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Intel Enters Anti-Virus Market

samzenpus posted more than 9 years ago | from the anti-virus-inside dept.

Intel 191

Jack writes "ITO holds a story on latest Intel investment: "Intel is branching into anti-virus security with a $16 million investment in Czech anti-virus software vendor Grisoft. Grisoft's AVG anti-virus is used on more than 25 million computers worldwide, according to the company."

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Antivirus CPU (1)

fembots (753724) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505472)

Is it too early to expect built-in virus protection from Intel CPUs in the future? Like an extension of Centrino?

Re:Antivirus CPU (3, Informative)

JoshRosenbaum (841551) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505510)

I'd say if it was going to go to hardware it would go to the BIOS, which can be updated with new virus definitions. I'm pretty sure you can't update your CPU currently and I haven't heard of any plans to change that in the future.

Back in the day (maybe now too) some BIOS's watched the boot sector of the computer for viruses that tried to install themselves there.

Re:Antivirus CPU (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505688)

I'm pretty sure you can't update your CPU currently and I haven't heard of any plans to change that in the future.

Man, there should really be some sort of competency course people need to pass in order to post on /. . Programmable microcode is old news, fucktard.

Re:Antivirus CPU (2, Informative)

mwilli (725214) | more than 9 years ago | (#13506151)

Back in the day (maybe now too) some BIOS's watched the boot sector of the computer for viruses that tried to install themselves there.

To this day, most motherboards still have this option, at least Award bioses do. It's not activated by default and is somewhat hidden in a sea of options.

It would be nice, however, if they would actually perform virus scans at given times, on given days, in the background. I don't think it would be too difficult or too much to ask for this to happen.

Re:Antivirus CPU (2, Insightful)

drsmithy (35869) | more than 9 years ago | (#13506208)

It would be nice, however, if they would actually perform virus scans at given times, on given days, in the background. I don't think it would be too difficult or too much to ask for this to happen.

I think it would be quite difficult, from a practical perspective - not to mention a frighteningly massive security hole - for your BIOS was able to access every filesystem on your machine.

I think you'll also find that once the [protected mode] OS has booted, the BIOS is never used again anyway.

Re:Antivirus CPU (4, Interesting)

Stevyn (691306) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505524)

This seems like a big company diversifying and buying a portion of a smaller company, not trying to incorporate antivirus capabilities into their microprocessor line of products.

And Centrino was just a branding for a specific CPU, WiFi, and chipset. It wasn't some flashy new technology, just flashy marketing. I don't think you can really make virus detection software at the CPU level anyway.

Re:Antivirus CPU (5, Funny)

hungrygrue (872970) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505530)

Yes, they plan to build chips that automatically shut down when they detect Windows running. Problem solved.

Re:Antivirus CPU (4, Funny)

failure-man (870605) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505982)

Funny, but not without truth. We wouldn't be thinking about extensive antivirus, much less hardware-integrated antivirus if Windows didn't basically have sex with the internet.

Re:Antivirus CPU (2, Insightful)

Dhalphir (862198) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505537)

Built in hardware Antivirus? An interesting thought... Actually...even more interesting now that I think about it. It'd be fairly difficult, I imagine, for a virus, if it got in, to disable or cripple a hardware Antivirus as opposed to a software one like Norton or McAfee.

Re:Antivirus CPU (4, Informative)

GT_Alias (551463) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505545)

Kind of ties in to the future of anti-virus...AV is moving towards file behavioral analysis to determine a file's viral status since signature detection presents an increasingly serious zero-day problem. Virtualizing a file is a great way to determine behavior, and Intel is working on hardware-assisted virtualization:

http://www.intel.com/technology/computing/vptech/ [intel.com]

Tie the two ideas together, and you might see one of the ways Intel is hoping to use it's virtualization technology.

Re:Antivirus CPU (1)

camzmac (889291) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505588)

That would probably involve updating some kind of firmware to update the virus definitions, and if there is a security problem with that, repair people would probably have a helluva of a time fixing the firmware stuff.

Also wouldn't antivirus CPUs have to be tied to a specific operating system (hint hint) to be able to detect some bad binaries? I sure as hell wouldn't want bigger chip real estate to support a specific operating system I may never want to run on that specific CPU.

