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Voyager 1 Sends Messages from the Edge

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the so-long-and-thanks-for-all-the-fish dept.

Space 287

dalmozian writes "NASA's Latest News about the Voyager 1 is being run on Sci-Tech. The Voyager has passed into the border region at the edge of the solar system and now is sending back information about this never-before-explored area, say scientists at the University of Maryland. From the article: 'Voyager 1 and its twin spacecraft Voyager 2 are now part of a NASA Interstellar Mission to explore the outermost edge of the sun's domain and beyond. Both Voyagers are capable of returning scientific data from a full range of instruments, with adequate electrical power and attitude control propellant to keep operating until 2020.'" The proof of crossing the termination shock was covered earlier this year but now we can see the actual data.

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first message received from beyond... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653219)

first post!

Wow. (5, Funny)

doxology (636469) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653223)

Those roaming charges must be astronomical!

Re:Wow. (3, Funny)

spoonyfork (23307) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653371)

Those roaming charges must be astronomical!

$65+ million over the next 15 years to put a number on it. My mobile bill doesn't seem so bad anymore.

Re:Wow. (5, Funny)

doxology (636469) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653397)

With that sort of cost, it would suck to cross the event Verizon and be pulled into a Cingular-ity.

Re:Wow. (4, Insightful)

DeadVulcan (182139) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653608)

...it would suck to cross the event Verizon and be pulled into a Cingular-ity.

Where is that "+1 Funny-to-some-but- may-induce-vomiting- in-others" moderation I've always wanted?

And the message was.. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653227)

Beam me up Scotty! :)

Top 10 List (5, Funny)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653234)

My attempt at humor. (Stand back.)

You might be an astrophysicist if:

10. You only refer to the ninth planet as "Pluto-Charon"
9. You constantly correct everyone that Pluto-Charon is sometimes the eighth planet.
8. You've throttled someone for joking about "The Borg" when you mentioned Wolf 359.
7. You are of the opinion that there are only 8 planets in the solar system.
6. You get booted out of the family reunion for constantly correcting "scientific" conversations.
5. You think that the slowdown of the Pioneer Space Probe is a more important mystery than the Pyramids.
4. The last JPL probe burst at least 10 of your pet theories.
3. You punched Neil Armstrong for "contaminating" the moon with human presence.
2. You passed out before Neil's return punch landed.

And the number one way to tell you're an astrophysicist is...

1. You hold your breath in awe as a probe sends back data on inky blackness.

Thank you, thank you! I'll be here all week! (Ok, ok. So the rest of the gags all sprung out of the number one "joke". Try not to groan too much.) :-P

Re:Top 10 List (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653317)

5. You think that the slowdown of the Pioneer Space Probe is a more important mystery than the Pyramids.
Mystery no more? [lanl.gov]

Re:Top 10 List (4, Informative)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653592)

That's one theory that's been suggested, but there are many more [wikipedia.org] . While the RTG explanation seems most likely, many scientists hold to the idea that the RTG doesn't produce *enough* thrust to cause the anomaly.

Re:Top 10 List (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653342)

Well, that's 30 minutes of your life you'll never get back.

Re:Top 10 List (3, Insightful)

RatBastard (949) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653375)

Not to hijak the thread too much, but what "mystery of the pyramids"? People built the largest stone structures they could using the most stable shape they could find. Where's the mystery? And it's not even like they got them right the first time. They had at least one pyramid colapse because the angle was too steep, hence the resulting "bent pyramid" where they changed angles half-way up. And they started with a much simpler design of a series of stepped platforms on top of each other. It's not that hard to think that an engineer looked at that and thought "Hey! I bet we could add sloped sides to that and it would look really cool!" and acted on it.

The only "mystery" is people being unwilling to understand the sheer number of men it took to build them. No one questions how the Great Wall of China was built, and it is a much more impressive engineering feat than the pyramids.

Re:Top 10 List (1)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653410)

Dude. It's a joke. Relax.

The "mystery of the pyramids" if you must know, is how they got the blocks in place. While there's a lot of hyperbole stating that "we can't even lift that much weight today!" (Yes, yes we can.) the truth of the matter is that we just can't figure out how they moved 3 ton blocks without the invention of the wheel.

One of the more interesting suggestions was that they used kites to lift the blocks, but my own feeling is that the historical record is simply incomplete on the technology they possessed.

Re:Top 10 List (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653459)

without the invention of the wheel

Ah... not to intrude on your funny fest here, but the Egyptians did know the wheel. How old do you think the Giza pyramids are, exactly? Are you even referring to Giza, or to the older ones? Or are you just pretending you actually know what you're talking about?

The Mayans are another issue altogether, since they knew the wheel only as a child's toy or in certain tools. How they moved those blocks from quarries to the construction sites (Tula, Uxmal, Chichen-Itza, etc) is a little harder to figure out.

Mayan Pyramids (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653489)

The Mayans are another issue altogether, since they knew the wheel only as a child's toy or in certain tools. How they moved those blocks from quarries to the construction sites (Tula, Uxmal, Chichen-Itza, etc) is a little harder to figure out.

Plenty of slave power?

Re:Top 10 List (2, Informative)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653526)

That's not the claim that's made [aol.com] :
Direct supporting evidence for any theory as to how the huge blocks were moved is sparse at best. To date, no text or relief (chiseled drawings) have been found describing how the Great Pyramids were built. Most Egyptologists agree that the wheel had not yet been invented, and the first recording of large blocks being moved with wheels is dated about 750 B.C.-some 2000 years after the Great Pyramid was built. The first wheeled transportation was introduced until the Middle Kingdom when the Hyksos brought chariots to Egypt between 2040 and 1786 B.C.

