. Lions and People Killing Each Other in Tanzania [yahoo.com]

Funny how on yahoos news page it is 2 lines below the article reference for introducing them to North America. From the other article:
Lions have killed more than 560 Tanzanians since 1990, scientists announced today. The victims include children playing outside huts and people dragged from their beds

Re:Can anybody... (2, Insightful)

utopianfiat (774016) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346780)

Well, it'll start with their bringing diseases into the country that we weren't expecting, bugs under their skin, parasites in their stomachs, and then they'll reject our food and ultimately break out of the reservations and start attacking people.

Re:Can anybody... (1, Flamebait)

Bastard of Subhumani (827601) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346897)

Well, it'll start with their bringing diseases into the country that we weren't expecting, bugs under their skin, parasites in their stomachs, and then they'll reject our food and ultimately break out of the reservations and start attacking people.
But enough about islamic fundamentalists ...

Re:Can anybody... (3, Funny)

hplasm (576983) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346800)

provide some information on how this may affect existing species? I would have thought that they might lose some of their ability to handle the effects of megafauna..

The existing species haven't lost their ability to handle firearms, so megafauna have no chance.

I can :-) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346871)

provide some information on how this may affect existing species?

I know how this may affect one existing species:

"Until next time, enjoy our 'Wild MegafaunAmerica'!"

JEWS (-1)

Sexual Asspussy (453406) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346747)

how about reintroducing them to Nazi Germany

lolwhat? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346748)

lolwhat?

Can it even work? (0)

BlackCobra43 (596714) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346750)

Think of the logistics involved in maintaining a herd of elephants. Where are you going to put them?

Besides, species die out all the time regardless of human behaviour. Let's stop meddling with nature.

Re:Can it even work? (2, Insightful)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346868)

Lets not. Each species that dies out reduces the total amount of genetic material available. At some point in the next thousand years humanity may discover that the cure for some disease or genetic condition in another species' genome, and (being rather fond of the human race) I would rather that it kept hold of all of the available materials.

Evolution is great for wiping up species when conditions change. If conditions change back then the survivors may find that they are not very well adapted to the new conditions.

The Wilds (5, Informative)

rlp (11898) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346752)

The Wilds [thewilds.org] in Cumberland, OH has 10,000 acres with African, Asian, and North American animals.

Re:The Wilds (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346830)

That site is sooo broken in firefox. :( Too bad, it seems like a cool idea.

Re:The Wilds (3, Interesting)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346926)

Great Adventure in Jackson, New Jersey has a huge drive-through safari with all of these animals, as well. It's almost a right of passage around here to have an ostrich eat at the gasket around your car window.

Already been done (5, Funny)

Takehiko (20798) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346753)

Sounds like a zoo to me...

Re:Already been done (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346831)

It sounds more like a safari park to me.

Overlords (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346760)

I for one, welcome the new Lion overlords...

Help me out here (5, Insightful)

cimmer (809369) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346761)

This sounds great in theory, but where in the US are we going to put free roaming lions so they will be no danger to persistantly encroaching civilization?

Re:Help me out here (1)

Sammich (623527) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346779)

The answer is a zoo. Otherwise they will end up like some of the man eating tigers that plague villages in India.

Re:Help me out here (5, Funny)

hivebrain (846240) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346796)

My vote is for Crawford, Texas.

Re:Help me out here (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346843)

That would be funny as hell to see them attack those protestors.

Re:Help me out here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346856)

Let's start with Texas, Colorado, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Montana, etc.

There are a ton of states in the US that have plenty of open space.

Re:Help me out here (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346864)

Well I don't know about the lions, but you could ride an elephant to work. Just add some cup-holders and you have a nice SUE (Sport Utility Elephant).

Re:Help me out here (1)

It doesn't come easy (695416) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346899)

You mean where they will be in no danger from persistantly encroaching civilization...

Re:Help me out here (0, Troll)

ds_job (896062) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346908)

They'd have to introduce civilisation to North America first...

