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Slackware Linux 10.2 Released

CmdrTaco posted about 9 years ago | from the everyone-remembers-their-first dept.

Operating Systems 250

excelblue writes "Slackware Linux 10.2 has finally been released. This release comes with Linux 2.4.31, with 2.6.13 available in the testing packages and glibc 2.3.5. This time, they've decided to get up with times and switch to Firefox, Thunderbird, and subversion instead of using the Mozilla suite and cvs from the previous distros. Here are Torrents of ISO images."

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Racial discrimination (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565454)

Story from GNAA President [www.gnaa.us] about slackware 10.2 release gets rejected:
2005-09-15 06:46:15 Slackware 10.2 Released (Linux,News) (rejected)
Story from a random faggot [nimp.org] gets accepted.

CmdrTaco just hates gay niggers. What a fucking jew. Discrimination!!

Re:Racial discrimination (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13566286)

Racism in its literal sense is nothing more or less than the belief that certain determinations about a person can be made knowing no more than their race.

I do not think it is automatically a racist act to call one individual black person the N-word, particularly if the epithet is qualified in some way {you're just a fat lazy n***er}. It's just a word. It's not saying anything about any other black people, and anybody who thinks it is is too thin-skinned IMHO.

You hear all these lousy rap records complaining that white people don't buy records by black artists, therefore they must be racist; but what the recording artists fail to appreciate is that the decision not to buy the record might have been made on grounds other than the colour of the principal performer's skin ..... grounds such as whether or not the record is any good?

I think it's not so much that CmdrTaco doesn't like gay n***ers. It's more likely that he is rejecting on principle all posts from the GNAA {an organisation which probably contains more asexual, white non-americans than any other group} on the basis that even though they claim to represent gay n***ers, they are also pains in the arse.

YAY! (4, Funny)

frinkacheese (790787) | about 9 years ago | (#13565459)


Time to test the 2Gb/s Internet connection with some torrent seeds :)

Well done to the Slackware team on another nice release of the nicest, most stable and most usable (for admins) Linux release there is.

Really, the completr lack of package management and silly whizzy clicky admin tools makes Slackware a lllot easier to admin when you have 120 servers running it.

Re:YAY! (2, Funny)

DenDave (700621) | about 9 years ago | (#13565476)

OMG you have 120 slackware boxes?

*bow down* we're not worthy!

Is it not easier to use gentoo for such a monstrous installation base?

Re:YAY! (4, Insightful)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | about 9 years ago | (#13565652)

Slackware is a bit more mature and less prone to change. You also have a lot of people who use Slackware because they know it inside and out.

Basically, if people haven't stopped using Slackware yet, they're not likely to.

Re:YAY! (5, Funny)

part_of_you (859291) | about 9 years ago | (#13565709)

I am a newbie learning slackware. Many people have warned against it, but I am not having any problem with it, other than the fact that I STILL can't find the c:\ and I can't get ANY of the *.exe files to do anything

Re:YAY! (0, Redundant)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | about 9 years ago | (#13565761)

That's hilarious. Good luck with that. I hear CYGWIN works well.

Re:YAY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565483)

The complete lack of package management makes dependacy hunting even worse than that stupid RPM format.

I grew out of Slackware 10 years ago.

Re:YAY! (1)

KiloByte (825081) | about 9 years ago | (#13565565)

The complete lack of package management makes dependacy hunting even worse than that stupid RPM format.

Dependency hunting is one thing. Try to actually upgrade something on a Slackware box!
Hadn't I try to migrate to the rape-my-entire-filesystem-on-a-whim reiserfs, a frozen Slink box that was upgraded to what Sid was 2 years ago would be still in perfect working order...

Re:YAY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565634)

Try to actually upgrade something on a Slackware box!

upgradepkg

Hadn't I try to migrate to the rape-my-entire-filesystem-on-a-whim reiserfs, a frozen Slink box that was upgraded to what Sid was 2 years ago would be still in perfect working order...

And in English?

Re:YAY! (3, Informative)

MikeDawg (721537) | about 9 years ago | (#13566047)

There isn't a complete lack of package mangement, it is the pkgtool suite (upgradepkg, installpkg, removepkg, etc.). That is one thing I like about Slackware, you should look to see what the dependencies are. The problem I've been having administrating Red Hat machines is the endless levels of dependencies that are compile against any random package. It is like a slippery slope installing a package on Red Hat, when it would be easier just to compile stuff from source, or not link it against so many things.

Such that to install package a, you need to install package b, which requires packages c and d, which also require additional packages. Compiling from source can be less time intensive if you ask me.

