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279 comments

FP? (-1, Offtopic)

mike.newton (67123) | more than 8 years ago | (#13590973)

not

Re:FP? (1)

mike.newton (67123) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591062)

Too bad nobody gets recognition for "FIRST MOD" on an article. It took about 30 seconds to get modded offtopic!

On an on-topic note, I managed to download and run this thing before the /. hordes got to it. After ignoring Sun's "We strongly recommend you do not install this software" warning (it's unsigned I think) it seems at first glance to be just another Outlook Express-clone.
Built in support for PGP, which is good for the geek in all of us. Not bad HTML support, graphics seemed to get cut up as I scrolled the message though. Probably a Java problem.
If I had a couple of different operating systems, I'd love to stick it on a flash drive and have my mail in any OS.

Of course, this is all irrelevant to me, because I'm forced to use Outlook at work!

Its a script (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591160)

There's probably a script that searches for the phrase "FP" or something as the first few posts and automatically mods you down. And congrats on the FP. You're gonna get laid!

Typo (0, Troll)

Saiyine (689367) | more than 8 years ago | (#13590980)


Typo in the title, seems to be "Columbia" not "Columba".

--
Superb hosting [dreamhost.com] 4800MB Storage, 120GB bandwidth, $7,95.
Kunowalls!!! [kunowalls.host.sk] Random sexy wallpapers (NSFW!).

Re:Typo (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591010)

A typo on slashdot?! Holy Moly!

Re:Typo (1)

ericdano (113424) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591228)

Seriously, what is next? Posting duplicate stories within 24 hours of each other?

Wait. Slashdot has been there, done that....

Re:Typo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591034)

It's "Columba." It would've been interesting if one of the project maintainers had gotten the name wrong (the submitter), but it just looks like ScuttleMonkey's mistake :).

Re:Typo (3, Informative)

Demerara (256642) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591039)

Oh dear. There is a typo in the article - not the title. It IS "Columba" and NOT "Columbia".

Follow the link (FTFL??) and confirm this.

and their page says... (2, Funny)

Ilgaz (86384) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591097)

It's been 3 years full of sacrifices, nurturing of beer bellies, kaput relationships, horrible startup images, embarassing typos

Re:Typo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591042)

No, it's like Bart Simpson's old catch phrase: "Aye Columba".

Re:Typo (2, Insightful)

ccbailey (859060) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591168)

It probably should be Columba as Columba is the genus to which Columba livia, the rock dove, or pigeon belongs. You know, like carrier pigeons and all?

Here's hoping.... (-1, Troll)

ABCC (861543) | more than 8 years ago | (#13590992)

That its not prone to crashing!

In all fairness, the blurb is wrong, the prog is called Columba, sans i.

Yey! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13590995)

Not slashdotted yet.

the question I have (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13590997)

The question I have though, is what makes this better than the other dozen free email clients?

--
Mod this up, and your penis size will increase by 10-20 percent in volume.

Re:the question I have (2, Funny)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591024)

Uh, well ... it's written in Java you see, and, uh well ...

Short answer: I dunno.

Re:the question I have (1)

nacturation (646836) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591096)

Judging from the screenshots, it looks like they're aiming to give Outlook Express a run for its money.
 

Re:the question I have (2, Insightful)

Unski (821437) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591148)

Hey I'll help you out with that.. Because, you see, apart from Java, this breakthrough also has the ability to, err..store email offline for later reading? * shifty looking grin * Ah! Internationalisation support...knew there was something that distinguished it from Thunderbird et al. Oh. [wikipedia.org] Well Java is still cool I spose. I did look at a Mac screenshot though. Looks like a crufty GNOME app. I hate to be a Negative Nancy but Yet Another Email client? Why?

Re:the question I have (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591182)

what makes this better than the other dozen free email clients?

If you ever lived in the middle of nowhere where mail takes a relative eternity to reach you... well that's exactly what it's like waiting for a Java program to start.

/me ducks

Re:the question I have (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591469)

I second this question. I've been using T-bird for a couple of years now and see no compelling reason to switch. Is this a new milestone in email clients or just another option that's more or less equal to the others?

the Java revolution... (1, Insightful)

jmcmunn (307798) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591004)


I am sure this was going to be groundbreaking 3 years ago when they started it. Ooooohhh...Java!

All joking aside, I am downloading it now to try it out. The screenshots make it look pretty decent. Although in the age of the new beta Yahoo! mail and Gmail it's going to have to be pretty damn good to get anyone to really use it I think.

