Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

World of Warcraft Interview "Responses"

CmdrTaco posted more than 8 years ago | from the it's-hard-work-printing-money dept.

Games 436

A little over a month ago we asked you for your questions to send on to the World of Warcraft development team. Unfortunately, it appears that these questions were misrouted to the Blizzard PR department. Any "Answers" you read here are completely devoid of real information or insight, and instead read like press releases and FAQ-style form replies. As I am a huge fan of this game, I was really disappointed by this. We promised to print their answers, so here they are.1.) Economic Monitoring... by nweaver
How much economic monitoring do you do? Both in-game and on the secondary market (eBay)? Have you considered working with an economist (Steven D. Levitt comes to mind, but there are dozens of others as well) to study some of these phenomenon?

Response -
We monitor the economics of the game very closely. We watch the in-game economy on a regular basis and have personnel that monitor game logs every day. When we see irregularities, we take action. This can range from exploring the account further, finding and removing exploits, or even possible suspension and bans. We also look closely at out-of-game transactions involving real-world cash for in-game items. Some of those transactions occur over eBay, some do not. But in many cases, the involved parties are warned or suspended, and some accounts are also banned.

2.) What would you have done differently? by Trespass
It's the biggest MMORPG to date in terms of number of subscribers. It's easy to guess that you've encountered challenges due to scale that no other developer has before. Knowing what you know now, what would you have done differently, and when?

Response -
Oh yeah, there were definitely things we wished we could have done differently during the development of World of Warcraft. But we learned from those challenges and used that knowledge to improve the game at every opportunity. All of us at Blizzard strive to study the challenges of development and apply those lessons to our next project. It helps us to refine our development process and make each game better.

3.) Mutiple platforms by Fizzlewhiff
Blizzard is one of the few companies that distribues Windows and Mac games together on the same media. Going further, WoW allows Windows and Mac users to play together on the same realms, something which isn't done in other MMORPGS. What kind of hurdles did you have to overcome to get both Windows and Mac versions to co-exist and have you had to make any sacrifices because you were only able to do something on one platfrom and not both?

Response -
There was never any question that World of Warcraft would be co-developed for Windows and Mac users. Blizzard has always supported the Mac platform; you'll notice that even as far back as Warcraft II and Diablo we were there supporting Apple. However, with World of Warcraft, we wanted to improve that relationship further and shoot for a simultaneous release on both platforms. All of us are thrilled that we succeeded in that respect, and we're sure Mac users are happy as well. Both games are equal in every respect; there weren't any features in one version that didn't make it into the other.

4.) Balance by zaffir
What is the process the dev team goes through for balancing character classes, items, NPCs, etc.? Seemingly minor changes can have a huge effect on gameplay, how do you avoid unwanted negative effects on the overall gameplay experience with each content patch? Also, How much of an effect does feedback from the community have on this process?

Response -
As you've implied, game balance is a very difficult and challenging thing to achieve. If it were easy, every game would be perfectly balanced. Of course we know that's not the case. Our designers work very hard to try to balance the game and we know that the more feedback we get, the better our odds of achieving that elusive balance. That's why it has always been important to us to hold closed and open beta tests for all our games, a process dating back to Diablo and StarCraft. The feedback of our beta testers has always been invaluable, and that is still the case in World of Warcraft. That's also why we have Public Test Realms and why all our patches go there first: for more testing before we reveal it to the public.

5.) More dynamic universe? by Zarhan
Battlegrounds are a nice feature, but despite them, the World of Azeroth is quite static place. There have been few events - like the orphan week - but nothing big. Are you planning to introduce "events" into the gaming world that would actually shape it permanently, like in Asheron's call?

Response -
That's something we're looking into. We'd like to enhance our events and create more ongoing ones as well. Children's Week, Darkmoon Faire, and the Stranglethorn Fishing contest are all steps in that direction. Darkmoon Faire, for instance, will continue to be enhanced with new content so that players can keep coming back for new experiences. The Fishing contest is a weekly recurring event that we hope makes the Stranglethorn area more relevant for players. We can't give away too many details for what we have in store, but our goal is to always make the game world feel and act more alive.

6.) Why innovate, if you're just going to stop later? by Mirkon
World of Warcraft was the first MMORPG I gave more than a passing play. Everquest, Asheron's Call, Ultima, SW: Galaxies; none of those interested me, because I saw and read about the endless toil and trouble just to gain numbers on your character stats. WoW was different - I saw the simplicity of Diablo/II in it: easy to play, rich in content, and with a wide world to explore. But then I got to level 60, and all that ended. Now, instead of being able to do most things alone or with a small group of friends, game accomplishments take a full raid of 40 people? You need someone to plan it all out in advance, you need everyone to agree to common rules and to get along with each other; and you need everyone to be coordinated in order to defeat ridiculous enemies. With this, the challenge of the game ceases to be learning techniques and honing skills, and becomes social. The difficulty is not in playing, but in making sure everyone else is playing. Endgame is a different game, and I don't care for it. It's not the game I bought. Rather, it's the games I declined to buy in the past. Friends of mine who played Everquest and Final Fantasy XI are right at home, but I'm decidedly out of place, and don't really want to invest hours, days of my time on goals with exponentially increasing difficulty and exponentially diminishing rewards. The early game is brilliant, and playing it was a joy. Why is that so hard to retain in level 60 play?

Response -
As this question illustrates, the audience for MMORPGs and especially World of Warcraft is very wide and diverse. It is difficult to please all gamers all the time. In fact, some decisions that we make are praised by some players and then criticized by others. It's a difficult balancing act to satisfy so many needs. However, at the same time, we understand that some players just don't have the time or social circle to experience the classic 40-man raids and high-end content of an MMORPG. That's why we created and continue to create more content that can be experienced by casual gamers. Our 10-man PvP Battleground, Warsong Gulch, was a response to this need. It allows smaller groups of people to experience content that is level-neutral and still walk away with great rewards. Arathi Basin, our newest Battleground, is similar in that casual gamers without large social circles can also enjoy playing there and reap great rewards from doing so. Zul'Gurub is an example of non-PvP content that we created for smaller groups of casual players. It is a 20-man raid dungeon that isn't as much of a time commitment as Molten Core or Blackwing Lair. And further in the future, we hope to do some things in Silithus that will enable solo and 5-man groups to still have plenty of fun and questing even after they've hit the level cap.