Re:YAY! (2, Informative)

[Galaxie] (40909) | about 9 years ago | (#13565637)

haven't heard of swaret? give it a try sometime, you might be suprised on how easy package and dependancy management is.

Re:YAY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565966)

The complete lack of package management makes dependacy hunting even worse than that stupid RPM format.

Cluefull admins don't tend to install that many applications, even then I can list the dependancies for almost everything on my servers. Package management is simply not a problem unless your a hosting company looking to employ monkeys; or an actual monkey.

I grew out of Slackware 10 years ago.
Pity you didn't grow out of the baby clothes at the same time; if you've nothing useful to add why whine?

Re:YAY! (2, Funny)

gowen (141411) | about 9 years ago | (#13565488)

nicest, most stable and most usable (for admins) Linux release there is.
YAY!

Let's all pull so-subjective-as-to-be-meaningless statements out of our butts in order to promote a "my distro is cooler than yours" dick-waving contest!

YAY!

YAY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565568)

YAY!

You missed the joke!

YAY!

Good work, sport.

Re:YAY! (0, Troll)

m50d (797211) | about 9 years ago | (#13565600)

a "my distro is cooler than yours" dick-waving contest!

You mean you came to slashdot expecting something else?

Anyway, stories about a particular distro or piece of software always promote the software in question. The cinelerra story described it as the best linux video program, firefox stories often call it the best open source web browser (even though that's patently not true, IMO) etc.

Re:YAY! (2, Funny)

a.different.perspect (817184) | about 9 years ago | (#13565714)

Let's all pull so-subjective-as-to-be-meaningless statements out of our butts in order to promote a "my distro is cooler than yours" dick-waving contest!

I'm confused by your metaphors. Are you saying you pulled a dick out of your butt?

Re:YAY! (1)

Markus_UW (892365) | about 9 years ago | (#13566139)

Yeah, I think he just did.

Re:YAY! (5, Interesting)

RiotXIX (230569) | about 9 years ago | (#13565526)

But there are package management tools. They've been working on it. And they're useful when you want to mass upgrade several packages on your system without having to uninstall (yes I still don't know how to uninstall a generic packages..like when I download something, untar; make; make install : where can I find out where it put all it's stuff?). Having a database/registry of where an application put's it's files is a damn good idea.

"Updated versions of the Slackware package management tools make it
    easy to add, remove, upgrade, and make your own Slackware packages.
    Package tracking makes it easy to upgrade from Slackware 10.1 to
    Slackware 10.2 (see UPGRADE.TXT). The slackpkg tool in /extra can
    also help update from an older version of Slackware to a newer one,
    and keep your Slackware system up to date. In addition, the new
    slacktrack utility (in extra/) will help you build and maintain
    your own packages."


Seriously many have a perception of slackware as being dated/non-user friendly, but it's one of the most integrated/structured distros I know - it DOES move forward/evolve with the times, it just keeps it's releases at stable versions.

Support Slackware and Subscribe... (2, Informative)

p.rican (643452) | about 9 years ago | (#13565625)

(yes I still don't know how to uninstall a generic packages..like when I download something, untar; make; make install : where can I find out where it put all it's stuff?)
Try this:

user@darkstar $ whereis <packagename>

or as root:

root@darkstar # updatedb
root@darkstar # locate <packagename>

Hope that helps. Slackware subscriber since 7.0

Re:YAY! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565667)

(yes I still don't know how to uninstall a generic packages..like when I download something, untar; make; make install : where can I find out where it put all it's stuff?)


make uninstall?

make uninstall (1)

Flooded77 (730881) | about 9 years ago | (#13565828)

I seem to remember a few packages that have make uninstall option that will remove everything for you. I think Gaim and PHP each have this option.

Check out the documentation for the package.

Re:YAY! (2, Informative)

Beek (10414) | about 9 years ago | (#13565930)

When I compile a program, I put everything in it's own directory in /opt (use the --prefix option when you run the configure script)
It makes for some long PATH and MANPATH variables, but it works for me
Since there are only 20-ish extra programs that I need, I find it quite managable

Use Checkinstall (1)

petabyte (238821) | about 9 years ago | (#13566125)

(yes I still don't know how to uninstall a generic packages..like when I download something, untar; make; make install : where can I find out where it put all it's stuff?)

Easiest way is probably to use Checkinstall [asic-linux.com.mx] . I'm using 1.5.3 and 1.6.0 doesn't seem to like me, but its as simple as ./configure, make, checkinstall -S (instead of make install) and it'll make install a slackware package that you can remove with pkgtool like everything else.