I don't get one thing (5, Interesting)

Ilgaz (86384) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591058)

Why people act like Java is dead on Slashdot? More Karma?

They coded a full featured IMAP4/POP3 client which becomes standard in India schools and works on everywhere.

Interface? Don't get me started about Yahoo and Gmail. For example, Yahoo must be the simplest pop3 server on the planet without any APOP or TLS options. I don't even hope for IMAP.

I already switched to Spamcop with 15 mb or so storage, at least they serve IMAP with decent spam tools.

I refuse to comment about gmail on slashdot.

Re:I don't get one thing (2, Informative)

Trepalium (109107) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591118)

Because for desktop apps, it more or less is dead. It's like a lot of other Sun technologies where the company didn't quite know what to do with it until it had lost almost everything. Swing and the company's facination with "applets" is probably at least partially to blame.

Today you see some business apps written in it and a fair number of server apps, but desktop java is completely absent. And frankly with Microsoft's .NET framework, I'm not sure Java even has much of a chance at that anymore.

Re:I don't get one thing (2, Informative)

jcnnghm (538570) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591380)

Ever heard of LimeWire or Azureus? I wouldn't say Java is dead on the desktop, mine has a copy of both running right now.

Re:I don't get one thing (4, Insightful)

El Cubano (631386) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591141)

works on everywhere.

Please be sure and qualify your statement properly. It should read: works on everywhere where Java is.

Java is not platform independent. It is a platform as much as Linux, *BSD, Solaris, Irix, Windows, vxWorks and others are platforms. It just happens that Java has been designed to run on other platforms.

Columba or columbia (5, Insightful)

SysKoll (48967) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591009)

Columbia is an email client written in Java

Columba, not columbia.

When the team embarked for these three years of develomment, they luckily didn't foresee that their 1.0 release would be announced on Slashdot with a spelling mistake in the name. Otherwise, they would have played videogames instead.

Re:Columba or columbia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591173)

"When the team embarked for these three years of develomment"

Develomment? When one goes out of their way to be snotty about an easy to make spelling error, one should be competent enough not to make any in their own post.

Me? I spel wrong all the time. I could give a flying fuck one way or another so long as someone can figure out what the fuck I mean. Maybe next time you will remember this and not be such an asshole when correcting others.

Oh wait, this is the slashdot peanut gallerys where we just flame each other for the sake of doing so. As such, please mod this redundant, because someone has probably already flamed accordingly in the past.

Re:Columba or columbia (1)

ConceptJunkie (24823) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591178)

they luckily didn't foresee that their 1.0 release would be announced on Slashdot with a spelling mistake in the name

No, they looked at a few articles on /. and saw that the typo was an inevitability, chalked it up as the irrelevant idiocy that it is and got back to work.

Re:Columba or columbia (1)

Moofie (22272) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591209)

"develomment"

One more time please? I found a typo in your spelling flame...

Re:Columba or columbia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591335)

Columbia is an email client [what another?] written in Java [oh shit!]

Admit it people, this is an accurate reflection of your mental processes while reading the article.

Looks like Thunderbird (4, Interesting)

MSch (674675) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591016)

I have to say, I expected something like Lotus Hannover [nyud.net], but to me it looks like a copy of Thunderbird implemented in Java with icons from Evolution.

Directlink to screenshots: 1 [nyud.net], 2 [nyud.net], 3 [nyud.net].

Re:Looks like Thunderbird (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591151)

but to me it looks like a copy of Thunderbird implemented in Java with icons from Evolution

That's funny, it also looks just like Outlook. What could this mean?

(P.S. God bless you for the coralized links.)

Why would I prefer this... (3, Insightful)

c0l0 (826165) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591027)

...over Evolution, Mozilla Mail/Thunderbird, Sylpheed, mutt, or anything else? Just because it's written in Java, and I need a full-blown VM around it that comes with a redistribution-hostile license? Or is there anything super-special (and equally well-disguised) about it?
 
It's still better than Outlook Express, that's for sure. :-)

Re:Why would I prefer this... (2, Insightful)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591169)

Most of the other clients are written in unsafe languages. You wouldn't want people to be able to run arbitrary code on your system by sending you an email. Java does not suffer from many of the security problems C suffers from. (And yes, I am aware that you can write safe programs in C, but if you read security lists, you would know what happens to that in practice).

