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Korea Post Office Supports XPCOM Based E-Banking

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the isn't-it-about-time dept.

Mozilla 144

Channy writes "Mozillazine is reporting that the Korean Post Office has decided to support Mozilla Firefox for internet banking and has started the developement project of an XPCOM based internet banking system. From the article: 'In past there were no web browsers for 128 bit encryption except Opera 3.5 for international users when Korea started internet banking services in 1998.'"

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Now (2, Interesting)

42Penguins (861511) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486441)

All they need to do is DROP support for IE.
Also quite the undertaking switching 4700 from windows to linux.
Yay for Korea and Korean memes!

Re:Now (3, Interesting)

daviqh (906581) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486458)

We could also have some more support in Mozilla Browser, and I hope they start support for that too.

Re:Now (1)

daviqh (906581) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486483)

"Also quite the undertaking switching 4700 from windows to linux."

<snicker> Perhaps we should also drop support for IE in Windows... </snicker>

Re:Now (5, Insightful)

strcmp (908668) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486558)

Why should they drop support for IE? It's still the most widely used browser, despite its many flaws.

This is no worse than saying that they should drop support for Safari because it's so sparsely used.

Re:Now (1)

daviqh (906581) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486579)

The point is that anyone relitively smart will know that it has tons of flaws, and wishes someone takes an act against it.

Re:Now (1)

Tolookah (837210) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486760)

yes, but for a moment, consider the average person...

now, 50% of the population is dumber than that...

Re:Now (4, Insightful)

killjoe (766577) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486764)

The average person will eat whatever you shove down their throat. MS knows that, Politicians know that, why don't you know it?

Re:Now (2)

bit trollent (824666) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486902)

Compete on features, not on dirty tricks.

Aww screw it, who are we kidding. You morons would tell someone to ban IE from their website even if it would run them out of business.

Why?

Because you are a bunch of self rightous pricks. Thats it. You get on your high horse and you pontificate on matters which you don't really understand or have any business attempting to infuluence.

But what the hell. This is slashdot. Thrust your hypocritcal ideologies on the shitheap. It doesn't matter. Nobody takes you seriously.

Re:Now (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486644)

No, they should drop support for IE because it's unsafe to use.

Re:Now (2, Interesting)

strcmp (908668) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486735)

Unsafe for the client, but not the server... as far as I know. People should be aware that they browse "at their own risks" and do have a choice as to which browser to use. If some people want to use IE, well, they were warned.

A better solution, of course, is to have a banking system that is not dependent on the underlying browser architecture.

Re:Now (1)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487043)

Having a cross-browser system is important, yes, but if I were a bank I would seriously consider (artificially) locking out IE, in order to reduce the risk of fraud for my customers.

I can see it now! (5, Interesting)

Agarax (864558) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487418)

Oh yeah, I can see you at the board meeting now:

You: "Well, sir. I think we should block out Internet Explorer users because their browser is unsafe."

Boss: "Is it unsafe for us or them?"

You: "Them. It would'nt really effect us. They are just more likely to become victims of identity theft through a virus."

Boss: "Can they also get the same virus through an email attachment? Or by someone digging through their trash?"

You: "... yes."

Boss: "How many of our customers use IE?"

You: "About 80%"

Boss: "And what is there to prevent them from moving to another bank that DOES support their browser?"

You: "Well, that would be a lot of trouble for them to go through. It's easier to just download a safe browser."

Boss: "And what would we do about the advertisements our competitors would air stating that we don't properly support internet banking because we dropped support for IE? Getting new customers might become difficult."

You: "Well ... we tell them that it is foolish of them to use Windows and Internet Explorer and that they should switch to something else."

(Long Pause)

Boss: "While we are at it, why don't we refuse entry to SUVs in the drive-thru ATM because the customer is more likely to scratch his paint and he is wasting the gas he paid for? You should stick to IT, you don't know jack about how a business works. "

Re:I can see it now! (1)

Hurricane78 (562437) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487885)

To me this looks a bit like that suppressing kind of arguing where moral is irrelevant and profit is everything, that lets every human with some sense of indebtedness feel some pain inside.

It's that feeling of: "this just isn't right!" even if it's "correct and makes sense"

To me poeple who decide in that style even are near to criminal in cases of legitimity and fairness.