And then there's that antivirus thing in some BIOSes... haven't played with it though.

Re:Antivirus CPU (4, Informative)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505616)

> ...built-in virus protection from Intel CPUs...

Sure. It's called "Trusted Computing". It's another name for "Disney Rights Management". I hope you enjoy getting what you're wishing for.

GNAA declares victory over Wikipedia (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505474)

GNAA declares victory over Wikipedia
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Worked for Microsoft... Let's see how Intel handle (4, Interesting)

Nerd Systems (912027) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505475)

Intel buying an anti-virus software could work out well for the company, especially if they share the success that Microsoft had when buying Giant's Anti-Spyware program and taking over it's development. Intel has the ability to take a good product and make it even better, and possibly even implementing hardware-based virus detection into future processors as well.

If an Intel processor could be made to have hardware-based virus detection, integrating with this software-based virus detection, the team could be a very powerful deterrant to any future virus outbreaks. Imagine the hardware and software components working side by side to protect systems, giving future virus writers another hurdle to be cleared, when developing new virus infestations.

Hopefully the virus software can be made more efficient as well, so that running virus software on a system won't bog it down, hogging system resources like crazy, making people want to not run virus software in the first place. This has long been the bane of the majority of software packages, as the slowdown they cause for certain users, especially gamers, has made them desire to not run the software packages on their systems, resulting in these systems being more vulnerable to a virus outbreak.

Another added benefit that I can see from Intel buying this software, is that eventually if they integrate software and hardware aspects into a cohesive package that is well-implemented and able to fight viruses at a better efficiency then other programs, this will cause Intel based processors to stand out as well, as these days, virus protection and spyware protection are very important to the majority of users out there.

If Intel does this right, this can raise the bar for future processing efforts. Soon there will be more to consider when buying a new system then processing speed and cache size, might have to start considering integrated software as well in the not so distant future...

Good luck on this one Intel...

Re:Worked for Microsoft... Let's see how Intel han (4, Informative)

Red Pointy Tail (127601) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505535)

Not quite 'buying over the company' as partnering with a local Czech VC to buy over a majority stake from another Czech VC firm.

From the press release on Grisoft's website:

Grisoft announces investment by Intel Capital and Enterprise Investors

Prague, Czech Republic - September 6th, 2005 - Grisoft, one of the leading providers of anti-virus security software, announced today that Enterprise Investors (EI), the largest private equity firm in Central and Eastern Europe, and Intel Capital, Intel Corporation's venture investment fund, have made a substantial investment in the company.

The $52 million investment in Grisoft by Enterprise Investors and Intel Capital will result in a new ownership structure of the company, with a majority stake being acquired from current owners Benson Oak Capital. As a result of this strategic transaction, the two new investors will own a 65% stake in Grisoft.

Re:Worked for Microsoft... Let's see how Intel han (2, Informative)

Amouth (879122) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505567)

if your intrested in tech like that you need to look at DEP .. is seems to me better than a hardware virus scaner as it makes their methods of invasion almost useless the new intel chips support hardware DEP and server 2003 & XPSP2 support it (although it isnt' set to the most picky level in XP which makes it pointless)

Re:Worked for Microsoft... Let's see how Intel han (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505628)

The most efficient way to handle malicious software is still to use your brain. As long as people blindly trust some new hightech stuff to know which software is wanted and which not, clever blackhats will get around it. People that don't think about what they do will always be victims of stuff like this, unless they don't have control over their PC anymore. And I don't want to see the power of computers crippled, just because computer illiterates don't get infected with the 10th worm in succesion.

PS: Sorry for getting into that TCP stuff, but people like the parent poster seem to blindly follow stuff like that crap. That ticks me off... :>

Re:Worked for Microsoft... Let's see how Intel han (4, Insightful)

krappie (172561) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505702)

Microsoft seems to have a good strong competative pattern that they've been doing. I don't know if Intel can compete. Microsoft's pattern is:

1. Create an Operating System
2. Look at what software is successful and making money on that Operating System.
3. Create Microsoft version of same software
4. Integrate said software into the OS and use Windows leverage to force OEM's and manufacturers to bundle preinstalled on most computers.

