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U.S. Announces Global Intellectual Property Plan

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the our-way-or-the-highway dept.

Patents 292

Angry_Admin writes "ZDNet is running a story about how the U.S. has announced new plans to expand its crackdown on intellectual-property infringement overseas. From the article:'One program would place intellectual property experts on the ground in regions where infringement is considered a concern. There they would work with overseas U.S. businesses and native government officials to advocate improved intellectual-property rights protection, according to a department fact sheet. Another program, called the Global Intellectual Property Rights Academy, would train foreign judges, enforcement officials and other stakeholders in international intellectual property obligations and best practices.'"

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That's it! (5, Funny)

Dizzo (443720) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632633)

Screw this, I'm moving... oh, wait.

I hate my job. (1)

Fecal Troll Matter (445929) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632653)

How can I get myself fired and still collect unemployment?

long time nervous breakdown (0, Offtopic)

da5idnetlimit.com (410908) | more than 8 years ago | (#13633005)

1/ don't sleep for at least 36 hours
2 / go to work on monday, having taken something to prevent sleep
3 / early in the afternoon, your colleagues will all encourage you going to the doctor, as you've been a bitch of a zombie to deal with
4 / see the doctor, be constructive, get 15 days off work - renewable
5 / Profit(or)

(Depends on your local ruels of unemployement...

Re:That's it! (3, Funny)

justin12345 (846440) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632815)

The more you tighten your grip, MPAA/RIAA, the more systems will slip through your fingers.

Re:That's it! (2, Insightful)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632939)

I guess that's one way to stop other countries with lighter IP restrictions from out innovating us...take away their advantage!

BIG BROTHER! (-1, Troll)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632635)

FP

Fp! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632637)

Fp

Hmmm. How can we gouge other countries? (5, Insightful)

HolyCrapSCOsux (700114) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632640)

The problem is, other countries have other laws. You can't enforce US law in china. They'll tell us just where we can stick our initiative. I hope that ALL the countries do the same....

Re:Hmmm. How can we gouge other countries? (4, Insightful)

squidfood (149212) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632704)

You can't enforce US law in china.

Why not?? We westerners have always done this kind of thing to Asia! I want my government to promote our monopolies abroad. I offer you five words: British East India Tea Company.

Re:Hmmm. How can we gouge other countries? (2)

N1ghtFalcon (884555) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632716)

See, Iraq thought the same thing... And look what happened to them.

Re:Hmmm. How can we gouge other countries? (2, Insightful)

justsomebody (525308) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632813)

In Europe their Software patents have fallen out too, ... but somehow I feel that US companies are on it again and that this law is nothing but another form of already rejected SoftPatent proposal. It would make no difference for them if they would be allowed to enforce their US patents or if they have to patent overseas, in fact it would be even cheaper.

They could at least wait a year or two.

Personally, I'm developing reflex against US citizens (non-intentionaly against people, I know it should be politics only), there's more and more medling to other coutry affairs and last years it is evolving from noticeable to annoying.

Re:Hmmm. How can we gouge other countries? (1, Troll)

southpolesammy (150094) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632911)

If the Chinese gov't isn't willing to enforce the preservation of US intellectual property rights, then the US ought not have to export machinery and machine parts, integrated circuits, or soybeans to them -- oh wait -- that's much of the raw materials needed by their entire economy.

It's called a squeeze play. Develop the technology yourself, and it's yours, but steal it from others, regardless of national boundaries, and be prepared to suffer the consequences of a global economic market.

Re:Hmmm. How can we gouge other countries? (2, Informative)

twosmokes (704364) | more than 8 years ago | (#13633006)

Good idea, but as it stands China would put the squeeze on us.

Re:Hmmm. How can we gouge other countries? (4, Insightful)

dmatos (232892) | more than 8 years ago | (#13633021)

You are absolutely correct. The US is under no obligations to ship soybeans, machine parts, and integrated circuits to China. However, if the US does stop shipping these products to China, what are they going to do with the vast stockpiles that will build up? How are they going to replace the lost revenue?

