Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Solaris DTrace To Be Ported to FreeBSD

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the new-toys dept.

Sun Microsystems 151

daria42 writes "It looks like Sun's famous Dynamic Tracing tool - one of the best features in Solaris 10 - is getting ported to FreeBSD. Sun open-sourced the code back in January and it has been picked up by FreeBSD developer Devon O'Dell. The tool provides insanely great advanced performance analysis and debugging features for server software. Good to see some result come out of the Sun open-sourcing process." From the article: "O'Dell told ZDNet Australia the aim of the project -- which commenced a month ago -- was that all scripts and applications that utilised DTrace under its native Solaris environment should be able to run in FreeBSD with no changes. While FreeBSD's existing ktrace function was similar to DTrace, it was limited in scope, according to O'Dell. 'FreeBSD implements a somewhat similar facility for dynamically instrumenting syscalls for any given application,' he said."

cancel ×

151 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

New slogan... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13508749)

Slashdot : All vaporware, all the time

License? (3, Interesting)

rpbailey1642 (766298) | more than 8 years ago | (#13508768)

The article doesn't say whether the program will be released under the BSD license (unlikely) or whether it will remain under the CDDL [opensource.org] . The latter seems most likely.

Re:License? (5, Insightful)

jonadab (583620) | more than 8 years ago | (#13508878)

Why would this occasion a license change? It's a *port*, as in, the code will now run on more systems than it used to. Licensing doesn't have anything to do with that; it's still fundamentally the same codebase, so I'm sure the code will still be covered by the same licensing terms it already was released under.

To create a BSD-licensed version, someone would have to *clone* it, which is different from porting.

Re:License? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509932)

But most of DTrace is tightly integrated with the kernel. You can't do this thing without heavy kernel support.

Obviously you can't just merge DTrace into FreeBSD and not have license issues. Likewise you probably couldn't just make it an optional part of the ports tree either, for technical reasons, due to its heavy kernel changes.

Good for Ruby! (5, Insightful)

fishdan (569872) | more than 8 years ago | (#13508772)

OOOH! Someone please tell me that the OSX port is close behind. I'd been living on a mac for quite a while, but after seeing the how dtrace can help with Ruby dev [sun.com] I'd switched to Solaris for my Ruby optimization (which is up to about 30% of my work now). If I can start doing this on my powerbook, I'll be a super happy camper.

I'm not sure how this benefits Sun, but something as awesome as this, I'm willing to assume it's altruism, and I appreciate it.

And this is soooo off topic you just have to give (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13508873)

Well then you'll be happy to see the adventures of the iGuy!!

Doing battle with the evil ZenMAster!! [geeknet.nl]

Re:Good for Ruby! (4, Informative)

TheTomcat (53158) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509119)

There have been bindings for PHP [php.net] for a few days, now [netevil.org] .

S

Re:Good for Ruby! (4, Insightful)

jm91509 (161085) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509574)

I'm not sure how this benefits Sun, but something as awesome as this, I'm willing to assume it's altruism, and I appreciate it.

Thats easy. You used to be a Mac only person (making some guesses here...) but now you are a Solaris user.

How many other people are trying solaris for the first time because of this feature?

Suck in the developers and they may turn into server sales or even just positive PR.

Sounds like more than altruisim to me.

Re:Good for Ruby! (1)

mccalli (323026) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509596)

Someone please tell me that the OSX port is close behind.

I'd hope so too, but doesn't it depend on the kernel? OS X doesn't have a FreeBSD kernel, it's a MACH-based affair.

It clearly can be ported between kernels because this is precisely what the article is describing. However, that doesn't translate to the work actually taking place to run it against MACH.

Cheers,
Ian

Re:Good for Ruby! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13510853)

I'd hope so too, but doesn't it depend on the kernel? OS X doesn't have a FreeBSD kernel, it's a MACH-based affair.

That is not correct. The OS X kernel is a hybrid of Mach and FreeBSD. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xnu [wikipedia.org]

When will it be available in Linux ? (2, Interesting)

UltimaGuy (745333) | more than 8 years ago | (#13508776)

I have seen the use of this tool, and seriously, it rocks. There is no other tracing tool to compare with this. So, I am very eager to hear any news about this being ported to Linux, as not many people use FreeBSD ;-)

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (5, Interesting)

brilinux (255400) | more than 8 years ago | (#13508853)

Um, actually, quite a few people (myself included) use it on servers (and I use it on my laptop as well), and most of us are quite happy about this, and get quite upset when people blow us off as if the only real F/OS OS to use is GNU/Linux. You might actually like a BSD if you try it...

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (1)

10Ghz (453478) | more than 8 years ago | (#13508944)

Well, there WAS a smiley in the GP-post, in case you missed it...

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13510055)

Well, there WAS a smiley in the GP-post, in case you missed it...

What makes you think he didn't notice, arsehole ;-)

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (0)

cbreaker (561297) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510480)

Um, actually, quite a few people (myself included) think you need to chill the hell out. He put a smiley, it sounded sarcastic, I took it as such - but you didn't because you're one of the BSDefenders.

Don't be so defensive, it's just an OS!

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (1)

misleb (129952) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510924)

I've been using Linux for almost a decade now. I've settled on the distribution that I prefer (Debian). But I recently started a new sysadmin job where they run mostly FSBD web/mail servers. I had a chance to build a new mail gateway. I resisted the temptation to just go with what I was comfortable with (Debian) and I installed FBSD.

My first impression is that FBSD is like another distribution of Linux. I don't mean pigeonhole FBSD. And I realize it may come as an insult, but after using so many different flavors of Linux, that is what the differences amount to as far as I am concerned. And looking at it as a distribution of Linux, it isn't all that impressive. I dont' particularly care to compile most software from source. Although the ports system does offer some very up to date packages (if you cvsup), if I wanted to to compile everything from source and have bleeding edge versions of stuff, I'd just run Gentoo Linux. The Gentoo portage system is much more refined than the old, clunky BSD ports system. Overall, Debian's packaging system beats all, hands down, IMO.

On a server it isn't such a big deal to compile everything from source because generally you install it and let it run for months or years with only minor updates. But on a workstation it is downright annoying.

