Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Your Homework is Play Video Games

CmdrTaco posted more than 9 years ago | from the i'd-still-probably-get-a-d+ dept.

Education 331

GuitarNeophyte writes "Four schools in the UK will be testing a new program idea to use video games for educational use. An IT researcher, along with Electronic Arts (the software game giant) are funding the proposition. 'We're looking at developing some of the softer skills that are needed for the 21st century, such as problem-solving, resilience, persistence and collaboration.' "

cancel ×

331 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Ew... (5, Funny)

ZakuSage (874456) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347079)

They have to play EA games? Wow, I feel sorry for them.

Re:Ew... (2, Funny)

ucahg (898110) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347138)

Hey, at least the summary was kind enough to clarify that he meant Electronic Arts the game giant, and not Electronic Arts the chimney sweep.

Re:Ew... (2, Funny)

southpolesammy (150094) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347213)

"No Johnny, you can't go outside and play. You've only put in 10 hours of homework today, and you haven't made your weekly quota of 110 hours yet."

"But Mom, it's Sunday!"

"Do you want to let us down? Now go back and don't come out until you've put in another 5 hours, and maybe we'll let you watch TV for a couple minutes before bedtime."

Re:Ew... (0, Redundant)

xtracto (837672) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347255)

And note that they are not any games thy are EA games... indeed poor kids... they will get into the 28 hour/days :)

Re:Ew... (5, Funny)

FidelCatsro (861135) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347240)

Playing EA games they will learn important business skills , such as :

1:) milking a franchise for all its worth

2:)Maximising your profits by removing such silliness as overtime wages and workers rights

3:) how to count (One sequel , two sequels ....... fifteen sequels )

4:) how to rush things to market to upstage your opposition

5:) how to cover up #4 with marketing

Re:Ew... (2, Funny)

Gleng (537516) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347415)

At least they'll learn how to Challenge Everything.

I suppose that's possible (3, Funny)

Alcimedes (398213) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347081)

IIRC, Doom had a lot of very graphic anatomy lessons built in.

Re:I suppose that's possible (1, Redundant)

deadmantyping (827232) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347193)

yeah and they could use GTA:SA as sex education

Re:I suppose that's possible (4, Funny)

Shads (4567) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347288)

Look at the bright side, parents and kids can agree on what makes them go on suicidal rampages-- homework. :P

I beleive this to be the future of education (2, Insightful)

BlackCobra43 (596714) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347082)

IMO, it is vital to make homework not feel like homework in order to get children interested in their schooling again and combat their growing apathy.

Re:I beleive this to be the future of education (5, Insightful)

ryanov (193048) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347119)

I don't really get it though. My parents told me "listen, quit the fucking apathy and do your homework." If I didn't, I was sorry (no, they didn't beat me up, but they punished me, y'know... like parents). I'm not really sure why grade school kids get to decide whether they wanna do work or not these days.

Re:I beleive this to be the future of education (5, Insightful)

mrRay720 (874710) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347223)

How very true.

But then since you can seemingly get branded a child-hating monster of a bad parent nowadays by even looking at your child in a disaproving manner while they rape and old woman... this isn't really surprising.

Children nowadays are given more and more freedom and less and less resonsponsibilites. You can get away with pretty much anything short of murder if you're under 16. What are parents getting in return in order to combat this? Well they're told that it's not their responsibility, and this is reinforced over and over. For those that realise that this is completely stupid and dare actually try and rase their child sensibly, they're attacked for doing so.

Homework is just a tiny fraction of the overall problem here.

Re:I beleive this to be the future of education (4, Insightful)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347272)

The idea here is to make homework more engaging. Even though the term "video game" is being bandied about, what they're really talking about is "computer simulation." This technology will make it easier to introduce the concept of *case studies* to kids at an earlier age. As anyone who went to college knows, the best way to learn something is by doing case studies.

When I was in grade school and high school, we just did pages full of math problems, with no real explanation of what use they are. While I still think that is necessary just to build up practice, I would have appreciated going to the next level and learning how some of those concepts actually applied to real life. As a result, there is a lot of stuff I learned in algebra and trig that I have simply forgotten over the years because I never had a chance to apply it to a real life situation, albeit a simulated one.

Re:I beleive this to be the future of education (1)

LDoggg_ (659725) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347397)

I think its fine but only if it used in addition to written homework.
 
As far a real world application, isn't that what the word problems are for?