Having said that, I completely agree with your post. Java has many disadvantages (but watch out: if you say it on Slashdot, you'll often be modded Troll or Flamebait).

Re:Why would I prefer this... (-1, Troll)

p2sam (139950) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591199)

Most JVM's are written in unsafe languages, you dumbass.

Re:Why would I prefer this... (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591318)

Yes, but a JVM written in C is more likely to be safe than a normal program written in C, especially if the former has more users than the latter. Same goes for Python, Perl, Ruby, etc.

Re:Why would I prefer this... (4, Insightful)

NoOneInParticular (221808) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591328)

tsk, foulmoothing on so little pretext. Yes the JVM is written in an unsafe language. This simply means that the JVM is a single point of failure. However, if the JVM is safe, all java apps are safe. Now try to argue the same thing with every C-app, and envision the amount of effort that goes into (a) ensuring that the JVM is safe and (b) ensuring that every c-application on the face of the earth is safe. Then estimate the chances of success for (a) and (b). Furthermore try to envision the amount of effort that has gone into ensuring that the Java sandbox is foolproof, compared with the effort in avoiding buffer overruns in your random c-app. Only when carefully thinking this through, start calling people dumbasses, dumbass.

Re:Why would I prefer this... (1)

p2sam (139950) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591426)

I'm sorry if I was a little strong, but I wince when people started saying that somehow languages can be "safe" or "unsafe". It sounds dumb.

I like Java. I use it at work all the time. It's easy to use and allows me to be productive. But I would not go so far as to call it "safe". It's just a dumb thing to say. It over simplify the security situation, and gives you a false sense of security.

Dumbass. :)

Re:Why would I prefer this... (1)

fm6 (162816) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591190)

I don't share your hostility towards the Java runtime, but I do think you have a point. Why should anybody care about this project? To be newsworthy, a release announcement should contain some significant features that would make me want to try the software.

But I'm a sucker for new software, so I tried it anyway. First using the Java Webstart installer (which seems to be broken), then using the Windows native installer (which does work). What I got was a Java implementation of Thunderbird, with not as many features and a few more glitches. Why bother?

Re:Why would I prefer this... (2, Interesting)

grotgrot (451123) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591294)

It's still better than Outlook Express, that's for sure. :-)


It is funny you mention that. I have been a hard core IMAP user since the mid 90s. mutt has been the best text mode client for IMAP I have found. On the GUI side Outlook Express is!

Every year or so I try all the other clients out there and keep coming back to OE. OE works perfectly for offline mode. It also doesn't suffer the belief that it is the only mail client you use. Most other mail clients treat IMAP as a source just like POP3 and do the best they can to copy mail into local folders after which it is treated just like it came from POP3. They don't fundamentally get that the mail is stored on the server and that the contents could be changed by any number of clients from any number of locations at any time. (The IMAP protocol has good support for dealing with that - the poorer clients aren't paying attention since they are just in gloried POP3 mode).

And perhaps the funniest thing is the clients with the fancy features (Outlook, Evolution, Mac Mail etc). The settings are stored on the local machine. If you lose the local machine, you lose the settings. If you use the same program on another machine, then it knows nothing about the other instance. If you want the same settings, you have to manually reenter them. And of course the client will reapply the rules/learning/whatever each time you it on the disparate machines! This all makes the features mostly useless. (A good solution would be for the programs to store the settings in an IMAP folder or to use the ACAP Protocol (rfc 2244) but none do.)

So ultimately the simplicity of Outlook Express and it treating IMAP server side storage sensibly keeps me coming back to it. I really wish someone would do a better IMAP client. It is about time for my annual check ...

IMAP (3, Insightful)

Noksagt (69097) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591499)

mutt has been the best text mode client for IMAP I have found. On the GUI side Outlook Express is!
Hillarious! Most would consider pine to be the best IMAP text mode client (Mark Crispin, who created IMAP, has a hand in pine) & mulberry as the best GUI client (written by more people who write IMAP servers). If you restrict it to open source clients, mutt is "o.k." in the text regime & Mulberry/Evolution are good for GUIs.