Yes, maybe I'm just a lone idealist in a dog-eat-dog society. But I'm proud of it an if I die poor (in cases of money) because of this, at least I die happy (in most other cases) and with a clear conscience.

(Did I mention that i would bet that i could bring up unbeatable arguments arguments to everyone, that business in it's base is one of the two main supports of pure evil in this world? [dumbness is the other one an ist mostly required as the culture medium for it])

Re:I can see it now! (3, Insightful)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 8 years ago | (#13488075)

Boss: "Is it unsafe for us or them?"

You: "Them. It would'nt really effect us. They are just more likely to become victims of identity theft through a virus."
That's incorrect. In case you haven't noticed, most banks advertize that they'll bail their customers out when they get defrauded. So it does effect the bank, because they have to raise interest rates to cover their losses from fraud.
Boss: "And what would we do about the advertisements our competitors would air stating that we don't properly support internet banking because we dropped support for IE? Getting new customers might become difficult."
We tell them that, (apparently) unlike other banks, we care about their financial well-being, and try to do everything possible to ensure a safe electronic banking experience.

Re:Now (1)

QuietLagoon (813062) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486874)

Why should they drop support for IE?

Because it is standards-challenged?

Re:Now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13486943)

Neither is Firefox. Whats your point?

Re:Now (1)

a.d.trick (894813) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486988)

While I'm not is support for such a non-standard implementation unless it's absolutely nessisary, there is a big difference between being firefox only and safari. Firefox is cross-platform, it works on mac, linux, and most importantly windows. It's a lot easier for people to do a free 5mb download than get a whole new computer.

Re:Now (0, Redundant)

Archibald Buttle (536586) | more than 8 years ago | (#13488219)

It'll be a cold day in hell when a Korean institution drops support for IE. There's basically nothing but Windows in Korea - mostly Win98 at that.

Very few web sites in Korea work correctly on anything besides IE - you're SOL if you want to access your bank in Korea from a Mac, Linux, or using Firefox.

Re:Now (1)

Trejkaz (615352) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486801)

I might not have been too hard to get people to switch because in Korea, only old people run Windows.

Re:Now (1)

bit trollent (824666) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486911)

No, you need to drop your self-rightous worthless opinons. Who do you think you are? Compete on features, not on dirty tricks. Aww screw it, who are we kidding. You morons would tell someone to ban IE from their website even if it would run them out of business. Why? Because you are a bunch of self rightous pricks. Thats it. You get on your high horse and you pontificate on matters which you don't really understand or have any business attempting to infuluence. But what the hell. This is slashdot. Thrust your hypocritcal ideologies on the shitheap. It doesn't matter. Nobody takes you seriously.

Re:Now (1)

McGiraf (196030) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486973)

Hi! having a nice day?

Re:Now (1)

Louis Guerin (728805) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487013)

Never gonna happen. Korea is a windows monoculture.

Not that it's unique in that respect.

L

Re:Now (1)

Daengbo (523424) | more than 8 years ago | (#13488236)

Agreed. I was sriously disappointed when I moved to S.K. from Thailand. I haven't yet seen an Linux computer in the country, despite regularly visiting places like tech malls.
The company that makes Hangeul Office (which appears to have better market share than MS Office here) produce a version of linux in order to offer their office suite on it, but I have never heard of anyone using it except myself.
Compare this to my time in Thailand when the hypermarket down the street would sell computers with Linux on them and the newsstand had small books on it, and I feel that Linux has made no inroads into S.K. at all.
That said, Thailand appears to have ditched Linux, as well. My visit their in June showed that I couldn't find a single book published in the last year about it. I guess that the governments turnaround on its Linux policy and subsequent multi-year (no cost) agreement with MS really took its toll.

Re:Now (1)

iluvcapra (782887) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487096)

FTA: After browser war, it was useless the NSplugin for internet banking, so most of bank support only Active-x plugin. So some Mac and Linux users are troubled on using internet banking.

Though they were troubled, they were likely not as troubled as the "Active-x" users.

Huh? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13486454)

WHERE is Zonk, and why are you posting this shit in HIS game blog?

Obl. "In Korea ..." (5, Funny)

weighn (578357) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486469)

Only old people use secure internet banking.

The kiddies are swapping cvs details over Telnet.