A trade relationship only exists (ideally) when both sides benefit. If you think the US is selling products to China, or anywhere else, simply out of the good of their collective hearts, you are sorely mistaken. For every article that leaves a US port, a certain amount of foreign money flows into the US economy. Disrupt this state of events at your own risk.

It shouldn't be too hard (1)

aztec rain god (827341) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632963)

The article says we already have one guy in China enforcing this new dictate. Lucky guy.

Re:Hmmm. How can we gouge other countries? (1)

stlhawkeye (868951) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632966)

The problem is, other countries have other laws. You can't enforce US law in china. They'll tell us just where we can stick our initiative. I hope that ALL the countries do the same....

We're not going there to enforce our laws. We're sending people to advise businesses on local laws and stump for IP rights for businesses in those nations. Further, there are international IP rights, and the programs in question are intended to serve as training for judges and attorneys in international courts and advocate best practices. Nowhere in here is an attemp to force US IP law on other governments, only to encourage them to abide by the laws of their own countries and those laws that such nations have agreed to abide by in the international arena.

Or you could knee-jerk and flail your arms at the injustice of world, that any company doesn't want its software being sold on the streets of Jakarta for $2, in violation of local law, while police look the other way. I don't think this is unreasonable.

Way to go, Dunya. (0, Troll)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632642)


This sounds like the biggest wankfest ever. We're sending over advisors??? Exactly what good does the administration think this is going to do? Hey George, if you're gonna send in the Planeteers, don't forget Ma-ti [geocities.com] ...he's got the power of Heart, after all...

I'm so glad my tax money is being squandered on this joke, rather than going to something worthwhile, like...say...Katrina relief.

Re:Way to go, Dunya. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632667)

I don't know what is stranger, the fact that you made a Planeteers reference in your post, or that someone actually made a Planeteers webpage...

Re:Way to go, Dunya. (1)

spauldo (118058) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632684)

It's like Vietnam - we just start with advisors to keep the chinese out of it...

Re:Way to go, Dunya. (2, Funny)

op12 (830015) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632697)

FTA: "The Commerce Department has recently taken other actions intended to combat international intellectual-property infringement. In July, President Bush created within the department a senior-level position -- the coordinator for international intellectual-property enforcement."

So I guess that would make this guy the Wankfest Coordinator. That has a much better ring to it than CIIPE.

Re:Way to go, Dunya. (3, Funny)

Shadow Wrought (586631) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632830)

I'm so glad my tax money is being squandered on this joke, rather than going to something worthwhile, like...say...Katrina relief.

Since Katrina relief is now a French concern [bsnews.org] , you no longer have to worry about misallocation of tax dollars.

F*** That Sh*T (3, Funny)

bazmail (764941) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632648)

Yankee go home!

Re:F*** That Sh*T (1)

Meagermanx (768421) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632880)

...exclaimed the 14-year-old white boy, violently.

When questioned about this plan... (5, Funny)

Suzumushi (907838) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632649)

The RIAA/MPAA spokespeople for the US government responded, "We just need some breathing space."

Re:When questioned about this plan... (3, Funny)

ln -sf head ass (585724) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632733)

I'd normally shout "Godwin's Law," but I'm too busy laughing! Up next week, RIAA annexes the Sudetenland.

Funny? (1)

trezor (555230) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632756)

The RIAA/MPAA spokespeople for the US government responded

The fact that someone can write this of as a joke makes it sad. (But yeah, I'm chuckling as well.)

Re:When questioned about this plan... (4, Insightful)

antiMStroll (664213) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632804)

That's backwards. The US government now proves itself a wholly owned subsidiary of entertainment cartels. Future historians will have a field day with our era, endlessly arguing, picking apart and tracing precisely where and how it was decided to relinquish fundamental rights for the benefit of a tiny minority of business interests specializing in trivialities.