Re:I beleive this to be the future of education (2, Interesting)

gr8_phk (621180) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347185)

"IMO, it is vital to make homework not feel like homework in order to get children interested"

Sure, but rather than have them PLAY video games, have the MAKE video games. Yes, you can start that in elementary school - I did, and so did every other kid lucky enough to have a computer prior to 1980 - the masses were getting ATARI though. Besides, you don't need to pay EA to make games: Python and PyGame - now get started.

Re:I beleive this to be the future of education (5, Insightful)

hungrygrue (872970) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347216)

Ummm no. If it is necessary to keep the brats entertained at all times and constantly stimulated in order to get their attention, then there is a serious problem. The correct response is to not allow them to have their toys and games at all if they can't be bothered to come out of their fantasy world and do some work.

Pandering to them and trying to keep them interested because they have the attention spans of fruit flies will only make the problem worse. It is the kids that need to change, not the entire world in which they live. If little Johnny can't be bothered to do his Math homework because it's not as fun as playing Quake, then little Johny should get teh $#!+ beat out of him until he decides that maybe he SHOULD do his work. His math teacher should not have to wear a clown nose, dance a jig, and assign video games for homework just to keep him awake.

Re:I beleive this to be the future of education (3, Insightful)

BlackCobra43 (596714) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347238)

I find that children respond better to positive reinforcement and supportive counselling than savage beatings. What is this, 1920?

YMMV..

Re:I beleive this to be the future of education (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13347283)

Children, until trained to act and communicate like a grown human, are simply small, human-looking animals. Pain is the most effective and simple way to let someone know "hey, you fucked up!"

Re:I beleive this to be the future of education (2, Insightful)

Washizu (220337) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347291)

"I find that children respond better to positive reinforcement and supportive counselling than savage beatings."

Especially when savage beatings are the next step when positive reinforcement fails.

They were doing something right back then. (3, Insightful)

CyricZ (887944) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347375)

People coming out of the 1920's education system were far smarter than what the system is producing now. They could actually read, write, and perform mathematics. Imagine that! Today you'll find many university-level students who struggle with such basic tasks.

The strict discipline of the early 20th century gave children only one choice: to learn! And so they did.

Re:I beleive this to be the future of education (1)

Andrewkov (140579) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347378)

I find that children respond better to positive reinforcement and supportive counselling than savage beatings.

But which gives the teacher more job satisfaction?

Re:I beleive this to be the future of education (1)

mnemonic_ (164550) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347405)

ellipsis with only two full stops
lol errors

Re:I beleive this to be the future of education (2, Funny)

tourvil (103765) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347267)

IMO, it is vital to make homework not feel like homework in order to get children interested in their schooling again and combat their growing apathy.

You know, I'd love to help eliminate the growing apathy problem, but... meh...

Re:I beleive this to be the future of education (1)

cavemanf16 (303184) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347276)

IMO, these magical "soft skills" are learned by interacting with one's classmates on a daily basis, not combating child apathy. Child apathy is due to the morons teaching them poorly, and overcrowding problems in schools - not their lack of entertainment in school. I enjoyed learning like many of my classmates the smaller the class was because we interacted with the teachers more, not because the teachers were necessarily "entertaining."

Re:I beleive this to be the future of education (2, Insightful)

Shotgun (30919) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347421)

IMO, it is vital to make homework not feel like homework in order to get children interested in their schooling again and combat their growing apathy.

Bullocks. How will you make the hamburger-flipping jobs they get after graduation not feel like hamburger-flipping? Will EA create a hamburger-flipping game to make minimum wage exciting. This is nothing but a total abdication of responsibility by the teacher organizations.

People need to get it through their thick skulls that success depends not on what happens to a person, but how they react to it. Apathy doesn't come from the homework being boring. It comes from the lack of a connection between the work and the real world. Teaching is the art/science of helping students make that connection, and then standing back while the student does the rest. Once the children discover that the games are pointless, the apathy will be just as deep. Except now we'll be further along the path of convincing ourselves that it is the world, not ourselves, that is screwed up, and that everything would be more exciting if we could just change the color of the virtual armor to make life not feel like work.

How 'bout teaching the three "R"s? (3, Funny)

mmell (832646) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347089)

You know - Readin', Ritin', and 'Rithmatic? After all, it worked for decades here in the USA!