Re:Obl. "In Korea ..." (1)

daviqh (906581) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486503)

I just checked and...the winner is:

No Button...anyone persistant and speak Korean?

Great news! (3, Interesting)

webby123 (911327) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486475)

Great news, does this mean they will be including a "get firefox" icon on their website?

Re:Great news! (1)

daviqh (906581) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486591)

I just checked, and they don't have one...

pouts...

Re:Great news! (0, Troll)

mnemonic_ (164550) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486626)

Um, who the fuck cares?

MOD PARENT UP (0, Offtopic)

Douglas Simmons (628988) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486994)

It's a good question.

Microsoft (1, Flamebait)

jasonBTV (911446) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486489)

Anything that helps take market share away from Microsoft...

which korea? (3, Funny)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486501)

is this north korea south korea or both?

Re:which korea? (1)

daviqh (906581) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486527)

Maybe they both share a post office? They are based in Seoul, and their site says nothing about who they serve, but perhaps it is whatever side of Korea Seuol is on. Just my $.02

Re:which korea? (2, Interesting)

Geoffreyerffoeg (729040) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486585)

You're right that it says it's in Seoul, so it would be in South Korea.

(You're completely mistaken if you think that North and South Korea would want anything to do with each other. Here's a hint: there's troops on each side of the border between them.)

Re:which korea? (3, Informative)

natrius (642724) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486794)

You're completely mistaken if you think that North and South Korea would want anything to do with each other. Here's a hint: there's troops on each side of the border between them.

"It's time for us to put an end to history of dissension, and open an era of national integration. This also means laying the grounds to surmount division, and to ring in a reunified era ruled by peace and prosperity."
- South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun [bbc.co.uk]

Sure, there's some tension there, but I think saying that they want nothing to do with each other is a bit much. That'd be a better characterization for Pakistan and India, where some of the people actually dislike each other. I don't think the North and South Korean people actually dislike each other, but one group just happens to be ruled by a crazy dictator.

Re:which korea? (2, Interesting)

AstroDrabb (534369) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486946)

Huh? You are quoting _SOUTH_ Korea. There is a _huge_ difference between what South Korea wants and what North Korea wants. South Korea is basically democratic. North Korea is a dictatorship.
where some of the people actually dislike each other. I don't think the North and South Korean people actually dislike each other
I agree with you there. However, there is the HUGE problem of the North Korean dictator that is know for having pretty bad human rights violations. I doubt many South Koreans would volunteer to be a part of that.

Re:which korea? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13488012)

I don't think the North and South Korean people actually dislike each other, but one group just happens to be ruled by a crazy dictator.

Ahhh, so just like Canada and the USA?

Re:which korea? (1)

daviqh (906581) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486534)

One theroy suggests that perhaps under 5 minutes ago, Korean's in North and South Korea decided to "merge". Somehow in that time we didn't find out about it and the Postal offices merged and changed their name.

Re:which korea? (4, Funny)

damsa (840364) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486565)

North Korea doesn't have internet nor money. My bet that this is South Korea.

Re:which korea? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13486574)

is this north korea south korea or both?

Ha ha ha. Are you trying to seduce me or something?

Re:which korea? (1)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486651)

mod funny. haha north korea. FYI, think of how many koreans you know that call themselves south korean instead of korean and you will understand why korean is used.

Re:which korea? (1)

Louis Guerin (728805) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487019)

I'm really glad the parent got modded 'funny'. Must be another geographically-challeneged american.

L

Internet explorer (0, Troll)

cataclyst (849310) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486505)

You know... [[insert IE bash here]]

Next week, on slashdot, Pimp-my-Anything-but-microsoft...

Re:Internet explorer (0, Offtopic)

mnemonic_ (164550) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486636)

Hey that's not a real wikipedia article. What's the deal?

Re:Internet explorer (1)

strcmp (908668) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486660)

In case you did not get the joke, in Wikipedia's markup language, putting double brackets around an article title autolinks to that article (usually at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Article_title [wikipedia.org] ).

Support for Firefox???? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13486518)

All you need to do is support a standard web browser (without requiring activeX crap to work), and firefox works fine.

My bank doesn't "support" firefox, but it works great.

Re:Support for Firefox???? (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486586)

Yeah. My bank only mentions Netscape and Explorer on their site, but also say that any Javascript-enabled browser with 128 bit or better security should work. A few years ago they were IE-specific, which used to irritate me ... for the one thing I do online that I really want to be secure I had to use the world's least secure browser. But they got with the times.