7.) final decision process? by grungebox
Let me be up front: I don't play any MMORPG's...probably never will. I'm sure WOW is fantastic, but I generally stick to console games. Which sort of leads to my question. How in the world did the decision for a Warcraft MMORPG get made?

Response -
Well, we hope that you'll try out the game. You might be pleasantly surprised. World of Warcraft was designed to be easy and inviting for non-traditional MMORPG players to try. It has an intuitive interface, stylized and familiar settings, and very easy-to-accomplish quests for the casual gamer. As for why we decided to make World of Warcraft in the first place, well, many of us loved playing MMORPGs and we wanted to make one that had all the features we wanted to see and experience ourselves. Since no one else was making the exact MMORPG we wanted to play, we decided to design it ourselves.

8.) What are you doing to curb farming and ebaying? by Amich
I've noticed that "bot"'d characters programmed to do nothing but farm money and items has become a growing problem in WoW. Farming bots can frequently be spotted in the game, and I have evern personally recieved in-game mail spam advertizing mmobay.com . What do you plan to do to curb this issue that is eating away at the economy and atmosphere of your realms?

Response -
We have a zero-tolerance policy against the sale of World of Warcraft items on eBay and similar activities. We investigate such allegations very seriously and those accounts that are indeed guilty of exploits or selling of in-game items for real-world cash suffer disciplinary action within the game. We have various steps we sometimes take in dealing with such issues, but trust us when we say we don't tolerate actions that destroy the economy of the game.

9.) More solo endgame content? by Anonymous Coward
I played WoW since closed beta, and bought it the day it came out. In about 3 months, I made it to level 60. But... then my interest in the game sort of ended. I didn't care about high end raids, or about any PvP content. Elite content was more of a hassle for me than it was fun and exciting. I eventually cancelled my account. So, my question is, are there any plans for more solo content for the endgame? I understand the concept of a MMORPG is to interact with others, but I don't want to have NOTHING to do if I can only play for an hour and want to do something alone.

Response -
We touched on this in the earlier question, but yes, we know that some gamers want more casual content that can be experienced in short periods of time. Many of our quests are designed to be accomplished in short bursts, and that goes from low-level to high-level quests. In future patches, you'll see more casual content that continues along this philosophy.

10.) Developer blogging as done in Linux, MS groups by Sleepy
I loved the Warcraft games so much that I could never play WoW (major time sink! :-) My question is, would your company encourage, allocate time for and generally nudge willing developers to blog? If anyone's worried about bad postings and replies to the blog, a good example to look at is the Microsoft IE7 bloggers. A public blog seems to have influenced Microsoft into fixing IE7 to a degree more than initally planned, which is a Good Thing for many. A theory is their developers wanted to do the right thing, and the blog helped support that.

Response -
We care deeply about our community and definitely want to keep our World of Warcraft gamers updated, but the development and refinement of our games take first priority. However, we do our best to keep the community up to date with regular updates such as the World of Warcraft "Battle Plan," as well as interviews with various news organizations such as this one. Every company has a different way of reaching out to the community and we feel that the World of Warcraft community site is a great way to keep gamers up to date and informed about every aspect of World of Warcraft. The forums are also a great place for gamers to express their opinions and give feedback about the game.

cancel ×

436 comments

Arrghhh (5, Interesting)

grub (11606) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623566)


My pancreas is going to explode from all that sugar! PR people that treat the customers as morons should be unemployed.

I can't resist... (1)

Wazukkithemaster (826055) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623624)

Wow customer != moron? lets not get ahead of ourselves :)

Maybe what they are trying to say is that the important people with important jobs cannot be bothered by silly questions from some very silly people. They are too busy buying servers or something.

Re:Arrghhh (4, Interesting)

Pantero Blanco (792776) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623699)

I'm not completely sure if he was being sarcastic about them being rerouted to the PR department or not. I could see that actually happening, but I figure it's much more likely the developers were worried about saying something they weren't supposed to, and Taco's comparing them to PR people.

Re:Arrghhh (5, Insightful)

grub (11606) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623718)

Yeah, it sure sounds like either a PR person or developers' replies by consensus. No one out on a limb or adding any flavour to the replies.

Re:Arrghhh (4, Interesting)

Surt (22457) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623904)

Blizzard has a pretty strict policy about routing public communications through the PR department. Though I no longer work there and don't know for sure, I would feel confident betting $1000 that PR was involved in generating and sanitizing these answers (and i'm pretty poor, so that would be a big bet for me).

Re:Arrghhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623706)

Lynn-ucks likes teh butt-seks.

FP! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623569)

FP!

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623571)

first post

Yeah (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623577)

ok

Right now (5, Funny)

Approaching.sanity (889047) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623578)

That is one bitter Taco.

give them a chance. (5, Funny)

pezpunk (205653) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623844)

these responses are scheduled to be fixed in the patch next tuesday morning.

Re:Right now (5, Funny)

saider (177166) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623954)


Taco: "Our interview was turned into a meaningless stunt by some PR bitch!"
Cowboy Neal: "You bitter?"
Taco: "Yup! Bit him, too..."

Congratulations Taco! (0)

AEton (654737) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623581)

A new web site, an attitude that's more harsh than fawning towards sucky interviewees...

truly the times have changed.

(First post?)

Re:Congratulations Taco! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623671)

No doubt; this kind of commentary is exactly what I'd expect to see on The Register (albeit with a bit more reference to those "naughty" bits). Keep up the good work!