Re:Help me out here (5, Funny)

SB5 (165464) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346909)

I would say Los Angeles or Washington D.C.

Both are very far from any known civilisation.

Must....resist.... (0, Troll)

GillBates0 (664202) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346762)

I, for one, welcome our new megafaunic overlords.

I wonder which of these is most likely? (5, Funny)

Alranor (472986) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346763)

parks could be set up as breeding sanctuaries

vs

It's coming right for us! Quick Ned, shoot it

New kind of stray animals? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346767)

I can see it now. A kid living in a ranch coming home from school might say, "Mom, this elephant followed me from the bus stop. Can we keep him?"

Or worse, large African felines would make for pretty demanding neighborhood cats if they're not fed what they want and on schedule!

Forget guard dogs... (1, Funny)

BlackCobra43 (596714) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346801)

No one is going to try to steal stuff from your house if it's protected by a guard panther.

Not quite... (1)

KitesWorld (901626) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346850)

They'll bait and steal the panther to sell it to some collector somewhere. *THEN* they'll steal the rest of your stuff. :/

Really (3, Insightful)

SLASHAttitude (569660) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346771)

Do they not think that they would affect what is currently inhabiting those parks? I see that this can be a real problem. Not to mention the law suits that might come if some kids tries to feed a lion and winds up being a meal.

Great... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346773)

Millions of people are starving to death in Africa, and millions more have HIV and will soon die because they can't get effective drugs because of US imposed "intellectual property" laws.

Buy, hey, let's all feel good about ourselves as we save the cuddly animals.

Re:Great... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346826)

Millions of people are starving to death in Africa, and millions more have HIV and will soon die because they can't get effective drugs because of US imposed "intellectual property" laws.


Are these people US citizens? Do they pay taxes in the US? Didn't think so. Not my concern.

Buy, hey, let's all feel good about ourselves as we save the cuddly animals.


And encourage biodiversity? Sure.. as long as it is a benefit to the US.

You may now go back to screwing yourself.

Re:Great... (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346865)

If the elephants and lions and wild horses are smart enough to stop fucking the members of the herd that are obviously diseased and dying, then I say more goddamned power to them, welcome to the country, here's a slab of ribs to gnaw on.

And it's not "US imposed intellectual property laws" that are keeping those people from effective drugs, it's the fact that there AREN'T any effective drugs. HIV/AIDS will end when the people who have it finally STOP FUCKING HEALTHY PEOPLE and all die. Easy, quick, and morally unambiguous, ain't it? Then we can go back to spending money on diseases that people just randomly wake up with, as opposed to ones that we know exactly how the fuck to AVOID getting.

I don't think so... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346775)

Uhhhhhh.... No!

Enough! (2, Insightful)

garcia (6573) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346776)

Reintroducing the modern relatives of the Late Pleistocene losers to North America could spark fresh interest in conservation, contribute to biodiversity and begin to put right some of the wrongs caused by human activities.

Those animals are dwindling in numbers for a reason and should remain as such. Believe it or not that's the nature of the Earth. Superior animals control populations of other animals and sometimes entire populations die creating chain reactions.

I am thrilled that we have advanced enough scientifically to help with animal populations but I really think that we should just let it go and let the Earth work the way it has for billions of years.

Shit happens -- let's work with the way the world works rather than trying to recreate how it was all the time.

Re:Enough! (0)

cbelle13013 (812401) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346837)

Amen!

Re:Enough! (-1)

Jackdaw Rookery (696327) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346870)

Shouldn't "Superior animals" help others?

If we don't, what is your definition of superior animals?

One species that can watch another dwindle and die without taking action? Personally, I don't think that's particularly superior.

As "Superior animals" I think humanity has a duty to protect other species.

Re:Enough! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346881)

No, in general, the superior animals eat the other animals. It's only the human being that would try to save another species.

Re:Enough! (1, Insightful)

garcia (6573) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346895)

Shouldn't "Superior animals" help others?

My intended definition of "superior" was for hunting, killing, and consuming (in whatever manner) of other animals.