Re:Support for Firefox???? (1)

daviqh (906581) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486601)

"I really want to be secure I had to use the world's least secure browser"

Don't you just love oxymorans...

SEED? (4, Informative)

erikharrison (633719) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486532)

The article is a little ambiguous - this seems to be only for SEED, a Korean only strong encryption algorithm, which itself isn't native to browsers, which is why they required activex in the first place.

Re:SEED? (5, Informative)

Channy (904433) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486745)

In past, there were no 128bit browser for international users. But, 40bit is very weak for financial service. So Korea chose plugin based internet banking and made own 128bit algorithm called SEED. Firstly, both NSPlugin and ActiveX were supported. After browser war, there is no market share of Netscape. So most of banks stop NSplugin. The SEED goes to world standard. http://www.ietf.org/html.charters/smime-charter.ht ml [ietf.org] http://www.ietf.org/internet-drafts/draft-ietf-smi me-cms-seed-02.txt [ietf.org]

ENGLISH MOTHERFUCKER (-1, Troll)

mnemonic_ (164550) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487857)

Do you speak it?

What's the point of the encryption? (-1, Troll)

putko (753330) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486533)

The Koreans are mostly running Windows, so they are probably loaded down with keyloggers -- or they will be, once it pays to load them down with keyloggers.

What's the point of the encryption? They still lose.

Re:What's the point of the encryption? (0, Redundant)

daviqh (906581) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486547)

It's the thought that counts...

Re:What's the point of the encryption? (0, Flamebait)

korea (615587) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486634)

Replace "Koreans" with any other modern country, and see if the same statement doesn't fit. Also, keylogging isn't a Windows-only problem.

Despite spikes in complexity, the amount of time it takes to decrypt even the newest encryption methods is relatively trivial, so what's the point of encryption for anyone on the planet?

The Earthlings are mostly made of carbon, so they would burn pretty quickly -- or they will once the sun starts to fizzle out and completely engulf the Earth... so what's the point to being alive?

Re:What's the point of the encryption? (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486773)

Also, keylogging isn't a Windows-only problem.

Hummmmmm. And what none MS keylogger is there? In fact, what none MS virus/worm is there that is causing any real issue? Not just logged, but actually causing a problem?


the amount of time it takes to decrypt even the newest encryption methods is relatively trivial, so what's the point of encryption for anyone on the planet?

Really? So what solution do you have that allows for 2048 bit key RSA to be solved in this year? In fact, lets make it 128 bit.

Re:What's the point of the encryption? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13486805)

Surely you jest. Ever heard of rootkits, buffer overflow exploits and the like?

I work IT department at a major university. Our servers are probed relentlessly. If we don't stay up on the patches, we will get 0wn3d rather quickly.

I can't tell you how many times some boneheaded student who thinks he is the alpha geek comes to school with his Gentoo or Fedora box, plugs it into his dorm room's ethernet jack, and then proceeds to get owned becuase he doesn't know jack about securing his box. Within a rather short period of time, these boxes are relaying spam (we block outgoing port 25 now) or have become a zombie host for some script kiddie's botnet on IRC.

Windows is definitely a problem too, I certianly don't want to gloss over that, but you said non-MS doesn't get viruses.

Re:What's the point of the encryption? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13487030)

No, I don't jest. The amount of issues that arises with VIRUSES and Keystroke Loggers on none-MS are NIL. As to worms/Rootkits/Buffer Overflows, yes, they do occur. The question is how much a problem is it? Very minor. As to the number of zombies, I used to work on a system that monitored OC-48s. We had several systems installed in several RBOCS (letting them see what traffic was going through, as well as selling to several agencies). One of the trivial things that we did was to pull stats for these. They showed that nearly all of the zombies that were sending were Windows boxes (better than 99.7%, which is interesting in that Windows accounted for less than 83% of all traffic). One of the things that our box did was to ID what type of system the packet was from.

For all intense purpose, all your spam, virus, and worms are coming from Windows boxes.

Re:What's the point of the encryption? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13486833)

A 128 bit RSA public key can be trivially reversed. Perhaps you mean an RC4 or AES block cipher?

