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Dead Star Set to Escape the Milky Way

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the ware-the-undead dept.

Space 132

slackah wrote to mention a NewScientist.com article discussing a fast-moving stellar corpse on its way out of our galaxy. From the article: "The object, called B1508+55, is a rotating neutron star, or pulsar. It is the superdense core of a massive star that exploded as a supernova about 2.5 million years ago. The explosion seems to have ejected the pulsar with such force that it will eventually escape the Milky Way entirely, says team member Shami Chatterjee, an astronomer with NRAO and CfA."

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132 comments

Yippie! (-1, Redundant)

TheComputerMutt.ca (907022) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469176)

We now know that a star is going to leave the milky way in an absurdly large amount of time! I can now die happy!

Stellar probes for dark matter (4, Interesting)

nounderscores (246517) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469215)

Ok, the article didn't say anything about when it will leave the milky way. It just said that B1508+55 was going to leave the milky way, and that it had been traveling for 2.5million years from its point of origin in Cygnus. That translates to a velocity of 1100km/s or being able to cross 1/3 of the night sky from the time of birth to the present.

There are two things that excite me about this. 1) B1508+55 is a massive radio emitting object which is boldly going into the intergalactic space where all that putative dark matter is supposed to be. If its path bends we might end up discovering a "dark galaxy". Of course someone with access to human astronomy records must be around to observe this when it happens.

2) Cygnus spits out a lot of these objects. Maybe if we get a very much faster one, we can have a more convenient probe.

Re:Stellar probes for dark matter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469317)

Of course someone with access to human astronomy records must be around to observe this when it happens.

Yeah, that'll happen....

Re:Stellar probes for dark matter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13470582)

Or maybe someone is launching them.

Re:Stellar probes for dark matter (3, Informative)

schwanerhill (135840) | more than 8 years ago | (#13470942)

B1508+55 is a massive radio emitting object which is boldly going into the intergalactic space where all that putative dark matter is supposed to be. If its path bends we might end up discovering a "dark galaxy".

Indeed, pulsars are used to probe the interstellar medium to get at how much mass is tied up in ionized hydrogen, which scatters incident radio waves, causing scintillation which can be observed with a radio telescope. (Scintillation is the same effect the Earth's atmosphere has on visible light from stars, known as twinkling.) One of the ways we estimate the electron density in interstellar space is by comparing the dispersion of the pulsar signal to the distance to the pulsar. (This assumes you can get an accurate measurement of the distance, which is hard and uncertain for all but the most nearby pulsars.) There aren't great constraints on how much mass is tied up in interstellar gas, although it's not a terribly hot prospect for the missing baryonic mass.

There are about 40 known pulsars that are substantially above the plane of the milky way (galactic altitude > 3 kpc or 9000 light years; this pulsar is 2.4 kpc away, according to the paper, for an altitude of 1.9 kpc). Most of these are in globular clusters or the Large and Small Magellenic Clouds, two small, nearby galaxies that orbit the Milky Way. What's remarkable about this pulsar is that it formed in the galactic plane and was kicked up that high.

Pulsars typically move at velocities of ~100 - 500 km/s, so they cover a lot of space quickly, which lets you see the changes in the scintillation pattern on solar system size scales over the course of a few months. If you want to look at big scales, you look at many different lines of sight (i.e. many different pulsars).

(Yes, I am a pulsar/interstellar medium astronomer, or at least a grad student who works in this area and knows very little.) ;)

Re:Yippie! (1)

utnow (808790) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469477)

finally... darth vader is leaving us alone and returning to his galaxy far far away.

Re:Yippie! (1)

PunkOfLinux (870955) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469906)

Unfortunately, the poster got the DEATH star confused with the DEAD star -- the DEATH star collects the souls of other stars.

Re:Yippie! (1)

yogkarma (635120) | more than 8 years ago | (#13470878)

You know what, word supernova make no sense to me now a day I am more concern about superdome and astrodome. Yogi

Rogue star (1, Funny)

theufo (575732) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469178)

I wonder how long before Bush declares war...

not long (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469763)

It's escaping the galaxy, so it probably is hiding something. Probably Weapons of Mass Destruction! We have to eliminate it to protect the freedom of the American People in our fight against interstellar terror!