How 'bout teaching the three outcomes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13347161)

"You know - Readin', Ritin', and 'Rithmatic? After all, it worked for decades here in the USA!"

Yeah! And look at how well we turned out.

Re:How 'bout teaching the three outcomes? (1)

JLEGERE (321312) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347343)

'Readin, 'Writin, 'Rithmatic...

You forgot 'Ritalin...

Re:How 'bout teaching the three "R"s? (1)

Bimo_Dude (178966) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347201)

Yep... and now we have 'Raq.

Re:How 'bout teaching the three "R"s? (1)

FidelCatsro (861135) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347310)

Which is apt because the three R's should really be W.A.R (well RWA) .

Re:How 'bout teaching the three "R"s? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13347239)

No wonder US americans can't spell!

Calling Captain Obvious (5, Insightful)

WormholeFiend (674934) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347093)

If it's work, it won't bring the same satisfaction as playing a game for pleasure.

Re:Calling Captain Obvious (3, Insightful)

bedroll (806612) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347279)

Exactly.

As an example I'll use my nephew. When he was 5 years old my brother-in-law bought a new computer, after two years of me pleading that he accept that his Packard Bell Pentium 133 wasn't up to playing 99% of available video games. When he did this we almost immediately bought my nephew several K-3 educational video games. At first he really liked them and was excited to play them, until someone gave him their old playstation. Now you can't pull him away from your standard lot of sports and kids games. These games do little to teach more than hand-eye coordination. They are more fun, though, so he'll stick to them.

Ouija Board (5, Funny)

captnjameskirk (599714) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347096)

And in related news, the TEA are consulting Ouija Boards to determine the next Social Studies curriculum.

All your homework are belong to us. (5, Funny)

jwriney (16598) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347102)

Your Homework is Play Video Games

Apparently someone skipped their English homework.

--riney

MOD PARENT UP PLEASE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13347149)

Hes teh funnay

Re:All your homework are belong to us. (2, Informative)

strider44 (650833) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347207)

Not necessarily. The capitalisations of "Play Video Games" suggest that it is a title of a subject or field of homework, in which case the grammar is correct.

Re:All your homework are belong to us. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13347220)

<pedant>
"their" -> "his or her"
</pedant>

Re:All your homework are belong to us. (1)

Evro (18923) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347312)

Meh, just use "his" and be done with the politically correct crap. "His/her" and "(s)he" need to go away.

Hmm... (3, Funny)

Musteval (817324) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347103)

I wonder what their adult education games are like.

*moves to UK*

Re:Hmm... (2)

ryanov (193048) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347155)

We've already got Hot Coffee here. All they got over there's tea.

how about (1)

jest3r (458429) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347107)

Lemonade Stand ...

Re:how about (3, Insightful)

utopianfiat (774016) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347269)

Oregon Trail
Dino Park Tycoon
Odell Down Under

and the endless other games we played in school. How is this new?

Re:how about (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13347301)

That old game is pretty much the reason why I am now a programmer. It was pretty boring at first, but then someone showed me that we could modify how it worked, that you could change it's behaviour, that you could make it do what you wanted. I fell in love with programming right then!

So basically, I'm a programmer because of *almost* open source code.! :P

Thanks whoever made this and to my old school for buying that software! :P

There's a simple truth in all of this. (0, Redundant)

rob_squared (821479) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347110)

Some work just can't be fun. And playing games for one area will just detract from another (IMHO).

Re:There's a simple truth in all of this. (3, Interesting)

grasshoppa (657393) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347296)

Some work just can't be fun.

You are a product of the industrialized education system. So am I. We were taught that work wasn't fun, it was work. And it wasn't something we had a choice in, regardless.

My daughter *loves* school. She loves the work, and looking it over, so would I ( and would have, at her age. ).

When I was in 2nd grade, my math homework ( for example ) was a sheet of numbers and operators. She brings home these little booklets that have word problems, stories, with numbers. Both accomplish the same thing, but hers also teaches problem solving ( figuring out which numbers go where in the equation ) AND she enjoys it because it's a story.

I won't even get into the science. They do some awsome things with science now.

History, for some reason, they still teach like they did when I was in school. On this date, this happened. On this date, this happened. And then they test you on the dates. idiotic.

My overall point being, we were taught by our schools not to have fun while doing work. Now a days, teachers have better tools at their disposal, and kids are actually learning to have fun while working.

Now if we could only get the parents to show some interest in their child's education and get the ID people to drop it. A scary world where a teacher feels too threatened to teach science theory because of religous nuts.