Re:Congratulations Taco! (1)

Drey (1420) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623835)

You're just saying that because Zonk hasn't reposted it yet. Wait 24 hours and see if you feel the same way.

WOW PALYERS AM TEH FAGGOTS (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623584)


ENLIGSH SI MY FVRIOTE SPROT (-1, Offtopic)

slippyd (694387) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623656)

ENLIGSH SI MY FVRIOTE SPROT

CRAP (1)

hlopez (220083) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623594)

This has to be the worst kind of BS a PR department can spud out.

Spot the one response written by a PR flunky... (4, Insightful)

xxxJonBoyxxx (565205) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623595)

Spot the one response written by a PR flunky...3...2...1...Time's up!

Q: What would you have done differently?

A: ...we learned from those challenges and used that knowledge to improve the game at every opportunity. All of us at Blizzard strive to study the challenges of development and apply those lessons to our next project. It helps us to refine our development process and make each game better.

So...the answer is NOTHING?

Re:Spot the one response written by a PR flunky... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623639)

What did you expect? This is a company that ignores ALL customer feedback on their own forums, and make knee jerk idiotic decisions that throw pvp balance off all the time. (the new paladin ranged attack comes to mind for one)

Re:Spot the one response written by a PR flunky... (3, Interesting)

Rubel (121009) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623826)

What did you expect? This is a company that ignores ALL customer feedback on their own forums


The Mac division gives great support, even talking and giving support on forums like Inside Mac Games.

Re:Spot the one response written by a PR flunky... (3, Interesting)

cnkeller (181482) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623928)

The Mac division gives great support, even talking and giving support on forums like Inside Mac Games.

I'll second this. I've gotten great support from one of the mac developers at Blizzard on everything from mac specific bugs (always seem to get fixed in the next release while they give me a work around) to how to tweak the settings to take advantage of the less-than-optimal-drivers for our video boards.

Re:Spot the one response written by a PR flunky... (0, Offtopic)

harvardian (140312) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623739)

Worked for Bush :-P

Re:Spot the one response written by a PR flunky... (4, Insightful)

op12 (830015) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623756)

PR flunky? That's PR mastery! Evade the question, and spew out some nonsense that you hope the person asking the question will believe is true.

The "C word" is the dead giveaway (4, Interesting)

Infonaut (96956) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623780)

No, not that "C word", this one: Oh yeah, there were definitely things we wished we could have done differently during the development of World of Warcraft. But we learned from those challenges and used that knowledge to improve the game at every opportunity.

PR people are taught never to use the word problem, except when referring to a competitor's products and services. When your own company has a problem, it's a "challenge," usually one that gives you an "opportunity" to continue to "innovate" or be creative.

Heh. (2, Insightful)

Pantero Blanco (792776) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623600)

Kinda reminds me of something I'd see on G4 instead of Slashdot, but that's what you gotta expect from PR. Way to go, bureaucracy.

"completely devoid of real information" (4, Insightful)

Erioll (229536) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623605)

Any "Answers" you read here are completely devoid of real information or insight, and instead read like press releases and FAQ-style form replies.

Truer words were never spoken. This whole thing is just more of the same: we don't want you talking to the developers, ever.

Re:"completely devoid of real information" (1)

Pantero Blanco (792776) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623632)

They're probably worried that either 1. the developers will say something to embarrass them or 2. the developers will say something violating their non-disclosure agreements. Maybe both, I can't know for sure.

Re:"completely devoid of real information" (5, Insightful)

Erioll (229536) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623702)

Or 3. Developer Celebrity. They had a number jump ship to NCSoft for Guild Wars. And they were people that some knew their names, and thus caused some waves about "true spirit of blizzard", etc. I don't know if it's true at all, but keeping them seperate completely takes this problem away.

Or 4. This keeps decisions from needing to be justified. With much questioning you can always say "the developers must have their reasons" rather than them being vetted by the community at large. It also helps them justify the snail's pace of fixing classes (1 talent revamp PER patch? wtf?).

Why Not? (1)

BenVis (795521) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623740)

we don't want you talking to the developers, ever.

Anyone care to speculate why Blizzard is so interested in insulating its developers from the public? Is it some sort of fear they will leak secrets? Maybe the PR people are afraid the ravaging hordes will make the devs cry. I guess if I were Blizzard, I wouldn't want my devs spending time replying to comments, I would want them writing the code I told them to write.

This is something I really don't understand (4, Interesting)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623956)

I don't understand why Blizzard is so opposed to any sort of real, technical response to questions. Other MMORPGs have done that and it's worked fine. DAoC was a very successful MMORPG (and is still around, acitve, and profitable, though fairly small) and they did it all the time. Someone would ask a question about game mechanic X, PR person would find out the programmer responsable, send an e-mail, and print the response. In that way the PR people still made sure nothing secret leaked, and that everything looked good (proper spelling and so on), but you got real responses.

I fail to see why Blizzard has such a problem with that. It also seems somewhat counter productive. Humans like reasons, they like to know why. Reasons don't always satisfy them, but it'll at least satisfy some people, and is often better than nothign for the rest.

When the server cluster I play on was having massive problems I really wanted to know why. I suppose there's no rational reason, it's not like it'd get fixed faster or I could help them or anything, but I had a need to be told what was wrong. I was mad that the response was just "we have a problem and are looking at it." Well ok, WHAT is the problem? Tell me, it'll make me feel better.

bleh on PR. (5, Insightful)

GoNINzo (32266) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623608)

Can we resubmit these to get it routed to a technical person? Or possibly make requests on the Forums to get the real answers? This is just useless, but exactly what you'd expect out of blizzard. At least on the forums, you sometimes get a real answer of 'yeah, that's a bug, I don't see it getting fixed anytime soon, so stop doing it.'