Open Source, Linux and the JPL (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469180)

I started (or attempted to start) using Linux a few years back when I started university, just out of plain curiosity. My buddy and I downloaded the ISO images of Red Hat Linux 8.0, and from that point forward, it all went to shit.

I figured it would be no problem, I used Sun's Solaris quite a bit so I understood the shell at least. Install went well, even though I was confused why I needed seven million partitions which I had to allocate manually and to have a root password since it was a single user machine. After my install, I restarted my machine, saw a bunch of ugly crap being spewed to the screen, and before you knew it, X Windows loaded up and I was in Linux. "Ooh, this looks neat, just like Windows. Let's see if I can surf the web!"

This is the point where I discovered the 'magic' of Linux. It couldn't find a driver for a simple ethernet card. So I got onto another computer running Windows, and found some type of driver for it. All right, I'll just burn it to a cd, pop it onto the Linux machine, and we're good to go. I started looking around for the CD ROM icon...where was it? Apparently I had to mount it manually, luckily I know UNIX. Then it asks me for root password. Okay, so I enter it. Then I can see the CD ROM, great. Oh look, the driver is in the form of source code, I have to compile it. So I tried to compile it with the configure script that came along. Oh wait, I need some !@#$ing stupid C library. All right, so I download that as well in the form of a RPM, which luckily worked, and then I was able to compile the driver.

Okay now what? According to the instructions, I had to recompile the kernel making the driver a part of it. 'Recompile the kernel?' I thought, 'What kind of sick operating system makes you recompile its kernel...' Apparently I didn't know what kind of twisted people designed Linux. Oh wait, it wants the stupid root password again...good God. So after about 5 hours, I had Internet...given that I knew how to use a UNIX machine. Four days later I tried installing something else, it asked me for the same stupid C library but version 1.2.3.4.5 instead of the version I had...God forbid...1.2.3.4.4 (oh what a fool I was for not updating every 10 minutes!) Within an hour, my drive was formatted (twice out of spite) and running Windows XP.

A few months back I was inspired again to run Linux. If you read the tech news, there's no doubt about it, it's taking over the server market. A Linux sys admin will make 20 grand more than a Windows sys admin (Makes you wonder if 20 grand is worth eventual suicide), so I felt I should pick it up. Of course now I was more prepared, I've read books, admin guides, worked as a student UNIX operator, 3 years under my belt as a computer science student, two internships, and had studied the Linux kernel in depth.

I decided I would try a whole bunch of distributions, I tried Red Hat 9, Fedora Core 2, SuSe 9.1, Debian, and Mandrake 10. All special in there own little way...like retarded children. As soon as SuSe loaded up, I was like..."nice nice, very sleek...", then a hissing came out my left speaker that wouldn't go away. Nice autodetection for the sound driver. Bye bye SuSe. All right, let's try Red Hat 9...oh look Red Hat won't give any more automatic updates because now that it has a little bit of money...!@#$ open source, let's become the next Microsoft! Oh Debian and Mandrake, just plain ugly and slow.

What about Fedora Core, Red Hat's latest method of getting code for free rather than having to pay programmers in India $0.85 an hour to do it. Why pay someone when you can have some idiot from GNU or some grad student do it for free, then sell it for 400 bucks a pop. It was surprising though that that experimental piece of crap worked better than all the other distributions, even though its autoupdate some how corrupted my kernel and I had to overwrite it.

But what I find most stupid is the philosophy behind it. Why make something so complex for free? I'm an excellent software engineer, good software is hard to make, it's beyond art, takes incredible amounts of education, hardwork and talent, and it should be kept proprietary and one should be paid to make it. I shouldn't have to run around asking for donations and shouldn't have to live in my mom's basement to get by.

Go to the GNU assholes' site, their feeling is that it should be my 'moral obligation' to code for free and give that code away as well. Those guys don't care about the rest of us, they have jobs, they're being paid by the government to design their half ass compilers and shitty OS. Some of us aren't shady recluses with no other goals in life other than to understand every little thing about computers. After our 8-5 day, we want to live our lives...and giving away software for free is not helping anybody except big corporations who save even more money.