Re:When questioned about this plan... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632820)

I could've sworn I heard something about living space.. living room.. liebensraum...

Great (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632674)

As if we (the U.S.) didn't have a PR problem already. Now we're going to be viewed as the Microsoft of the world.

"intellectual property experts" (1)

doormat (63648) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632680)

By this, of course they mean representatives from the RIAA/MPAA. So you know that all sides of the discussion on intellectual property will be treated fairly.

Re:"intellectual property experts" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632766)

"all sides of the discussion on intellectual property"

One program would place intellectual property experts on the ground in regions where infringement is considered a concern. There they would work with overseas U.S. businesses and native government officials to advocate improved intellectual-property rights protection, according to a department fact sheet. Another program, called the Global Intellectual Property Rights Academy

Of course they will treat all the sides mentioned fairly because there is only one side mentioned here. There is no mention at all of consumers, people, citizens, fair use, etc.

You can pick any side as long as they pick the sides available.

Re:"intellectual property experts" (1)

SirChive (229195) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632859)

The RIAA/MPAA bought the laws and pay for Congress so, of course they are the ones to go. Isn't unrestrained capitalism wonderful?

All of a sudden... (1)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632683)

> One program would place intellectual property experts on the ground in regions where infringement is considered a concern.

...being a mercenary for Blackwater seems positively ethical by comparison!

The War on Corporations Losing Money! (3, Funny)

garcia (6573) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632685)

Experts will be sent to Brazil, India, Russia, Thailand, China and the Middle East and serve a five-year tour of duty, the fact sheet said.

You just *have* love quotes like that. Yay! The War on Drugs and now the War on Software Piracy! Tours of duty, lol!

Re:The War on Corporations Losing Money! (1)

Hoi Polloi (522990) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632802)

Personally I welcome our new carpetbagging overlords.

Is this now the war against foreign cultures? "Sorry, you can't use your god image anymore, it bears too close a resemblence to Mickey Mouse."

Re:The War on Corporations Losing Money! (1)

Meagermanx (768421) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632941)

I'm sure those Mortal Kombat dudes are gonna sue the advocates of Vishnu because he bares too close a resemblance to Goro.

"Train" (4, Insightful)

grub (11606) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632688)


would train foreign judges

Yeah, all those years of school and working as lawyers in the field couldn't prepare them enough.

Re:"Train" (2, Informative)

garcia (6573) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632831)

Yeah, all those years of school and working as lawyers in the field couldn't prepare them enough.

They have to be "retrained" to start taking money from the "right" people.

Re:"Train" (1)

SatanicPuppy (611928) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632976)

Uh, why is this a troll?

If we're sending people to teach their judges how to judge, then that's what we're doing. We're saying that they don't know what they're doing, and that we, because we're a SUPERPOWER and we're RIGHT, ought to show them how its supposed to be done.

Isn't it ironic... (5, Insightful)

Enlarged to Show Tex (911413) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632845)

...that the US wants foreign judges to consider US law as it judges things in its own jurisdiction, yet doesn't want US judges to consider foreign law as it judges matters here in the US?

E2ST

Re:"Train" (1, Interesting)

stlhawkeye (868951) | more than 8 years ago | (#13633026)

Yeah, all those years of school and working as lawyers in the field couldn't prepare them enough.

It clearly doesn't. While American judges typically attend undergraduate school, law school, and practice as attorneys or are at least involved in the legal system for some kind of tenure before being appointed to courts, judges in many other nations often have far less legal expertise. The standards of American legal knowledge inherent in our court system are not shared worldwide. A handful of nations have judges who are far more knowledgable, but on balance, the nations in question tend to have a relatively large number of people in positions of legal authority whose primary qualification is being related to or owed favor by the right people in power. That does happen in the 'States too, but usually those people have some case for being qualified on their own merits.