So far, this has pretty much worked and usually kills whatever piece of software was successful on Windows. I think its about to happen with antivirus software. I dont know if Intel or the other antivirus companies can compete with this. What do you think?

I wonder.. (2, Interesting)

Dance_Dance_Karnov (793804) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505478)

how many of those are AVG free?

Re:I wonder.. (5, Interesting)

Mahou (873114) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505851)

more important: will intel still allow avg free to exist?

Re:I wonder.. (1)

uncoveror (570620) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505886)

Yes, that is a very important question. AVG Free works really well. Also, it is still obscure enough to be ignored by hackers who expect to encounter Norton or McAfee, and know how to disable them. It would be very bad if Intel killed AVG free edition.

Re:I wonder.. (1)

cujo_1111 (627504) | more than 9 years ago | (#13506341)

Well, it isn't obscure anymore...

Re:I wonder.. (1)

Frogbert (589961) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505944)

Whats the difference? I mean I use AVG at home and guess which one I'll be first to recommend if my Boss asks me?

Re:I wonder.. (2, Informative)

Molochi (555357) | more than 9 years ago | (#13506252)

Well I can tell you I've installed AVG free on >300 computers this year. Me. By myself. Basicly if I run into a homeuser client with an expired licence of some AV software that came with their computer they get a copy of AVGfree... 5 so far, this week. I'm numb to the mindless use of computers. Everybody gets AVG, MS-AS, and a real freakin firewall.

I hope Intel understands the value of AVG being free cause these morons would rather be plague carriers than pay for something other than a quick fix.

NIGGERS ARE DYING RIGHT NOW IN NOLA (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505480)

And all you pale white nerds care about is Intel.

Get some fucking PRIORITIES.

Re:NIGGERS ARE DYING RIGHT NOW IN NOLA (-1, Troll)

PunkOfLinux (870955) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505532)

get a fucking CLUE
This is a site about TECHNOLOGY, not what's happening in the world around us.

Re:NIGGERS ARE DYING RIGHT NOW IN NOLA (-1, Flamebait)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505642)

That's right, goddamnit. If it didn't happen in my basement: it didn't happen!

Re:NIGGERS ARE DYING RIGHT NOW IN NOLA (-1, Troll)

Namronorman (901664) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505758)

I hate to go off topice, but... What are your priorities?

Perhaps you should look at yourself before you look at others.

SO? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13506141)

It's not like anybody is going to miss them.

Besides, we got priorities. Through the power of Intel processors, someday, we will find a way to genetically engineer smarter, more socially agreeable and willing to work niggers with which to stock our prison industries allowing this great nation to better compete globally. Such is the promise of advantage in strength through diversity.

We can do with less niggers today since we have an over abundance to dibilitating degree and also since present stocks of niggers will simply provide the marginal genetic material necessary to create suitably improved, value added future niggers as a feedstock for this nations economic engine. We can accomplish that with less than half the niggers we have today.

Between now and then we should simply look at our present day nigger situation as a value proposition and when we do that, clearly those NOLA niggers are not really worth our time, money or attention. There is no, and will be no return on investment.

Admittedly this is a small but no less important first step in turning disasters into opportunities and liabilities into assets. Thank God we have people in position with the leadership and vision to capitalize on what nature has provided.

For the Record... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505481)

Intel Enters Anti-Virus Market
Author: IT-Observer Staff
Wednesday, 07 September 2005, 17:44 GMT


Intel is branching into anti-virus security with a $16 million investment in Czech anti-virus software vendor Grisoft. Grisofts AVG anti-virus is used on more than 25 million computers worldwide, according to the company.

Intel said its investment will help the software to reach a wider market and approach new customers. The companys product is already distributed through resellers worldwide and through the Internet.

By acquiring shares in Grisoft, Intel Capital is supporting the development of anti-virus software development and deployment around the globe," said Intel Capital President Arvind Sodhani.

The purchase is Intels largest investment to date in Eastern Europe. Last year, Intel invested more than $100 million with 40 percent of the investments were made outside of United States.

More Free Software Disappearing? (5, Insightful)

PipOC (886408) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505484)

Does this mean that they're no longer going to release AVG updates?

Re:More Free Software Disappearing? (1)

baldass_newbie (136609) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505497)

It's gone.
Was just looking for the free version last night after McAfee started getting flaky (again.)