Hmm? (1)

shadowcode (852856) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469184)

I wonder if it has a trench..

It can't be a space station. (3, Funny)

nounderscores (246517) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469198)

It's too big to be a space station.

Tracking (3, Insightful)

nounderscores (246517) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469188)

I wonder how long we can track this object once it leaves the galaxy. Any perturbations of its path will tell us about the dark matter between galaxies and the gravitational pull such putative dark matter exerts.

Re:Tracking (3, Funny)

DrEldarion (114072) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469210)

Blah, forget that scientific mumbo-jumbo nonsense. I want to see what happens when it hits something. Shit, they could put it on pay-per-view and make a mint.

Re:Tracking (5, Insightful)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469369)

I wonder how long we can track this object once it leaves the galaxy. Any perturbations of its path will tell us about the dark matter

Fast, for a star, but it's 1/300th of c. So it'll be at least 300,000 years to get 1000 ly out, getting to the edge of the galaxy. By then we'll either be extinct or know all about the dark matter.

Insighful (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469470)

The earth will be long dead, come on show a little knowledge.

Re:Insighful (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469604)

Show a little knowledge, we as a species might still be around (to say nothing for the planet)

Re:Insighful (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13471076)


Earth may be long dead, and the sun may be reduced to a nebula by the Secret Math, but Solar life will stick around, unless the human executives are unsuccessful.

Source: [blogspot.com]

PARENT IS FULL OF Bool-Shat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469565)

iF yA CAn'T bAFFLe ThEM WiT bRILLO-YONcE, bAfLLe ThEM WiT b00L-ShEeT.

Re:PARENT IS FULL OF Bool-Shat (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469895)

You fail it.

The saying goes: "If you can't dazzle them with Brilliance, baffle them with bullshit."

Oh, and your punctuation is atrocious.

Thanks for playing, have a nice day!

Galaxies must be a lot more dynamic than I thought (3, Interesting)

Hannah E. Davis (870669) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469206)

This kind of thing makes me wonder how static the current shape of our galaxy is. Do stars (dead or otherwise) leave all the time, and do they ever come in from somewhere else? Do ejected stars form the cores of new galaxies? I doubt we'll ever get a chance to see much of this in action anyway since the galaxy in general moves so slowly, but it's still neat.

It also occurs to me that this isn't really news: depending on how far away the star is/was, there's a fair chance that it left our galaxy millions of years ago :)

Re:Galaxies must be a lot more dynamic than I thou (2, Informative)

darmey (910068) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469224)

Not millions - the Milky Way has only about hundrend of thousands of lightyears in size. So at least some of our ancestors could see it when it was in our galaxy for sure. If neanderthalls are our ancestors, of course.

Re:Galaxies must be a lot more dynamic than I thou (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469426)

They aren't.

Galactic colission simulations (2, Interesting)

nounderscores (246517) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469226)

http://www.npaci.edu/online/v4.9/galaxies2.html [npaci.edu]


for what it's worth, here's a simulation of Our milky way hitting Andromeda.

Things like this happen all the time.

Re:Galactic colission simulations (1)

Jace of Fuse! (72042) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469245)

Watching something like this and realizing that it's constantly going on up there, you have to really wonder.

This animation almost makes the galaxies appear to be alive.

Mirror link (1)

Skevin (16048) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469302)

In case the above link gets slashdotted, you can find a lower-resolution mirror in: /usr/lib/xscreensaver/galaxy

You can change other parameters as well, such as number of galaxies, their size, even their colors!

Solomon Chang

Re:Galaxies must be a lot more dynamic than I thou (-1, Offtopic)

vought (160908) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469475)

I'm sorry; I'm completely disgusted by the "so what" attitude here on Slashdot with regard to the Hurricane.

I know this is "news for nerds" and a technology site. Slashdot covered 9/11 like a blanket, but all week long, there's been a single appeal on the front page for donations.

