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Virtual Muggings in Lineage II

CmdrTaco posted more than 8 years ago | from the i-need-my-widgets-back dept.

The Courts 745

electro-donkey writes "A man has been arrested in Japan after on suspicion using a bot to beat up and rob characters in the online computer game Lineage II. The stolen virtual possessions were then exchanged for real cash, according to this report from NewScienist.com. "I regularly say that every form of theft and fraud in the real world will eventually be duplicated in cyberspace," says Bruce Schneier."

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745 comments

Where the fault lies... (5, Interesting)

bigwavejas (678602) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348657)

This sounds more like an issue with game design. The whole fact you're able to mug someone in-game makes this a non-crime. If the developers are worried about mugging then they should take the "looting other Player Characters (PC)" out of the game. It seems to me the only thing "wrong" this guy did was use a Bot (making his PC unbeatable). Show me where in the manual is says, "If you use a Bot you will be arrested." If they (Lineage II) don't want Bots in-game, then track down the offenders, ban their accounts and give the loot back to the rightful owners.

Re:Where the fault lies... (5, Insightful)

FortKnox (169099) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348672)

Wow... I come into this discussion and only 1 post is here, which is the parent. I agree on every point. If it is possible to become 'invincible' in the game, its not the fault of the person who used it, its the fault of the gaming company for allowing it to happen.

The game involves real money and looting, this should be expected and the players know the risk coming into the game. No crime, IMHO, was committed.

Re:Where the fault lies... (0, Troll)

Evil Adrian (253301) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348748)

So if a gun makes me unbeatable in the real world when I decide to mug someone at 3am, I guess it's Smith & Wesson's fault right?

Re:Where the fault lies... (5, Insightful)

hawkbug (94280) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348812)

No, now you're talking about the real world. Not a fake game. In a game, the programmers have complete control over how people interact with each other because they define the world in which they interact.

Re:Where the fault lies... (-1, Flamebait)

BlackCobra43 (596714) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348912)

Clearly then, GOD is at fault for the mugging-at-gunpoint.

And every other crime on the planet.

Re:Where the fault lies... (2, Funny)

Jeff DeMaagd (2015) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348918)

Not a fake game.

As opposed to a real game?

Re:Where the fault lies... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13348813)

Congratulations, you win the daily Slashdot award for "Worst Analogy"! What you're describing in no way relates to what happens in a digital (simulated) world where every action can be centrally controlled. Spewing crap like this just devalues anything else you might have to say about the issue.

Re:Where the fault lies... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13348839)

Nooo... Because that's the "Real World" and this is a "game." There is a difference...

Re:Where the fault lies... (2, Insightful)

niskel (805204) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348863)

In the real world, it is your fault and you should go to jail.

In a fantasy world, the law should not be held up on virtual 'muggings'. If it isn't meant to happen, the developers should never have included. In the virtual world, you are not doing anyone any harm. Non of their assets are real, none of their gold is real and if the devs want players to be able to steal from other players that's up to them.

The one issue with this situation in particular is the bot. In this case, the bot/user should simply be banned. I don't agree they should go to jail though because all they have done is interact with non-real items and non-real god. These items are part of a game, not reality.

Re:Where the fault lies... (1)

sammy baby (14909) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348919)

The issue isn't what gave you the ability to do something. The issue is jurisdictional.

If there's a rule in the game that says "you can't do this," then it should be coded in. Circumventing that code should be a violation of the license agreement, and your account should be terminated.

In real life, we have rules which are called "laws." Account suspension happens by moving your avatar to a special facility called a "jail." Occasionally (depending on the situation), your account may be terminated entirely, often by means of "lethal injection" or "the chair."

What the parent posts are addressing is that regardless of how you feel about the use of the bot, or selling the virtual goods for real money, it's not immediately obvious that any laws were broken here, which is why the police involvement seems sketchy.

Re:Where the fault lies... (5, Interesting)

Nuttles1 (578165) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348755)

I am assumming the poster is not a programmer. Programming is a complex task! I don't think online games will ever be hack proof. It is more like the real world, an arms race between the game programmers and the exploiters.