One species that can watch another dwindle and die without taking action? Personally, I don't think that's particularly superior.

You don't think it's morally superior. There's a difference you know.

As "Superior animals" I think humanity has a duty to protect other species.

I think we have a duty to protect only ourselves (as we were intended to do) and that *may* include protecting other species that we depend on for our survival. Introducing large animals from Africa to North America for tourism isn't something that is needed for our survival.

Re:Enough! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346905)

Superior animals control populations

Truly superior animals understand the value of diversity and can see beyond their own lifespan.

let's work with the way the world works

How's that going, anyway?

rather than trying to recreate how it was

I don't think that's what they have in mind.

Re:Enough! (2, Insightful)

gravteck (787609) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346931)

I read the article yesterday. IIRC, one of the arguments for transplanting the animals is the lack of control some Asian and African governments have in controlling poachers and other encroachers of habitat. I understand the Darwinian argument, but I just have a hard time believing that poachers killing needlessly to produce fur and ivory products is what Darwin had in mind regarding "survival of the fittest." I would like to believe that necessity dictated by nature, not people's aestethic "wants", is what drives Darwinism.

Bring 'em on (1)

parasonic (699907) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346778)

Elephants, cheetahs, and horses, oh my!

What?! (5, Funny)

Shky (703024) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346781)

Has nobody seen Jurassic Park?!

Yes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346783)

Now we can all hunt something other than nerd.

Excellent.

Dumb idea (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346784)

More proof that being "educated" means squat.

Let us not forget all of the other misguided attempts at relocation. (Rabbits and cane toads in oz, anyone?)

Lets not forget how far south the North American winter pushes - sure, I can totally see a lion in Nebraska... with 50mph north winds and horizontally falling snow.

A Little Late (5, Interesting)

MooseByte (751829) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346785)

So 13,000 years after relatives of these megafauna disappeared from North America, they want to import their cousins?

Seems the continent has had 13,000 years for it's ecosystems to adapt to the current state of things, why screw it up with sudden introduction of species that weren't actually here in the first place? And if so why stop there? I'm sure Velociraptors wandered Texas long ago.

Now if they wanted to bring back to vast herds of buffalo, sure.

Re:A Little Late (1, Insightful)

dave420 (699308) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346817)

They were Bison, actually ;) Buffalo were never in north america.

Re:A Little Late (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346858)

would there be space for vast herds of buffalo?

would there be really space for these megafauna? sure they would probably make a quite intresting nature park but that's pretty much it...

First Elephants and then Dinosaurs! (0)

ZP-Blight (827688) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346786)

Think of the children!

If only... (2, Insightful)

Wicked187 (529065) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346788)

we had facilities where we could breed and look over endangered species here in North America.

Zoo (1)

ranton (36917) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346789)

Am I missing something, or does this sound alot like a zoo? Or are we actually trying to breed these animals in this country to stop their possible extinction?

I dont really see the point in doing this if it means taking them to a biome where they are not native. I am all for the protection of species, but not introducing them into environments they werent built for.

Re:Zoo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346863)

I believe the idea here is that since some of these animals existed on this continent 13,000 years ago, they are in fact "built" for this area.

Futurama (1)

kevin_conaway (585204) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346792)

Hmm. 198 billion babies in a few weeks. We'll need an army of super-virile men scoring 'round the clock! I'll do my part. Kif, clear my schedule.

How about have them privately owned (1)

hsmith (818216) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346793)

Re:How about have them privately owned (1)

Bob3141592 (225638) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346883)

1) Import endangered animals to North American parks.
2) Wait for the public to becme bored with the idea.
3) Sell hunting licenses and safari junkets.
4) Profit!!!

Tigers, oh my! (1)

bytor4232 (304582) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346797)

The only concern that I would have with this is in the future, will the fences be removed? I could only immagine some poor farmer in nebraska being stalked and eaten by a tiger.

Still, it would be cool to go RVing to a park in this country and see live elephants. Maby even make a "fan-documentary" of roaming herds of elephants.