As a former resident of New Orleans and someone who fell in love with computers in part because of the dedicated computer staff at Loyola and Tulane (Loyola's Gandalf, I remember thee well) I find it hard to comprehend the lack of a floating banner on this site dedicated to disaster relief. I'm also blown away by the "mine mine mine" attitude of geeks in the prevous hurricane thread.

I don't give a shit what you mod me, because I care about what I'm writing, and more importantly, I know about what I'm writing.

Slashdot is irrelevant while this goes on. The people who were left behind in New Orleans are the ones who should have access to the same kind of math and science educations we all got.

Slashdot "People In Charge" (yes, I'm equating you with the "PICs" at Fry's electronics, which should give you all an idea of what I think of your response to this disaster), I am formally asking you to put a permanent banner for disaster relief linked to the red cross on your homepage.

Shame on you if you don't.

Re:Galaxies must be a lot more dynamic than I thou (-1, Offtopic)

PakProtector (115173) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469503)

I haven't eaten bait in a while. Here I go.

I live in Florida. We get hurricanes all the time. Now, I realise that New Orleans is pretty much wiped off the face of the Earth, and all your prisoners were let loose, and now you have to pay for it since the first thing they all did was break into pawn shops and get guns. But really. Just like the Law of Gravitation, I don't need to be constantly reminded of it.

I didn't need so much reminding of 9/11, either.

I also happen to live in Gainesville, Florida, where Danny Rollins killed 5 people 15 years ago.

There is a section of wall in town, called 'The Wall,' where one is allowed to commit the crime of graffiti and no one really cares. There is a section of wall there that reads 'We will always remember,' or maybe it's 'We will never forget,' but you get the idea.

I don't need to be reminded of depressing, horrible events every day. There's something called letting go of the past, so that you can move forward.

I don't suggest to forget it -- I'll never forget that, say, the Holocaust occured -- but I don't let it run my life.

Now, I realise this is somewhat silly with the Hurricane having destroyed your city from the face of Terra so recently, but you get the idea, right?

Also, as you point out, /. is a technology website. Or, it claims to be. How exactly does Katrina impact the world of Computers and Technology?

Re:Galaxies must be a lot more dynamic than I thou (3, Interesting)

Markus Registrada (642224) | more than 8 years ago | (#13471213)

depending on how far away the star is/was, there's a fair chance that it left our galaxy millions of years ago

7700 years, anyway, according to the article.

But it's never a good idea to take these announcements at face value. It's far from clear the thing has anything to do with a supernova, or that it's a neutron star at all -- presuming any of them exist at all. What we do know is that its light (radio, x-rays, etc.) pulses at a rate too fast for them to understand unless it's a tiny thing spinning.

The reason they insist it has to be something spinning is that they have studied almost no plasma fluid dynamics, so they can't understand something blasting out radio, light, and x-rays that doesn't have a star in the middle of it. They don't understand fluid instabilities and current oscillations, so they're at a complete loss to understand the (quite common) sudden, often temporary changes in oscillation rate in pulsars.

What little they have studied, typically, is a trivial approximation to plasma fluid dynamics known as "magneto- hydro-dynamics" (MHD) which assumes space is superconducting and magnetic fields can't change distribution or strength. (They talk in all earnestness of magnetic fields "frozen" in place -- even in the sun!) Therefore, they can't understand how large flows of charged particles -- currents, which they insist on calling "jets" -- produce their own magnetic fields and flow along them, or how these flows' fields can interact in marvelously complex ways.

Everything you read about "dark matter", "supermassive black holes", and "neutron stars" amounts to a desperate attempt to find some way to make the extremely weak and purely attractional gravity account for the complicated things they see. The mathematics behind plasma fluid dynamics is too hard for them, and they just can't stand that. It makes their press releases funny to read, but it's sad, too. (Think of the lives wasted on planetary epicycles.)

WHY DON'T YOU LISTEN TO ME (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469209)

George Bush doesn't care about black people
George Bush doesn't care about black people
George Bush doesn't care about black people

Re:WHY DON'T YOU LISTEN TO ME (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469579)

He doesn't care about whites either! He doesn't care about whites either! He doesn't care about whites either! He doesn't care about whites either! He doesn't care about whites either! He doesn't care about whites either! He doesn't care about whites either! He doesn't care about whites either!