Re:bleh on PR. (5, Informative)

Surt (22457) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623777)

I assure you, more than enough devs at blizzard read slashdot. Most of the team will have seen this article, and many are surely irritated. Some may have even been consulted about answers, and are probably upset by the sanitization that has gone on. But that said, none will post here because Blizzard can be pretty draconian with its devs, and they fire people for smaller stuff than that.

Re:bleh on PR. (4, Interesting)

mattOzan (165392) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623947)

Doesn't Anonymous Coward work for Blizzard? I don't see why he can't speak up...

Re:bleh on PR. (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623949)

do they have technical staff? at least on euro servers it seems sometimes that they do not, and from how slowly improvements have been trickling into the game one would suppose that the dev team is either too small or works just a week in a month. the game needs new content badly and the pvp system is still a joke.

Marketing stuff, indeed. (2, Insightful)

Paolo DF (849424) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623615)

If I submitted a question and after a lot of time read this, well, I'd be quite p'ed off... :-/

Re:Marketing stuff, indeed. (1)

seramar (655396) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623806)

You mean pr'ed off.

Promised a developer response? (5, Informative)

brouski (827510) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623617)

Were you specifically promised a response by the development team when this Q/A was arranged?

This has been a long-standing problem in the WoW community, the "ivory tower" approach (or lack of approach) that the developers have taken to the common gamer.

Compare that to a game like City of Heroes where the developers post on a daily basis.

Re:Promised a developer response? (2, Interesting)

toad3k (882007) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623704)

I remember back in the days before starcraft was out, you could see in depth comments on the forums from devs. I guess I can assume that is ancient history now.

I seem to recall there were instances where the devs said things they shouldn't have and I would not be surprised if they clamped down on them at some point. The fansites would collect and put full analyses up of any post with an official [blizzard] tag next to it.

Re:Promised a developer response? (3, Insightful)

Surt (22457) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623748)

As an aside, I can assure you it is not the dev team's fault. I used to work at blizzard north, and there was a pretty strict policy on never talking about anything in public without permission. With Blizzard South, the policies are even stricter and more draconian, and they fire people on a more regular basis to keep the devs in line.

Re:Promised a developer response? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623813)

Everquest 2 is like that in many regards, in that the dev's post to the forums discussing topics. Some players even are pissed that they're 'blogging' in the forums rather than developing, so it's a two-way street.

Also, I'm sure their success has corrupted them at least somewhat. If they have such a large player base, they don't really have to worry about keeping their customers satisfied. They have more of a creative license to do what they want, than what the player base wants. I'm sure it'll bite them in the end, but not anytime soon.

In comparison many other popular mmorpgs have the devs actively listen to the players, which isn't always a good thing. If 90% of the playerbase wanted an easier game, and the devs listened and made it easier, they would all end up leaving once they ran out of content. If they made it too hard, there would be too much grinding. Add too much content (in combination with a questing/mission system which most have), and you end up with mostly soloing as opposed to grouping, since different people are working on different quests/missions. Too much soloing, and people don't get a sense of community and would rather play a normal RPG that is more enjoyable due to a sense of a developed storyline.

In terms of fixing bugs, I think they boil it down to economics. If it's cheaper to prevent a bug from being exploited through threats of bans and deletions, and by monitoring shards than it would be to actually fix the bug, it's a hard sell to justify fixing it other than to sleep better at night. Also, if fixing one bug might only affect 5% of the playerbase involved, but adding new features is likely to impact almost all players (and also helps prevent them from leaving for another game).

Put in another way, how many people leave games because of a few bugs, and how many leave due to lack of content and boredom? Heck, even one of the questions mentioned that (for the level 60 character).

WOW is mostly PR anyways (5, Insightful)

linzeal (197905) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623619)

I am totally underwhelmed by the evolving storyline WOW is putting out. It would be nice if the entire game had the depth of a 300 page novel but sadly it doesn't. After a string of missions from any of the racial leaders there is a little more than finding an item here or there with a shoddy backstory.

Re:WOW is mostly PR anyways (1)

brouski (827510) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623640)

I think I speak for many when I ask...WHAT EVOLVING STORYLINE??

About as useless (5, Insightful)

nonuttin (851992) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623641)

as an ashtray on a motorcycle. What a shame they could get real answers to some great questions.

Ack! (5, Informative)

daeley (126313) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623647)

This is a paragraph with absolutely no meaning. It's like cotton candy minus the spun sugar, good taste, and positive childhood associations: i.e., stinky carny air.

We care deeply about our community and definitely want to keep our World of Warcraft gamers updated, but the development and refinement of our games take first priority.

This is meaningless, but we have to pretend to care so you will keep giving us money.

However, we do our best to keep the community up to date with regular updates such as the World of Warcraft "Battle Plan," as well as interviews with various news organizations such as this one.

Our marketing drones send marketing blurbs to marketing-friendly news outlets, where they give us free publicity.

Every company has a different way of reaching out to the community and we feel that the World of Warcraft community site is a great way to keep gamers up to date and informed about every aspect of World of Warcraft.

The website is a place we can funnel the people who give us money so they can help each other out and save us on tech support costs.

The forums are also a great place for gamers to express their opinions and give feedback about the game.

Not that we will pay attention to it. But feel free to post away!

Maybe a little to cynical? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623903)

Well could be worse, atleast they still give you the freedom to give opinions as well as some other services. Still, would have been nice if they trusted the community enough or the devs, to let them communicate somewhat more with each other.

Relating to the public is not a PR speciality... (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623649)

Understanding how their responses would be perceived (read: very negatively) is not as important as how their responses would be received by their bosses.

It's the same problem with HR people - they don't care about employees, they care about their bosses.

It's ------ up, basically.

GNU/Linux? (5, Interesting)

JonJ (907502) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623650)

I saw several questions in the last topic about support for GNU/Linux, were they included when you gave them your questions? Or did they simply ignore them?