But if I'm going to pay cabbage, at least AVG seems to work quickly and cleanly. More than I can say for McAfee's bloatware of Symantec's worthless offering.

Re:More Free Software Disappearing? (5, Informative)

JPM NICK (660664) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505507)

Its not gone, i Just got it this weekend. It is just hidden on the site. I think ypu need to go to free.grisoft.com

Re:More Free Software Disappearing? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505692)

http://free.grisoft.com/doc/2/lng/us/tpl/v5 [grisoft.com] should be a direct link.

Re:More Free Software Disappearing? (5, Informative)

PIPBoy3000 (619296) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505561)

There's always ClamAV [clamav.net] , though it doesn't have real-time virus scanning and it's not as easy to use (a Windows install requires Cygwin). Still, it's an open source option.

Re:More Free Software Disappearing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13506040)

http://www.clamwin.com/ [clamwin.com]
no cygwin required, easy to use.

Re:More Free Software Disappearing? (2, Insightful)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 9 years ago | (#13506182)

ClamAV isn't really a replacement for AVG or other Desktop virus scanners. The ClamAV engine could be adapted to the task with a suitable wrapper app, but as it is it's gear more towards scheduled scans.

On the other hand, FreeBSD mail gateway that I run at work where ClamAV works beautifully. It's all about using the right tool ;).

Get Clamwin (4, Informative)

msaver (907214) | more than 9 years ago | (#13506263)

Don't bother with Cygwin just for AV. Clamwin [clamwin.org] is pretty sweet. No real-time scanning, but installation and configuration is fairly straight-forward -- and the database is updated several times a day.

The biggest problem it faces may be that it's so plain and easy to use that people have trouble accepting that it's as good as all the colorful commercial offerings they see. I wonder if Intel's gonna keep AVG's viruses. [grisoft.com]

Use it as a second scanner if you already have another AV program-- Clamwin is not a resource hog.

Oh yeah -- it's frequently used as an email scanner in networks of all sizes... don't worry about it's virus database!

Re:More Free Software Disappearing? (1)

Bob54321 (911744) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505631)

You can always switch to other free AV scanners. I switched to AntiVir http://www.free-av.com/ [free-av.com] when McAfee slowed down my computer too much. It does the job for me...

Re:More Free Software Disappearing? (3, Informative)

nolife (233813) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505844)

Caution with AntiVir. I have not tried it in about two years so things may have changed but the free version will not scan files on network drives, not even real time when they are opened and accessed from a network drive. If you are using AntiVir, you can test this with the Eicar test file stored on a share. This may not be a problem for some but a word of caution if this may apply to you. That is the only reason I switched to AVG from AntiVir for my home use.

OH SHIT (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505487)

LOL I LIKE COCK

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Score: 0 (Logged-in users start at Score: 1)(Use the Preview Button! Check those URLs!)
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Crap. (4, Insightful)

spauldo (118058) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505493)

I hope there remains a free version of AVG. That's what I install on the few windows machines I maintain for people. It's a lot easier to convince people to run antivirus software when they don't have to pay for it.

Re:Crap. (4, Informative)

Steamhead (714353) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505555)

Well there always is Avast [avast.com] antivirus.

Re:Crap. (5, Informative)

JPriest (547211) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505663)

And AntiVir [free-av.com]

Re:Crap. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13506056)

And ClamAV [clamav.net] .

Re:Crap. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13506245)

Re:Crap. (3, Funny)

xaque (869340) | more than 9 years ago | (#13506309)

And... uh... pirated Norton? > I just wanted to belong...

Agreed (1)

bogie (31020) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505696)

Dear Intel, please don't take away the free version. And please for the love of God don't add a billion useless features to it. Just let the group that puts out the free version do its thing. AVG works well, updates often, and is light on resources. Losing that would suck especially for home users who among other things do NOT need yet another subscription fee tacked onto their monthly bills!

AntiVIR (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505866)

Sure, they're based in Germany, but they make another free virus scanner. And who can't love a scanned called Luke Filewalker?

http://www.free-av.com/ [free-av.com]

avg free edition (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505495)

not a bad scanner, i have used the free edition on friends PC's

Kudos to Intel. (0, Troll)

CyricZ (887944) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505501)

It's great to see Intel taking the initiative to deal with problems that are associated with their product, but not directly caused by it. While the problems lie with Microsoft and the faults of their Windows operating systems, at least Intel is willing to put some effort towards limiting the damage that may be caused by malicious software.