Re:Tigers, oh my! (1)

Bob3141592 (225638) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346912)

The only concern that I would have with this is in the future, will the fences be removed? I could only immagine some poor farmer in nebraska being stalked and eaten by a tiger. Fences? What fences?

Re:Tigers, oh my! (1)

Detritus (11846) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346917)

I'd like to see an electric fence that would stop an elephant.

Mountain lions are already snacking on hikers. Although, to be fair, you are much more likely to be killed by your neighbor's dog.

Old news, really (2, Informative)

Creosote (33182) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346799)

Paul Martin [usgs.gov] of the University of Arizona, whose name has been synonymous with Pleistocene megafauna for decades (he first advanced the "Pleistocene overkill" theory of their extinction), was in the news several years ago for suggesting something like this. For example, see this talk [amnh.org] at the American Museum of Natural History from 1998.

I'd Google for more references, but I have a plane to catch...

That's... (1)

jar240 (760653) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346805)

...great news! I'm going to go and clean my rifles! [Please don't tell Noah]

Chris

Climate (2, Informative)

Webs 101 (798265) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346806)

Ignoring the pros and cons of conservation and the potential animal-human interactions, lions may not be suited to the cold North American winters that dominate on the plains.

Elephants may be able to handle it through sheer size, but lions have no adaptations for cold. Nor do cheetahs.

Zoos and free-animal parks provide shelter that wild animals wouldn't have.

Global warming (1)

benhocking (724439) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346877)

Haven't you been paying attention [climatehotmap.org] ? ;)

'Ecological History' Park? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346811)

What makes these different from Safari Parks?

It's a nice idea and all, and I support it, but it isn't as if it is an amazing idea.

In related news... (-1, Troll)

A beautiful mind (821714) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346813)

Republicans point to the plan already in progress, as a rare and not so smart chimpanzee is already taken care of by a team of adviso^Wexperts in Washington D.C.

Re:In related news... (-1, Troll)

A beautiful mind (821714) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346886)

Oh some rednecks lost their sense of humour?

Reminds me next time that you can joke about everything except republicans, in the name of fairness and avoiding hypocrisy.

I say "Go for it!"... (3, Interesting)

interactive_civilian (205158) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346815)

but on one condition: No animals are allowed to be killed with anything except bare hands, even if they harm humans.

Then we can just let Darwin take care of the rest.

Because, you know, some people out there actually think this might be a good idea.

Why is this a good thing? (1)

ifwm (687373) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346823)

Why is introducing biodiversity where it doesn't exist (and hasn't for generations) a good idea? Apart from the feel good part of the plan, the very real dangers involved as well as the cost make this seem like a waste of time.

Great idea, completely impractical, and potentially irresponsible.

Perhaps there was a reason they all died (2, Insightful)

MooseTick (895855) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346825)

If they all died out 13000 years ago it can't exactly be blamed on modern man. Even men of 13000 years ago wouldn't have been likely to systematically kill several species. There weren't that many people and they were still roaming around in small groups.

I like elephants, lions, ligers, and tions as much as the next guy. Nonetheless, I'd rather have a nuclear plant near me then a wild animal preserve. I'd definately be a lot safer! I've heard some of those creatures can even do magic.

Re:Perhaps there was a reason they all died (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346874)

Actually, the disappearance of the megafauna from the Americas coincides with the arrival of humans in the Americas. I'm not sayin'... but I'm sayin'.

CNN's AP story (5, Funny)

Webs 101 (798265) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346833)

Yahoo has the reuters wire story; CNNN has AP's:

http://www.cnn.com/2005/TECH/science/08/17/wild.am erica.ap/index.html [cnn.com]

The AP story ends with this memorable quote:

Donlan concedes that lions would be a tough sell to Americans.

"Lions eat people," he said. "There has to be a pretty serious attitude shift on how you view predators."

Re:CNN's AP story (4, Funny)

grasshoppa (657393) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346898)

"Lions eat people," he said. "There has to be a pretty serious attitude shift on how you view predators."

That, my friend, is what I call a selling point.