Is there any reason why I shouldn't look at FBSD as if it were a flavor of Linux? Yeah, it has a different kernel. I guess FBSD might be a little faster? That is what the benchmarks say, but the difference isn't staggering. I certainly don't notice. Is it more stable? I haven't had many problems with Linux that couldn't be blamed on cheap PC hardware.

Anyway, I'll continue using FBSD where I work if only because there is no compelling reason NOT to use it. I probably could convert it all to Linux if I really wanted to.

-matthew

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (5, Informative)

halber_mensch (851834) | more than 8 years ago | (#13511885)

Is there any reason why I shouldn't look at FBSD as if it were a flavor of Linux? Yeah, it has a different kernel. I guess FBSD might be a little faster? That is what the benchmarks say, but the difference isn't staggering. I certainly don't notice. Is it more stable? I haven't had many problems with Linux that couldn't be blamed on cheap PC hardware.

Yes, a very important reason - FreeBSD is not Linux, just as surely as SCO UnixWare is not Solaris. Their codebase is certainly not the same, and in fact FreeBSD's code lineage dates back many years before Linux.

FreeBSD and Linux, being F/OSS systems, share a very large base of F/OSS software, so looking at kde on X on FreeBSD really won't appear that different from looking at kde on X on linux. I could just as well ask why anyone would want to use Linux when it just looks like a derivative of FreeBSD, which predates it. but that would not be a fair assessment because Linux is a seperate work built by another party. Yes, it is a unix-like system. Yes, it strives to adhere to POSIX standards. Yes, it runs all the same software. But no, it is a different system.

I have been using FreeBSD and NetBSD for many years, and where I work all of our stuff is on SuSE. In my opinion, SuSE is impossible to upgrade, its package system is inadequate, and shorewall is a lousy attempt at ip filtering. If I had my way I'd probably replace everything with FreeBSD. But did you notice somehting about the attitude of my opinions? Wasn't your first thought "Well gee, you use FreeBSD all the time and you've probably barely given SuSE Linux a shot?" If it was, you would be right. Because I learned to accomplish tasks in FreeBSD, I favor it - the same way I favor speaking in english over german because english is my native language. I'm sure if you sit down and think about it, when you picked up FreeBSD you tried to do things in the Debian idiom, expecting Debian results. But you didn't get them. So you're underwhelmed. It's natural, but please don't try to attribute it to FreeBSD being an inadequate copy of your favorite system, because that simply is a lie.

On the packages/ports system, I think you've really overdramaticized your plight with the BSD way-of-doing-things. First, you can cvsup the ports tree and compile from source. But you can also use pkg_add to add binary packages. If you don't want to fetch the package tarball yourself, you can use pkg_add's remote fetching feature. Simply pkg_add -r and you're on your way. It will take care of dependencies and the package database will record the package's information. You can also install portupgrade and use it to magically update a port and its dependencies when it is time to upgrade. It's not a difficult or time consuming system to use. I'm unfamiliar with Debian's package system, so I can't make any comments on it, but FreeBSD's package system has always been very useful fo me, and it gets more powerful all the time.

Overall, though, Linux and BSD really do feed from eachother's growth. What's good for one is good for the other. I may use FreeBSD, but that doesn't mean Linux is useless; and the opposite is true as well. All this bickering is really pointless because both projects will continue on in their own directions; some people will favor the one while some people will favor the other. It's simply a matter of preference

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (5, Insightful)

tsalaroth (798327) | more than 8 years ago | (#13508958)

I'd be willing to bet there's a shitload of FreeBSD web servers out there, since I manage twelve of them, myself.

Linux has its uses and is great for many tasks, but only Gentoo comes close to the ports system and how well it manages software installation.

Either way, I'm hoping that yes, it will be ported to Linux as well, if it hasn't been already.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (1)

speculatrix (678524) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510476)

FreeBSD... linux great but... only Gentoo comes close to the ports system

I've used many different package systems - solaris's, linux (debian's apt, suse's yast, redhat's), ipkg on zaurus... and maybe I'm missing something, but I didn't find FreeBSD's ports better than debian's system, or even much better than yast's... and it wasn't entirely unbreakable either.

I'm sorry, FreeBSD guys, but it's still too much of a minority interest, with too many real-world solutions missing.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (2, Informative)

OrangeTide (124937) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510498)

Actually crux [crux.nu] is closer to ports, and slackware + pkg-src [netbsd.org] is basically the same thing.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509012)

There is no other tracing tool to compare with this.

Yes, there is: SystemTap [redhat.com] by Red Hat, IBM and Intel.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (3, Informative)

freshman_a (136603) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509408)


Yes, there is: SystemTap by Red Hat, IBM and Intel.

Perhaps you should read

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/solarisx86/message/2 7818 [yahoo.com]

and

http://milek.blogspot.com/2005/08/linux-and-solari s.html [blogspot.com]

Two discussions on some differences between SystemTap and Dtrace. (And yes, both links are in favor of Dtrace, and for good reason it appears.)

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509750)

Solaris developer uses his blog to slag of competition -- news at 11.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13510128)

Anytime you want to actually contribute and refute with examples or logic, feel free to pipe up.

Thanks!

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (2, Informative)

ahl_at_sun (853337) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510590)

That's not a Solaris developer (though I am) -- it's a customer who's been using DTrace for quite a while. He actually knows what he's talking about.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509015)

Why bother? The Linux kernel itself is actually pretty crap. It's monolithic and the wuality of 2.6 is a joke. It's the actual open-source applications such as Gnome, Firefox et all that everyone likes. Given the troubles with BitKeeper, and the many, many problems with 2.6.x, I'm surprised many distros haven't switched kernels already.

If you want DTrace, switch to either OpenSolaris or BSD. You should still be able to use the same software as well.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (3, Insightful)

Zedrick (764028) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509200)

as not many people use FreeBSD ;-)

...and that's their loss. I think that 75% of those who give FreeBSD a (serious) try will stick to it. It's the best thing since Amiga OS, and I'm happy to run it both on my desktop, and for my router+web/ftp-server in the wardrobe.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (3, Interesting)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509445)

I've been spoiled by GNU extensions to tools like grep and ls. Considering I spend most of my time in a command line (under a GNOME terminal, no less), I'd probably find myself frequently irritated.