Reasons why mutt still sucks as an IMAP client
  • No IMAP server-side searching, sorting, threading
  • Can't search across multiple mailboxes
  • Can't download messages without downloading attachments
  • Many settings are applied to ALL IMAP servers
  • Overly-agressive checking of ALL folders by default (though this can be reconfigured)
  • Can't flag IMAP messages on the server as deleted--only purges them
  • No user-defined labels
  • Can't store onfiguration on the server (pine and mulberry can. you say this is a good feature...)
  • IMAP passwords are stored as plaintext
Reasons why Outlook Express has ALWAYS sucked as an IMAP client
  • No IMAP server-side searching, sorting, threading
  • Can't download messages without downloading attachments
  • Can't store onfiguration on the server (pine and mulberry can. you say this is a good feature...)
  • No IMAP server-side drafts/sent mail folders
  • Can't run multiple instances on one PC
  • No flagging
  • Makes too many connections to the server (so can't truly take advantage of IDLE)

Re:Why would I prefer this... (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591329)

Well, that it's done in Java with WebStart is pretty cool. Other than that (looking at the screenshots), I don't see anything revolutionary about it and it doesn't look like the configuration stuff is particularly easier (or in fact, even any different) than most other clients out there.

I won't use it. I don't have a use for it (I use mail.app anyway) - but it's certainly cool.

Re:Why would I prefer this... (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591356)

You mean, the Mozilla Public License that allows you to use, modify and redistribute the software? Super hostile!

Re:Why would I prefer this... (2, Insightful)

adolfojp (730818) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591452)

I have been a loyal thunderbird user for a while, nevertheless, I am giving this program a try.

So far, the rules that you can set in this software are far more advanced than those that exist in thunderbird. The GUI feels also feel a lot lighter and more responsive.

Why try this program? Because competition makes innovation. Do you criticise the Linux community for making a thousand distros?

Unless you use exclusively Open Source software I don't see how you can criticize Sun's JVM. Please remember that the next time that you play a video game or use an ATM.

Cheers,
Adolfo

Great UI innovation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591033)

Everyone, welcome Yet Another Outlook Clone.

What is the point? (1, Troll)

Trigulus (781481) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591051)

There are many good email clients out there. Makeing one with java that looks like the rest and doesnt seem to offer anything unique seems pointless to me. EVERY gui java app I have ever used is a slow unresponsive mess. Perhaps this could be fast but still it just another client that looks and behaves like every other one out there? I am probably wrong.. Please fill me in on the wonderful things this one does that others do not.

Re:What is the point? (2, Insightful)

Spodlink05 (850651) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591129)

EVERY gui java app I have ever used is a slow unresponsive mess.

How many would that be? I've used plenty of non-Java GUI's that were a slow, unresponsive mess.

Blame the programmer(s), not the language.

Parent is a moron (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591259)

You sir are a moron. Tried using Netbeans lately? Think it's slow? Idiot. There's nothing slow about Java, in fact it is very fast. Period. Moron.

Re:What is the point? (1)

TheIndifferentiate (914096) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591297)

I used a pre-1.0 version on Windows XP, and it was just as fast as Thunderbird. I guess if you were concerned about being able to use a perfectly consistent interface for your email across a variety of platforms, then Columba would be good.

Re:What is the point? (0, Offtopic)

seweso (842331) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591383)

I think the visio-like editor yEd [yworks.com] is a very good java-application, you should try it!

Outlook look-a-like (1, Informative)

simulacrum25 (664049) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591053)

Looking at the screenshots, Columba appears to be a clone of Micosoft Outlook. I guess it will be easy for Microsoft users to move to a different application, hopefully it doesn't suffer from the same security flaws & bloat.

Re:Outlook look-a-like (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591122)

Microsoft copies OSS
Slashdot: Bash bash bash, M$ sucks, narf!

OSS copies Microsoft
Slashdot: Ooh, this will make it easy for users to convert! Hooray OSS!

Written in Java (-1, Flamebait)

Tim Ward (514198) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591064)

email client written in Java

Ooh, yes, I'm sure I can spare half a gig of RAM just to keep the email client's UI satisfied!!

Pull the other one. An email client is something you keep loaded all the time, but you still need most of the machine available to do some real work. Nobody without a ludicrous amount of excess hardware can afford to keep a Java application running that they're not actually using continuously, so surely to goodnes an email client is absolutely the first thing you want written in a proper language??

(Unless of course your Java email client is command line only, in which case not so much of a problem, provided you restart it every hour or so.)

Re:Written in Java (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591085)

(Unless of course your Java email client is command line only, in which case not so much of a problem, provided you restart it every hour or so.)