It's a start (5, Insightful)

Nairoz (856164) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347111)

The way I see it, at least they're considering if this is a good idea, rather than going down the "games=bad" route. All of the skills they want to teach the kids, from the article, are present in games.

I'd be interested to see how this turns out, and if it's actually teacher-led "gaming", as it were, rather than "I'll sit here with a cup of tea catching up on my mountain of paperwork when you play these games and hopefully learn something".

At the very least, it's a start.

Games in school? Not MY child! (2, Insightful)

Knight Thrasher (766792) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347114)

Some parent, some where, is in a panic thinking the system is about to spring GTA on their kid.

It's been said before that parents don't care what kind of games their kids play [slashdot.org] but rather how much time they're spending playing them.

Make video games cool? (4, Funny)

burtdub (903121) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347116)

Does this mean the next generation will procrastinate by reading Socrates and performing Fourier Transforms?

Re:Make video games cool? (2, Funny)

dascandy (869781) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347249)

No, sorry, that was the previous one. The next one will use Bacardi Breezer 4nd 1337sp33k.

Drivers Ed (4, Interesting)

rlp (11898) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347121)

A lot of American schools have eliminated drivers ed. It would be useful for a driving simulator (not racing) that is designed to help new drivers with both normal driving (merging, heavy traffic, navigation) and emergency situations (accident avoidance, skids, bad weather, etc).

Re:Drivers Ed (1)

Eddy_D (557002) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347233)

How about GTA San Andreas? - Eddy_D

Re:Drivers Ed (2, Informative)

tont0r (868535) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347256)

id imagine a lot of schools have simulators. i went to a really ghetto highschool and we somehow managed to get some. it wasnt really a game though. it was a machine that played a movie (same one no matter one) and it would keep a log of if you did the right things or the wrong things.

Problem-solving (1)

daniil (775990) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347122)

FTA:'We're looking at developing some of the softer skills that are needed for the 21st century, such as problem-solving, resilience, persistence and collaboration.'

I don't get all the fuzz about problem-solving. What's so special about it? Why has it suddenly become so important? You can find it even in the synopses of some of the subjects taught in colleges: "helps improve problem-solving skills" or something similar. Except that, well, it's no use if you are a wicked awesome problem solver, but you cannot find the fucking problem as you have no experience with the thing in question.

That, of course, is just my totally uninformed opinion. Mod me flamebait if you wish.

Re:Problem-solving (1)

grasshoppa (657393) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347209)

Part of problem solving *is* defining the problem.

As you pointed out, what good is being able to solve a problem if you can't define it. You aren't the first to come up with this insight, and as such, these things are taught if the teacher is truly interested in teaching problem solving.

Re:Problem-solving (1)

Talrinys (888624) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347230)

I have to say that is the wisest thing i have heard for a long time. I'm a 14 year old from a danish private school, and when i hear about the stuff other schools are doing i am so glad that my parents put me here(even though they have crappy computers!) Problem-solving is a skill of course, a skill that gets developed by learning the origin of the problem and how to fix it, that's it, it really ain't a hell lot harder than that. Some schools here are doing things like letting kids do their assignments in school in 5 different ways, like you can go play a ball game and the teacher will show you how it realates to the laws of gravity. I don't see how that will work, seriously, you spend 5 times as much money that could well have went into improving the books and other educational resources. If you spend 10 years playing games instead of learning maths the proper way do you really think you will get it, or will you think of the game instead? I guess that is individual, but the traditional way has worked here for over 250 years so why not today? "We're looking at developing some of the softer skills that are needed for the 21st century, such as problem-solving, resilience, persistence and collaboration." That is just plain wrong, a kid that doesn't know how to collaborate or be persistent enough to solve a problem, shouldn't have extra resources spent on them, they need a friggin lesson where teachers tell them how the rest of their lives will be. You don't tell your boss that you don't want to collaborate, of that this problem takes too long so i will just go do something else instead. So why teach kids that that is ok and a common problem?

Re:Problem-solving (1)

dzfoo (772245) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347250)

>> "I don't get all the fuzz about problem-solving. What's so special about it? Why has it suddenly become so important?"

Perhaps it is because of the overwhelming lack of critical thinking and other cognitive skills in young adults nowadays. Apparently, someone thought that *barely* being capable of reading and/or writing was not enough to perform any real work.