Checkinstall (3, Informative)

Gleng (537516) | about 9 years ago | (#13566213)

Checkinstall [freshmeat.net] is your friend. You'll never have to type "make install" again. Instead, run checkinstall at the "make install" stage, and it builds a package for your distro (it handles .rpm, .deb, and .tgz based distros) and installs it. You can then just use your distro's package management tool, in Slack's case pkgtool, to remove it at a later time.

I think it's in the extras directory on the second Slack CD, if memory serves correctly.

Re:Checkinstall (1)

Gleng (537516) | about 9 years ago | (#13566235)

Fuck it. Beaten like a cheap whore.

Re:YAY! (2, Funny)

EddyPearson (901263) | about 9 years ago | (#13565615)

gotta luv the old school linux system. still maintained by a single person ;) the open source dictatorship :p

quit being a baby (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565650)

Just install Swaret and shaddap.

Sad there's no GNOME (0, Troll)

a.different.perspect (817184) | about 9 years ago | (#13565689)

Pat's done an excellent job keeping Slackware fast and stable, but it's a shame he didn't put an equal premium on flexibility. As someone that just feels most comfortable in GNOME, the unfortunate fact is that Slackware can't even be a consideration for my primary desktop.

Re:Sad there's no GNOME (1)

richlv (778496) | about 9 years ago | (#13565717)

check changelogs - there were mentioned reasons for dropping gnome, also alternative places where you could get gnome for slackware

Re:Sad there's no GNOME (4, Informative)

a.different.perspect (817184) | about 9 years ago | (#13565808)

Thanks. I assume you mean this [slackware.com] ?

From the changelog, and for anyone else interested:

gnome/*: Removed from -current, and turned over to community support and distribution. I'm not going to rehash all the reasons behind this, but it's been under consideration for more than four years. There are already good projects in place to provide Slackware GNOME for those who want it, and these are more complete than what Slackware has shipped in the past. So, if you're looking for GNOME for Slackware -current, I would recommend looking at these two projects for well-built packages that follow a policy of minimal interference with the base Slackware system:

http://gsb.sf.net/ [sf.net] http://gware.sf.net/ [sf.net]

There is also Dropline, of course, which is quite popular. However, due to their policy of adding PAM and replacing large system packages (like the entire X11 system) with their own versions, I can't give quite the same sort of nod to Dropline. Nevertheless, it remains another choice, and it's _your_ system, so I will also mention their project:

http://www.dropline.net/gnome/ [dropline.net]

Please do not incorrectly interpret any of this as a slight against GNOME itself, which (although it does usually need to be fixed and polished beyond the way it ships from upstream more so than, say, KDE or XFce) is a decent desktop choice. So are a lot of others, but Slackware does not need to ship every choice. GNOME is and always has been a moving target (even the "stable" releases usually aren't quite ready yet) that really does demand a team to keep up on all the changes (many of which are not always well documented). I fully expect that this move will improve the quality of both Slackware itself, and the quality (and quantity) of the GNOME options available for it.

Folks, this is how open source is supposed to work. Enjoy. :-)


I'll look into the alternatives, though it's still sad I won't be able to depend on their stability as I would the base system.

Re:YAY! (3, Informative)

MikeDawg (721537) | about 9 years ago | (#13565979)

Too bad there isn't a "completr lack of package management". pkgtool is a package management tool, it scares me to think you admin 120 boxes, and you aren't familiar with the pkgtools suite of tools.

Floppy or MS Windowe required(?) (1)

Random Walk (252043) | about 9 years ago | (#13565984)

The installation method looks truely ancient: seems that you need a floppy drive for installing. Is there any slackware-based distro with installer CDs?

The FAQ actually suggest an alternative method through MS Windows (with loadlin), but needing Windows to install Linux seems pretty silly.

Re:Floppy or MS Windowe required(?) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13566063)

The installation method looks truely ancient: seems that you need a floppy drive for installing. Is there any slackware-based distro with installer CDs?

No, you don't have to install with floppies. Maybe their docs are ancient :-)

Disk 1 is bootable, you can install from that.

Re:Floppy or MS Windowe required(?) (1)

a_n_d_e_r_s (136412) | about 9 years ago | (#13566175)

Read the documentation again.

Of course you can install Slackware from a CD.

Re:Floppy or MS Windowe required(?) (1)

Budenny (888916) | about 9 years ago | (#13566195)

No, you just boot from the installation CD (or the DVD of 10.1 that was on magazine covers lately) and away you go.