A simple solution to this mugging problem that I use is having LAN parties. I think they are more enjoyable because you know who your playing and you don't have to worry about hacking. Well, if someone hacks the game, then you can simply get up and beat his a@@.

Re:Where the fault lies... (3, Insightful)

FortKnox (169099) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348882)

I'm a J2EE developer, actually.

Nothing is hack proof, but my main point is that when you play a game that requires you to use real money to buy things and you know it is possible to get mugged, then you are accepting the risk that someone will steal everything from you.

The developers, on the other hand, should be working dilligently to prevent the ability of bots to happen. They should have watchdog algorithms that detect bot activity.

What the solution should be is that the developers should ban the guy with the bot, return all the items to their old owners and fix the issue. Instead, they call the cops and claim its a crime.

Re:Where the fault lies... (1)

MindStalker (22827) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348704)

While theft charge is kinda silly, one could make arguments for fraud charges as he did break rules in order to obtain other peoples stuff.

Re:Where the fault lies... (2, Insightful)

EasyComputer (797633) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348709)

Hmm...If your could figure out how to fabricate the items that are so valuable, it could be a lot more profitable, than having bots running around stealing, just make 20 swords of death or whatever, and sell em. Wow, I'm gonna get to work, I'll be rich!!

Re:Where the fault lies... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13348712)

You hear that God?! If we're not supposed to kill each other, you should have made us immortal or something. Since you didn't, I'm going to go out now and mug a few people and kill a few others since it's obvious it's "OK" to do it!

Re:Where the fault lies... (1)

digitallife (805599) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348753)

You're assuming there is a god.

Re:Where the fault lies... (0, Troll)

beanlover (710167) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348833)

His point is correct either way. Even more so if there isn't a God. No designer=anything goes morality-wise.

-1: Disillusional (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13348756)

I'm going to go out now and mug a few people and kill a few others since it's obvious it's "OK" to do it!

You consider the life of a virtual character equivalent to that of an actual person? How misguided.

Re:-1: Disillusional (1)

revery (456516) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348889)

You consider the life of a virtual character equivalent to that of an actual person? How misguided.

Define actual.

Re:Where the fault lies... (5, Funny)

Minwee (522556) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348854)

If you look through the archives you'll find a list of bannable offenses in one of the early patch messages. "Thou shalt not kill", "Thou shalt not steal" and... um... something like "Thou shalt not covet they neighbour's ass" are all in there. Mess with that and you're in danger of having your account suspended.

The dev team is really too busy to go around policing every player so there are teams of volunteer guides who wear blue robes and hats to take care of that kind of thing. They don't have GM powers but the online community generally supports them in what they do.

Getting back to the original story, I was not aware that "Using an automated system to play an online game" was a criminal offense in Japan. If it is then this guy got what was coming to him. If not then someone is either making up ex post facto laws or pulling them ex rectum.

Re:Where the fault lies... (1)

failure-man (870605) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348724)

Exactly, there's really very little difference between doing this and just playing evil on a PvP server. I fail to see why the police should be involved.
 
Also, that must be one hell of a bot to be able to do this sucessfully enough to get its owner in trouble.

Re:Where the fault lies... (4, Interesting)

TrippTDF (513419) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348741)

NOW we get into an arena of virtual ethics. Yes, this guy could comit a crime in-game based on the rules (features?) of the game, but what he did is still ethically wrong.

Now, it is up to the government to decide if an in-game crime is a real crime or not, and THEN they need to decide if the company that built the game can be held responsible for using a rule-system that allowed for the crime to happen. Remember, these are suddenly real-world tax dollars fighting a problem that could be solved through changing the rules of the game. As a taxpayer, I vote for that option.

Re:Where the fault lies... (2, Interesting)

billster0808 (739783) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348775)

If in game crime is real crime, I hope the cops don't catch me playing GTA. I killed a few hookers in there today.

Re:Where the fault lies... (1)

tont0r (868535) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348801)

its not necessarily a 'mugging' feature. when you die, there is a chance that you will drop something. im assuming all the bot did was kill people, and if they ended up dropping something, they would take the item. but there is not 'mug' button.

Re:Where the fault lies... (2, Insightful)

Gunny101 (894783) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348810)

Does this mean I'm going to get charged with murder for killing someone in Battlefield 2? Or would those be war crimes?