Re:GNU/Linux? (2, Insightful)

Pantero Blanco (792776) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623750)

People who give answers like these probably don't even know what Linux is, or only know about it by name and figure that it has too little marketshare to bother with.

Re:GNU/Linux? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623889)

They probably figured the sort of people who say "GNU/Linux" aren't going to pay for anything anyway...

Re:GNU/Linux? (2, Insightful)

truesaer (135079) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623900)

Lets just get realistic....the market for Mac is iffy, the market for Linux is nil. Linux is not a realistic desktop market that can justify spending a lot of money.

Re:GNU/Linux? (1)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623941)

"the market for Mac is iffy"

How did you determine that? Mac users spend thousands on their machines and certianly pay for software. There is a whole community of Mac shareware where piracy hasn't completely taken over like in the case of windows. The same can't be said for linux users who are used to getting everything for free.

Re:GNU/Linux? (4, Insightful)

Rycross (836649) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623921)

Its because that question has been asked over and over ad nauseum, and the answer is always the same. Its always "Linux doesn't have enough of a marketshare in the gamer market to justify a port." And this is almost always met with indignation and argument by Linux fans. Then the Windows fans usually come in and start flamewars.

So in short. Its already been asked, and answered, and its really not worth asking again.

Any chance of getting a real response? (1)

kenobi_wan_obi (586333) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623657)

Those are great questions, it'd be great to have answers from the real developers. Any chance of that happening? I *assume* someone at Blizzard reads slashdot, they must know these answers are lame and are making them look bad.

What did you expect? (1)

WinDoze (52234) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623667)

The only people who have time to respond to things like this in software development are those who have no meaningful duties. They justify their positions by doing inane crap like this.

Why should they care? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623668)

What else is to be expected? When you have millions of accounts, you don't care about minor erosion due to poor(or non-existant) customer service/public relations. The game is solid enough to keep most people playing, all they need to do is keep things from being totally unplayable and they'll make a ton of money.

Eliza (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623673)

These guys couldn't pass a Turing test. Eliza could do a better job at answering these questions.

Actually, let's try that:

Q: Blizzard is one of the few companies that distribues Windows and Mac games together on the same media. Going further, WoW allows Windows and Mac users to play together on the same realms, something which isn't done in other MMORPGS. What kind of hurdles did you have to overcome to get both Windows and Mac versions to co-exist and have you had to make any sacrifices because you were only able to do something on one platfrom and not both?

A: Is it because distribues windows and mac games together on the same
media going further wow allows windows and mac users to play together
on the same realms something which is not done in other mmorpgs what
kind of hurdles did I have to overcome to get both windows and mac
versions to co exist and have I had to make any sacrifices because I
was only able to do something on one platfrom and not both that you
came to me?

I think Emacs' doctor has a future in PR!

Blizzard or EA in disguise? (3, Insightful)

Rhalin (791665) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623683)

Come on guys, I'd expect this kind of PR slush from Electronic Arts, but Blizzard? You've got a user base that really loves the work you do, and a chance to answer some of thier more technical questions and make them even happier with you and your games, and you just toss it right out the window.

Way to go.

Re:Blizzard or EA in disguise? (2, Insightful)

Rhalin (791665) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623709)

On an afterthought, I think I'm gonna go hit gamasutra.com and read post mortums from game companies that actually care enough to write about what people want to know...

as comic book guy would say (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623686)

worst. interview. ever.

Content free grammer. (5, Insightful)

Godeke (32895) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623689)

I thought at first that the story summary was a bit harsh, but it is pretty clear that Marketing neutered the answers and produced a press release instead of an interview. I commend /. for following through with the promise to publish even though the answers were so sycophantic that it made me wince more than once. I guess that's what happens when you have millions of subscribers: you can't say anything even mildly interesting for fear of creating a target for discontent.

Re:Content free grammer. (2, Insightful)

Ythan (525808) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623892)

I guess that's what happens when you have millions of subscribers: you can't say anything even mildly interesting for fear of creating a target for discontent. And yet they seemed to accomplish just that.

Blizzard of Poo (4, Insightful)

Andr0s (824479) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623696)

What can I say? I'm massively dissapointed. I've been fan of Blizzard, and especially Warcraft franchise, since Warcraft 1... and it more than slightly annoys me to see the company which always seemed to care about its player base visibly more than most other companies suddenly finds it necessary to answer both the most basic and quite intriguiung questions related to their best-selling game with a load of cookie-cut, soulless and rather empty phrases instead of honest, insightful answers that'd show us Blizzard still consists of people who -enjoy- creating games.

Yes, I play on WoW. And while the game, in itself, is quite awesome (though not, by any stretch of imagination, flawless or perfect), I am increasingly annoyed and dissapointed by the kind of feedback players receive for Blizzard representatives on all levels of game - from in-game issues and assistance requests sent to GMs, through many querries directed to Bliz Forums CMs, all the way to requests for assistance regarding account and payment issues. I find it hard to believe that any company that reached its current cult status purely through great products it created by listening to its fans and customers can make such a sudden and radical turn for the worse in the ways it communicates with those same fans who helped it grow into what it is now.

{ Durmitor/Hermann, Alliance side of Terenas (US) Server}

That...was...ummm... (1)

bynary (827120) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623719)

Well, Blizzard just sucked it up there. Thanks for "delivering timely information to most accurately convey the concern that Blizzard has for its loyal customers".

On Topic/Off Topic (3, Interesting)

TrippTDF (513419) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623735)

I've got one more day to go at my para-corporate job as a Project Manager.

When I've been asked for my opinion, I try to give an answer with some substance to it, something that can be discussed and built on. However, I find that more often than not, people are looking for answers like the ones we see above, where literally NOTHING is being said. It makes me mad that people would rather have nothing said to them but said well than nothing at all.

Re:On Topic/Off Topic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623952)

Ah, you just haven't learned the three magic phrases of project management: "On schedule," "Under budget," "No major problems."