But that could also be my totally uninformed opinion, too.

      -dZ.

Re:Problem-solving (2, Insightful)

shawn(at)fsu (447153) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347302)

Perhaps it is because of the overwhelming lack of critical thinking and other cognitive skills in young adults nowadays.
I wonder if every generation says this about the generation they produced. Meanwhile technology still progesses forward.

Boycott (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13347128)

I'm sending out an Immediate Action Memo to boycott all schools which use this EA-sponsored plan. Electronic Arts is bad news for everyone.

Local merchants must not sell to students, faculty, or staff of any EA-sponsored school. No employer may hire any graduate of any EA-sponsored school. No motor vehicle company may allow its products to drop children off at any EA-sponsored school.

With your help, parents, we can win this fight.

Great idea! (5, Funny)

October_30th (531777) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347133)

skills that are needed for the 21st century, such as problem-solving, resilience, persistence and collaboration.

Hey, what a great idea! We never needed those before, but NOW there's some serious demand for brand new skills like problem-solving.

Problem solving skills... (1)

Iriel (810009) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347137)

Like finding l337 phucking ways around $h|77y chat filters? I'm sure these kids will be giving presentations at Black Hat in no time ;) </drippingwithsarcasm>

How effective are these "educational" games? (3, Informative)

manavendra (688020) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347145)

There was talk early this year (or was it last year), about the game developed by WHO, to teach young kids in the developed countries, about the plight and standard of living of people in third world countries. However, it met with the same fate as the others that I heard of in the past... the launch of such a game is covered a lot by the media, but fizzles out with no updates posted about the effectivness.

On the other hand, how does one measure the effectiveness of such an initiative?

As for this trial, one has to wonder how much of a push is it from the gaming giant to lure more children into the gaming world?

Good game (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13347152)

Yeah, and let'em play GTA San Andreas, some say it's good for sexual education.

Together at last? (1)

deathwombat (848460) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347163)

Videogames as homework? Oh my god they've done the impossible!!!! *Head explodes*

Sounds like fun! (3, Insightful)

TildeMan (472701) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347164)

When I was little, I had all the computer games like Operation Neptune, Super Solvers Midnight Rescue, Where in Time is Carmen Sandiego, Number Munchers, and so on. Those were totally awesome. I'd play them again if I had them. When I was even younger (like maybe 4), I had an awesome baseball game where at each at-bat, you choose a level of difficulty and they give you an appropriate arithmetic problem. You get it right, you get a hit. You get it wrong, you're out. /No point to this post, just waxing nostalgic...

Math Blaster FPS! (2, Funny)

bobsacks (784382) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347166)

Too bad they didn't parter with ID to make a Math Blaster FPS. Or maybe an American McGee's Reader Rabbit.

Re:Math Blaster FPS! (1)

Musteval (817324) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347204)

Math blaster FPS, eh?

"Look! A square root! Use the rocket launcher!"

*BOOM*

"Yeah! You blasted that math!" ...

"Oh no! A math teacher! Use a boost to break through!" ...

"Do a barrel roll!"

Right. (2, Interesting)

dzfoo (772245) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347178)

'We're looking at developing some of the softer skills that are needed for the 21st century, such as problem-solving, resilience, persistence and collaboration.'

Right. Too bad they will be lacking in social skills and cultural values.

But then again, he did say "needed for the 21st century"...

-dZ.

Re:Right. (1)

xtracto (837672) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347293)

Bah! dont worry United States has been making its kids learn what they will need for this for some time now... just blow up things and kill "aliens" (in the broad sense of the word)... just a nice training.

Procreation? moral values? ethics? ha... who needs that? /rant

Re:Right. (1)

goldspider (445116) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347347)

Not to mention mathematics, reading comprehension, history, civics, science. Once upon a time, those were taught in schools.

Cue the "perennial dumbing down of America" posts (1)

RealityProphet (625675) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347179)

Oh, wait....

EA? (5, Funny)

grasshoppa (657393) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347182)

Top three reasons why I don't want EA involved in this

1) Homework will take 10 hours a night to complete, but "only during crunch time".

2) There are always other students willing to participate in the program if you don't want to

3) Students won't get extra credit, no matter HOW much homework they do

On a more serious note, I've been saying for YEARS that we need to focus on these so called "softer" skills. Current education is too hooked on what a child knows and how well they can memorize, not how able they are to figure things out. I realize that the subjects are supposed to be vehicles to teaching these "softer" skills, the problem is many teachers don't. They teach facts to be memorized ( especially at the higher levels ), not concepts to be thought about.