Hey, that's unfair! I saw tomcat (A java server) server that ran for 2 weeks one time. It died a few days later.

Re:Written in Java (1)

S.O.B. (136083) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591240)

I've had a Tomcat server running for up to 5 months. The only time I restart it is when I make certain changes to the configuration that require it.

Re:Written in Java (2, Insightful)

shadowmatter (734276) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591127)

Ooh, yes, I'm sure I can spare half a gig of RAM just to keep the email client's UI satisfied!!

This is the year 2005, not the year 2000. Java isn't so kludgy anymore.

An email client is something you keep loaded all the time, but you still need most of the machine available to do some real work. Nobody without a ludicrous amount of excess hardware can afford to keep a Java application running that they're not actually using continuously...

Perhaps you should sit down and have a face-to-face talk with those half-dozen or so Azureus users.

...surely to goodnes an email client is absolutely the first thing you want written in a proper language.

You mean a non-managed language, like C++? Worked so well for MS Outlook -- and it's practically buffer-overflow, vulnerability-free!

- shadowmatter

Re:Written in Java (0, Flamebait)

pyite (140350) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591165)

This is the year 2005, not the year 2000. Java isn't so kludgy anymore.

Yes, it is.

Re:Written in Java (1)

astrashe (7452) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591215)

That's pretty much my reaction.

Instead of saying Columba sucks because it's written in java, maybe we should reconsider the old conventional wisdom about java gui programs.

Azureus really is fairly slick.

On top of that, the idea of flaming guys for writing good software and giving it away is sort of hard to understand.

No one seems to be talking about how this sort of thing chips away at lock in. It's not a death blow to lock in, but it does take a little chink out of it, and over time, those chinks add up.

Re:Written in Java (1)

billyjoeray (65862) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591225)

Perhaps you should sit down and have a face-to-face talk with those half-dozen or so Azureus users.

Azureus consistantly uses 200MB+ of ram for me.

Re:Written in Java (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591462)

Maybe you should have 20 or 30 less torrents running at once, pr0nmaster.

Re:Written in Java (1)

KoolyM (602345) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591425)

Perhaps you should sit down and have a face-to-face talk with those half-dozen or so Azureus users. No, maybe you should. Anecdotal evidence (hell, who bothers to measure these things?) suggests computers with Azureus running in the background slow down quite significantly. Of course with modern computers offering so much more performance than most people really need, it's not really a problem but that doesn't mean Java applications do not demand a seriously larger share of system resources than comparable applications written in other languages.

Looks good, some bugs, icky java (0, Troll)

coolnicks (865625) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591069)

Just downloaded and installed, looks good, but hit a bug instantly, even tho its minor its still annoying, such as the new account wizzard dosent stay in focus, such as when you go to another window and back again the main application is disabled and the new account wizzard is not visable, such i would presume they are many minor bugs throught, saying that i dont enjoy using java programs, you can spot them a mile off and they seem icky.

Re:Looks good, some bugs, icky java (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591142)

I got around that by alt+tab.

It's ok.Memory hog tho my 800MHz and 256MB laptop.

Thunderbird 5 second startup 15MB memory used.
Columba 15-20 second startup 40MB memory used.

3 years (1)

goarilla (908067) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591072)

they invested 3 years of their life into the development of this project that alone deserves credit even would it suck good work guys (y) ! :D

Re:3 years (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591111)

they invested 3 years of their life into the development of this project that alone deserves credit
3 years, hah that's nothing. Just wait until Duke Nukem Forever comes out.

Re:3 years (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591375)

I only have stumps left.. I've been rubbung my hands to together so long, waiting, that they seem to resemble matchstick heads.

fist fucked.

So why? (2, Insightful)

tktk (540564) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591084)

I took a look at the online Java web start on their webpage. At first glance Columba looks like your typical email client.

So what features would entice to stop using Thunderbird and start using Columbba? I don't see it. On computers where I can install programs, I'd use Thunderbird. On others, I'd just be using a some version webmail client.

Hey, Cool! (4, Funny)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591146)

So how much do I need to pay to get my software advertised on Slashdot?

- mailvisa [nyud.net]: simple bayesian spam filter in Ruby (beats most filters in Debian w.r.t. performance, precission, recall, and memory usage)

- logalize [nyud.net] :analyzer for Apache log files, written in Perl. Simple, so it's easy to customize.

- wake [nyud.net]: remotely wake up machines using wake-on-lan magic packets (written in Perl).