Re:Floppy or MS Windowe required(?) (2, Informative)

kosibar (671097) | about 9 years ago | (#13566248)

I've been installing Slackware from bootable CDs for a number of years now. Making a boot floppy isn't as easy as it was in the past either because kernels and such have grown beyond the space limitations of a floppy.

Burn the ISO to CD and boot it. Disc 2 has (at least in the past) a number of troubleshooting tools on it when you boot. It's sort of a rescue disc. (I say at least in the past because my 10.1 discs are not working that way, though I suspect it is a bad burn.)

I was looking for the point at which they switched to bootable CDs and more info on the boot/root floppy situation, but Slackware.com is coming up blank. Maybe somebody else knows.

Rich

Re:YAY! (2, Informative)

Lumpy (12016) | about 9 years ago | (#13566184)

not just for admins! Slackware completely and totally rocks for the real nitty gritty linux tasks like embedded linux development.

I can create a testing linux install in less than 20 meg with slackware as it is. using slack on my development pc makes it easier to make the embedded linux device work through the testing phases and I have only been able to get cross compiling and uclibc cross compile to work easily under slackware instead of the rpm or deb based setups. it's great when you download GCC and simply type ./configure; make; make install and it works instead of a convoluted string of modifications so that things go where some nutcase thinks they should go in other distros.

Slackware is the #1 choice for people wanting to really tinker on the bleeding edge but not have to have a ream of paper telling you what changes and command line switches to have to se so that app will install correctly on the distro that does not follow the software developers wishes.

I also found it's easier to design your own embedded distros under slackware than under mandrake,fedora,ubuntoo, etc... (never had the time to dink with gentoo)

i equal slackware to other commercial unices for heavy design work.. it's just easier in it.

granted, my servers at home run centOS, my desktops use Mandriva but for the real nitty gritty, it's slackware...

like today, I'm hacking the firmware/linux install on this 4 video input Ethernet video device I found on ebay. and am 1/2 way to getting a tiny slackware install running on it for a complete redesign of how the thing works.

cvs & mozilla still available (5, Informative)

richlv (778496) | about 9 years ago | (#13565463)

well, if i understood this submission correctly, it implies that mozilla & cvs now are missing - that's not true.

it contains mozilla-1.7.11 and cvs-1.11.20

at least in latest-current that should be identical to 10.2 :)

Re:cvs & mozilla still available (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565520)

Easy mod points, What a slacker!

Re:cvs & mozilla still available (0)

strredwolf (532) | about 9 years ago | (#13565589)

They're also complied for 486. Patrick only includes the binaries for Firefox and Thunderbird, so if you have a Pentium I with 64 megs of RAM, you'll have to compile it yourself.

Re:cvs & mozilla still available (3, Informative)

richlv (778496) | about 9 years ago | (#13565704)

um, if they are compiled for 486, shouldn't they run just fine on pentium ?
and how does ram amount affect cpu optimisation choice ?

Re:cvs & mozilla still available (1)

187807 (883881) | about 9 years ago | (#13565932)

at least in latest-current that should be identical to 10.2 Indeed. I run slackware-current. After using slapt-get to update my machine last night I noticed that /etc/slackware-version now contains 10.2.0.

Retro Linux - Sweet! (0, Flamebait)

Zate (687440) | about 9 years ago | (#13565464)

This release comes with Linux 2.4.31, with 2.6.13 available in the testing packages

I didnt realise anyone made a Linux distro that didnt use a 2.6 kernel .. how retro !! now I can relive all the hoots and woots of 2003.

Re:Retro Linux - Sweet! (4, Insightful)

richlv (778496) | about 9 years ago | (#13565482)

until 2.7 will be split and 2.6 stabilized a bit, i agree that 2.4 should be the default - that's what most people use in servers where they don't want to upgrade kernel in a couple of weeks.

and slackware is fully 2.6 ready, to use it just compile it, dropin replace, lilo & it's done.

oh, i forgot that you also have a precompiled one in testing that also should be easy to deploy :)

Re:Retro Linux - Sweet! (3, Insightful)

Wonda (457426) | about 9 years ago | (#13565797)

You're in for a long wait, the development model changed and now 2.6.x is unstable, 2.6.x.y is bugfixes, so the latest 'stable' version is 2.6.x.y where x is one lower than the current development version and y is the highest you can find. 2.7 can be years away, if it ever happens at all.