Re:Where the fault lies... (1)

springbox (853816) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348818)

Most games are smart enough to have a clause in their EULA that says you're not allowed to modify your game or break into the game's network. Of course, if the game was designed well enough, even if someone did break in, the damage would be limited to what they would leagally be able to do in the game anyway.

Re:Where the fault lies... (1)

plarsen (579155) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348844)

"This sounds more like an issue with game design." Perhaps in this game. I have friends making big money on bots playing Texas Hold'em on Online card game rooms. Here one can't question the game design, since it has been well tested for ages, but one can question the possible autonomous where there is no control of weather the other side of the line is a real person or a bot.

Re:Where the fault lies... (1)

TedTschopp (244839) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348861)

Well, lets take the out of a virtual world and place it back in the real world.

You state: The whole fact you're able to mug someone in-game makes this a non-crime.

Your argument is something like this. If I have the ability to do something I must have the right to do something.

That is not how reality works. Do you really want a system where ability does determines the right to do something.

How would you take our reality and make this work. Establish a diety which controls all this? Establish the state which can sometimes see and control others through force to comply? Or perhaps hope that people will check their own abilities against the rights of others?

IT's not the fault of the company that one of their players is an asshole. It's the assholes fault, in the end, that he is an asshole. That is how it works in reality, and in virtual realities.

Ted Tschopp

This Post... (0, Offtopic)

repruhsent (672799) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348660)

...is officially the first. Thank you, that is all.

Idea... (5, Funny)

JonN (895435) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348664)

"I regularly say that every form of theft and fraud in the real world will eventually be duplicated in cyberspace,"

What about vice versa? Because I would love to see someone wall hacking irl

Re:Idea... (2, Funny)

FortKnox (169099) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348706)

I've tried 15 different techniques, but now I can't remember which ones I've tried and which I haven't.

Also... is it bad to bleed out your eyeballs? Can you get your nose replaced?

Re:Idea... (0, Redundant)

agent424 (906054) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348721)

Ask and you shall receive [baytoday.ca]

Re:Idea... (1)

NelsonM (906317) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348809)

I know when I'm in trouble irl, I just use the "IDKFA" code. Hey, if it's good enough for Kenneth Lay...

Re:Idea... (1)

springbox (853816) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348850)

What about vice versa? Because I would love to see someone wall hacking irl

From The Shining (apparently): "Hereee's Johnny!"

Give the guy some credit (4, Funny)

b0r1s (170449) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348668)

It's pretty clever.

Re:Give the guy some credit (1)

American AC in Paris (230456) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348851)

It's pretty clever.

How, exactly?

As best I can tell, he used a bot to cheat at a game. The only remotely 'clever' thing about it is that he turned around and sold the lucre for real money--not exactly something that requires a "Eureka!" moment, that.

It strikes me as being almost as clever as slapping a digital clock on the front of an otherwise clock-less small appliance.

How is this illegal? (5, Interesting)

th0mas.sixbit.org (780570) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348673)

How is this illegal?

Certainly he broke the EULA by using a bot.

Certainly he broke the in-game rules by beating up and robbing people.

But.. it's a game. They didn't get mugged, their characters did. I can see how the company could, say, return the items to the original owners.. but charged?

Re:How is this illegal? (1)

Komarosu (538875) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348729)

Now that selling items can be a full time job for some people i could see it heading down the "loss of profits" routes to charge this person.

Re:How is this illegal? (1)

lasermike026 (528051) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348754)

This is so dumb. Its a game. Its not real.

Re:How is this illegal? (2, Informative)

superpulpsicle (533373) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348766)

This is Japan. They have the lowest crime rate in the world and tolerate alot less than US would.

Re:How is this illegal? (1)

niskel (805204) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348786)

The bot aspect is the only thing I see as being potentially being illegal at all. As far as breaking 'in-game rules' by robbing people, I don't agree at all that this is illegal because it is part of the game. Why would a developer make this possible and then go on and say it is against the rules?

Personally, I think the people inforcing these rules are having trouble seperating reality from fantasy. An MMO world is not a real place, there is no direct harm being done to people; this is what I believe the law inforcers are missing.