For the record, law school trains you very, very little to actually be an attorney, and not at all to be a judge. Lawyering skills are almost entirely acquired on the job. When attorneys and judges "grow up" professional in a corrupt legal system, all the training in the world isn't going to convince them to enforce law consistantly. By international standards, American courts are a model of principle and fairness, as amazing as that may seem.

sure (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632691)

There they would work with overseas U.S. businesses and naive government officials....

stupid idea (1)

gcnaddict (841664) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632694)

Try this in iran and any chance they have at keeping them from building a nuke will go out the window

it sorta puts our lives on the line., and I care more for my life than i do the MPAA's IP

Re:stupid idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632947)

Iran is not a concern, it is an Islamic state, crap such as Britney Spears or movies from the states are not permitted, you have to pray five times a day, and observ many Islamic laws.

That keep people busy, in addition, if someone tries to download music, porn or whatever crap produced in the United States, it is not possible due to the firewall (similar to the one used by the chinese) that the Iranian goverment has implemented.

Poor Iranians, I have been contacted in chat by people asking for help to be able to get porn.

Re:stupid idea (1)

Meagermanx (768421) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632982)

...or we could just copywrite the shape of a nuclear missile. Or we could copywrite radioactive substances. Hell, we could copywrite steel, so that they can't use microscopes, metal folding chairs, or cars.
That would impede their progress.

So this means... (2, Funny)

kc32 (879357) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632701)

We're basically invading China with nothing but lawyers.

Re:So this means... (1)

mangus_angus (873781) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632816)

Dear god......

If they were smart they would just ask us to drop a nuke on them and not put them thru so much suffering.

Re:So this means... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632885)

That's fine by me just means less lawyers to have to deal with here.

Re:So this means... (2, Funny)

jbeaupre (752124) | more than 8 years ago | (#13633025)

Why do you think we have so many lawyers? As everyone is quick to point out, war is bad. Diplomacy goes both ways. But drop 100,000 lawyers on some poor country, and you quickly overwhelm them. No legal system can endure. Not a drop of blood spilled and a country is brought to its knees. Plus the lawyers bill the victim.

Still, it is rather expensive to feed and house a standing army of lawyers.

Its cold here in hell (4, Interesting)

hackstraw (262471) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632711)

From TFA:

Another programme, called the Global Intellectual Property Rights Academy, would train foreign judges, enforcement officials and other stakeholders in international intellectual property "obligations" and best practices. The academy, overseen by the US Patent and Trademark Office, plans to convene in 24 sessions in 2006, paying all travel expenses for the foreign participants, who will come from many of the same areas where experts will be working.

I don't know what to even say to that.

The US Patent and Trademark Office has their own special issues. We are going to "train" people about their laws concerning intellectual property "obligations" and "best practices"?

Put me in charge of this damn thing. I'll use napalm to train these guys.

I'm speechless. I don't think I really want to live in this country (USA) any more.

Re:Its cold here in hell (4, Insightful)

garcia (6573) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632789)

I'm speechless. I don't think I really want to live in this country (USA) any more.

That's the worst possible solution -- being speechless I mean.

Re:Its cold here in hell (1)

Ruud Althuizen (835426) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632915)

Another program, called the Global Intellectual Property Rights Academy, would train foreign judges, enforcement officials and other stakeholders in international intellectual property obligations and best practices.
And who's ideals would that be, the RIAA's or the people's?

Re:Its cold here in hell (1)

swimmar132 (302744) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632973)

What the fuck does this have to do with the RIAA?

Are they the only ones with IP now?

Commandos (1)

VisceralLogic (911294) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632718)

You know those guys who jump out of planes and parachute into heavily defended territories with night-vision goggles and silenced guns? Yeah, them... the RIAA.

Cool! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632719)

This is exactly what I want my taxes spent on, go Bush!

Re:Cool! (1)

Meagermanx (768421) | more than 8 years ago | (#13633002)

America has spoken. Now America has to live with its decision.