Re:Retro Linux - Sweet! (1)

richlv (778496) | about 9 years ago | (#13565827)

yep, but lately because of several large scale changes (for example, reiser4) there are more and more calls for 2.7.

also, people are resisting 2.6 on stable servers - i don't mind running it on workstations, but for servers it is a race to keep up. given that each kernel upgrade requires a reboot, it's not a nice situation.

Re:Retro Linux - Sweet! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565484)

Yea, so ... let me have the "hoots and woots" of 2005 and be upgrading on a regular basis.

I think being consistant and stable is more preferable.

Re:Retro Linux - Sweet! (3, Informative)

millwall (622730) | about 9 years ago | (#13565509)

Well, from the announcement :
A precompiled Linux 2.6.13 kernel, modules, and source code are provided (along with complete instructions on how to install the new kernel).

Re:Retro Linux - Sweet! (1)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | about 9 years ago | (#13565585)

People still use Windows 2000 servers/workstations because they have proven reliable, whereas the newest latest whizbang systems have yet to undergo full hardening (if such a thing can be done with windows)

As of now, like the 2.4 kernel, windows 2000 may be old, but it certainly isn't retro (just yet).

Re:Retro Linux - Sweet! (1)

parasonic (699907) | about 9 years ago | (#13565677)

Developer: ualuealuealeuale
Me: LOLOLOL

Bit OT, but I can't resist (1)

rsilvergun (571051) | about 9 years ago | (#13566093)

how do you get that 2.6.13 kernel installed? For the life of me I can never figure it out, and always cop out and just compile my own. I don't remember there being an option during install and I seem to remember it taking more than just installpkg afterwards.

Re:Bit OT, but I can't resist (1)

Markus_UW (892365) | about 9 years ago | (#13566183)

You just install the packages from the testing directory and type lilo. It's really easy, actually, i'm running that kernel in my slackware now.

This is nice but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565481)

I'm still waiting for "Slackware Enterprise Linux" to come out.

Re:This is nice but... (4, Informative)

Punk Walrus (582794) | about 9 years ago | (#13565543)

I'm still waiting for "Slackware Enterprise Linux" to come out.

Slackware has 28 distros based on it [distrowatch.com] (29 if you include the new PocketLinux [gnulinux.de] ), some of which are trying to be "Enterprise Level."

Re:This is nice but... (2, Informative)

Budenny (888916) | about 9 years ago | (#13566273)

Vector Soho, a slackware derivative, is worth looking at. KDE, OpenOffice etc. As fast and light as you can be, with KDE. Has the very nice personal database package tellico with it. A collection manager, but you can customise it to be anything you want. In a small office environment this is a very reasonable choice on older hardware. Installs very easily. You can get used compaqs or dells with P3s and run this stuff quite acceptably fast, and be very secure and stable. Easier for ordinary users not to have multiple file managers, mail clients etc. Great for charities and small low budget educational insititutions.

My (quick) distro of choice (5, Interesting)

Punk Walrus (582794) | about 9 years ago | (#13565486)

I am looking forward to trying this out. Slashdot alerted me to Slack fans, and I have been using it steadily in personal and professional environments for years now. I like LFS and Gentoo, just because I can tweak every living thing out of my hardware and software, but if I need a "quick set and forget" distro just to get a box running, Slackware is hard to beat.

I don't know why people claim the installation is so hard. I guess the disk partition thing might be intimidating, but then again, I have FDisk'd so many times because Windows/DOS had issues back in the day, I find the two-tone ncurses thing to be a positive boon!

A hearty congratulations to Pat and all the people who worked for this!

Re:My (quick) distro of choice (1)

richlv (778496) | about 9 years ago | (#13565545)

installation of slackware as a gui workstation _is_ harder than suse, mandrake and probably fc and some other distros :)

also, it might be harder for novices because of lack of dependacy system. other than that (and partitioning mentioned by you) it probably isn't much harder, i think.

Re:My (quick) distro of choice (1)

rugger (61955) | about 9 years ago | (#13565730)

Yep, the more I have used to slackware install, the more appreciative of it I am. It doesn't go to great lengths to guide disk partitioning, swap making ect, extensive configuration. Instead it just gets to the job of installing files onto the hard drive you want, and does it without wasting time I could be properly configuring the box. :-)

It may be imtimidating to first time users, but if you are going to be installing linux more then a few times, you don't need the time wasted by complex installers. (like windows XP's installer)
You already know how you are going to set everything up, and the slackware setup lets you express this very consicely.

Re:My (quick) distro of choice (1)

cerelib (903469) | about 9 years ago | (#13565844)

What is so complex about the XP installer? I personally like it as much or better than any linux distro installer I have used.