I would love to see the developers of PHP take a similar route. Their product has often looked very bad as of late, mainly due to security flaws in third-party software written in PHP. While the developers themselves are not to blame, they could still work towards limiting the damage caused by poorly written scripts.

Re:Kudos to Intel. (4, Insightful)

springbox (853816) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505694)

It's just like making hardware with built in AV software. The idea to me seems absolutely redicilous. Why does the industry need to revolve around fixing Microsoft's problems? Virus scanners are primarily (if not totally) geared towards Windows, right?

Intel makes a general purpose CPU, and it works just fine. They shouldn't be responsible for fixing their hardware (thinking of the hardware AV idea) because of software that someone wrote to run on it that has undesirable effects to the end user. Similiarly, the PHP developers shouldn't be bothered to fix the (common?) mistakes made by hobbyists or otherwise.

This is the real world, my friend. (3, Interesting)

CyricZ (887944) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505771)

Remember, this is the real world. Things aren't always fair, and things don't always go as perhaps they ideally should.

While Intel probably shouldn't be responsible for helping prevent some of the problems associated with Windows, they should very well act so as to protect their image. Limiting the association of malicious software with their processors is a very good start. That is something that they alone must do, however, regardless of what Microsoft does.

Likewise for the developers of PHP. Sure, they can stand back and always blame the third-party developers who write shitty, insecure scripts. Or they could do the sensible thing, and take some action. Put measures in place to prevent, or at the very least limit, the ability of poorly written third-party scripts to reflect poorly on PHP.

It's far more beneficial for Intel or the PHP developers to act, rather than just throw blame around while their public images are decimated. Throwing blame around solves nothing, while taking real, technological action may very well prevent the problems in the first place.

Re:Kudos to Intel. (4, Insightful)

UserChrisCanter4 (464072) | more than 9 years ago | (#13506123)

Why does the industry need to revolve around fixing Microsoft's problems?

snip

They shouldn't be responsible for fixing their hardware (thinking of the hardware AV idea) because of software that someone wrote to run on it that has undesirable effects to the end user.

Why? Cash!

You're right, Intel shouldn't be responsible for fixing Microsoft's problems. I'm certain they don't feel that way. Fixing Microsoft's problems, though, is worth millions of dollars. Assuming Intel is looking to build an anti-virus system at the CPU or chipset level (pure conjecture, but let's just assume), they wouldn't be doing it because they feel a responsibility to do so. Rather, they'd be looking for a competitive advantage over AMD, and another reason for customers to ditch their perfectly good (but three year-old) 2.0 Ghz Pentium 4.

Of course, I'm not even sure how such a hardware anti-virus would work, other than something similar to the NX system on the x86-64 chips. If such a beast does rear its head, though, rest assured that it won't be because someone felt a moral responsibility to fix some Microsoft bugs.

Re:Kudos to Intel. (1)

merreborn (853723) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505791)

I would love to see the developers of PHP take a similar route. Their product has often looked very bad as of late, mainly due to security flaws in third-party software written in PHP. While the developers themselves are not to blame, they could still work towards limiting the damage caused by poorly written scripts.

By that reasoning, the developers of C and C++ should be held accountable for the flaws in Windows! If the guys who write the C compiler aren't responsible for Microsoft's mistakes, why are the developers of PHP responsible for all the shitty code in PHPBB?

Re:Kudos to Intel. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505873)

By that reasoning, the developers of C and C++ should be held accountable for the flaws in Windows!

Luckily for us, Microsoft writes their own compilers. So we can blame the compiler programmers too! Go team!

Intel??? (3, Insightful)

xiaomonkey (872442) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505506)

Any clue on why this might be a good strategic move for Intel?

I mean, it seems a bit random in that it's miles away from their 'core competencies' in chip design/manufacturing.