How to control the world (5, Informative)

wlvdc (842653) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632724)

Hmm, this sounds more like a world domination plan. So the US-government and US-businesses have agreed that all intellectual-property shall be theirs, and their agents ("... train foreign judges") will do the field administration to assure US interests secured. Why is the US so convinced of it's own legal system. Why should it work for the rest of the world?

Re:How to control the world (4, Insightful)

Yaa 101 (664725) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632860)

It doesn't... look at the world trade center...

It is exactly these kind of arrogant things that form a magnet for negativity...

Re:How to control the world (2, Funny)

mtaht (603670) | more than 8 years ago | (#13633028)

Next invasion of a country will be to protect intellectually property rights. The marines will go in, followed shortly thereafter by the lawyers. Come to think of it, sending in the lawyers inot the beach would solve a lot of problems for both sides - the enemy military gets in some worthwhile target practice - and our side ends up with less lawyers.

So this *isn't* colonialism, right? (5, Funny)

myowntrueself (607117) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632726)

From the article:'One program would place intellectual property experts on the ground in regions where infringement is considered a concern. There they would work with overseas U.S. businesses and native government officials to advocate improved intellectual-property rights protection

*native* government officials?

Lord Blimey, we can't have those nig-nogs and fuzzy-wuzzies running about without proper supervision! They might *violate* our intellectual property!

Send the colonial administrators in to pick out a few of the more obedient and docile wogs and turn them into loyal colonial servants.

(and if you can't spot the sarcasm in that, you'd better bloody well mod me down, hadn't you?)

Re:So this *isn't* colonialism, right? (1)

aztec rain god (827341) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632874)

Send the colonial administrators. . .

I'd prefer the title proconsul or dominus, you petulent plebe.

NWO (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632735)

The New World Order.

How dare they?!? (2, Funny)

VAXGeek (3443) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632754)

I find it outrageous that these countries not only violate federal law, but they also refuse to obey the causes in our constituition dealing with copyright!

On the sole export of the US (3, Interesting)

Haiku 4 U (580059) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632758)

When all you make is
crappy IP, you damn well
gonna do just this.

I miss the old days
when we could point to something
tangible we made.

Now, all we export
is bad movies, music, and
pain and suffering.

Re:On the sole export of the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632836)

You've got that wrong. The US is pretty good at exporting pain and suffering, as it's had decades to perfect it both at home and abroad.

Re:On the sole export of the US (0)

swimmar132 (302744) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632994)

Yeah, the U.S. doesn't make anything.

We don't make airplanes. Or software. Or medicine. And we certainly don't design anything.

Why doesnt someone... (1)

firepacket (809106) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632767)

Patent the workings of anti-piracy measures. There could be a big fund to help hold them indefinetly and the industry would help by lobbying for extended intellectual property.

Training please (1)

SkjeggApe (649721) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632769)

I'm a judge in [some foreign country], and would like some training on the global IP rights of US companies, and to join Bushie's "war on piracy" .. Anyone know where I can sign up? Do they offer night classes?

Sincerely,
Gunther "not so smart" Zhang

YEAH! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632774)

I for one welcome our new global overlords!

Cause nobody knows history, right (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632780)

"Experts will be sent to Brazil, India, Russia, Thailand, China and the Middle East"....right, and all those places are going to be real interested in protecting U.S. IP rights. The Middle East hates us, and the rest are mainly interested in catching up to our level of prosperity and technological development...with China working hard at becoming our next rival superpower.

And all of them know that when the U.S. was in their position, we ignored the IP rights of the leading nations of the day. That's partly how we got where we're at now.

I swear, I was the most patriotic kid ever when I was growing up, and I was way into that American Revolution stuff...now I'm living in the modern equivalent of the British Empire. Complete with a King George. This is really getting old.

MWAHAHAHAHAHA (1)

smooc (59753) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632799)

What are they thinking? Wow, come of your high horses please!

I mean the Bush administration does not have the most favourable imago right now. But this... this is going to get them ridiculed across the globe. Suddenly mr. Bush turned into a stand-up comedian.

mr. Bush I sincerely think you should have other matters on your mind (Rita maybe?)