Re:My (quick) distro of choice (2, Insightful)

rugger (61955) | about 9 years ago | (#13565945)

XP installation is not that bad .... it is still shows signs of its ancient NT 3.51 history though.

Also, the second stage, where you enter your details and devices get configured, sucks, mostly due to poor feedback and how painfully slow it is. Give me a Windows 95 install process anytime over XP install. And then, once you get it going, you still have to configure > 90% of your important hardware because the OS doesn't have adequate drivers for them.

Whereas the slackware install, I can tell it what partitions to use for swap and install. Then tell it what packages (in detail) I want installed, and once it has installed the packages get it to install LILO. And thats about it. Its much faster then an XP install, and lets me choose all what to install.

Once the system reboots, I can actually go about configuring the hardware and network, without a slow or buggy interface in the way.

And in other news.... (3, Informative)

Rob_Ogilvie (872621) | about 9 years ago | (#13565499)

slamd64 [slamd64.com] has been released with many quite similar changes. What a coincidence, 'eh? Grab [slamd64.com] it now if your CPU is of the x86-64 persuation.

Re:And in other news.... (1)

fred87 (720738) | about 9 years ago | (#13565558)

You just beat me :) Here's a bit more info:

Slamd64 is an unofficial amd64 port of Slackware. Slamd64 10.2 has also been released today, with 2.6.12.4 kernel (with reiser4 support), but otherwise very similar changes.

Good for Pat (1)

Artie_Effim (700781) | about 9 years ago | (#13565503)

It is nice to see that he has rebounded enought from his odd illness to keep up with what I think is the best server distro of all time. Low overhead, fast and stable, all I want.

Up with the times (5, Informative)

bwaynef (692229) | about 9 years ago | (#13565504)

Re: up with the times... Slackware has never tried to be up with the times. They're just now allowing 2.6 kernel (from the installer). Firefox is still a 1.0.x release so its not as stable as the mozilla suite has been (though its pretty good). I think Pat just lets everyone else work out the bugs before he incorporates it into his release. Stability and Ease of Use.

Re:Up with the times - ala M$ style? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565656)

Maybe Mozilla suite is unfashionable now, but I started with Netscape suite (3.x IIRC) back in the late 90's (or so), and have had my email in that mode ever since, thus now in Mozilla Suite. Do we really need to emulate the M$ style of killing backward compatibility???

Since I see another post indicating 1.7.11 IS included, that encourages me to consider Slackware in my endless quest for a distro that "does it all" without me having to tweak/twiddle settings past my (admittedly limited) patience and time - been doing that since the Yggdrasil days with a Mitsumi 1x CD ROM drive. Even then Slack on diskettes was fairly straightforward if time-consuming.

I get paid to tweak and twiddle Solaris and various server packages, and don't really enjoy having to continue in that mode on my own time when it gets to be significant. The BSD's look better all the time with their uniform approach and consistent ports packaging. NOw if they could allow installation to logical partitions instead of primary only to allow replacement of an existing linux partition, and get on better terms with JavaOne to keep their Java port up to date...

Glad they stuck with 2.4 (3, Interesting)

m50d (797211) | about 9 years ago | (#13565548)

Others will disagree with me but I still find 2.6 kernels to be unstable more often than not (see my journal [slashdot.org] ). As a more server-oriented distribution, stability is perhaps more important with slackware than many distributions, and it's good to see Pat's priorities reflect that.

Re:Glad they stuck with 2.4 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13566282)

I have been using the 2.5 and now 2.6 kernels in production heavy load web environments for some time with very very few crashes on whitebox hardware. I find very few issues over all.

Warning: Subversion does not scale! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565594)

Please be careful if you plan on using this system for version control. The default configuration of the latest version scales even worse than previous ones (using their fsfs datastore which completely sucks nuts for scalability). The devs even admit that there are scalability problems in their mailing list threads.

Making me a Slacker again . . . . . (4, Funny)

failure-man (870605) | about 9 years ago | (#13565604)

I could:
a) Get some work done tonight so I don't fail classes.
or
b) Install some new Slackware on my primary beast.

I think I hear the torrent's call . . . . .

Re:Making me a Slacker again . . . . . (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565746)

You will have plenty of time to do your homework, the torrents are slow as balls.

Slackware's purpose? (3, Interesting)

Zemplar (764598) | about 9 years ago | (#13565610)

Now that you can get a 'real' UNIX for free, what are the compelling reasons to use Slackware GNU/Linux whose primary function is to be "...the most "UNIX-like" Linux distribution out there."