Works every time, and saves time, too. They can't do anything about problems anyway, and would just have to report them to their superiors. Only in the case of absolute failure should any mention of problems be made.

Yuck. (2, Insightful)

stinkwinkerton (609110) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623751)

That was a crap sandwich. It would have been less insulting if they had just not bothered to respond.

Wow, way to be a tool. (0, Troll)

dbc (135354) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623755)

We promised to print their answers, so here they are.

To whom did you promise, them, or us?

If us, then you did not print answers. You should have sent the entire interview back and said: "try again".

If them, then *why*? You call your selves journalists. Why give up editoriral control?

I hope you have learned that in the future you should tell all interviewees that you reserve the right to reject tripe and give them a chance to answer again or have the story dropped with a notice as to why. Or simply post it to a "hall of interview shame" section, not the front page, for crying out loud. You had options.

Re:Wow, way to be a tool. (1)

kenobi_wan_obi (586333) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623790)

I disagree. Much better to print the lame answers. That way we can all drop comments in the WoW general forum. At least that way more people at Blizzard will see what a piss-poor job the PR people did.

Re:Wow, way to be a tool. (4, Interesting)

Andr0s (824479) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623803)

I'd dare say /. did the right thing... this 'interview' paints a certain, not too impressive, image of Blizzard. Purpose of interviews is not always simply to get correct and informative answers to questions you ask - more often than not, interview is interviewer's tool to paint a portrait of interviewee. How will the target respond is more important than what he will say. will his responses be lethargic, enthusiastic, agressive or premeditated tells readers a lot about interviewee's personality, even if it leaves questions themselves unanswered. Thus, may I suggest that - while we'd love to actually see real answers to those questions - /. did owe us the posting of Blizzard's 'answers' to the questions...

Tool this! (1)

miketo (461816) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623957)

Sending it back with a link to http://www.cluetrain.org/ [cluetrain.org] would be a great first step. Then if the same mess comes back, post the correspondence between parties, allowing the world to see that Blizzard doesn't speak to people, it speaks to "markets." With enough negative word-of-mouth like this, revenue decreases, and marketroids get fired.

As a side note, marketroids *must* be hit directly in the face with negative publicity, otherwise they won't learn. I speak from experience in a dev organization; developers, product managers, et al. were never allowed to talk to "press," customers, etc. without a marketroid present (and after being heavily coached). Net result was that the press and customers never trusted a word we said.

And no, I didn't work for a certain Redmond software company. But when marketing controls a company, this behavior is commonplace.

Didn't I read something about this a few day ago? (1, Interesting)

Jumbo Jimbo (828571) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623782)

If I remember, the previous story on Slashdot was like this, about a strange plague on WoW???

ringbarer writes "News is coming in that the lands of Azeroth have become infected with a deadly plague which the developers never intended to spread. Originating from the new P'R instance, the plague has spread from marektng bot to marketing bot via 'consultants'. Entire teams are being rendered incpable of independent thought and expression, yet players are surprisingly finding this rather predicatable!" From the article: " Some answers have gotten so bad that you can't read them without getting covered in bullcrap (and anyone less than like level 50 nearly immediately drowns in it). GM's even tried quarantining marketing bots in certain areas, but they kept escaping the quarantine and spreading their nonsense."

Yeah that's pretty lame (4, Insightful)

Chitlenz (184283) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623783)

They *used* to be such a cool company, really cutting the edge in gameplay mechanics even when they lagged behind on graphics. WOW is a great game, with tons of eye candy. Unfortunately, it's a great game by a company that's now owned by some mindless,faceless multinational corporation (Vivendi Universal).

The upside of this is that Rome must fall, and the recent exedous of Blizzard's devs has already started to erode away the machine, in this instance. Witness Guild wars, which had several refugees from the Diablo team on board, there's another new one too that sprang up from a WOW team exedous in the last month.

Vivendi just doesn't get that the players can tell when the people making the games are having fun doing it. I cannot imagine that this kind of 're-routing' can be good for morale among the people who matter at Blizzard, i.e the people responsible for actually CREATING the products.

PR Department, pfft.

That's insulting.

-chitlenz

Where's the beef? (1)

vertaxis (250038) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623786)

This set of answers sounds like a bot responded to them.

With all the marketing doublespeak and evasion of questions, what was the point of asking anything when all the responses are obfuscated.

This Q&A is as clear as mud.

Warsong Gulch for the casual player (1)

Rhys (96510) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623793)

That'd be relevant if a WSG match had run since the patch went live. I haven't seen one on Llane when I've been /whoing, and from what the queue tells me (admitedly in the 20-29 bracket, I just started a month ago and have alt-itis) there hasn't been one period.

Re:Warsong Gulch for the casual player (1)

glyneth (47975) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623932)

Whoo, Llane! Alliance or Horde?

Everyone's gone to AB anyway.

I really don't think they care. (2, Interesting)

Trespass (225077) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623795)

They've got a license to print money, for the time being. It would have been nice to have an answer to my question about what they would have done differently, but I suspect anyone that knows is NDA'ed out the ass.

World of Warcraft was a rare treat for me: It's the first MMORPG I've played, and I got into the industry last year working on a MMORPG that'll be out next year. It's nice to see what works and what doesn't while having some power to make a potentially better game.

I suspect they really wish they could have ramped up for the number of players better and faster. That may be a limit imposed by their suppliers of server and network hardware. Sure, they're the biggest game, but how many players they lost because their realms were overloaded is open to speculation. I suspect their numbers will fade in a year or so, depending on what they can do to keep people interested and what the competition is like.

It's all well and good to insult Blizzard for their czarist relationship with their players, but realize that their are things to learn from them anyhow.

Not only devoid of any content... (1)

Z0mb1eman (629653) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623807)

...but also just plain wrong on occasion.

Our 10-man PvP Battleground, Warsong Gulch, was a response to this need. It allows smaller groups of people to experience content that is level-neutral and still walk away with great rewards.