That said, I have downloaded the FreesBIE LiveCD; I just haven't burned it yet.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (1)

Electrum (94638) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509782)

I've been spoiled by GNU extensions to tools like grep and ls. Considering I spend most of my time in a command line (under a GNOME terminal, no less), I'd probably find myself frequently irritated.

Install the sysutils/coreutils [freshports.org] port. You'll get all the GNU utilities with a 'g' prefix, i.e. gls, gcp, etc. You can alias the ones you want to use.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (1)

Some Random Username (873177) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510708)

Extensions like what? I spend lots of time at a command line too, and that's why I can't stand linux machines, the GNU tools are awful compared to the BSD ones. I'd really be interested in hearing what is "missing" from the BSDs grep and ls, besides ls displaying everything in color.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13511302)

Lots of the time the GNU fans are complaining about options from XPG3 and XPG4 and other POSIX extended standards not being present, like the -f of ps.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (3, Interesting)

diegocgteleline.es (653730) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509218)

Linux does have a "comparable" feature (soon to be merged in mainline) called "kprobes", or "systemtap" (systemtap uses kprobes)

You can see a fairly detailed analisis in the 2005 Proceedings, Volume 2, page 57 [linuxsymposium.org] of the linux symposium

Also some doc from IBM: http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/librar y/l-kprobes.html [ibm.com]

also there's a "linux trace toolkit". A post about LTT vs dtrace [theaimsgroup.com] ...whatever, too much flamewar for my taste.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (2, Informative)

diegocgteleline.es (653730) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509252)

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509583)

kprobes is not comparable to dtrace, to see a comparison between dtrace and kprobes check out
dtrace vs. krpobes [blogspot.com]

systemtap is in its infancy and being designed without safety as a priority, dtrace was created to be 100% safe to run anytime, even in production. systemtap is being made for the kernel hacker to debug the kernel. With possibly some userland probes and safety as an after thought. Sure they talk about safety as a goal. But as documented dtrace_usenix.pdf [sun.com]
dtrace was created from the start to be safe and secure. They even sacrafice some functionality to keep production servers safe. Systemtap is like building a bank they build the building, bring in the money, and desks, and machines, and promise that top of the line doors, windows and safe will top of the line and installed any day now.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509641)

I went to a talk by an IBM guy on systemtap at Linux 2005. A few people in the audience asked how it was different / better than DTrace. As far as I could tell, the answer was `We're IBM! And we made it! And we're better than Sun! Sun suck!' I have never seen quite so much evasion of a question outside of a political rally.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13510130)

I was there too and that was most certainly NOT the reaction IBM gave. There were some Sun guys in the audience that kept harping on the lack of equivalence to dtrace, and the IBM guys repeated again and again that systemtap was in its early stages of development. Apparently it wasn't good enough for the Sun guys in the audience who basically heckelled the presenters throughout. Pretty damned shameful behavior I have to say.

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509308)

Never, Linux is dying :P

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (1)

JabrTheHut (640719) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510216)

As soon as enough people in the Linux community, including Linus, can eat humble pie, admit they were wrong, and start working on it. I believe Linus called it a joke. Shame it was on him...

Re:When will it be available in Linux ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13510426)

I'm waiting for the OpenBSD folks to come out with "DTrace SSL."

Insanely great (-1, Offtopic)

christopherfinke (608750) | more than 8 years ago | (#13508791)

insanely great
You know, I've read a lot of software reviews, but I don't think I've ever seen the "insanely" used as an adverb before...

Re:Insanely great (2, Funny)

Elrac (314784) | more than 8 years ago | (#13508826)

I've seen it before, fairly often. Perhaps a bit of an exaggeration, but still - commonly used.

Google shows 229,000 hits for "insanely great" (as a phrase).

Welcome to, umm, Geek English!

Re:Insanely great (5, Informative)

dylan_- (1661) | more than 8 years ago | (#13508911)


"insanely great" is well known. In fact, it's in the Jargon File [catb.org]

Re:Insanely great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509846)

Mac community, from Steve Jobs; also BSD Unix people via Bill Joy. Something so incredibly elegant that it is imaginable only to someone possessing the most puissant of hacker-natures.

So, it's a derogatory term?

Seriously, neither Bill Joy, and least of all Steve Jobs, strike me as being able to have an informed opinion on elegant software implementations. Jobs has good design taste, but that's different.

Re:Insanely great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13510002)

I don't care what ESR or his Aunt Tillie think.

That said, I have no objection to the word "insanely".

Re:Insanely great (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509136)

"Insanely" is an adjective in that context, not an adverb.

Re:Insanely great (0)

moonbender (547943) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509731)

Maybe he thought it was a typo for "insanely grate".

Re:Insanely great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509832)

You know, I've read a lot of software reviews, but I don't think I've ever seen the "insanely" used as an adverb before...

They're called context clues smart guy. I learned about them in like second grade. Although IANAGE (I Am Not A Grammar Expert) I could have figured out what "insanely great" means in the second grade.

Tons of links in the article (5, Interesting)

ReformedExCon (897248) | more than 8 years ago | (#13508796)

It looks like a really useful tool. I wonder what the performance penalty is when the tool is turned off.

Do you need to instrument the calls you expect to profile? If so, how can you avoid taking that performance hit when deciding whether to perform the profiling or not, even when the profiler is off? It's still got to check the profiler level each time, doesn't it?

Re:Tons of links in the article (1)

Wesley Felter (138342) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509616)

I wonder what the performance penalty is when the tool is turned off.

None. DTrace patches code when you use it, and then un-patches itself when you're done.

Re:Tons of links in the article (1)

ReformedExCon (897248) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509964)

I'm curious. Does it seek out function signatures (i.e. push params onto the stack and branch) and insert itself automatically?

Does it swap out normal binaries for instrumented binaries on the fly?

How is it able to manage a zero penalty hit?