Holy crap (1)

dragonp12 (798787) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632805)

You're going to try to inflict your crap on us as well? Bring on the colonisation of Mars :-\

right... (1)

theheff (894014) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632818)

this is exactly what all those uncivilized, un-american, overseas excuses for human beings want for themselves, right? i believe this action already has a name... "preemptive strike"

the day we stop thinking that our fat american culture is superior to anything else out there is the day that world stops hating our country.

Western Civilization.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632829)

...was nice while it lasted.

Re:Western Civilization.... (1)

dragonp12 (798787) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632884)

And was a good idea.

Re:Western Civilization.... (1)

miscz (888242) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632919)

No, it was just a good idea.

One plan to rule them all....... (1)

Rank_Tyro (721935) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632838)

Had to say it...

Join the EFF now! (2, Insightful)

StefanJ (88986) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632841)

It may not help in the end, but at least you'll feel like you did something while Homeland Security is dragging you away to have a NeuroDongle(tm) installed in your parietal lobe to keep your brain from processing non-DRM equipped media.

One RIAA... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632869)

One RIAA to Rule Them All!

Ooh, watch out, Canada! (4, Interesting)

Grendel Drago (41496) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632878)

I'm surprised they didn't mention Canada. See, Canada currently has Life+50 copyright (while Europe, for instance, has Life+70); unless someone leans on them, the complete works of A. A. Milne (d. 1956) will become public domain there on January 1, 2007. So, given that Winnie the Pooh is a particularly large cash cow for Disney, who wants to bet that Canada mysteriously chooses to extend their copyrights to "harmonize" (or whatever the bullshit phrase is) their copyrights with ours, or with Europe's?

Inevitable for this to be the norm? (1)

duerra (684053) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632889)

A good point in the article is made in saying that the state's sovereignty trumps intellectual property. It is critical that government agencies remain as open as possible to the needs of the people, and locking them into the use of Microsoft-only formats is not putting you on the fast track to success.

I have to wonder if such action will eventually become the norm - not just in the US, but everywhere. Being tied down to a US corporation that could potentially leave you high and dry doesn't really sound to me like a position that governments would want to put themselves in. And that doesn't even consider the security implications of the closed nature of commercial operating systems.

Now, that isn't to say that a commercial product can't be used. There is no reason that Office couldn't support open standards, but if other states start following suit, I guarantee Microsoft will change their mind on that stance.

Over Paid, Over Sexed, Over Here!!! (2, Insightful)

metoc (224422) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632890)

At this rate American's won't be welcome anywhere.

This is a good thing (0, Flamebait)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632901)

Trying to achieve some kind of global consensus on IP is a good thing. Most rational people who know what they are taking about (so you can disregard most of the opinions you read here on shashdot) understand that IP is vitally important to ensure that inventors and venture capitalists are properly compensated for their expended efforts and resources. I'm not saying that the US has the best system, but it is certainly on par with any other system I've seen implemented. It's not like we're suing governments in the WTO over their treatment of copyright and patents, we're just trying to help other countries enforce existing laws regarding IP. No harm there.

Way to Legislate Special Interest (4, Insightful)

LordMyren (15499) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632905)

I'll repeat it again;
Way to legislate special interest!

What fuck-asses. I cant wait to see the nepharious two-fisted bullshit these content-holder hitmen are going to try to pull on the rest of the world. Once you get past the sickening reality, it should be downright fucking hilarious. They wont exactly have all that much leverage, they're just some random joe show shows up claiming to be defending some other nations interests. Surreee, we'll listen to you.

The US remains the only place in the world where law enforcement considers 100% enforcement their duty. Less barberic civilization seems to have realized that the purpose of laws is for the general goodwill and fortune of the populous, and laws should be enforced or not enforced as such. Its called humanity you nincompoops.