Their reputation is being tarnished. (3, Insightful)

CyricZ (887944) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505549)

Windows is very much associated with Intel (ie. the term "Wintel" systems, for instance). Each time a virus, worm, etc., damages or destroys a massive number of Windows systems, Intel ends up looking very bad. In general, Intel PCs are known to be susceptible to malicious software, even though that is mainly due to the widespread use of Windows, and not directly related to the Intel chips.

So it greatly benefits them to improve the image of their chips, security-wise. This is something that others should be looking into as well. The PHP developers, while they do not develop hardware, do develop a very similar product. Both an Intel CPU and the PHP interpreter provide an instruction execution environment. As with nearly any such system, abuse is possible. That is why the PHP developers should follow Intel's lead, and create solutions that will help prevent third-party scripts from running amok, and thus tarnishing PHP's reputation.

Re:Their reputation is being tarnished. (5, Insightful)

commo1 (709770) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505670)

I..... don't agree. Viruses are not generally written in machine or machine-specific code, they do the same as most Windows software does: call APIs that have flaws in them because MS does not write them robustly enough nor is there peer review to point out flaws that an originating team optimizing for flawless interoperability with another team's APIs and other code. In essence, open-source development is so sucessful in a security sense because such review (ie: how could a virus exploit this?) has already taken place in the development process in the wild.

A virus written for a Windows XP machine has at least a 90% chance of hitting a similarly protected Alpha running XP (OK, OK, let the flames begin....). Does the above comment infer that when Mac OS moves to i386 it will be more suceptible? This may be the case, for one or both of two reasons: 1) by then the focus will have moved from MS Windows attacks to Mac OS attacks because of market penetration, plus the added bonus of being a novelty like Windows virii have become. 2) the virus developers have learned tricks for machine calls and stops only pertinent to i386s; see the missing 10%.

AVG (4, Informative)

wviperw (706068) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505509)

AVG download page [grisoft.com]

I've used the free version of AVG for a few years now and it has been very good to me. I just hope that with this infuse of money Grisoft doesn't become too "corporate."

Re:AVG (1)

xutopia (469129) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505633)

I'm hoping the same but the reason why AVG can boast big numbers like that is because of their free version.

Re:AVG (1)

The-Perl-CD-Bookshel (631252) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505684)

Ditto. I have had AVG installed on this box for 2 years and I have never had a problem. *crossed fingers*

subscription services.... (1)

BewireNomali (618969) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505512)

... makes for consistent revenue, makes stable companies.

I can imagine some guy at Intel has been screaming "diversify" - wide-eyed, panic-stricken, for a while now.

LanDesk (1)

abrotman (323016) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505521)

Didn't Intel used to sell LanDesk AV software?

Re:LanDesk (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505572)

Yes it got sold to symantec and is now SAV. Landesk is still around as a seperate company selling desktop/server management tools.

Re:LanDesk (2, Insightful)

Wiseleo (15092) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505704)

Yep I remember Landesk 6.0 very fondly :-)

That's what makes Symantec Antivirus (and not consumer Norton brand nonsense) so good.

Time to build up another Antivirus and sell it off again for Intel?

Re:LanDesk (1)

Nasarius (593729) | more than 9 years ago | (#13506158)

That's what makes Symantec Antivirus (and not consumer Norton brand nonsense) so good.

Are you serious? I've used many versions of SAV. They all have a very noticeable effect on the speed of the computer. AVG does not.

AVG is a bad choice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505527)

AVG is used on all my school computers. It is almost spyware, it slows the computer down so much. Intel should have invested in something more worthwhile.

Re:AVG is a bad choice (1)

gui_tarzan2000 (625775) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505777)

"AVG is used on all my school computers. It is almost spyware, it slows the computer down so much. Intel should have invested in something more worthwhile."

Tell your tech to check it out. We use it on all of our school computers and it doesn't slow anything down.

Re:AVG is a bad choice (1)

ender- (42944) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505868)

Interesting. AVG is the only AV software I've found that doesn't slow my machines to a crawl.
I briefly had AVG-Free on our receptionists computer because it was too old and slow [P2-400] to run our company's official client [McAfee]. We finally got her a new computer so it got McAfee. It sucked. It was originally set to scan zip and encoded files. It made Thunderbird take like 2 minutes to open any emails [even without attachments]. AVG was set to scan open archives as well, but it never had a problem...