Re:Tons of links in the article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13510293)

Have you even heard of Google before? I assume since you have a GMail account you must be at least familiar with the search enging, give it a try sometime. Or is that too much to expect from a "criminal?"

Re:Tons of links in the article (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509766)

There is no overhead when off or need to pre-instrument points to be traced. Dtrace dynamically inserts a probe point into the code path wherever you want it, typically at a function entry/exit point.
The overhead when in use is low enough that you can turn on a blanket Dtrace of all functions in the kernel without killing the OS. If you target your trace points sensibly the overhead is low enough that its not an issue. Its designed to be safe to use, so the Dtrace scripts that do in-kernel filtering can't do anything bad.

Linux had this for ages (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13508798)

This has been working on Linux sometime in 2004

The official reason is that it wasn't release was because Linus didn't want the BSD folks using it, but the real reason is the Department of Homeland security didn't want the BSD folk to find the last bug in their release.

Thats what I just head right now. (Thanks, voices)

Re:Linux had this for ages (5, Informative)

Hackeron (704093) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509048)

if you're referring to http://oprofile.sourceforge.net/news/ [sourceforge.net] , you're sadly mistaken. Realtime system profiling is very far behind on Linux compared to Solaris.

Can you monitor how much network bandwidth each process uses? -- Sure you can see listening ports and IP traffic, and ntop is fantastic at showing what network bandwidth is used for (i.e. spotting p2p and IM traffic, eg). However if you have a trojen and you see suspecious network activity, there is a certain amount of guess work to try to find the process. Solaris will show exactly what process is making what connection where and the bandwidth it is using.

Can you monitor how much IO utilization each process has? -- No, only IO wait and CPU consumption which is normally enough, but say you have a script thats just reading all content on the disk and redirects it to /dev/null - Sure you'll see abount 1% cpu utilization, but again, guess work at whats actually using IO.

Sure you're usually right making an educated guess but system profiling is far ahead on Solaris.

Re:Linux had this for ages (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509238)

Did you read the parent post, or just the title?

Re:Linux had this for ages (1)

babyrat (314371) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510858)

No, i'm pretty sure he was being sarcastic...I'm sure the dept of homeland security is not really afraid of FreeBSD finding their last bug.

Although perhaps the voices were right...who's to say...

first post? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13508800)

first?

DTrace kicks ass (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13508818)

People in the computing field like to spur the use of spurious jargons. The less educated they are, the more they like extraneous jargons, such as in the Unix & Perl community. Unlike mathematicians, where in mathematics there are no fewer jargons but each and every one are absolutely necessary. For example, polytope, manifold, injection/bijection/surjection, group/ring/field.., homological, projective, pencil, bundle, lattice, affine, topology, isomorphism, isometry, homeomorphism, aleph-0, fractal, supremum/infimum, simplex, matrix, quaternions, derivative/integral, ... and so on. Each and every one of these captures a concept, for which practical and theoretical considerations made the terms a necessity. Often there are synonyms for them because of historical developments, but never "jargons for jargon's sake" because mathematicians hate bloats and irrelevance.

The jargon-soaked stupidity in computing field can be grouped into classes. First of all, there are jargons for marketing purposes. Thus you have Mac OS "X", Windows "XP", Sun OS to Solaris and the versioning confusion of 4.x to 7 to 8 and also the so called "Platform" instead of OS. One flagrant example is Sun Microsystem's Java stuff. Oak, Java, JDK, JSDK, J2EE, J2SE enterprise edition or no, from java 1.x to 1.2 == Java 2 now 1.3, JavaOne, JFC, Jini, JavaBeans, entity Beans, Awk, Swing... fucking stupid Java and fuck Sun Microsystems. This is just one example of Jargon hodgepodge of one single commercial entity. Marketing jargons cannot be avoided in modern society. They abound outside computing field too. The Jargons of marketing came from business practice, and they can be excusable because they are kinda a necessity or can be considered as a naturally evolved strategy for attracting attention in a laissez-faire economy system.

The other class of jargon stupidity is from computing practitioners, of which the Unix/Perl community is exemplary. For example, the name Unix & Perl themselves are good examples of buzzing jargons. Unix is supposed to be opposed of Multics and hints on the offensive and tasteless term eunuchs. PERL is cooked up to be "Practical Extraction & Reporting Language" and for the precise marketing drama of being also "Pathologically Eclectic Rubbish Lister". These types of jargons exude juvenile humor. Cheesiness and low-taste is their hall-mark. If you are familiar with unixism and perl programing, you'll find tons and tons of such jargons embraced and verbalized by unix & perl lovers. e.g. grep, glob, shell, pipe, man, regex, more, less, tarball, shebang, Schwartzian Transform, croak, bless, interpolation, TIMTOWTDI, DWIM, RFC, RTFM, I-ANAL, YMMV and so on.

There is another class of jargon moronicity, which i find them most damaging to society, are jargons or spurious and vague terms used and brandished about by programers that we see and hear daily among design meetings, online tech group postings, or even in lots of computing textbooks or tutorials. I think the reason for these, is that these massive body of average programers usually don't have much knowledge of significant mathematics, yet they are capable of technical thinking that is not too abstract, thus you ends up with these people defining or hatching terms a-dime-a-dozen that's vague, context dependent, vacuous, and their commonality is often a result of sopho-morons trying to sound big.

Here are some examples of the terms in question:

    anonymous functions or lambda or lamba function
    closure
    exceptions (as in Java)
    list, array, vector, aggregate
    hash (or hash table) ? fantastically stupid
    rehash (as in csh or tcsh)
    regular expression (as in regex, grep, egrep, fgrep)
    name space (as in Scheme vs Common Lisp debates)
    depth first/breadth first (as in tree traversing.)
    operator
    operator overloading
    polymorphism
    inheritance
    first class objects
    pointers, references
    tail recursion

My time is limited, so i'll just give a brief explanation of my thesis on selective few of these examples among the umpteen.