Re:What's the point of the encryption? (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487477)

hummmm. Actually, I was thinking of AES. Brain fart, I guess. Thanx.

Re:What's the point of the encryption? (2, Funny)

korea (615587) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486980)

I prefer none without the e, thank you. Both of your statements were addressed in replies to you by Anonymous Cowards. I hope that answers your question.

Re:What's the point of the encryption? (1)

kurtmckee (870398) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487695)

what solution do you have that allows for 2048 bit key RSA to be solved in this year? In fact, lets make it 128 bit.

Those numbers aren't interchangeable like that. 2048-bit asymmetric keys are considerably different than 128-bit symmetric keys because of the math behind them. Saying "Break my 2048-bit encryption! Wait, I'll go easy on you and make it only 128-bit" doesn't work.

Re:What's the point of the encryption? (1)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487931)

Yeah, I am very aware of all that. I meant to say AES, in which case, 128 will still be non-trivial in its time. However, I let my fingers do the thinking.

Re:What's the point of the encryption? (1)

CharAznable (702598) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487262)

"the amount of time it takes to decrypt even the newest encryption methods is relatively trivial"

Uh, no.

Re:What's the point of the encryption? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13486666)

The Koreans are mostly living in cities, so they are probably loaded down with thugs -- or they will be, once it pays to load them down with thugs who beat people up for their passwords.

What's the point of the keyloggers? They still lose.

who cares (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Cowterd (910764) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486546)

Who cares that they are creating an XPCOM piece of shit? Why dont they just make a web-based thing that would work for all browsers. And seriously, you people are such hypocrites. XPCOM doesnt work on IE, and activex doesnt work on Firefox. So that instantly makes Firefox better? Give me a break.

Mod parent up! (1)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486777)

He's an asshole, but he's right this time. Why not use AJAX? Not just to support IE, but to avoid installing software on the local machine...

128 bit encryption in AJAX?! Mod parents way down. (1)

SimHacker (180785) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487387)

You have completely missed the point, which is to use 128 bit encryption over the wire, because the encryption built into the browser is not strong enough.

Are you proposing implementing the encryption on the server side, and sending passwords over the net unencrypted?

Or are you suggesting they implement the 128 bit encryption algorithm in JavaScript?

-Don

Re:128 bit encryption in AJAX?! Mod parents way do (1)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487592)

Isn't 128 bit encryption already provided via SSL? So if you have to, you send passwords over the net, encrypted?

Re:128 bit encryption in AJAX?! Mod parents way do (2, Informative)

SimHacker (180785) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487600)

In case you haven't been paying attention, the whole point of this plug-in is to work around the problem that 128 bit encryption is NOT provided via SSL.

Please read (and understand) the article before posting, next time.

By the way, AJAX is not the solution to every problem.

-Don

Re:128 bit encryption in AJAX?! Mod parents way do (1)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487609)

In case you haven't been paying attention, the whole point of this plug-in is to work around the problem that 128 bit encryption is NOT provided via SSL.

In old browsers. My Firefox does support it, and has since there even was a Firefox. And what old browser is going to have xpcom?

If you're going to force them to use a new browser anyway, why lock yourself in more than you have to?

Please read, and understand, and THINK about the article before posting.

Mod parent up too! (1)

Jessta (666101) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487058)

They aren't supporting firefox, they are just not supporting other browsers. I will be terrible to see when everyone becomes locked in to firefox. Free software is about freedom and compatibility. This will be neither.

Re:who cares (3, Insightful)

The Original Yama (454111) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487202)

XPCOM is freely available for anyone to implement (unlike ActiveX). It is more secure than ActiveX and more functional than AJAX.

Perhaps MS should include XPCOM in IE? There's nothing stopping them, really.

Misinformation about ActiveX/DCOM (2, Informative)

SimHacker (180785) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487520)

Thanks for trying out, but you can't be a cheerleader if you don't do your homework.

The ActiveX Specification [opengroup.org] is freely available for anyone to implement. In case you didn't know, XPCOM is just an open source knock-off of ActiveX, with enough gratuitious changes to make them incompatible in practice. But essentially, they're the same thing.

XPCOM is no more secure than ActiveX. They both have total access to your computer. It's irresponsible of you to spread the misinformation that XPCOM is more secure than ActiveX, when it's not. It doesn't help anyone to have a false sense of security based on well meaning hype and uninformed cheerleading.