I'm picturing a service, we'll call it Rent-A-Lion, where in you hire the services of a lion for the afternoon. Now, say you have a boss who's a prick or you just know an asshole who needs a good eatin', you just park this lion in their house and wait.

Brilliant I tell you. As an added bonus, there's always the possibility that the lion would eat the evidence.

Beast in the Garden (2)

G4from128k (686170) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346834)

Before adding to the North American wildlife, they might want to read Best in the Garden [beastinthegarden.com] . Sure, they might try to contain these creatures in parks, but they will escape and learn to live with (or on) humans.

What about wolves, bison, eagles? (5, Interesting)

caffiend666 (598633) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346838)

We have enough problems keeping the native species alive. Yes, it's important to save these animals, but should we be putting more effort into saving the animals than we put into bringing animals here from half a world away? I'd be more interested in seeing them hunting free/tamper free zones for native animals.

Don't they know??? (1)

ivanjs (801614) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346854)

Don't they know the next big ice age [geekronomicon.com] is just around the corner and they'll all just freeze to death??? Geez! ;)

"Yeah, but... (1)

McBainLives (683602) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346855)

...the Pirates of the Carribean don't eat the tourists." Hasn't this debate already been played out? Besides- the critters they're planning to "reintroduce" haven't really been here before. Sure, we used to have mammoths, wooly rhinos, and sabre-toothed cats in North America, but you can hardly call modern elephants, etc. the same thing. Why would anyone expect a different creature to adapt to the physical (and meteorological) environments that exist here today? Leave them where they are, and tell USAID to sponsor a higher bounty on the poachers than the poachers get for the threatened animals. The invisible hand will do the rest...

Nope. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346860)

This is a horrible idea. These non-indigenous megafauna will compete with our own native megafauna , and could have the same deletorious effect we see in so many other ecosystems. Our big guys may be down, but they're not out yet. Mike Moore deserves this last chance, people. Let's not bring in a bunch of elephants to make it even harder on him.

Worse than wolves (1)

FridayBob (619244) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346861)

Cattle ranchers in the western United States were already not very happy with the re-introduction of wolves to certain areas, so I don't think they'll be giving this idea a very warm welcome. And what about elephants? They eat a lot and they're so big that they pretty much go where they want. The farmers will be worried about that.

Forthermore, nobody really knows why the North American megafauna disappeared. Scientists used to think that the woolly mammoth went extinct because of human encroachment, but later studies indicated that it probably had more to do with climate change. Could that also be the case for their North American counterparts? There weren't many people around back then and eradicating all lions and elephants from the continent would seem like a pretty tall order.

To Hell With The Animals (1)

Cylix (55374) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346862)

I want my condos, strip malls, golf courses, air strips and every other fricken huge structure out there. I want it all and I want it in my back yard.

I haven't got any room left for a flock/herd of animals that were kicked off the continent 13000 years ago.

Tackles another problem... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346866)

...rising obesity in the North American population.
Imagine being chased by leopards on your commute.

Not a team of scientists... (-1, Troll)

RhettLivingston (544140) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346867)

Ted Turner is proposing this through a team of paid minions. It is very typical of his radical ideas that would coop people up in anthills (cities) and return the west to the animals (apparently, we don't count as such).

Put the Megafauna in the Buffalo Commons? (2, Interesting)

PaleoTek (174518) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346872)

The Buffalo Commons is a proposal by Karl Popper and others to reintroduce buffalo on a large scale in a belt of counties that are depopulating from Texas to Montana/North Dakota. There are hundreds of counties here where 50% of income is either farm subsidies or social security.

They, for one, might welcome the new megafauna theme park overlords.

Wolves (1)

PWatson (898578) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346873)

OK, so according to one place in the article, they are proposing that these animals are placed in a wildlife preserve-like setting. However, in another, it talks about free-roaming cheetahs becoming an ecotourism alternative for ranchers. Many ranchers, and a significant portion of the general population, have put up a big fight against reintroducing wolves into their native habitat in North America. If they can't get people to agree to let overgrown dogs (over-simplification) roam around, how in the world do they think they'll get people to accept lions and cheetahs?