In a branch of math called lambda calculus, in which much theories of computation are based on, is the origin of the jargon _lambda function_ that is so frequently reciprocated by advanced programering donkeys. In practice, a subroutine without side-effects is supposed to be what "lambda function" means. Functional languages often can define them without assigning them to some variable (name), therefore the "function without side-effects" are also called "anonymous functions". One can see that these are two distinct concepts. If mathematicians are designing computer languages, they would probably just called such thing _pure functions_. The term conveys the meaning, without the "lamba" abstruseness. (in fact, the mathematics oriented language Mathematica refers to lambda function as pure function, with the keyword Function.) Because most programers are sopho-morons who are less capable of clear thinking but nevertheless possess human vanity, we can see that they have not adopted the clear and fitting term, but instead you see lambda function this and that obfuscations dropping from their mouths constantly.

Now the term "closure" can and indeed have meant several things in the computing field. The most common is for it to mean a subroutine that holds some memory but without some disadvantages of modifying a global variable. Usually such is a feature of a programing language. When taken to extreme, we have the what's called Object Oriented Programing methodology and languages. The other meaning of "closure" i have seen in text books, is for it to indicate that the things in the language is "closed" under the operations of the language. For example, for some languages you can apply operations or subroutines to any thing in the language. (These languages are often what's called "dynamic typing" or "typeless"). However, in other languages, things have types and cannot be passed around subroutines or operators arbitrarily. One can see that the term "closure" is quite vague in conveying its meaning. The term nevertheless is very popular among talkative programers and dense tutorials, precisely because it is vague and mysterious. These pseudo-wit living zombies, never thought for a moment that they are using a moronic term, mostly because they never clearly understand the concepts behind the term among the contexts. One can particular see this exhibition among Perl programers. (for an example of the fantastically stupid write-up on closure by the Perl folks, see "perldoc perlfaq7" and "perldoc perlref".)

in the so-called "high-level" computing languages, there are often data types that's some kind of a collection. The most illustrative is LISt Processing language's lists. Essentially, the essential concept is that the language can treat a collection of things as if it's a single entity. As computer languages evolve, such collection entity feature also diversified, from syntax to semantics to implementation. Thus, beside lists, there are also terms like vector, array, matrix, tree, hash/"hash table"/dictionary. Often each particular term is to convey a particular implementation of collection so that it has certain properties to facilitate specialized uses of such groupy. The Java language has such groupy that can illustrate the point well. In Java, there are these hierarchy of collection-type of things:

  Collection
      Set (AbstractSet, HashSet)
          SortedSet (TreeSet)
      List (AbstractList, LinkedList, Vector, ArrayList)

  Map (AbstractMap, HashMap, Hashtable)
      SortedMap (TreeMap)

The words without parenthesis are Java Interfaces, and ones in are implementations. The interface hold a concept. The deeper the level, the more specific or specialized. The implementation carry out concepts. Different implementation gives different algorithmic properties. Essentially, these hierarchies of Java show the potential complexity and confusion around groupy entities in computer languages. Now, among the programers we see daily, who never really thought out of these things, will attach their own specific meaning to list/array/vector/matrix/etc type of jargons in driveling and arguments, oblivious to any thought of formalizing what the fuck they are really talking about. (one may think from the above tree-diagram that Java the language has at least put clear distinction to interface and implementation, whereas in my opinion they are one fantastic fuck up too, in many respects.)

Re:DTrace kicks ass (-1, Offtopic)

DrSkwid (118965) | more than 8 years ago | (#13508927)

You seem to have a poor grasp of what jargon is.

thanks for trying

Re:DTrace kicks ass (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509056)

Wow. I didn't think anyone would even put that much effort into a troll. I mean it shows quite a lot of ignorance and stupidity to be sure, but under the guise of being almost intelligent.

Must be sad, living your life. Be content in knowing you'll be dead someday.

Re:DTrace kicks ass (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509380)

No effort went into it. He's just copy/pasting from an earlier post. I think this is the 3rd time I've seen this crap recently...

Re:DTrace kicks ass (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509476)

Gah.... I've just found you can also read this tripe on several other sites [google.co.uk] . I had to look, I was curious........

Wikipedia:DTrace (5, Informative)

Saiyine (689367) | more than 8 years ago | (#13508901)


For we that don't have a clue what DTrace is, here's what the [wikipedia.org] has to say: DTrace allows to do performance tuning with applications and troubleshoot production systems--all with little or no performance impact. DTrace provides improved visibility into kernel and application activity, giving the user operational insights with which they can make performance gains..

The no performance penalty sounds really cool to me.

--
Superb hosting [dreamhost.com] 4800MB Storage, 120GB bandwidth, $7,95.
Picaday! [picaday.host.sk] Soon to be open "Picture of the day web".

Re:Wikipedia:DTrace (1)

Willy on Wheels (889645) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509233)

The article is a stub at the moment. Lets put the slashdot effect into good use and expand it [wikipedia.org]

Re:Wikipedia:DTrace (1)

Tony Hoyle (11698) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509319)

So how does it differ from truss, or even ltrace/strace? Not much detail there... just marketing blurb ('operational insights??').

It's not on solaris 9, just checked (checked solaris 8 for fun too), so can't make any real comparisons.. anything that makes solaris debugging less than a total 'mare sounds like a good idea though.

(shouldn't be too hard on solaris though... I have to do an HPUX port too - that's an OS I wouldn't wish on my worst enemy...)

Re:Wikipedia:DTrace (3, Informative)

davecb (6526) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509402)

It's way more fine-grained than truss or apptrace (which I helped build), and has overhead only when used.

--dave

Re:Wikipedia:DTrace (1)

popechunk (863629) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510342)

I know that there are not a ton of Solaris SAs on /. (compared to Linux/MS), but can anyone w/ a lot of prod Solaris experience tell me if upgrading to Solaris 10 (to get at this feature or others) is really worth the effort?

Is this mostly a developer tool, or is it useful to SAs, too?

Are you seeing most 3d party software vendors supporting Solaris 10? Zones?

Re:Wikipedia:DTrace (1)

bofkentucky (555107) | more than 8 years ago | (#13511442)

On the telco side I'm seeing some of our apps being moved for solaris 2.6 only or solaris 8 only to 10, but its early and a lot of telco vendors branched out to SLES or RHAS since 8 was released. I'll be so glad to finally offline our last Solaris 2.6 boxes, they've served us well but they can be a bit of a pain to keep patched properly.