I would really have liked to see the result of such a situation had the mugger been an actual player.

Re:How is this illegal? (4, Insightful)

ebrandsberg (75344) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348800)

On point 1, yes, he broke the EULA by using a bot.

On point 2, NO, he did NOT break in-game rules, it's part of the game.

On the last point, agreed, if he broke the EULA, he should be banned and items returned, but that's it.

It is illegal because of the money lost (1)

John Seminal (698722) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348840)

Players who played by the rules were cheated of their time and that means money.

Just because it happened on-line does not lessen the crime. There are victims.

If some real person spent 20 hours working to get an item from a quest, and then someone used a BOT to steal that item, that is theft. The first person is out the 20 hours of work it took.

It is the same as if I work 20 hours at a store to save up enough to buy a watch, and someone steals the watch.

The RIAA taught us that theft is not just physically stealing something like a chair. Theft can be stealing a right to something.

Re:How is this illegal? (1)

tont0r (868535) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348905)

But.. it's a game. They didn't get mugged, their characters did. I can see how the company could, say, return the items to the original owners.. but charged? This mostly compes from people who have never really gotten into an MMORPG. The time it takes for people to recieve items in these games can take up a month. That means they are spending their time earning it. It is their property. If someone took my crap in a game that I spent over a month trying to earn, i certainly would hope something bad happens to them. I can understand where you are coming from, but still. its a huge pain. Plus if its a feature in the game, you just cant go back to the GM and say 'i lost my item after being killed, gimme it back'. I think the only reason why they are being charged is because they exploited a "problem" with the game and then turned it into a profit.

Re:How is this illegal? (1)

EasyComputer (797633) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348915)

It is illegal because, after he stole the stuff, he didnt just use it in-game for his personal use, but went ahead and sold those stolen items for real money.

Depending on the value of the goods, basically how much money he made selling it, it could mean jail time or just a fine, oh wait, this is china, So I don't know the laws there, come to think of it, I don't know the laws in the US either.

Oh well.

Question 1 (1)

Durinthal (791855) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348679)

..how is a bot (particularly in an RPG) unbeatable?

Re:Question 1 (4, Informative)

Stanistani (808333) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348735)

From the article: "By performing tasks within a game repetitively or very quickly, bots can easily outplay human-controlled characters, giving unscrupulous players an unfair advantage."
Automation is a force multiplier.

Could be worse (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13348680)

I gotta say, a virtual mugging is much better than a real one. Unlike sex, say...

hm? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13348682)

is bruce schneider really the name of a japanese cop?

anyways i find it hilarious how much games mirror reality in japan. That's us in 10 years (hopefully). well maybe not

-bigboehmboy

Can I get jailed (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13348684)

for using a first post bot?

Defining online property (4, Insightful)

myheroBobHope (842869) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348699)

If he was allowed to steal from the characters, as it was part of the game, and then other people gave a value to the item, doesn't that cloud the issue? The items have no intrinsic value, yes they represent hard work and dedication, but really they can just be created out of thin air by the game designers. The items are not supposed to have real world value, and that is why they can be stolen in the game. It's an interesting collision of worlds, and might eventually leave a precedent for the value of goods in an MMORPG. Law is coming to the New Wild West.

Re:Defining online property (1)

blechx (767202) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348797)

yes they represent hard work and dedication, but really they can just be created out of thin air by the game designers.

sounds like most "intellectual property" to me.

Online Cash-games (1)

plarsen (579155) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348703)

I am more worried about being robbed by bots playing at online cardrooms. I really don't like playing texas hold'em using real money against virtual players who never chats in the table. How can I know I am playing a real person or are bot that has compromised the portals client?

Hey, where's the group?.... (1)

BartulaPrime (744634) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348707)

Ah, I remember being invited to a group in EQ on Rallos Zek (PVP server). So, after arriving at the specified location, I was immediately jumped by my new-found friends. Of course, as a cleric, I just cast my spell of one-minute invulnerability while I bagged my things, but it was still humiliating.

This First Post Brought To You By... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13348711)

This First Post Brought To You By:
jFirstPostBot v0.98b

Have a nice day!!