So for me, when I'm forced to used Windows, I'll stick with AVG. It was the only AV software I was willing to pay for to use on my wife's business computer.

Re:AVG is a bad choice (1)

DeathElk (883654) | more than 9 years ago | (#13506355)

AVG won't install on Win95, and noticeably slows down anything 600MHz 128Mb. But compared to any Symantec product, it positively flies.

Great Product (5, Informative)

JPM NICK (660664) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505529)

AVG is great for me because it barely uses any system resources. I run a small company with older hardware and it runs great on there. Much better than something like Norton which can really bog down one of those machines

Resource consuming utilities (1)

ReformedExCon (897248) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505551)

Anyone ever notice that the Gmail Notifier takes up 10 megs of memory? What is it doing with all that memory?

I use AVG on all my machines. It just makes sense, like F-Prot did back in the DOS days.

You shouldn't need anti-virus software. (0, Troll)

CyricZ (887944) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505613)

Have you considered switching to Linux or FreeBSD? That is, of course, assuming you don't have any Windows-specific applications. Linux and FreeBSD work great on older systems for many applications, and offer vastly increased security. You wouldn't have to worry about installing anti-virus software, and the chances of your computers getting infected with spyware would be near zero. That, of course, could very well prevent your business' data from being sent to criminals from parts unknown.

Re:You shouldn't need anti-virus software. (1, Insightful)

dotwaffle (610149) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505693)

Just because you run Linux/BSD doesn't mean you don't need an anti-virus! Sure, the risks are minimal, but virii do occur on those platforms!

ClamAV is free, and at all good apt repositories - go install ;)

Re:You shouldn't need anti-virus software. (1)

Leebert (1694) | more than 9 years ago | (#13506064)

Just because you run Linux/BSD doesn't mean you don't need an anti-virus!

Ummm, for all practical purposes, yes it does.

...virii...

*eyeroll*

ClamAV is free, and at all good apt repositories - go install ;)

Pointless unless you're scanning mail or are a Windows fileserver.

Re:Great Product (1)

bsquizzato (413710) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505798)

Norton bogs down machines because by default it is set to do all kinds of scans in the background every time you are downloading or opening a file and other things like that. If you use a combination of virus protection with just good computer sense then you can minimize the amount of crap Norton needs to be doing in the background designed for people who click on anything before thinking about what it is.

Re:Great Product (3, Informative)

krunk4ever (856261) | more than 9 years ago | (#13506213)

just wanted to say AVG isn't FREE for everyone.

from http://free.grisoft.com/doc/2/lng/us/tpl/v5 [grisoft.com]

Is AVG Free right for you?

AVG Free Edition is for private, non-commercial, single home computer use only. Use of AVG Free Edition within any organization or for commercial purposes is strictly prohibited. The AVG Free Edition is absolutely not for use with any type of OEM bundling with SW, HW component or any service. Your use of AVG Free Edition shall be in accordance with and is subject to the terms and conditions set forth in the AVG Free Edition License Agreement which accompanies AVG Free Edition.


i'm pretty sure a small company computer doesn't constitute as a non-commercial, single home computer.

just my 2 cents. the software works great, and i recommend it to everyone who wants a good free av software, but their clause does state that any type of commercial use requires the purchase of a license.

Re:Great Product (3, Funny)

chill (34294) | more than 9 years ago | (#13506413)

Not bad, you can read! Now point out the part in the post you replied to that said they used the free version...

Take your time...

  -CH

whats next? (1)

gaanagaa (784648) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505552)

World's top chip maker into anti-virus? Soon McDonalds will be building their own, oil refinery.

Re:whats next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505596)

http://www.grisoft.com/doc/314/lng/us/tpl/tpl01 [grisoft.com]

Read the grisoft info...intel is only buying a 65% stake with to venture capital firms...probably only own 20-25% of the company not even a majority owner.

Re:whats next? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13506310)

Soon McDonalds will be building their own, oil refinery
You ever see the skin of their employees?

I can picture it now... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505554)

Virus Found: AdvancedMediaDestruction.worm

Threat: 5
Ease of Removal: 3

Symptoms: Unit performs well in games and does not get nearly as hot under normal operation.