Its kind of scary to think nations might willingly forfeit the sovereignty of letting someone else come in and demand that they start enforcing their laws better. There's cases of defunct government where such aid is needed, but its pathetic that hte only place the US is going to start leveraging such direct extra-national influence is to the cock-sucking lobbyists that've completely monopolized the entertainment sector. Its even more terrifying to think that any self respecting international body would let agents of a single nation impose this policy.

Little more ire than usual, but whatever. "Sometimes you know, I get so pissed off,"
Myren

Myren

Where have I seen this before? (1)

Jason Hildebrand (103827) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632908)

Another program, called the Global Intellectual Property Rights Academy, would train foreign judges, enforcement officials and other stakeholders in international intellectual property obligations and best practices
Hmmm... it sounds like the "judicial version" of the School of the Americas [geocities.com] .

So... (4, Insightful)

Evil Butters (772669) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632910)

[sarcasm]

Well, now that we've captured Bin Laden, resolved all of the problems from hurricanes Katrina and Rita, finally got out of Iraq and solved our crime and unemployment problems locally, I'm glad to see that our country is putting our over abundance of tax dollars to good use!

[sarcasm]

Makes sense... (1)

Bogtha (906264) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632927)

Over here in the UK, 50 year copyright terms mean that early Elvis recordings etc are entering the public domain. That's about the earliest recordings that USA companies still profit immensely from. Our slightly more sensible copyright laws are now affecting USA company profits, and thus must be "fixed", as every year that passes, the extent to which USA companies can leech off long-dead artists is reduced.

I really can't take any politician seriously when they suggest longer terms for copyright. If the profit you make over the course of fifty years isn't enough, then you are either too greedy or not talented enough to be granted the privilege of being supported by society as a full-time artist.

'Intellectual Property' = Corporate racketeering (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13632948)

If the definition of 'Intellectual Property' was more restrictive, then this may make sense, but in fact, 'Intellectual Property' is sadly just a term used for a legalised form of corporate racketeering.

Property is Theft (1)

Epeeist (2682) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632949)

Proudhon

Too much gin on a Friday night.

Could be worse... (1)

thewils (463314) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632954)

It could be the Interplanetary Intellectual Property Plan

Dear US Govt (1)

panurge (573432) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632960)

I am a foreign judge who urgently requires training in intellectual property laws. Unfortunately I need to bribe dishonest officials to obtain exit visa so I can attend Harvard Business School. Five million dollars in unmarked gold bullion should pay for it nicely. Any laws you want made on my return, just ask.

Judges being influenced by US officials?! (1)

kwandar (733439) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632969)

Train judges in best practises?!!!



I think not!



Best practise for a judge is to follow the law and avoid the appearance of a conflict of interest!!

Before everyone gets too hot about this... (2, Interesting)

Kphrak (230261) | more than 8 years ago | (#13632991)

I've already seen hundreds of "The US is a dictatorship based on world domination, RIAA MPAA Microsoft Bush corporations hate hate hate" comments as a result of this article. Before everyone starts screaming about the same thing in a frenzy of knee-jerk reactions, keep in mind that many developing nations run factories dedicated to producing illegal copies of software, mostly American, Japanese, and European. In Indonesia one used to be able to find whole software stores with not one legitimate copy of a product in them (probably still can; I was there about six months ago). Lawmakers and judges in these countries officially support intellectual property, but wink at it in practice.

I don't know, let me put this question up to Slashdot's tender mercies: Do we advocate illegal copying of commercial software, and if so, why? Although I know we're supposed to be for the "little guy", and against the corporations, these guys aren't Johnny Downloader; they're companies that make their living solely from copying the products of other people's labor. Is it because "information wants to be free", and that the very idea of exchanging money for software is evil? Is it because Microsoft or Redhat or Oracle are evil, and they should be punished for their crimes by the piracy of their software?

The United States has a big software business. It has copyright laws that are, on paper, agreed to by other countries by international agreement. So why the big fuss when they want them to be enforced?