Re:This First Post Brought To You By... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13348790)

Time you started work on version 'c' I think.

3. Someone will go to jail for stealing... (2, Interesting)

Shea_Butter (810204) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348713)

Reminds me of an article posted about how MMORPG's [pointlesswasteoftime.com] will eventually take over the world. If the object has real world value and takes time and work to obtain, shouldn't it be a crime to steal it?

Re:3. Someone will go to jail for stealing... (1)

code_elite (894610) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348823)

You can't be serious. It's not stealing when it's part of the game!

New Phishing (5, Funny)

pin_gween (870994) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348715)

Didn't fall for the "PayPal" or "eBay" scams? Watch out for the "Lineage II" phish

"Please take a few moments out of your online gaming experience to buy the Sword of Invinciblity"

So... (5, Insightful)

kaellinn18 (707759) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348716)

What exactly was the crime here? The article is slim on details. Was it the fact that he was using a bot? Is that against the TOS (would be my guess)? Surely, it can't be the fact that the bot "beat and robbed" a player character. If it's something you can do in the game, then how can you be arrested for that? Or was it the selling of the items online? Was that illegal? It just seems to me the article doesn't say much to perpetuate discussion.

Re:So... (1)

fool36 (864682) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348832)

I don't think you understand the severity here... > [the items] could have included the Earring of Wisdom or the Shield of Nightmare! It's all fun and games til i lose my Earring of Wisdom!

Civil? (4, Insightful)

Renraku (518261) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348725)

I don't know if this falls under civil or criminal code. On one hand, its just a game. On the other hand, so is blackjack, but its a crime to cheat someone out of money.

Robobbery (1)

3770 (560838) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348727)


"I regularly say that every form of theft and fraud in the real world will eventually be duplicated in cyberspace," says Bruce Schneier."

So, Mr. Schneier? Do you often get robbed by robots?

But isn't that the point? (4, Funny)

Minwee (522556) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348730)

I have played Lineage II. It's a game _about_ beating up other players' characters and taking their lunch money. That's the whole point of the game.

What's next? Will a man be sentenced to community service for turning over cards in Solitaire? Arrested for playing Minesweeper in an airport? Sued for using the "Undo" feature in Spider?

Re:But isn't that the point? (1)

Renraku (518261) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348761)

The point is, he didn't do it fairly. A bot did it. From the sound of it, if you walked up and attacked his bot, you'd be owned with no chance of survival.

This begs the question... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13348732)

if some guys buys a Real Doll [realdoll.com] , and he's married, has he committed adultery?

I mean, c'mon -- everyman just wants a girl who will let him watch an entire season of Stargate in one uninterrupted sitting.

Where's the felony? (1)

ccozan (754085) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348736)

Did he get arrested because:
- he beat and rob characters in game ?
or
- he used a bot in the game?
or
- he sold the "stolen" virtual properties for real cash?

Is this a crime? (2, Informative)

Transcendor (907201) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348739)

Well that's the question.
There are three crime scenarios one could apply to this:
  1. theft
  2. mugging
  3. fraud
As far as I'm concerned, theft means to me taking someone's possesions without asking. Mugging is like theft, but instead of simply not asking you use or threathen to use violence against your victim or a object /subject of special value to the victim. Actually, using a bot to automatically slash RPG-Characters cannot be called voilence because it does neither include physical violence nor a form of psychical violence. (Yes, I know it's annoying, but it's only a game)
after all, there's fraud left. Fraud is to take advantage of somebody's missing or wrong information. After all- users of the game propably didn't expect someone to bot 'em up... but who's betraying who here? I think they could possibly blame the author of the game, for not telling them explicitely that they could get virtually stolen.

Re:Is this a crime?(me after all) (2, Interesting)

Transcendor (907201) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348815)

I've read my comment and came to the conclusion that there could be a crime. The selling of property, virtual or physically present, you have no right to possess could be judged as crime under certain circumstances - and judications. (I don't know how it is for example in the US or here in Germany)
So if there is a civil process in which it is decided that the botter actually took advantage of the lack of ability / knowledge to do something against his bot (however that trial could work), it'd be a case of fraud. mmh..
It's unethical anyways-
---
Be fair. Don't bite [linklike.de.vu] the hand that does not feed you.