Re:Wikipedia:DTrace (3, Informative)

cant_get_a_good_nick (172131) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509413)

truss/strace is a syscall tracer. Anything in your app that makes a syscall gets it's arguments and return values logged. ltrace adds the ability to do the same with dynamic library calls.

dtrace is much different, you have areas of your kernel that have probes, places that accumulate data. dtrace is a language where you can read these probe areas (including the syscall interface) and print them out to user level and figure out whats going on (wrong) in your kernel.

For the people who say Sun isn't real about open source, they should realize this is a differentiating technology, years ahead of what anything in Linux/bsd or commercial linuxes have. If it's going into the BSD kernel, it's probably also BSD licensed, meaning all UNIXes can take this.

Re:Wikipedia:DTrace (1)

cahiha (873942) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509799)

For the people who say Sun isn't real about open source, they should realize this is a differentiating technology,

And that's why Sun and Solaris have been such smashing successes recently?

Face it, most people would not know how to use DTrace if their life depended on it. That leaves the few who do. Many of those don't have a choice in platforms, so it's academic. And many of the performance problems gurus encounter and can fix are blatantly obvious anyway. And even if DTrace may be a little better, it's not like other operating systems don't have similar tools already. So, you are left with a tiny group of people who can possibly solve a few, rare obscure problems slightly faster with DTrace than with other tools, provided they spend time learning it. That's not much of a differentiator.

In fact, the same is true for most of the stuff Sun and even Microsoft have been working on in order to "improve" their operating systems and justify new releases: they just don't matter.

Re:Wikipedia:DTrace (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13510111)

The difference between Sun and Microsoft, though, is that I can go on the Sun website and download a copy of Solaris 10, and I could do this for Solaris years before it was open-source.

How does that translate into profit for Sun? Shrug. If they really want to be successful they should lower the price of their hardware.

Re:Wikipedia:DTrace (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13510395)

this is where ready made dtrace scripts come into play.

Brendan Gregg's Dtrace toolkit [tpg.com.au] contains over 80 premade script that allows normal users to use dtrace to find stuff about there system that no other tool can. one small example

connections snoop inbound TCP connections as they are established, displaying the server process that accepted the connection. Full example is here.

# connections
    UID PID CMD TYPE PORT IP_SOURCE
        0 242 inetd tcp 79 192.168.1.1
        0 359 sshd tcp 22 192.168.1.1
    100 1532 Xorg tcp 6000 192.168.1.1

Insider reveals "What Killed FreeBSD" (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509122)

The End of FreeBSD

[ed. note: in the following text, former FreeBSD developer Mike Smith gives his reasons for abandoning FreeBSD]

When I stood for election to the FreeBSD core team nearly two years ago, many of you will recall that it was after a long series of debates during which I maintained that too much organisation, too many rules and too much formality would be a bad thing for the project.

Today, as I read the latest discussions on the future of the FreeBSD project, I see the same problem; a few new faces and many of the old going over the same tired arguments and suggesting variations on the same worthless schemes. Frankly I'm sick of it.

FreeBSD used to be fun. It used to be about doing things the right way. It used to be something that you could sink your teeth into when the mundane chores of programming for a living got you down. It was something cool and exciting; a way to spend your spare time on an endeavour you loved that was at the same time wholesome and worthwhile.

It's not anymore. It's about bylaws and committees and reports and milestones, telling others what to do and doing what you're told. It's about who can rant the longest or shout the loudest or mislead the most people into a bloc in order to legitimise doing what they think is best. Individuals notwithstanding, the project as a whole has lost track of where it's going, and has instead become obsessed with process and mechanics.

So I'm leaving core. I don't want to feel like I should be "doing something" about a project that has lost interest in having something done for it. I don't have the energy to fight what has clearly become a losing battle; I have a life to live and a job to keep, and I won't achieve any of the goals I personally consider worthwhile if I remain obligated to care for the project.

Discussion

I'm sure that I've offended some people already; I'm sure that by the time I'm done here, I'll have offended more. If you feel a need to play to the crowd in your replies rather than make a sincere effort to address the problems I'm discussing here, please do us the courtesy of playing your politics openly.

From a technical perspective, the project faces a set of challenges that significantly outstrips our ability to deliver. Some of the resources that we need to address these challenges are tied up in the fruitless metadiscussions that have raged since we made the mistake of electing officers. Others have left in disgust, or been driven out by the culture of abuse and distraction that has grown up since then. More may well remain available to recruitment, but while the project is busy infighting our chances for successful outreach are sorely diminished.

There's no simple solution to this. For the project to move forward, one or the other of the warring philosophies must win out; either the project returns to its laid-back roots and gets on with the work, or it transforms into a super-organised engineering project and executes a brilliant plan to deliver what, ultimately, we all know we want.

Whatever path is chosen, whatever balance is struck, the choosing and the striking are the important parts. The current indecision and endless conflict are incompatible with any sort of progress.

Trying to dissect the above is far beyond the scope of any parting shot, no matter how distended. All I can really ask of you all is to let go of the minutiae for a moment and take a look at the big picture. What is the ultimate goal here? How can we get there with as little overhead as possible? How would you like to be treated by your fellow travellers?

Shouts

To the Slashdot "BSD is dying" crowd - big deal. Death is part of the cycle; take a look at your soft, pallid bodies and consider that right this very moment, parts of you are dying. See? It's not so bad.

To the bulk of the FreeBSD committerbase and the developer community at large - keep your eyes on the real goals. It's when you get distracted by the politickers that they sideline you. The tireless work that you perform keeping the system clean and building is what provides the platform for the obsessives and the prima donnas to have their moments in the sun. In the end, we need you all; in order to go forwards we must first avoid going backwards.

To the paranoid conspiracy theorists - yes, I work for Apple too. No, my resignation wasn't on Steve's direct orders, or in any way related to work I'm doing, may do, may not do, or indeed what was in the tea I had at lunchtime today. It's about real problems that the project faces, real problems that the project has brought upon itself. You can't escape them by inventing excuses about outside influence, the problem stems from within.