A quick side note: The availability of illegal proprietary software hinders the adoption of open source in developing nations because Windows is so readily available (about $3 in USD per copy). In addition, the GPL is an intellectual property agreement. If we stand for the violation of commercial intellectual property, we must allow for the violation of open-source intellectual property. Legally, they are no different.

Excellent (1)

MemoryDragon (544441) | more than 8 years ago | (#13633000)

Good place for US Laywers, Chines Prisons, Russian Gulags... perfect disposal areas for the US waste....

hmm...(c) - patent#: 53022946814633 (1)

layer3switch (783864) | more than 8 years ago | (#13633012)

"pegged rates of usage of unlicensed software at 90 percent in China, 87 percent in Russia, 74 percent in India, 70 percent in Thailand, 64 percent in Brazil and 58 percent in the Middle East..."
"intellectual property infringement, which the department claims costs US businesses $250bn (£138bn) and 750,000 jobs per year..."
"Experts will be sent to Brazil, India, Russia, Thailand, China and the Middle East and serve a five-year tour of duty..."

So we make up for $250 billion and create 750,000 jobs by "educating" foreign countries about US Intellectual Property Law? hmm... US companies outsource jobs to those same countries stealing US "intellectual properties". Maybe it's time to stop the outsourcing and start thinking maybe and just maybe US "intellectual properties" which may benefit mankind should not be patented and whored by corporate fat fucks.

Perhaps Ben Franklin should have patented lighting rod after all... There are just too many assholes need to be hit by lightening these day and age.

IP is a big American fantasy (3, Informative)

Simonetta (207550) | more than 8 years ago | (#13633020)

'Intellectual Property' is nothing more than a big American fantasy invented to compensate for the fact that they don't make anything anymore except ultra-high-tech death machines and recycled entertainment products.
      And frankly, killing can be done, when needed, with the tried-and-true low-tech methods and the recycled entertainment product can all be easily copied by anyone with a $100 PC.

    IP is what you use to try and convince people that you are still relevant in the world when you don't make anything anymore, your people are buffoons living on borrowed money from everyone, and you still have enough hydrogen bombs to make it awkward for anyone to point out the obvious fact that you are nowhere near as important as you were fifty years ago.

    So all this effort to metamorphize a concept like 'intellectual property' into the legal equivalent of actual physical items that have intrinsic value is bound to fail internationally. In more ways than one, people just aren't going to buy it. They'll give you lots of lip service, sign your treaties, stay in expensive hotels for endless international conferences (as long as you pick up the tab), and then, just ignore whatever it was that you were getting so upset about.

    The Americans thought they were so smart by trashing their industrial base, shipping all of their manufacturing jobs overseas, and laying off (or never hiring in the first place) all the people that comprised the only real asset that they ever had...smart people willing to come to termperate North America from all over the world in order to get away from the assholes that were making it impossible to make a good life in the old country. Now the Americans have fucked up their physical country, their economy, their good name, and their middle class.

    So what's left? Intellectual Property! And just what exactly is that? One more illiterate, psychopathic 'rapper'? One more $100,000,000 buddy-cop movie?

    Grow up, fools!

Nothing to make headlines about (1)

xiando (770382) | more than 8 years ago | (#13633022)

The RIAA and MPAA and their members like Fox are greedy evil assholes. Not news. And they don't like piracy. Not news. And they want to do something about it. Also not news. But the most important non-news is that the Internet's biggest Piracy Distribution Site, The Pirate Bay, IS LEGAL because of the glorious and very clever laws. So there is locally nothing to "crack down" on, because even though they may be breaking US Laws they are NOT breaking any local laws. So the US can complain and wine do what the fuck they want, but fact remains that the people of EU are smarter than the US population (Take songs as a good example, people in EU listen to the lyrics and the music, US people judge by the amount of skin shown in the music video) so we will not change our laws no matter how much the US dislikes them - so this is all just not news.

One Program (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13633027)

One Program to rule them all, one Program to find them, One Program to bring them all and in the Darkness bind them
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