You know your life is sad... (4, Funny)

Dogun (7502) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469212)

when you find yourself envying a neutron star.

Re:You know your life is sad... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469357)

when you find yourself envying a neutron star.

Could be worse.. could be like listening to an Olivia *Newton* John album

Nothing is worse than listening to an Oliva *Newton* John album.

no time to waste! (1)

darmey (910068) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469214)

We should immediately send a spaceship to the star to attach a message "We come with a mission of peace!" Who knows when there is going to be another chance for mankind to send a mesage out of our galaxy?

Re:no time to waste! (2, Funny)

thc69 (98798) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469572)

Yes, and fill the spaceship with hairdressers, telephone sanitizers, and middle managers.

I want a name like that! (2, Funny)

skaap (681715) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469216)

If only my parents had been creative enough to give me a name as cool as B1508+55!

Abraham (1)

nounderscores (246517) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469238)

If your parent was the biblical Abraham, then you would have as many brothers and sisters as the stars in the sky and the sand in the sea.

Of course, we'd end up naming you fairly boring and common names like David and Sarah.

Amazing (4, Interesting)

Cash202 (854642) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469218)

How interesting and spectacular.....

Strange how one can be so impressed by something, he knows so little about...

The concept of escaping the galaxy is awsome, but it would be nice to know more about it...

So I did some research: Milky Way Galaxy is: ~100,000 light years in diameter; ~3,000 light years in thickness; ~250,000 light years in circumference.

Basically, its huge. The ratio of our solar system to the milky way galaxy is 1:65,000,000.

From this I believe that just about anything can escape the galaxy, it would just take an extremely long time. However, as I have stated, my knowledge on the subject is limited, so it is possible that the planets and stars are arranged in such a way, that the gravitational pull would always redirct any object to go back. (i.e.: meteors and asteroids pass Earth in patterns and intervals, without leaving the galaxy).

The subject is very interesting, and if someone could bring more light on it, it would be helpful...

You've got the point (1)

darmey (910068) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469244)

It's like a molecula of oxygen escaping the uppermost layer of Earth's atmospere, yeah

orbits (1)

nounderscores (246517) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469246)

You're right, the fact the galaxy exists is because the planets and stars orbit the galactic core.

It is exceptional that something got the escape velocity to leave the galaxy in a kind of time frame that we're able to see it happen in.

This pulsar is the new speed record holder for an object of its class.

Cops on the freeway will love this one... (1)

Mechcozmo (871146) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469263)

"But officer! I'm just a pulsar setting a new speed record for an object in my class!"

Re:Amazing (4, Funny)

meringuoid (568297) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469441)

Milky Way Galaxy is: ~100,000 light years in diameter; ~250,000 light years in circumference.

Wow. I knew we had a central black hole, but I didn't realise it distorted space that much. What value is the pi where you live?

Re:Amazing (2, Informative)

eggstasy (458692) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469590)

Galaxies aren't circular, they are elliptical, and accurately calculating the circumference of an ellipse is very different from 2*pi*r.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circumference [wikipedia.org]
Wikipedia confirms the poster's numbers BTW.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milky_Way [wikipedia.org]

Re:Amazing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13470850)

That's true, but things with diameters, also known as circles, do have a circumference of pi*d. An ellipse has focal points and a major and minor axis, but no diameter. If you're going to be pendanic at least get the vocabular right.

Did anyone else... (4, Funny)

cloudkj (685320) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469264)

...read that as "Death Star Set to Escape the Milky Way"?

Re:Did anyone else... (1)

darmey (910068) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469278)

Guess most of us did :) Have you noticed the guy some posts up telling about Darth Vader not being amused?

Re:Did anyone else... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469427)

Oh! You misread the title in an unexpected way and posted about it! Haha! Everyone quick, mod this guy up!

Re:Did anyone else... (1)

Altima(BoB) (602987) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469516)

"Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've created. The ability to leave the Milky Way is insignificant next to the power of the Force."

(My God... that's the second consecutive post I've made on /. consisting of just a modified Star Wars quote...)