Japan ....tsk ....tsk (5, Insightful)

The_Spectry (900377) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348743)

What doe sthis say about how advanced a country is when even their police departments understand cyber life well enough to grasp the thought of an MMPORG mugging . Can you imagine calling the Police in say Kansas City and explaining to them how Zoltare the Unmerciful is repeatedly muggin your character Meri the Fancy . I'm sure you get a few laughs or maybe just complete silence . Whats next ?

Get Guild Wars Instead (2, Informative)

ivanjs (801614) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348745)

Guild Wars [geekronomicon.com] instances each area to each player (except towns and communities where you can't carry weapons anyway), making it impossible for cyber thugs to pull these ridiculous stunts.

Re:Get Guild Wars Instead (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13348838)

I've got to say thats the worst attempt i've ever seen at trying to plug your own website. Your site is a real torrent of activity, har har.

Re:Get Guild Wars Instead (2, Insightful)

SnoopJeDi (859765) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348895)

It's not even that complicated. Guild Wars only allows PvP in a controlled setting, with consent of both parties, and even then, you can't get mugged (well, as far as I've played anyway).

When you emulate a real world you get real problems. We play games to get away from real life, not to suffer the same problems (and usually sucker out ~$15 USD a month for it)

Who runs the game? (3, Insightful)

TurdTapper (608491) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348746)

What kind of a game is this where the creators/admins can't just take the things away from him and give them back? How hard could that possibly be rather than spending the money/manpower to arrest him?

Re:Who runs the game? (1)

dupup (784652) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348883)

OTOH, isn't this a great advert for how realistic the game is? Perhaps the designers, while not overtly encouraging such thugishness, aren't horribly upset by the attention.

Breaking news.... (1)

Hogwash McFly (678207) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348760)

Virtual Killings in Counter-Strike!

Story at 11.

Bot steroids (1)

GPLDAN (732269) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348764)

Pretty soon we'll games where you gotta score some bot growth hormone or other anabolic steroid to get pumped up, bot tae-kwan-do classes. My bot is a black belt!

Actually.... that's a pretty good idea. A MMORPG where you play a thug, but firearms are outlawed or unavailable. Maybe post-apocolypse. You use your controller like a fighting game, and you pick up chains and bats and lead pipes, and maybe a bonus item from a quest is a chainsaw. Instead of the keystroke attack like all ORPG are now, you'd need a fighting game level of fidelity. You'd need really, really low latencies to make it work, it'd have to have the fighting fidelity of something like Tekken. And you could wrestle people to the ground and gang beat (or rape) them. Steroids and other juice made you stronger. Bennies to stay online for more than 20 hours, etc.

Hillary would hate it, you'd have to host it offshore. But I guarantee it would be a massive, massive hit.

Can you say.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13348765)

LOSER... it's a GAME.

What is wrong with people in Asia ? they take this stuff way to seriously.

Real life crime will be more dramatic than online (3, Interesting)

ReformedExCon (897248) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348768)

Case in point, I'm watching real police arresting real people who are protesting the real pullout of the Israelis from the Gaza Strip. Nowhere online will you find anyone so attached to items, parcels of land, or characters that they are willing to risk their real lives to protect them.

It is foolish to think that anything online is in any way reflective of real life. There is an offensive, yet quite insightful comic strip which shows a normal guy+anonymity+audience= a troll. Put someone in a video game where there is no real punishment for actions which would get them in trouble in real life, and you'll end up with a bunch of people willing to kill, rob, join gangs, and a host of other activities that are frowned on in real life. It doesn't help that the games themselves promote this sort of activity.

One of the obvious concepts that arises from that view is that online "crime" ought not be policed with real life authorities. This arrest is wrong, and sets a bad precedent. The game companies themselves ought to be up in arms against this action. It takes away their authority to enforce in-game rules, and gives excessive power to the police.

So let me get this straight (1)

coolestdickofall (858613) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348769)

So he was cheating... In a video game..... And got arrested??? I didn't realize the game was that serious...

You know you're a wimp when... (1)

Humorously_Inept (777630) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348770)

Not only do you get beaten up by bullies in real life, but they follow into cyberspace and beat you up in the virtual realm too!