- detach [nyud.net]: start commands detached from the terminal (keeps them from dying when the terminal exits)

- chrootexec [nyud.net]: run commands inside a chroot jail, as a normal user.

- Perlcookies [nyud.net]: random quotes from fortunes files (nice for sigs), but much smaller than the fortune package. Written in Perl.

More on my website, and many more on my harddisk, but these are the more useful ones. While you're at it, take a look at my esasys [nyud.net].

Re:Hey, Cool! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591195)

Once you classified worms and trojans as "virusses" (sic), I had to stop reading your poor essay, "Why We Should be Grateful for Viruses." Thanks for making me feel better about my technical knowledge and writing ability, though.

You don't have to pay anything! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591203)

All you have to do is write a and submit a story submission. It's as simple as that.

Re:Hey, Cool! (1)

ScriptedReplay (908196) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591427)

detach: start commands detached from the terminal (keeps them from dying when the terminal exits)

so why would I use that instead of nohup?

Decent roaming? (2, Insightful)

Craig Ringer (302899) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591166)

I went poking around the site trying to find out what it supports in terms of roaming. Being able to just pull down a .jar from anywhere, and have a writeable LDAP+TLS address book, IMAP+TLS mail (both protected by SSL clent certs), etc all preconfigured would just be bliss.

Right now, it's hard enough to find a client that supports writeable LDAP address books at all, let alone usably and with TLS and client cert support.

Alas, their website doesn't seem to have any sort of feature summary, so it's rather hard to say w/o grabbing and trying it out.

I agree with the other people. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591180)

I honestly don't see the significance of this at all. It's just another email client. It looks decent enough, but I don't see what distinguishes this client from any other clients out there. This doesn't really belong on Slashdot; I'd rather see it on freshmeat or something. Then again, it's a rather slow news day and Slashdot is going down the crapper. I wonder if I spent 3 years of my life working on an email client and then submitted it to Slashdot if ScuttleMonkey would post it. I wouldn't be surprised if he knew someone involved with the project.

Re:I agree with the other people. (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591322)

On the other hand ... yes, this is just another email client. However, I like the fact that there is lots of competition in something that so many people need and use. It gives users more options, more choices, more chances to find that one program that works just the way you want it. Otherwise, we might as well just give in to Microsoft Exchange, throw away POP3, SMTP and IMAP, and turn into Outlook lemmings.

But yeah ... not really frontline news, I agree. Better off on freshmeat.

Why It's Good (2, Interesting)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591189)

For all you people asking "Why would I want this?" or "Why the hack did they write it in Java?":

Writing it in Java does have some advantages. One is that you can use the same code on a few popular platforms. Think about what that means to maintainability.

Another one I pointed out in another comment [slashdot.org]:


Most of the other clients are written in unsafe languages. You wouldn't want people to be able to run arbitrary code on your system by sending you an email. Java does not suffer from many of the security problems C suffers from. (And yes, I am aware that you can write safe programs in C, but if you read security lists, you would know what happens to that in practice).


Yay, I said something good about Java for once.

Re:Why It's Good (0)

Tobias Luetke (707936) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591307)

Writing it in Java does have some advantages. One is that you can use the same code on a few popular platforms. Think about what that means to maintainability.

Please stop advocating this as an advantage, its exactly the opposite.

This is a advantage for the developer. For the users this is a clear disadvantage: It will never integrate as well into their platform as a native solution would. You might as well put on your projects web page that you care jack about your users.

Code is portable, User interfaces aren't. Take a hint from skype, implement your application in whatever language you please as a library and then make GUI's with the platforms native or best widget set. In their case that was C for the core and C++ QT, Delphi VLC and Obj-C Cocoa for linux, windows and mac respectively.

Re:Why It's Good (1)

Danathar (267989) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591374)

If that's the case WHY did they start with an Email client? A web browser would of been much more useful since the majority of exploits come from that application.

A free fully featured web browser in JAVA would be great!

YAEC!! (1)

AnonymousYellowBelly (913452) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591226)

Yet Another Email Client? With wizards!! And a SUPERB interface!! Good for them if they learned about project management, coding in Java, or whatever. But I have yet to see why should I even give it a try.

Going to hell for this, but whatever... (3, Informative)

Y-Crate (540566) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591227)

The crash log is so big that it's spread out over 3 states!