I'm sure that was the original intent for Warsong Gulch. The sad truth is that the people most likely to take full advantage of WSG are, again, people in large guilds who get together 10-man teams and farm it for honor and rep.

Ironically, the 40-man Alterac Valley can be a better option for the casual solo gamer to PvP for an hour and walk away with anything other than a bitter taste in their mouth.

I'd be shocked if any "official" response from Blizzard ever touched on anything like this...

new face of blizzard (1)

h8mE (748976) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623810)

welcome to the new face of blizzard, fuck the customer for all they are worth and laugh all the way to the bank; whilst the customers are stranded in a forrest of retards in suits

Something is fishy (1)

Mister Phister (910272) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623818)

Blizzards PR guy and supreme court nominee John Roberts....could they be one and the same???

Nahhhh, John Roberts was much more forthright.

I didn't read it (2, Funny)

ValuJet (587148) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623830)

and I feel like I won the prize for best use of time on slashdot

Ahh yes the dreaded attack of the clueless PRD. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623860)

But how do you combat such things?

In this case it is easy, share the link to this interview with others. Post it in other forums while bad mouthing the kiss ass, watered down drivel that we see. Once enough mindshare is reached the PR flunkies must then answer to someone above them who sees a PR failure because of the negative attention. Then those ever so smart PR guys will flip into damage control and give you the answers from the dev team...

BlizzCon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623870)

Maybe they are waiting for their convention to occur to give real answers. No, wait, perhaps the con in BlizzCon means something else... it definitly is not for 'Content'

Null and void (1)

Trails (629752) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623878)

You may have promised to print ttheir replies, but they promised responses, not cut-and-pastes from their marketing handbook. I say email them back and ask for actual answers.

Here's the short version (5, Insightful)

Achoi77 (669484) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623879)

What terribly long winded questions! Here's a condensed version.

(questions snipped for brevity, apologies if any questions were mangled. Also, please read it with a grain of salt *smirk*)

1) Question: How much economic monitoring do you do? Both in-game and on the secondary market (eBay)? Have you considered working with an economist (Steven D. Levitt comes to mind, but there are dozens of others as well) to study some of these phenomenon?

Response: We ban bots. I've banned 3 myself today.

2) Question: ..It's easy to guess that you've encountered challenges due to scale that no other developer has before. Knowing what you know now, what would you have done differently, and when?

Response: Why yes, there are things we wished we would have done differently...wha.. is this a two part question?.. Brain.. hurts!

3) Question: ..What kind of hurdles did you have to overcome to get both Windows and Mac versions to co-exist and have you had to make any sacrifices because you were only able to do something on one platfrom and not both?

Response: We made a windows AND a mac version. That means, if you have a mac, you can install it, and play it! Without a PC!

4) Question: What is the process the dev team goes through for balancing character classes, items, NPCs, etc.?..

Response: It's very difficult. Otherwise it wouldn't be easy. Ppl complain all the time. Stop bitching.

5) Question: ..Are you planning to introduce "events" into the gaming world that would actually shape it permanently, like in Asheron's call?

Response: We made it so you can run around and fight stuff. It's awesome.

6) Question: ..The early game is brilliant, and playing it was a joy. Why is that so hard to retain in level 60 play?

Response: Dungeons are cool. You can crawl thru them with 39 of your friends. It's awesome.

7) Question: Let me be up front: I don't play any MMORPG's...probably never will. I'm sure WOW is fantastic, but I generally stick to console games. Which sort of leads to my question. How in the world did the decision for a Warcraft MMORPG get made?

Response: Please play World of Warcraft. It's pretty awesome.

8) Question: Farming bots can frequently be spotted in the game, and I have evern personally recieved in-game mail spam advertizing mmobay.com . What do you plan to do to curb this issue that is eating away at the economy and atmosphere of your realms?

Response: Dood, we answered this questions 7 questions ago. RTFA plz.

9) Question: ...So, my question is, are there any plans for more solo content for the endgame?

Response: Dungeons are cool. You can crawl thru them with 39 of your friends. It's awesome.

10) Question: would your company encourage, allocate time for and generally nudge willing developers to blog? If anyone's worried about bad postings and replies to the blog, a good example to look at is the Microsoft IE7 bloggers. A public blog seems to have influenced Microsoft into fixing IE7 to a degree more than initally planned, which is a Good Thing for many. A theory is their developers wanted to do the right thing, and the blog helped support that.

Response: Use the forums plz, kthxbye.

Grr, the marketing droids and my question (5, Interesting)

nweaver (113078) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623884)

1.) Economic Monitoring... by nweaver
How much economic monitoring do you do? Both in-game and on the secondary market (eBay)? Have you considered working with an economist (Steven D. Levitt comes to mind, but there are dozens of others as well) to study some of these phenomenon?


Response -
We monitor the economics of the game very closely. We watch the in-game economy on a regular basis and have personnel that monitor game logs every day. When we see irregularities, we take action. This can range from exploring the account further, finding and removing exploits, or even possible suspension and bans. We also look closely at out-of-game transactions involving real-world cash for in-game items. Some of those transactions occur over eBay, some do not. But in many cases, the involved parties are warned or suspended, and some accounts are also banned.


Marketing droid just didn't get it. I'm interested in ACADEMIC modeling. EG, Star Wars galaxies has published interesting flows. People have done economic models of Evercrack's secondary market trying to estimate the GDP assuming a convertable currency. And Freakonomics is a GOOD BOOK damnit.

Stupid marketing droid. Needs to have his memory core wiped and reprogrammed over at Hammerhead.

They missed something... (1)

pickyouupatnine (901260) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623886)

While answering the questions.. the PR team forgot that they are replying to a forum full of geeks. We like technical answers to technical questions. Something like "what would you have done differently during development?" - I think most of us would be more satisfied to hear "yes there were challenges and we learned from em but the rest is one big secret than a suger coated answer for the numbed masses. I for one am downright disapointed by the answers - almost feel like I'm being patronised.