Removal Instructions:
1) Unplug computer and peripherals.
2) Take off side panel.
3) Locate large heatsink/fan and remove from chasis.
4) Remove the underlying chip (Warning: May cause demonic possession if not removed violently enough).

After which, you must replace the motherboard to fully alleviate all issues.

Prevention: Use Intel.

so does this mean...? (2)

weighn (578357) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505557)

that the AVG code will now be "optimised" to cras^H^H^H^H run-slowly on AMD CPU's?

Re:so does this mean...? (1)

failure-man (870605) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505679)

Since chances are they already use ICC anyway I doubt there'll be a difference. (Unless there's a secret "crash on Athlon" option which Intel will require.)

Good Luck, AVG (1)

KwKSilver (857599) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505626)

Their free product worked fine for me till I got tired of nursemaiding Windows. In fact if I can't avoid buying a box with Windoomed on it, or had to dual-boot, I'd be happy to use AVG. I think I saw their professional product on a store shelf recently.

The Story Is Wrong. (3, Informative)

Cocteaustin (702468) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505647)

So, this isn't Intel entering the anti-virus market. It's Intel Capital (the company's capital investment arm) making an investment in an software company. They're not buying the company, they're just picking up a chunk of it -- it's just like you or me buying stock.

Re:The Story Is Wrong. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13506272)

"-- it's just like you or me buying stock."

quote: "Intel said its investment will help the software to reach a wider market and approach new customers." I can't say you or me buying stock would do that.

$16 million is a serious investment. Anybody know how much control of AVG that gives them?

I love AVG (1)

Suppafly (179830) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505676)

I think this is great news, I love AVG anti-virus. I also end up working on pc's that are infected to the point where norton is too broken to work. AVG always seems to be able to remove the viruses that norton can't.

AVG = slow. Avast = the real deal (1)

gelfling (6534) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505689)

AVG does a pretty good job but Avast is better for normal scanning. I'm not sure which is faster when you scan everything on the machine. Avast though does a great job of keeping itself current.

Re:AVG = slow. Avast = the real deal (1)

Spy Handler (822350) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505910)

Agreed. I have had excellent results with Avast! the free version.

I tried the free AVG version but the interface was clunky.

Why? (4, Funny)

slashname3 (739398) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505710)

Why is Intel getting into the virus writing business? Aren't there enough virus writers out there doing this for free? We don't need the virus writers to be payed for doing this work! Is this some misguided plan to force everyone to run Linux?

Oh, wait, did it say anti-virus? Never mind. :)

Hardware Antivirus (1)

erikharrison (633719) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505814)

Lots of people are asking about integration of hardware virus detection into the CPU or mainboard. People seem to think it's cool

But . . . .isn't this one of the legitimate promises of DRM?

This FP For GNAA (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13505825)

'I Have to 4ill [goat.cx]

AVG Free Edition... (3, Insightful)

oskard (715652) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505845)

Was a beacon of hope in the freeware = spyware world. Guess we're gonna kiss that one goodbye too :\

A good start... (1)

bjbyrne (28514) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505872)

It would be great if Intel would grow into a company that could compete with Microsoft on the software front. After all, if Microsoft makes money selling hardware, then hardware companies should have no problem selling software.

Intel and Anti Virus (3, Informative)

rodgster (671476) | more than 9 years ago | (#13505933)

IIRC Intel used to have an AV product namely Intel LanDesk manager. Then they sold it to Symantec which became NAVCE (Norton Anti Virus Corporate Edition) and now SAVCE.

AVG has a Linux based admin server (2, Interesting)

DeathElk (883654) | more than 9 years ago | (#13506318)

I've opted for the commercial AVG network edition at my site due to the option of running the AV administration database (tcpserv) under Linux, using firebird db. This ties in nicely with our samba environment.

Their tcpserv product gathers status data from all AVG "clients" on the network, including several hung off a 64kbps leased line - it's conservative on bandwidth. AVG for linux scans samba shares, and soon I will have AVG for sendmail monitoring mail in and out.

The AVGadmin client can be used to view reports, force updates and make configuration changes to all clients from my desktop - I've yet to try running their AVGadmin app under wine...

I'm very pleased with the flexibility offered by AVG network edition for linux/windows sites. I hope Intel doesn't pressure AVG to scrap the linux support.

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