Re:Going to hell for this, but whatever... (2, Informative)

Y-Crate (540566) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591423)

Ahem...I'm not normally one to complain about modding issues, but I think the parent is one of my most mis-modded posts ever. Some people just didn't get it.

The Mac OS X screenshot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591255)

seems to have a slight windows look to it? LOL

rations

Sorry to bodda you, but.. (3, Funny)

slideroll (901934) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591260)

It's actually called Columbo, and it featuers the voice of Peter Falk saying, "Excuse me sir, but you got mail!".

That was fast (3, Informative)

generic-man (33649) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591288)

I downloaded and unpacked the application onto my laptop (12" PowerBook 1.33 GHz) and double-clicked the JAR file. Went to set up an e-mail account. (I like how the provided example is to set up mail for Bill Gates. Very professional.)



At the dialog whose instructions were


Please specify your incoming mail server properties.

If you are unsure please
ask your system administrator or internet service
  (cut off)

, I entereed my login and host name. I have an IMAP server, so I clicked the drop-down box where "POP3" was currently selected. No response. Clicked again. Nothing happened or changed. Clicked again and again.



Tried to set up a new mail account after the fact. POP3 is the only choice. As an IMAP user, Columba to me is nothing more than a broken Evolution clone.

Re:That was fast (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591373)

On my XP machine it installed fine and connected to my IMAP server no problem.

Still ... so much for "write once run anywhere".

Hmm..Brew/CellPhone Option? (1)

redwoodtree (136298) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591325)

It would be interesting if this could be made to run on a cell phone because it's already in java. It does seem a bit BIG in terms of UI elements, but that could be modified.

Currently, the only options on cellphones include paying 5 or 6 bucks a month (at least on the verizon network).

Of course, I don't think there's a way to install a bew app without verizon's permission? Not sure.

Anyway, lot's of questions in my mind about putting this to use on mobile devices.

Java Jive (0)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591326)

Looks like we have to install "Java Web Start" to use Columba, even if we already have a JVM installed (and its browser plugin). The best advantage for Java applets over other languages and platforms is that the user doesn't need to do anything to install the new app other than hit the webpage. Users don't care about "Java", they care about what it can do, and what they have to do (as little as possible) to do it with Java. Why not produce these applets in Flash, which doesn't require extra software installations?

That ignorance of Java's main benefits for applets is written all over the language. For example, the security model requires the user to change their Java "Control Panel" settings to OK an applet to use a proxy to make connections to servers other than the one from which it was served. Even if the proxy is on that server. But of course the applet can just make URL connections to a proxy CGI on that server, sending it the URL, without the benefits of transparency, performance and maintainability of an actual proxy server. While the applet can just issue a "showDocument(<URL>)" call on the browser in which it's running. Which will make the browser connect to any URL. So the security model requires Control Panel interaction by the user to protect from something a malicious coder can produce anyway. More inconvenience and less power.

These inconsistencies are among the reasons that client SW like Columba has not swept "Web desktops" in the 10 years since Java first offered its promises. Now that sophisticated applets are really arriving, is the platform both too weak and redundant to compete?

it's not an applet, dumbass (1)

jbellis (142590) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591481)

P.S. any java runtime new enough to run columba already has Java Web Start. JWS has shipped with all JREs since 1.2, which was released 5+ years ago.

Re:it's not an applet, dumbass (0)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591497)

OK, fuckface, I just installed JDK v1.5.0, and Columba still insisted on forcing me to install WebStart. Who's dumber, them or you? I'd say it's you, because you actually expect me to take you seriously when you call me "dumbass". Then you talk out of your dumb ass. Shithead.

Re:Java Jive (0)

adolfojp (730818) | more than 8 years ago | (#13591495)

Looks like we have to install "Java Web Start" to use Columba, even if we already have a JVM installed (and its browser plugin).
NO, YOU DONT! You can use the java web start version if you don't or can't download the software. THE DOWNLOAD BUTTON IS RIGHT IN THE FRONT PAGE. I downloaded it and works fine.

Why not produce these applets in Flash, which doesn't require extra software installations?
Because Flash's SDK is very limited and a pain to work with.

download failed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13591352)

OK, so how do I need to set up my java to download it? It's giving me....


An error occurred while launching/running the application.

Title: Columba
Vendor: Free Software (MPL1.1)
Category: Download Error

Found unsigned entry in resource: http://columba.sourceforge.net/webstart/columba.ja r [sourceforge.net]
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