Dear Blizzard Public Relations (2, Informative)

digid (259751) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623893)

You've once again ran the name of Blizzard through the mud. Hundreds of thousands of people(potential customers) are seeing how frustrated your customers are getting with you. Not a good way for potential customers to be introduced to the game. And now even more your customers are even more irritated than they were before. Get your act together.

Someone report Blizzard to the GM's (5, Funny)

Mr. Grimm (599800) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623895)

They obviously use bots to answer questions while not at the computer, a clear violation of the EULA.

They don't care about ebay transactions (1)

StormyWeather (543593) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623899)

I work for a banking firm, and although I'm not a great SQL guy, I know within about an hour I could find damn near every gold seller with a page or two long query. They don't give a crap or they would have devoted a few thousand dollars to buy up some gold online, and then do a transaction search off of those sellers accounts to find who had purchased gold, who the sellers were gettin gold from, etc.

If they don't want people selling... (1)

mark-t (151149) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623907)

Really, if they don't want people selling their games on ebay, then perhaps they should rethink their business model.

Specifically, instead of selling the game in stores, make it freely available for anyone to download. Free. No charge. Maybe even give away actual CD's too... just like AOL CD's.

Of course, as you have to actually pay money to the company to play the game online anyways, it doesn't seem to me that this approach would leave them out of pocket any real serious amounts of money.

Or maybe I just don't understand enough of any of this to be usefully contributing to this discussion.

This Is What Happens... (1)

BaldingByMicrosoft (585534) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623911)

...when you sell your soul to conglomerates such as Vivendi.

It's time to face the fact: Blizzard has been assimilated.

What the hell is this? (4, Informative)

Henry V .009 (518000) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623915)

Message to the Blizzard PR dept:

You fail it! The bad PR generated by these bland answers is 100 times worse than anything that you could have gotten with sincere answers. I'm not buying WoW until those responsible are sacked.

Remember... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623927)

Blizzard is owned by Vivendi. All the employees that are not directly developing WoW are more than likely managed by Vivendi management. I'm sure the developers got the original questions, answered them, and forwarded them up to whoever needs to check these things, and they "edited" the answers to what we see here. Vivendi is afraid of ANYTHING that might affect their revenue stream on this game. They've lost one cash cow in Valve through not having control, they will try to keep Blizzard and their other developers on a very short leash.

I played WOW for 14 days and then uninstalled it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13623934)

The things I want in games are : fun, action, be confronted to (tactical/strategical/mental) challenges and have fun solving them.

Well, what Wow gave me (I played an undead demonist) is :

Chores/Errands : to solve the typical Wow-quest, you have to (like in morrowind btw)
1) get the qest
2) find and walk to the place where to fulfill the quest
3) kill 10-40 monsters or harvest objects of 1-3 different species to get quest objects
4) come back to the person who gave you the quest to get the xp.

This kind of quests is ok when you just have to fulfill a dozen. .
The thing is, you have to go through like 100 of those to get to level 26...and when you know that the fun begoins at high levels (at level 60 ?).
(to gain xp you have either to kill huge number of monsters (gets boring aor engage in

Routin/no tactical choices :

Well, I played a demonist. Basically...from level 1 to level 26, in fights, you can only use one tactic :
Use your pet to stop the monster coming at you, curse/zap him with the same sequence of spells (the more efficient one),
then finish him with your weapon.

There are 2 variations :
a) drink a potion/heal yourself a bit
b) run for your life when your pet get killed/your hit points get dangerously low.

In WOW, the demonists (specialized in summoning..lol) can only summon 4 different monsters...

In Wow, you only gain xp if your opponents are high lvl enough (at most 9 lvls beneath you).
result : you never become powerfull as you are forced to constantly fight monsters that are the same lvl as you.

Low levels monsters can easily kill you if they are numerous enough (4 or more if you are a demonist)
result : you can't solo in instances/epic quests.

I happen to remember fondly my wizard in neverwinter nights.
I could scout dangerous places at level 3 (invisibility..damn usefull spell),
invoke like 50 different monsters : familiar, elementals, random monsters, undeads, fiends, morden kainen's sword...)
resist close combat warriors a bit (stoneskin)
turn into a juggernaut warrior
zap 'em into oblivion
I could kill huge numbers of weak mob with one spell (and get a little xp)
Death spells (my kingdom for words of power, phantasmal killer, cloud kill, weird)

Man, in neverwinter nights..playing a wizard was fun ! (and playing online was/is still free)
Now, I wonder why I bought Wow in the first place....Had I known...

Can't wait for neverwinter nights II....though

Maybe the developers are reading our responses. (1)

FuckTheModerators (883349) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623935)

Maybe they're miffed at how this was sanitized and willing to spend some time as ACs actually answering.
With that hope, I'll repost my question which was posted way too late for the original question batch:

What about single player?

Sounds odd, but hear me out:

I'm not a huge fan of MMO's, but I've played a couple (EQ & CoH). How hard would it be to package the world and soloable quests into a single player, non-online game?

Why don't MMO's offer this as an introductory experience? If people like the single player, they could upgrade to the online, monthly-fee system.

And those of us with severely limited gaming time could play offline, alone, at our own pace. All while making Blizzard money off an already-developed product.


C'mon devs, we know you're reading this.
Shoot us some AC answers!

Get a life people (0, Troll)

Emperor Shaddam IV (199709) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623936)

Jezz,
The answers came from the PR department. Don't SLAM them, they were just doing there job. SLAM Slashdot for not making it clear who the questions were meant for.

I've not see a larger bunch of "whiners" than when I last checked the "EverQuest" boards 2 years ago.

I wanna talk to a developer! Whin, Whin, Whin...

Its just a video game!

OMG (1)

Technoheretic (916905) | more than 8 years ago | (#13623942)

OMG the PR man broke my BSometer!
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...