To the politically obsessed - give it a break, if you can. No, the project isn't a lemonade stand anymore, but it's not a world-spanning corporate juggernaut either and some of the more grandiose visions going around are in need of a solid dose of reality. Keep it simple, stupid.

To the grandstanders, the prima donnas, and anyone that thinks that they can hold the project to ransom for their own agenda - give it a break, if you can. When the current core were elected, we took a conscious stand against vigorous sanctions, and some of you have exploited that. A new core is going to have to decide whether to repeat this mistake or get tough. I hope they learn from our errors.

Future

I started work on FreeBSD because it was fun. If I'm going to continue, it has to be fun again. There are things I still feel obligated to do, and with any luck I'll find the time to meet those obligations.

However I don't feel an obligation to get involved in the political mess the project is in right now. I tried, I burnt out. I don't feel that my efforts were worthwhile. So I won't be standing for election, I won't be shouting from the sidelines, and I probably won't vote in the next round of ballots.

You could say I'm packing up my toys. I'm not going home just yet, but I'm not going to play unless you can work out how to make the project somewhere fun to be again.

= Mike

--

To announce that there must be no criticism of the president, or that we are to stand by the president, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. -- Theodore Roosevelt

MOD PARENT UP! (-1, Offtopic)

RouterSlayer (229806) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509281)

the best damn piece on slashdot and some moron marked it flamebait. I've modded it up as much as I can (a big +1 whoo!)

It's sad to see slashdotters trod on brilliant posts like this one...

Re:MOD PARENT UP! (1)

Alranor (472986) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509392)

the best damn piece on slashdot and some moron marked it flamebait. I've modded it up as much as I can (a big +1 whoo!)

And then proceeded to cancel that moderation by posting in the story.

Let me guess, you must be new here?

Re:MOD PARENT UP! (1)

RouterSlayer (229806) | more than 8 years ago | (#13509420)

my +1 was already cancelled by someone else modding it as flamebait, so it didn't matter.

which is why I posted...

sigh...

weird tho, the score is the same as before I posted.
so someone else modded it up +1 to cancel the cancel on my +1 ? erg, you're making my brain hurt!
bad slashdot user, bad! ;)

Re:MOD PARENT UP! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13510757)


the best damn piece on slashdot

yeah, an anti-freebsd rant posted to an article about freebsd, how fucking original. let me guess, netcraft confirms BSD is dying, right?

some moron marked it flamebait.

the only moron i see here is you. you bitch about about flamebait being modded as such. no one cares how you used your mod points. get a fucking life.

FreeBSD really needs this (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509207)

FreeBSD performance has generally been declining with each subsequent release in recent years. No one seems to be able to get to the bottom of the problem. It could be the effects of FreeBSD suffering from "creeping featuritis" combined with a bit of bloat.

A tool like this could really aid in finding all the bottlenecks. Benchmarks have become an embarrassment for FreeBSD as of late, and it is really sad to see that FreeBSD has fallen so far behind. Hopefully this could start to turn things around.

Re:FreeBSD really needs this (4, Interesting)

dodell (83471) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510528)

While this has been moderated as -1, Troll, it is somewhat true. There have been various performance regressions, which are to be seen in performance tests benchmarking I/O between FreeBSD 4.x and 5.x. Some of the problems are difficult to find and analyze. I'm sorry that this was moderated as a troll, since it is partially a valid point. And DTrace is a great tool to help figure out precisely what is going on.

Re:FreeBSD really needs this (3, Insightful)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510684)

I think the point of the moderation of the parent had to due with being offtopic with Drace in order to trash FBSD and cause a flamewar.

I do agree with the parent poster as well since the threading and the code quality has made many old FBSD timers leave and work on Dragonfly. I no longer run FBSD as a result.

But I wold mod the parent down for the that reason. However I would mod him up if it was a general FBSD post about i/o or BSD vs Linux story.

Have a look at Sun's mischief and wrongdoing (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509515)

Sure, they may help out the open source community from time to time, but tell that to the scores of US workers they deliberately fired to replace them with cheaper foreignors who now sit in the very same desks; now those US programmers are suing Sun for its greed, since what it did is against labor laws.

More info:
http://malfeasance.50megs.com/ [50megs.com]

Linux is dead (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13509949)

Yet another crippling bombshell hit the beleaguered Linux community when recently Slashdot confirmed that DTrace would only be ported to FreeBSD . Coming on the heels of the latest Microsoft >survey which plainly states that Linux has lost more market share, this news serves to reinforce what we've known all along. Linux is collapsing in complete disarray.

I bet Sun's really angry (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13510018)

The whole point of open-sourcing Solaris 10 was to get free work done by "the Community."

I bet that Sun PHBs and the prima-donna set amongst the engineers are incredulous with anger and disbelief at this, since they behave that those unwashed, long-haired hippy developers are too stupid to port something like this to another OS.

Oh dear. Yet another dastardly plan foiled!

But!!! (1)

slave 6742 (703775) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510163)

I just have to post this due to amount of crap I get from the BSD fan club I associate with.

start sarcasm

But it is not BSD! It can't be better than anything BSD has created.

We all know that Solaris is just a crappy system that has no use in the enterprise.

end sarcasm

FreeBSD? what's that? you're breathing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13510179)

OMFG!!! IT'S ALIVE !!!!!!

bsd-style proc accounting? (1)

dAzED1 (33635) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510321)

Linux can be build with "bsd-style process accounting" and as such, can this be made to work in Linux?

this is great (2, Interesting)

mendicant_zero_x (911337) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510327)

It seems like everywhere I look I've heard comments about how great DTrace is, so to see it ported to FreeBSD really makes me happy. I do have a couple of questions about it though, simply going in line with the announcements over the last couple days.

1) Considering the fact that we are currently going through the Beta's for FreeBSD 6, I am curious how, if at all, a fully implemented DTrace would help the devs with tracking down and solving the current beta problems. From my current understanding, it seems that it could be a great help with tracking down and solving the current show-stoppers. Can someone clarify this for me?