You're right that both ActiveX and XPCOM are more functional than AJAX (for some definition of the word "functional" -- in the sense that it has more client side functionality).

Perhaps Firefox should include support for ActiveX? There's nothing stopping them, really. So then it wouldn't have been necessary for to write a special XPCOM control, since they could have used their original ActiveX control.

Oh yeah, I forgot, it's more important for Firefox to make a rhetorical point by excluding ActiveX support, than to serve the needs of its users. That's called cutting off your nose to spite your face.

-Don

Re:Misinformation about ActiveX/DCOM (1)

serialdogma (883470) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487666)

ActiveX makes use of thw windows API to do everything, firefox is only writen in XML with gecko making it all work.
Gecko is ment to run on non-windows system aswel as on windows, making use of the windows api in linux is about as good as using POSIX on windows.
To add activeX to gecko's windows codebase would just spilt the userbase.

Re:who cares (1)

suitepotato (863945) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487426)

The "cross platform standards is superior" line is only trotted out when it is against Microsoft. Apple could create a horrific new music format with more sinister DRM than Microsoft has ever remotely dreamt of and Slashdotter would give it a thumbs up. Ubuntu could drop all support for zip, bzip, etc., in favor of a proprietary new compression format that no other distro used and it would get glowing reviews and plaudits for it.

Microsoft could propose a new format the specifications of which they intend to make freely availible at no charge and they'd be excoriated faster than you can Slashdot Effect a Packard Bell running NT 3.51.

If this doesn't work across all platforms then all it is doing is seriously disenfranchising a massive number of customers and that is no better than any of the things MS is taken to task for endlessly or any company that embraces MS technologies over those of Firefox and company.

Slashdotters make Microsoft cry (1)

Arru (771173) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487621)

Microsoft could propose a new format the specifications of which they intend to make freely availible at no charge and they'd be excoriated faster than you can Slashdot Effect a Packard Bell running NT 3.51.
Oh yeah. That must be why they haven't proposed a truly open format yet.

Re:who cares (1)

Anonymous Cowterd (910764) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487677)

"The 'cross platform standards is superior' line is only trotted out when it is against Microsoft." This is about the smartest thing that any slashdotter has ever said. I applaud you for the truthfulness of your post. Basically, the rule is "We don't care if it's good or if it even works. If it's not made by Microsoft, we like it. Otherwise, we'll flame it until the rest of the Internet sees things our way."

Re:who cares (2, Insightful)

zurab (188064) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487662)

Hmm... Let's see:

Who cares that they are creating an XPCOM piece of shit?

Anyone in Korea that cares about cross platform compatibility of their banking and other related applications.

Why dont they just make a web-based thing that would work for all browsers.

Because as other posters and the article itself pointed out, the banking industry is already standardized on using SEED instead of SSL. Presumably changing that would be a tougher undertaking. Besides, XPCOM could work in any browser and any platform if a maker of that browser decided to support it - no Firefox or Mozilla suite are required.

And seriously, you people are such hypocrites.

OK, people out there definitely are.

XPCOM doesnt work on IE, and activex doesnt work on Firefox.

Sure, but the advantage of "Cross Platform Component Object Model" is that it works "cross platform." As I mentioned earlier, this enables any maker of any browser on almost any platform to use XPCOM. You can't say the same for ActiveX, which is an MS proprietary extension.

So that instantly makes Firefox better?

No, it makes XPCOM "better."

Not quite following... (5, Interesting)

uits (792760) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486554)

Because they were unable to use 128bit SSL in 1998, they are going to develop internet banking that is dependent on Mozilla XPCOM, instead of taking a cross platform standard SSL approach now?

While Mozilla is ostensibly a better platform to be locked into than Microsoft, is this really a big benefit?

Someone please translate for the layman (me)

Re:Not quite following... (1)

daviqh (906581) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486569)

Mozilla is a corperation now, and not to start a conspiricy theroy, but maybe
<winkwinknudgenudge> there is some cash flow below the table.</winkwinknudgenudge>

Re:Not quite following... (1)

uchihalush (898615) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486589)

or maybe there is some cash flow between you and M$ */endwinkwinknudgenudge*/

Re:Not quite following... (1)

Ambush Commander (871525) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486749)

Mozilla is not a corporation. Mozilla Corporation is a corporation, Mozilla Foundation is a non-profit organization, and the foundation is the parent.