Re:Slackware's purpose? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565641)

What are the compelling reasons to use Slackware?

I am compelled to use Slackware for religious reasons. Praise "Bob"!

Slackware's purpose is different (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565824)

The real purpose of Slack (at least as far as i'm aware) has always been so Pat could poke around with a Linux distribution of his own back when there weren't many more than Yggdrasil and one or two others. He kept using it I assume because it's what best fit his tastes as far as security, simplicity and size is concerned.

Slackware does not try to be like UNIX. If it did, it would have no documentation, no support, never update its packages and arrive at work in a nondescript brown paper bag.

Re:Slackware's purpose? (1)

Brainix (748988) | about 9 years ago | (#13565915)

Linux has surpassed traditional Unix in many ways:
  • O(1) scheduler
  • aggressive virtual memory subsystem
  • /proc filesystem
  • quality documentation
  • active developer/user communities

I enjoy these Linux features. But I prefer traditional, Unix-like distros. I use Slackware.

Another Nod to Bob (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565662)

You kids and your 2.6 kernels...
Slackware fits like a warm pair of slippers.
Its the Perfect distro for posting dupes and trashing M$

Is this true for Slackware? (2, Insightful)

bogaboga (793279) | about 9 years ago | (#13565683)

Is the following true about Slackware?

Is the snappiest distro out there in terms of overall responsiveness?

True that it is the oldest Linux distro?

If so why does it not seem to have the mind share that Fedora, SuSE, Mandriva and [K]ubuntu appear to enjoy?

Re:Is this true for Slackware? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565710)

Is the snappiest distro out there in terms of overall responsiveness?

Yes.

True that it is the oldest Linux distro?

No.

If so why does it not seem to have the mind share that Fedora, SuSE, Mandriva and [K]ubuntu appear to enjoy?

Because Slack is the most unforgivingly Unix-like of all the distros. If you want to use Slackware, you'd better be ready to spend a lot of time at the command line, compiling, swearing, and learning more about your OS and your computer than you ever wanted to know.

Re:Is this true for Slackware? (1)

BenjyD (316700) | about 9 years ago | (#13565835)

If so why does it not seem to have the mind share that Fedora, SuSE, Mandriva and [K]ubuntu appear to enjoy?

If my experiment with Slackware 10.0 a while back was representative, it's because of : lack of good automatic package management, lack of newbie-friendly administration tools, lack of all the advanced stuff like Project Utopia etc. and the relatively small selection of official packages

Of course, Slackers would probably say that all those things are the reasons they use Slack, which I don't understand.

Re:Is this true for Slackware? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13566106)

Of course, Slackers would probably say that all those things are the reasons they use Slack, which I don't understand.

You're right! Those are the reasons that I use Slackware. Slack refuses to hold your hand; it forces you to learn how your system works, and I like that. I learned more about Linux and my computer during my first day using Slackware than during all of my Red Hat and Debian time combined.

Now that I've learned all that, newbie-friendly administration tools, package managers, and things like that just insult me and waste hard drive space, so I stick with Slack.

Re:Is this true for Slackware? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13566223)

Actually many of the solutions in other linux distros (the ones you listed with silly names) are a waste of time when you're maintaining servers and workstations running custom applications. Likely you don't understand because you're a desktop user. SysV inits make allmost all other linux distro's unusable for me.

Re:Is this true for Slackware? (3, Insightful)

FauxPasIII (75900) | about 9 years ago | (#13565943)

> If so why does it not seem to have the mind share that Fedora, SuSE, Mandriva and [K]ubuntu appear to enjoy?

If you're used to Windows or Mac, it requires you to do more learning of Linux up front.

Re:Is this true for Slackware? (2, Informative)

SimilarityEngine (892055) | about 9 years ago | (#13566215)

According to good old Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] , Slackware is not quite the oldest distro. The earliest were MCC Interim Linux, TAMU and SLS (Softlanding Linux System). AFAIK Slackware is, however, the oldest distro that is still under active development.

Re:Is this true for Slackware? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13566272)

because it takes an IQ over 120 to be able to use it.

the others are simply intellectually inferior to us Slackwarians.

All hail the great slackware! ooohmay! dooomay! Durka!

seriousally, it's "harder" because there is no click and drool configuration options. and many want to be appliance operators instead of someone that understands how it works.

Re:Is this true for Slackware? (2, Informative)

lelkes (884952) | about 9 years ago | (#13566299)

Slackware is the oldest maintained distribution, Slackware 1.000 was released on July 16, 1993. The first Linux distro was MCC , which was made available to the public for download on the ftp server of University of Manchester in February, 1992, and the second was SLS (founded in mid-1992). Pat decided to modify SLS. He called the finished work Slackware. That's it.