Re:Did anyone else... (1)

Lispy (136512) | more than 8 years ago | (#13470202)

It's weird indeed. Not only do I recognize the exact phrase I can even HEAR the tonality in wich Vader gives the spech. In english AND in german. *sigh*

Re:Did anyone else... (1)

El Cabri (13930) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469864)

Yes but then I figure it couldn't be because they say specifically : "In a galaxy FAR AWAY". So the Death Star was never in our galaxy in the first place.

Re:Did anyone else... (1)

whitehatlurker (867714) | more than 8 years ago | (#13470350)

I didn't, but I wondered which movie actor was sending his/her ashes into cosmos now. (And how the heck they got that far out.)

ELE? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469299)

So are we going to die or not?

Re:ELE? (2, Insightful)

thc69 (98798) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469577)

Yes, of course we are. Were you expecting to hitch a ride on it and live forever?

Cool (1)

Devar (312672) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469303)

I want to hitch up with the civilization that is using that thing as a ride outta this dump! :)

Nothing new (1)

programgeek (726420) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469336)

The idea of a star (dead or live) is nothing new to astronomers. Even people with elementary knowledge of the massive forces in outer space are aware that gravity (the force which keeps our feet to the ground, us attracted to other bodies of high mass) is actually a puny force when compared to things such as strong and weak forces, and also electromagnetic. Is it really that hard to believe that a nuetron star is traveling at a momentum strong enough to break ahold of the gravitational pull of our galaxy?

How is this possible? (1)

Afty0r (263037) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469377)

The story explains that the force of the supernova appears to have accelerated the stars core away from our galaxy and that soon it will move out... but if there was an "explosion" surely the stars core would be at the CENTRE of the explosion, so relative to the rest of the galaxy the force exerted on the star by the supernova would be pretty much zero (cancel itself out by pushing in all directions at once)...?

Anyone care to explain it to a long-time-ago astrology student?

Re:How is this possible? (2, Informative)

Burz (138833) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469429)

Many supernovas are asymmetric. The net effect is that the remaining core receives a sideways "kick".

Re:How is this possible? (5, Informative)

imsabbel (611519) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469443)

The main point is: the core isnt EXPLODING, its COLLAPSING to a neutron star. The "explosion" is just a rebounce off the core (_slightly_ simplified :) ).

After the collapse, the kinetic energy of the quasi free falling neutron matter will overcompress the neutron star core, and then it will oscillate.

As the collapse istn something perfectly symetrical, there will be significant amplitude of the first harmonic of the oscillation. Thus (for example) the matter hitting the star on one hemisphere will have the core expanding in their direction with quite some speed, while the other side will see it receeding). As the impact isnt very long, there wont be time to average out. In the moment the hull impacts, the core will "push" itself away from that quasi-spherical shell thats hitting it.

(you have to remember: there is significant mass in that shell. Only a small part of the star actually ends of in the neutron star, so there IS enough mass in the hull for conservation of momentum)

Re:How is this possible? (2, Informative)

Yazeran (313637) | more than 8 years ago | (#13471566)

An other explanation of a fast star leaving the galaxy is a 'slingshot' trajectory close to some other star. One of the stars would loose energy (and fall towards the galactic center) and the other would gain energy and possibly achieve escape velocity.

The slingshot principle has been used for a number of spacecrafts and there is a number of trajectories which could transfer momentum between two objects traveling in a common gravity well (e.g. galaxy or solar system).

Yours Yazeran

Plan: To go to Mars one day with a hammer.

Re:How is this possible? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469511)

Where can one study astrology? Does it work like this "Get a degree for your life experience" thing?

Re:How is this possible? (1)

bogd (912084) | more than 8 years ago | (#13470417)

Somehow, I don't think astrology has anything to do with this.

At least I hope that our destinies will not be affected by the fact that a dead star is leaving our galaxy.

Thats nothing unususal (4, Informative)

imsabbel (611519) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469402)

Those neutron stars are the product of stellar cores collapsing into a neutron star (and then sheding the outer hull thats impacting on the core rebounce shockwave in a class II supernova).