You say "Homework" and they'll whine (1)

TarryTops (888130) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347189)

Make learning interesting. Teahc them young to become great game developers. That's what you ought to do. Make them passionate about it not just experiment on them as guinea pigs!

From (1)

JustOK (667959) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347197)

from the 3 R's to the 4 buttons. How fundamentals have evolved

This is nothing new (1)

Samir Gupta (623651) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347208)

For schools, from a maintanance and TCO point of view, game consoles often prove to be financially more viable as a technology platform than PCs or Macs, very recently studies have shown, especially with the capabilities of the next generation.

Even using older game consoles such as N64 and even SNES/SFC enables schools, particularly in rural areas, to immediately gain the benefits of technology without the cost and maintainence expense associated with traditional PC platforms.

Nintendo have done a lot of research into uses of Nintendo consoles other than gaming, such as using it as a inexpensive terminal for Internet access, or more compellingly, education, and we have done preliminary work with various Chinese governmental bodies and NGOs to make games such as Super Marx Brothers and The Legend of Deng Xiaoping to teach Chinese youth in new and engaging dynamic ways.

We look forward to seeing the results of this experiment in China, and will likely expand to other developing countries if it goes well.

Re:This is nothing new (1)

PhoenixFlare (319467) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347436)

NGOs to make games such as Super Marx Brothers and The Legend of Deng Xiaoping to teach Chinese youth in new and engaging dynamic ways.

Haven't you gotten tired of this [google.com] yet, after 10 years? And I thought you were working for Sega [google.com] ?

Skills... (1)

Transcendent (204992) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347218)

We're looking at developing some of the softer skills that are needed for the 21st century, such as problem-solving, resilience, persistence and collaboration.

As well as shooting machine guns or plasma cannons while jumping 10ft in midair, jumping out of moving vehicles at 30mph to run into and fly a nearby helicopter, diffusing explosives with a pocket knife, commanding legions of foot soldiers while maintaining a productive economy, and of course... respawning.

This isn't exactly new..... (2, Informative)

8127972 (73495) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347219)

I know two games I'd take to do this (0)

Qbertino (265505) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347222)

'We're looking at developing some of the softer skills that are needed for the 21st century, such as problem-solving, resilience, persistence and collaboration.'

Tribes 2, CTF.
Mind Rover for programming skills.

What about human interaction? (1)

Antony-Kyre (807195) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347227)

Is this going to take time away from human interaction, i.e. class discussions, teachers lecturing?

Re:What about human interaction? (1)

dakkon1024 (691790) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347356)

>Is this going to take time away from human
>interaction, i.e. class discussions, teachers
>lecturing?

Come on now, even Logictec makes a headset for the Xbox

Headshots for soft skills... :P (5, Funny)

creimer (824291) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347228)

Problem-solving... Get into difficult-to-reach sniper spot.

Resilience... Survive long enough in difficult-to-reach sniper spot to make a difference.

Persistence... Inflict as many headshots as possible without missing.

Collaboration... Can someone get me some more sniper ammo?

Re:Headshots for soft skills... :P (1)

FidelCatsro (861135) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347341)

Co-operation ... voting to have you kicked off the server for camping

Easy homework (2, Insightful)

mynickwastaken (690966) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347237)

There will be some web sites filled up with cheats as well.

Today's Assignment: Hit 2 German bunkers and MATH! (1)

IcyNeko (891749) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347247)

Yay! I'd love to learn basic school skills while raiding Iraq, Germany, or Vietnam! Given that EA/Origin poopoo'd the Wing Commander projects, I'm sure the superior graphics and gameplay of UO will make total winners out of tomoorow's kids. Personally, I'd love to learn Calculus and Advanced Math by having the World of warcraft elves teach me. :D Hothothot!

Why Johnny Can't Deduce (1)

moviepig.com (745183) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347248)

We're looking at developing some of the softer skills that are needed for the 21st century, such as problem-solving, resilience, persistence and collaboration.

"Soft" skills? "21st century"? In which human-inhabited geologic era were such talents not a near-necessity?

The project may prove valuable, but its mission seems the more commonplace one of sweetening a learning curve ...this time with the known seductions of a joystick...