Extinction (2, Insightful)

Jaeger (2722) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346879)

So what you're telling me is that major extinctions happen without human intervention? Who knew? (Just don't tell the endangered species people.)

Introduce them to Texas (0)

cwebb1977 (650175) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346882)

everything's bigger in Texas... we could have Gigafauna there!

Roadkill (1)

greenjello4 (821632) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346884)

I wonder what the big dent on my hood from a deer would look like if it was from a lion or giraffe or elephant?

No no no! (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346890)

Not those species lost only 13,000 years ago, let's go back a million or two! Let's get some dinosaur DNA from fossils, stick it into frog eggs, grow some dino-clones and then set them loose in north america!

I just thought of this idea in the spur of the moment...but it seems strangely familiar somehow...

Uhhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346892)

Sounds like a thoroughly thought out plan.

Oh wait, what do the lions and elephants do during North American winters?

Seems okay but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346896)

Won't this end up with legions of folks screaming
"Dingoes ate me baby"
Or lions or whatever. Sure they could release them all in Nebraska but there is a reason people won't live there I suspect a lion is plenty smart enough to head to Kansas City.

Uhhh... RE-introduce? (0)

grikdog (697841) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346900)

The woods is chock full of lunatics who keep their personal visions of the veldt alive in rural Murka. Sometimes in the urbs, or even suburbs, not to mention municipally sanctioned zoological gardens which preserve the DNA, but not the survival skills, of endangered species. The idea of transplanting elephants onto turf God made for bison (yeah, yeah, I know... that's "intelligent design" for ya) is just species imperialism. If you ask me, somebody just wants to play safari with their 8 ga. shotguns.

Obligatory Family Guy Quote (1, Funny)

everphilski (877346) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346901)

"Fox is running one of those new reality shows at 8:00... Fast animals, slow children"

-everphilski-

Bad idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346902)

This just sounds like a bad idea. We already have problems with non-native species. Asian Longhorn Beetles (I guess that they should now be called Asian Vista Beetles) were a huge problem a few years ago because they have no natural predators here. Imagine the problems with mega-fauna chomping away and reproducing with no predators to keep their numbers in check.

From the CNN article (1)

EddieBurkett (614927) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346907)

Other living species that are counterparts to Pleistocene-era animals in North America include wild horses and asses...
If they want asses on the Great Plains, they don't have to import them from Africa. I know of a few native to the continent that I wouldn't mind sending over...

sweet (1)

Lord Ender (156273) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346914)

I, for one, welcome our North American Lion overlords.

On second thought, how is this restoring anything? Did lions ever live in North America? I thought the coolest animal we ever had was the giant sloth.

Jeesus - just get a passport, (0)

goldcd (587052) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346919)

get on a plane, and go and see the stuff where it's supposed to be.
The locals will welcome you with open arms, and shower you with their praises for your enlightened foreign policy that enhances their lives..
On second thoughts, you're probably right and'll be safer with a Lion in your back garden.

Just what we need (1)

Electric Eye (5518) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346922)

More white trash overcrowding another national park. If these parks are created, then either make them off limits to humans or keep attendance restricted to a few thousands visitors per year. Ever se the miles of traffic and horrible air pollution caused at nat'l parks across the US in the summer?

Here's a better idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13346924)

Instead of taking the animals out of their natural habitat and watching them die here in the US, the US should invest money in Africa to set up zoos like this over there, and increase the popularity of Africa as a tourist destination.

Megafauna might mean mega-problems (2, Informative)

ACK!! (10229) | more than 8 years ago | (#13346929)

Ok, there are studies that show the impact of introduced wolf packs are having a positive impact on some areas in Canada.

On the other hand, it seems like every time we introduce a non-native bit of flora and fauna to the North American landscape we end up with those jumping fish in the Mississippi river or kudzu all over everything in the South or ..... (you get the picture)

Outside of a very restricted park environment I can see a serious potential for tragedy here.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?
or Connect with...

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>