Now if such a collapse isnt absolutly symetrical, there will be higher spherical hermonics in the neutron core oszillation, and thus the impact of the hull on the core will give it a random impuls vector (the first harmonic being the 2 hemispheres oszilating with 180degree phase difference).

The observation of those fast moving neutron stars helped the understanding of this processes, as there isnt much that can accelerate them after their creation to this speeds.

A common speed of a class2 supernova product is in the 100-1000 km/s range (about 2 orders of magnitures lower than the speed of the the ejected hull, thus the visible SNR still seemingly have the neutron star in the center), which is way enough for most to leave our galaxy (300 or so is needed)

Re:Thats nothing unususal (1)

iggymanz (596061) | more than 8 years ago | (#13470471)

Those neutron stars are the product of stellar cores collapsing into a neutron star you're kidding! I thought those neutron stars were the product of stellar cores collapsing into a almond crusted colby yule log.

Same star slingshot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469451)

Isn't this the same star getting shot out of the milky way that was mentioned on Slashdot a few months ago? I remember it was being used as proof for there being a giant black hole in them middle, the gravitational forces somehow got pretty strong as the star spun around the edge of the hole accelerating it to beyond the escape velocity of the gravitational forces from the black hole. Maybe it's a new theory to the same rebellious star

OMG (2, Funny)

ZeroExistenZ (721849) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469494)

Dead Star Set to Escape the Milky Way

OMG! DON't LET IT GET AWAY! SEND THE AMERICANS TO RETRIEVE IT!

ON second thought.. I slightly recall the "retrieving"-abilities of the US army and some guy who's bin pretty laden.

Re:OMG (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469544)

no-- send the spanish inquisition-

NO ONE ESCAPES (expects) THE SPANISH INQUISITION!

Re:OMG (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469603)

I'm sorry but that isn't funny. Why don't you try to get a sense of humour before you post jokes in the future.

Re:OMG (1)

ZeroExistenZ (721849) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469772)

I think it was...

You have billions in funds for the US army, and have the most advanced weapons. Yet you couldn't retrieve a guy on a camel.

Re:OMG (1)

tjstork (137384) | more than 8 years ago | (#13470386)

Our Army is not designed to retrieve or find single individuals, it is designed to destroy countries.

Escape the Milky Way? (1)

Conanymous Award (597667) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469519)

In other news, the star in question was said to have been heard screaming, "Watch out, that mad candy bar has rabies!!!"

Death Star set to...! Oh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469553)

Oh... That's all it is. Ok, back to playing Galaxies...

It's not leaving, it's going to blast Alderaan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469554)

After that, it will change course to take care of the rebel base on Dantooine soon enough. :)

egg (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469600)

I wonder if this dragon's egg, er, goose egg has any cheela?

Re:egg (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13469975)

dunno, must've blinked

Has to be done (2, Funny)

Conspiracy_Of_Doves (236787) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469698)

Radio transmissions have been detected from an area in space outside of our galaxy that lies on the star's path. When decoded, a voice could be heard to say:

"Bring out your dead!"

Roger Wilco strikes again (1)

Chemisor (97276) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469746)

Yet another fine example of galactic garbage disposal system working properly. Roger Wilco's involvement is rumored, although StarCon declined to confirm it.

I know what it is (1)

someone1234 (830754) | more than 8 years ago | (#13469905)

It is a giant spaceship transferring aliens out of our galaxy before it meets its fate with the Andromeda galaxy. We should follow them soon!

Whoa! (1)

Dasher42 (514179) | more than 8 years ago | (#13470185)

Slow-moving corpses are bad enough, but fast-moving ones are just scary! I still haven't gotten 28 Days Later out of my head!

Old news? (1)

mattr (78516) | more than 8 years ago | (#13470415)

This sounds a bit like a dupe or just old news, I've heard it before. Of course it really is *really* old news, but.. um.

Anyway it would be nice to project its path ahead to see what civs need bailing out. Then NASA's warp drive project has a goal! Maybe we should keep our scopes and neutrino detectors on that region of space to see if any other civs already have mounted a hypervelocity rescue effort? Note the star is seen 7000 years in the past, so it is actually 20 light years or so closer to its victims than it looks.
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