Ender's Game? (1)

edwardd (127355) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347259)

How long before educational games are networked & have psycological analysis built in?

WTF? (1)

ahhell (901552) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347284)

Geez and I always thought that TV rotten one's brain. I can't imagine what kind of zombies kids will be if they are "taught" by EA's shitty products. Yikes!! I think I would rather be on heavy doses of Ritalin than have to play Madden for hours on end. EA should rot in hell.

Bad Idea (1)

bizitch (546406) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347297)

Think of the boom in eyeglass salses - all those kids retina's trashed from video games AND homework.

Good for the kids. (1)

RamboIII (899894) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347325)

Little Johnny, you still haven't cleaned your room, or taken out the garbage! What's the deal??

Sorry mom, I'm doing my homework.

But you've been doing it for 6 hours now, it's almost time for bed.

Yeah yeah yeah ma, I gotta study for this test tomorrow. If I can't successfully beat the 4th level in 10 minutes, I have to repeat the 5th grade. You dodn't want THAT do ya?

Ack! I thought of this ages ago (1)

Anonymous Cowpat (788193) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347344)

I knew I should have gone down to the patent office instantly!

My idea was to hand out copies of Diablo to the kids (possibly over the summer) and then give them all copies of Jarulf's Guide and set question such as what the probability of finding a specific unique item in one complete single player game, from a unique monster is. Requiring maths skills and the ability to locate and use the information given in the guide

A Well Thought Out Reply (1)

mister_llah (891540) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347351)

by Mister "The Yellow Dart" Llah

Since maybe like the Middle Ages, there have been many differing opinions about hustle and bustle. This cannot be denied. It is my intention to sit down and play video games for several hours.

Games for Education (1)

Hroth1 (908517) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347365)

I've got the "Educational" version of SimCity here. The pack contains the DOS software (I didn't say it was recent), schemes of work and photocopiable assignment worksheets. Its all good stuff!

Most of the SIMxxx stuff was amenable to this approach, The value of the current trial would all depend on the games selected!

When I was a child.... (2, Insightful)

kinglink (195330) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347370)

We had many games that are "educational" the suprising thing though is these were well built games, and I believe the best ones came out of EGA (if I remember that company right) and EA. Carmen Sandiago anyone? I particularly liked the Super Solver series for their logic problems.

If EA is making games for children that'd be great, but Video games for homework only works when we deal with games for learning. Madden isn't going to teach anyone that much except hand and eye coordination and how not to get your QB completely sacked (then again I have yet to learn that).

All I hope is that they are as interesting and entertaining as the games in my youth, such as the typing games that had a car moving and the faster you typed the faster you went. Those games were entertaining to me, and kept my attention and taught me some spelling (though not that much) and typing.

Good--we need some teachers as admins (1)

writertype (541679) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347373)

"Johnny1337, that's a wallhack! You're to sit over in that corner, by the crates. Johnny, put that sniper rifle DOWN!" ...

"No, evilgrrl, that's spelled "dudes". There is no "z" in "dudes". How will you ever write for IGN if you can't spell correctly?" ...

Look, BillyBadAzz, I know the pirates came and stole your isk. You need to tell them that that's wrong, and not let them do that to you. And Billy... Billy, that's a BAD WORD in your name. You change that right now! /kick

I've been saying and doing this for YEARS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13347386)

...it doesn't work though...

Sorry I can't resist... (1)

Andrewkov (140579) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347395)

In Soviet Russia, your homework plays YOU!

Old is new again (3, Informative)

couch (83548) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347396)

This is nothing new, until the Windows platform completely wiped out the homegrown competition, we always had educational games in schools in the UK. Companies like Sherston [sherston.com] , 4Mation [4mation.co.uk] and others released loads of 'games' for schools. Googling about now, I've found a few of the old-skool education games still knocking aroung (for example Granny's Garden [rm.com] ), and some others that never seem to have made the jump from the 8 bit days (like Suburban Fox).

Some of the games that were created back in the 90s were very closely tied in with specific National Curiculum targets, and still manages to be quite fun to play - albeit made on quite a small budget, with the sort of money that EA has to throw at production, these new generation of education games could be really good.

GvR sounds like a good idea (2, Interesting)

pdamoc (771461) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347413)

http://gvr.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net] is an interesting concept to build upon.

the response (1)

justforaday (560408) | more than 9 years ago | (#13347435)

"But Mooooommmmmm...I don't want any hot coffee right now..."
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>