Patricks Health (3, Interesting)

nighty5 (615965) | about 9 years ago | (#13565703)

Last time I heard he was very ill, anyone have the latest?

Re:Patricks Health(Actinomycosis) (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565846)

He had Actinomycosis.
Brave guy to keep working as sick as he was.
You can rad about it here-
http://linuxreviews.org/news/2004/11/17_0_slackwar e_PAT/ [linuxreviews.org]

Great! (1)

J-Doggqx (809697) | about 9 years ago | (#13565745)

Right after I installed 10.1 on all my home systems this past weekend. Oh well, guess I know what I am doing this weekend.

Re:Great! (1)

richlv (778496) | about 9 years ago | (#13565800)

actually it's pretty easy to upgrade straight to 10.2

some configuration parameters might be left over, some packages might be changed (for example, see ff & mozilla java links), but overall i have just upgraded my systems sinze slackware 9, i think.

before each release i tell myself that i should do a clean reinstall, but as it just works...

lately though some strange things have happened because of old user config, so i have wiped them for some apps - but i can't even start with a fresh user config - so now i'm telling myself that i will reinstall when kde 4 comes out. well, at least on the laptop...

Nice one Taco (5, Insightful)

big_groo (237634) | about 9 years ago | (#13565755)

Instead of linking to the torrents, which are easy enough for anyone to find, why not link to the Slackware Store [slackware.com] and try to support Pat's efforts.

You have no problems pimping ads and subscriptions on /., but you won't link to the store of the oldest linux distro out there.

Vector Linux (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565801)

Vector Linux, based on Slackware, is the best personal-use distro I've seen. Got all of Slack's stability, basic package management system that doesn't try to do anything for you, but set up a bit more for desktop use. And it's FAST, the fastest binary-based distro I know of by a long shot.

http://www.vectorlinux.com/ [vectorlinux.com]

Now I just need to wait for them to update so they're compatible with 10.2...

Yeah but... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13565853)

Does it run Linux?

History of slackware? (3, Interesting)

hackstraw (262471) | about 9 years ago | (#13565898)


Slackware was my first linux distro. I learned a bunch from it when I first got into linux in 1994 with Slackware 1.something. It used the kernel version 0.99pl13. That was a long time ago.

I'll tell you, it was the best OS I could run at the time. I also thought it was cool that the default computer name back then was "Dark Star", which is a Grateful Dead song for those that don't know. The system was very modular, and it was relatively easy to install. Yes, I installed via sneakernet on 1.44meg floppies. The second time I installed it, I downloaded it over a 14.4 modem, possibly slower.

I did more reading when downloads took days at a time :)

Re:History of slackware? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13566167)

default computer name still is darkstar

Umm (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13566102)

Yippy?

slackware - upgrade/reinstall? (2, Insightful)

soop (22350) | about 9 years ago | (#13566144)

I didn't think people -reinstalled- Slackware ...

All this talk about going home and reinstalling 10.2 over 10.1 ...

Why not just update your packages or kernel and be done with it

Re:slackware - upgrade/reinstall? (1)

Markus_UW (892365) | about 9 years ago | (#13566249)

Just download swaret and get it to upgrade all your packages. Way less effort that way.

Magnet URI links (2, Informative)

Danathar (267989) | about 9 years ago | (#13566165)

Here are the Magnet URI links. The trackers are having problems. Connect this way...

Note that slashdot mangles URI's so ther is NO space before the last two charachters like it prints here...just get rid of the space

Disk 1
magnet:?xt=urn:btih:YYXZAJR2B3WFBOZCWCFXUSZBOA2MRA 5L

Disk 2
magnet:?xt=urn:btih:YWPGO6H445YQILY5A5XYGSZATPQCPW ES

Disk3 Source
magnet:?xt=urn:btih:FVUYDWUGGYSDXS3CH6KU4SDOEJIJKQ ZK

Disk 4 Source and Extras
magnet:?xt=urn:btih:PVCGFALOO52JJOSEHJA7YCIHHWERHG SN

I just installed 10.1 (3, Funny)

Ximok (650049) | about 9 years ago | (#13566187)

Crap, I held out for 2 weeks hoping they would come out with 10.2. So got tired of waiting, downloaded and installed 10.1 LAST NIGHT until 11:45! GRRRR.... I just wasted 2 cds on 10.1... Oh well, at least I don't have to download firefox now... seperately...
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