Oh yeah well... (1)

timmahtron (908593) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348773)

My dads bot can beat up your dads bot. Not to mention sell his virtual boxers on the internet in exchange for $$$$$$

dial 911 for admin.... (1)

beowulfy (897757) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348785)

How long will it be till we see virtual police NPC's walking the beat and investigating crimes? I could see a 911 chat channel where you could contact the local authorities. "Help, my character is being mugged!"

There are rules to everything, no man is above law (1)

John Seminal (698722) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348793)

By performing tasks within a game repetitively or very quickly, bots can easily outplay human-controlled characters, giving unscrupulous players an unfair advantage.

This is cheating.

These hackers are causing more problems than they realize. They ruin the game for everyone else.

There should be new rules. #1, no selling of characters or items. That would take care of the cheaters who do it for money. These people are the same people who would make spam, just to make a few bucks off everyones misery. Rule #2 should be anyone who uses a bot would be fined a large sum of money, something like $1000.

On-line games should do what banks in the USA do. Before anyone can open a checking account in most USA banks, the bank will call the CHECKS system. This is a private organization that keeps a database of anyone who ever opened a checking account. If a person is listed as owing money to any bank, then no other bank will accept that persons buisness. The only way to clear the complaint is to contact the original bank that issued the complaint, and settle the problem with them.

It comes down to fair play. The only cheaters are the stupid people who could not do it on their own. They need a crutch.

Plus, how fun can a game be when there is no real accomplishment? The cheaters did not win, they did not accomplish anything.

Arrested for cheating!?! (1)

SlayerofGods (682938) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348795)

I think Japan has just won the stupidest laws ever award.

Not a matter for the law (2, Insightful)

RogueyWon (735973) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348796)

This should not be a matter for the law to get involved in, plain and simple. At worst, the guy is breaking the game's TOS (in which case it's an issue for the GMs).

Lineage II is a PVP game which lets you take items from characters you defeat. It seems to me that, aside from the botting aspect, there's nothing in this guy's behaviour that's wrong. The botting aspect, if a TOS violation, should probably be punished by the suspension of his account.

You shouldn't outlaw the theft of property, or even murder, in online *gaming* worlds. Some of these games, such as the Lineage series, EVE Online and World of Warcraft are designed specifically with PVP in mind. Some, such as Final Fantasy XI, aren't. If you don't want to take the chance of being robbed and murdered, don't play a PVP RPG. It's not as if any sane games designer is going to make a PVP MMORPG (or any MMORPG aimed at making a profit) permadeath anyway.

In real life, I am a good, law abiding little citizen. Hell, I don't even do software/music/video piracy, because I still believe in the ideal that if you justify spending money on something inessential, then you shouldn't have it. However, when I play games, which are ultimately a form of escapism and release, I sometimes want to be a bit nasty. I want to beat people up and loot their still-warm corpse. If you're going to bring the law into stuff like that, then you're taking the whole point away and soon virtual worlds will be as heavily constrained as the real world.

Re:Not a matter for the law (1)

RogueyWon (735973) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348831)

Argh... noticed a critical typo moments after hitting post.

Should read "Hell, I don't even do software/music/video piracy, because I still believe in the ideal that if you CAN'T justify spending money on something inessential, then you shouldn't have it."

In other news (0, Offtopic)

ingo23 (848315) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348798)

San Andreas police cracked down on a car theft gang. 62 memory cards for PS2 seized.

misleading headline, as usual. (3, Informative)

Bethor (172209) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348799)

He was arrested for "hacking", not for mugging people in game.

Sounds like ./ gone haywire (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348804)

Sound like someone was watching the videos of dot hack slash - or the manga - and realized that the downfall of the Cerulean Knights could be done in real life.

In the anime, a bunch of kids kill off other players for fun, but there is a band of knights that protect players from unscruplous players who do things like rob or jack other players.

sigh.

Jeez . . . (0, Redundant)

SpeedyGonz (771424) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348814)

Virtual robbers, bullies, scammers . . . Net imitates life.

Re:Jeez . . . (1)

xmorg (718633) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348880)

The in-Game guards so should arrest all players/bots involved.