Although they did do that with Google (prefetching, anyone?)

Re:Not quite following... (3, Informative)

Wizarth (785742) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486793)

I'd say it's because they have all their SEED technology in place, and don't want to replace that. Especially since it currently works. Producing a XPCOM based plug-in for Mozilla based browsers lets them connect to SEED encrypted connections, without replacing infrastructure.

This explains it nicely (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13486847)

Re:Not quite following... (5, Informative)

ihavnoid (749312) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487255)

First, I'm a Korean citizen who uses on-line banking every day.

Just as the article mentions, 128-bit SSL wasn't an option when the internet-based banking started on 1998, so Korea had to develop their own standards. Since there are more than 10 million SEED-based certificates issued on this country, changing the whole infrastructure into SSL would be crazy.

Yes, certficates are issued to everybody who needs an on-line banking account, since itself is used as an authentication method. To get a certificate, you have to visit any bank that you have an account, ask them for on-line banking, and they will give you a one-time password for issuing your certificate (valid for one week).

Everything else is handled on-line. Since the authentication system is a national standard, it works with any bank, any credit card company, and I remember it also works on the stock market. You don't need any offline registration to use it on another bank.

The certificate is password-protected, just like any other certificate. I believe the certificate is node-locked. If you want to export/import the key, you need the password associated with the key.

I'm not sure how many of these kind of features are supported by SSL, but even if IE/Firefox/Opera's SSL has more features, I don't think it's a good idea to replace a system that works well. Yes, I hate ActiveX, but I don't want to see 10+ million Korean citizens visit the bank for re-issuing their certificate.

Re:Not quite following... (2, Interesting)

stoev (103408) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487895)

Are there any free open source implementations of SEED? I think a change to SSL should be discussed. I am also in Korea (I work here). In 10 minutes I will extend my SEED key online, which expires soon. I will not go to my bank (which is 50 meters from me). The same method can be used to change all the keys to SSL. No need to visit the bank office.

My personal opinion is, that the existing e-banking system in Korea is substandard. ActiveX requires admin on XP to install and most banks install 2-3 other activeX. This has to stop. Somebody has to educate these guys how to do e-banking.

Re:Not quite following... (1)

Rits (453723) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487967)

It is a real pity they didn't go with Opera at that time... Obviously, it was an option.

Is there a STANDALONE xpcom release? (1)

mi (197448) | more than 8 years ago | (#13486757)

Xpcom should, really, be available in a standalone tarball, so that it can be built, tested and deployed independently. Does anyone know, whether such a thing exists somewhere?

Mozilla is quite infamous for bundling everything (and the kitchen sink) into one. Only OpenOffice is worse...

Sims OO (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13487115)

"Mozilla is quite infamous for bundling everything (and the kitchen sink) into one. Only OpenOffice is worse..."

I believe OO has a dinette and washer/cryer set in theirs.

Here I was, all excited... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13486820)

... that South Korea was going to be calling X-COM for something, but nooo...

dxo7l (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13486851)

Have to say it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13487039)

Obligatory cheers to Opera 3.5, the first browser to support 128-bit SSL

Post office (5, Interesting)

DavidBartlett (748559) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487046)

In case you were wondering, most bills are paid at the post office in Korea.

mod Do3n (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13487687)

that FrreBSD is

This is suicide (1)

Anonymous Cowterd (910764) | more than 8 years ago | (#13487722)

Activex makes use of the windows api, so it will work on internet explorer. The second most popular browser is firefox, which, of course, uses xpcom. If 85% of the internet uses internet explorer (correct me if I'm wrong), then what is the point of make the banking system client in xpcom? That's cutting your potential userbase by 85%, which, needless to say, is suicide. Also, if (like some other person said earlier on this topic) only old people use secure banking, this would further cut your userbase, as most elderly folks don't know jackshit about computers, so they won't be downloading firefox. They think that the whole internet resides in that little blue "e" on their desktop. So there ya go. You've just cut about 95% of your potential userbase. Good job Korea!

gnItaa (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13488159)

benefits 0f being for the state of BSD's acclaimed about ou7side are having trouble With any sort Hubbard and Mike the future holds implementation to lead developers
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