2) I have also read an article somewhere where a DTrace dev showed how easy it was to track down a memory leak in a small program. With Gnome currently going on a memory reduction kick, would a fully featured DTrace be able to help with finding these memory problems? I realize that comparing Gnome with a small application is ridiculous so I can't expect it to magically find these problems in just a few minutes, but could it help? Also, if DTrace helped to find these problems on versions ported to FreeBSD, would they easily be ported back into the main linux-based version of Gnome?

Any feedback would be appreciated because from what (admittedly little) I've read, it seems that DTrace could help on these fronts, but I'm really not 100% sure that it would.

Re:this is great (4, Informative)

dodell (83471) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510501)

On 1):

Quite a lot, actually. I've talked with Eric Schrock about his thesis work, which was implementing some lock analysis tools using DTrace. This allowed him to detect (very precisely) things like LORs, deadlocks, and the like. His thesis is available at http://www.cs.brown.edu/publications/theses/ugrad/ 2003/eschrock.pdf [brown.edu]

On 2):

When I've seen demonstrations on this stuff, it has been Bryan Cantrill doing fun stuff with libumem, mdb, and DTrace. I suspect that, at the minimum, we'd need libumem to find and fix this stuff with the accuracy that it can be done in Solaris.

Hope this is useful information.

--Devon

Re:this is great (1)

mendicant_zero_x (911337) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510558)

Very helpful.

Thanks for the link.

"best" feature of Solaris 10 (0, Flamebait)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510450)

What with ZFS and Linux partitions being put off at least until 2006 it might be the *only* feature of Solaris 10 for now. Not to be confused with the "pains" that were added, like insipid way java management console plugins are added/admined, new hiding places for common admin/config files or how general installation is just a pain in the keister. Save yourself some trouble, GNU/Linux passed up Solaris about 2 years ago.

Re:"best" feature of Solaris 10 (1, Flamebait)

turgid (580780) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510947)

Yes, Sun did a remarkable job of shooting itself in the foot with its schedule and feature set for Solaris 10. Project "Flatline" (aka Greenline - the windows-style registry) went in at the expense of ZFS and Linux emulation.

Then there was a slight HR issue with many of the engineers...

Re:"best" feature of Solaris 10 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13511095)

turgid was laid off from Sun, so keep that in mind when you read his screeds against various Solaris technologies...

Clear up a few things (5, Informative)

dodell (83471) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510459)

As the guy porting DTrace, I want to clear up a few questions that appear frequently in the comments here. First, though, please be kind to the blog -- it's hosted on our (OffMyServer's) network, which is on a T1. I dunno how bad it got when the story was posted, but just for reference, it'd be nice to not have our network connection die.

FAQ #1 seems to be about the license. Obviously, the CDDL is `viral' in the sense that changes in the code need to be provided under the same terms of the CDDL. In my understanding, this applies only to files in which modifications take place. Extension of something CDDL by adding extra files seems to not require those files to be released under the CDDL. That said, this is a porting effort, and most of the changes I will make will be inside CDDL-licensed files. Thus, anything imported will be under the CDDL. This does not require anything external files to be under the CDDL and thus it can be shipped with FreeBSD without `infecting' other files.

FAQ #2 seems to be whether Sun is happy about this or not. If you have read the article, you would have seen that I've been encouraged to work on this by Sun kernel engineers. Whether Sun as a whole is happy about this is not known to me, but everybody involved in getting it this far has been, so I'm not terribly worried about the rest.

FAQ #3 is about performance incurrences. Certain aspects of DTrace incur performance penalties, but only when DTrace is running. DTrace by itself is a library and a userland tool. All instrumentation is done dynamically and when DTrace is not instrumenting something, no performance hits happen whatsoever. When it is running, we have several advantages to other tools because (unlike e.g. truss) we are instrumenting single processes. Processes which are not being instrumented will not take any performance hits other than the fact that they have a bit less CPU usage since DTrace is instrumenting something.

How do you not take a performance penalty when the profiler is off? You must be root to run DTrace. When you instrument functions inside an application, this is done on-the-fly by rewriting the code that is being executed. When it is not being executed, nothing is being rewritten and it's not even looking to rewrite something. It's just some code resident in memory (in fact, modules are even loaded as needed). It sounds like it might be prone to security flaws, but keep in mind that this has been working in production for a while now.

When will this be in Linux? I don't know. I won't be working on it. I challenge _you_ to do this :)

Is this vaporware? No. I'm continuing development from about a week off (since I lost my development machine) this evening.

Feel free to ask more questions, I'll try to address them as I see them. But please refrain from bad-mouthing Sun or myself out of spite, jealousy, or whatever. I know it's fun to troll (if you're a troll), but the rest of us really don't appreciate it.

--Devon

Re:Clear up a few things (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13510681)

Sounds great.

By the way, you don't need to be root to run DTrace. The Solaris privelege model allows assignment of dtrace priveleges to users. So you can selectively allow users to trace their own processes are more.

Are you planning to also support kernel level tracing? Dtrace is also really useful to Solaris kernel developers (my job) and allows tracing of kernel functions, system calls, etc.

Re:Clear up a few things (2, Informative)

dodell (83471) | more than 8 years ago | (#13510881)

Well, sure, but for the port you will, since we don't have that sort of privilege assignment and I don't want to initially implement that kind of process accounting.

Yes, I am planning on implementing every provider I can.

Re:Clear up a few things (1)

ak3ldama (554026) | more than 8 years ago | (#13511446)

From what I've heard, Sun is an entirely different sort of company, where the people like the Solaris Kernel Engineers are actually very in charge of direction taken. People that create a technology control that technology, it is as if the Market dweebs realize that they are the people that should be running the company, so they let the people in the know keep directional control. So yes, Sun is probably very happy with the FreeBSD port.

Re:Clear up a few things (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13511692)

>When will this be in Linux? I don't know. I won't >be working on it. I challenge _you_ to do this :)

Good challange! But isnt the big problem here the license issue? Someone can do something like dtrace but a port is hard...

Re:Clear up a few things (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13511891)

Fact: FreeBSD is dying

FreeBSD? Bones said it best (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13511633)

It's dead, Jim.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>