Theft or not? (1)

Undefined Tag (750722) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348828)

The problem is that there's a connection between in-game property and real property. Once someone is willing to buy something it has value - regardless of whether it's a virtual sword, a piece of music, or a car.

On the face of it, it seems as though stealing that piece of property is theft. However, it's a "part of the game". It seems to me that players are aware of the problem, accept the risk, and play anyway. It seems more like an NFL QB getting flattened during a blitz. Anywhere other than the football field that would be assault.

Furthermore, if you treat one character stealing a character's stuff as theft, wouldn't you have to treat the game destroying a character's stuff as destruction of property?

Clearly a breach of Rules (1)

MrCopilot (871878) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348830)

The following rules govern basic interaction within the Lineage II game and the Lineage II website (including message boards). Please be aware that failure to comply with these rules of conduct may result in the termination of your Lineage II game account according to the Lineage II User Agreement.

Rules of Conduct http://www.lineage2.com/legal/rules.html [lineage2.com]

Rule # 1. While playing Lineage II, you must respect the rights of others and their rights to play and enjoy the game. To this end, you may not defraud, harass, threaten, or cause distress and/or unwanted attention to other players.

Rule # 10. You may not advertise the intent to or commit the act of buying, selling, trading, sharing, or transferring access to any Lineage II account.

Rule # 11 You may not advertise the intent to or commit the act of buying or selling items for cash or trading items from one server to another.

My Favorite, Rule #18 You will not exploit any bug in Lineage II and you will not communicate the existence of any such exploitable bug (bugs that grant the user unnatural or unintended benefits) either directly or through public posting, to any other user of Lineage II. Bugs should be promptly reported via 'Ask A Question' at http://support.lineage2.com/ [lineage2.com] .

Yank his account but, I don't see any LAWS broken, but then again IANAJL.

Re:Clearly a breach of Rules (1)

MrCopilot (871878) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348890)

From the Eula: (I know we all read these, right?)

(d) Member Conduct. You agree not to use the Service to: (i) upload, post, e-mail or otherwise transmit Content that infringes any third party rights; (ii) impersonate any person or entity, including, but not limited to, an NC Interactive or its affiliates' employee, or falsely state or otherwise misrepresent your affiliation with a person or entity; (iii) upload, post, e-mail or otherwise transmit Content that violates any law or regulation; (iv) upload, post, e-mail or otherwise transmit Content as determined by NC Interactive at its sole discretion that is harmful, threatening, abusive, harassing, tortuous, defamatory, vulgar, obscene, libelous, invasive of another's privacy, hateful, or racially, ethnically or otherwise objectionable; or contains any viruses, trojan horses, worms, time bombs, cancelbots or other computer programming routines that are intended to damage, detrimentally interfere with, surreptitiously intercept or expropriate any system, data or personal information; (v) upload, post, email or otherwise transmit any Content that you do not have a right to transmit under any law or under contractual or fiduciary relationships (such as inside information, proprietary and confidential information learned or disclosed as part of employment relationships or under nondisclosure agreements); (vi) upload, post, email or otherwise transmit any unsolicited or unauthorized advertising, promotional materials, "junk mail," "spam," "chain letters," "pyramid schemes," or any other form of solicitation; (vii) interfere with or disrupt the Service or servers or networks connected to the Service, or disobey any requirements, procedures, policies or regulations of networks connected to the Service; or (viii) "stalk" or otherwise harass another member.

Complet text http://www.plaync.com/help/eula_lineage2.html [plaync.com]

Cyberspace Imitates Life? (1)

burtdub (903121) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348855)

I regularly say that every form of theft and fraud in the real world will eventually be duplicated in cyberspace

Technically, in real life, people don't get mugged by robots.

Yet... >:]

Unbeatable bots? (2, Funny)

amrust (686727) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348877)

The assailant was a character controlled by a software bot, rather than a human player, making it unbeatable.

Unbeatable? Those Lineage bots must be a lot better than the ones on FFXI. Those goofs can usually be outpulled/outskilled by a mental defective.

Well, I for one... (2, Funny)

canfirman (697952) | more than 8 years ago | (#13348878)

...welcome our new mugging bot overloards.

Now, where's my wallet?

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