There may still be argument over this as the wheel was invented about 3000 B.C. However, Egypt was supposedly quite late in getting wheel technology.

Re:Top 10 List (2, Interesting)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653654)

Even if they did have the wheel that does do not offer an easy answer to how they moved the stones. You would have problems with things like bearings and road surfaces. Sliding is a much more probable method. Remember wheels are only effect on smooth level surfaces.
I believe that that many people think they may have used rollers of some kind if not pulleys.
I find it odd that the Egyptians seemed to have figured out how to work metal, quarry stone, have a system of writing and government but had never seen a log roll down a hill? I would bet they had wheels. They may not have used them to move the stones but I bet they had them.

Re:Top 10 List (1)

RatBastard (949) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653524)

I'm not jumping your ass. I'm just venting my frustration that so many people (some of them even post here) beleive that there is some grand mystery to the Pyramids. Like the shape has some magical property or that they were influenced by aliens. People assume that people could not have been smart enough to build them, which is a laughable idea when you look at the things we build today.

And you are right, the only real "mystery" is the exact methods they used to move the blocks. But there is no doubt that human beings did actually move those blocks.

Re:Top 10 List (2)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653690)

I'm just venting my frustration that so many people (some of them even post here) beleive that there is some grand mystery to the Pyramids.

People also think we didn't land on the moon, and that the alien autopsy was a government cover-up. Don't let them get under your skin. :-)

Forgive my ignorance... (1)

soft_guy (534437) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653466)

7. You are of the opinion that there are only 8 planets in the solar system.

What does this refer to? Do some astronomers think one of the planets is technically a comet or something?

Re:Forgive my ignorance... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653531)

This probably refers to how it is debatable if Pluto is a planet.

Kuiper belt (2, Informative)

Pchelka (805036) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653651)

There has been controversy over Pluto's status as a planet for several years. Many scientists now believe that Pluto should be more properly classified as the largest Kuiper Belt Object [hawaii.edu] ever found. This is due to Pluto's size, its unusual composition, and odd orbit. Pluto's orbit is actually sort of like that of a Kuiper Belt object. Some comets do come from the Kuiper Belt, but I don't think people would actually classify Pluto as a comet because its orbit never takes it close enough to the Sun for Pluto to develop the classic comet tail.

Re:Forgive my ignorance... (2, Informative)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653660)

Well, we know that you're not an astrophysicist. :-P

Do a little reading [wikipedia.org] on Pluto, and you should understand. There's a huge debate about the whole "is it a planet, is it not a planet, it's just too small, but then what is a continent", etc.

Quick! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653240)

Let's /. the voyager!

i 0\/\/n0rZ t3h \/()j463r! woooot! (4, Interesting)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653458)

Let's /. the voyager!

I thought about something along those lines a while back. More specifically, with most space probes, what's stopping a malevolant third party from sending their own control transmissions to a probe, and making it do their bidding?

My guess is that they might include some precautions nowadays, but what of probes from a few years back?

Re:i 0\/\/n0rZ t3h \/()j463r! woooot! (1)

theurge14 (820596) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653552)

Since they run on 1970s era 8-track players, they're protected by old school DRM schemes from the RIAA.

Re:i 0\/\/n0rZ t3h \/()j463r! woooot! (5, Informative)

Thanatopsis (29786) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653662)

Yeah sure all we need is a deep space antenna and we will total own it. Oh yeah I don't have one of those.

In other words... (1, Funny)

0rionx (915503) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653283)

...Voyager 1 is now in the interstellar DMZ. Let's hope no one starts shooting at it.

Why are they cancelling funding...? (5, Interesting)

barawn (25691) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653294)

I actually got to see this data presented at a cosmic ray conference this summer. There are a few things you have to realize:

  • This is the only astronomical shock we are able to study closely
  • There are a lot of things we don't understand about shocks
  • Voyager 2 is still working, with better instruments, and will reach the termination shock early
  • We're seeing things we never, never expected


For instance, on the last bit, we expected to see cosmic rays from the termination shock, because shocks accelerate particles. We see them. But they don't appear to be coming from the shock. They're coming from somewhere else that we don't know. We see another set of cosmic rays (with a different spectrum) that we don't understand at all - we just call them "anomalous cosmic rays."

Also, inside the heliosphere, Voyager 1 kept crossing magnetic domains (so a needle on a compass would swing back and forth) periodically. It was expected after the shock that those domain switches would keep happening, much much faster. That didn't happen. In fact, the domain switches stopped. We don't understand why. That doesn't make a lot of sense.

This is our only probe and our only example of a large astronomical shock. It's full of information about how the Universe produces such violent outbursts like supernovae, or gamma ray bursts. We need to keep studying this.

Re:Why are they cancelling funding...? (2, Insightful)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653323)

Let me be the first to say, that is some excellent information, and is far more informative than the original story. Please wrangle Slashdot into posting a story if you hear any more.

Re:Why are they cancelling funding...? (2, Insightful)

barawn (25691) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653426)

Well, I can point you to the rapporteur talk when it goes up, but unfortunately, the conference was very poorly organized (it was in Pune, India - right by Mumbai, one day after the flooding - so that might explain some of it, although Pune wasn't really hit hard) and so I have no idea when it'll be up.

Also, a lot of it is very technical - although really, it's just demonstrating that we don't understand how wimpy shocks work, much less strong shocks. The anomalous cosmic rays were a good example of "who ordered these?!"

Re:Why are they cancelling funding...? (1)

barawn (25691) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653582)

It also might help if I hadn't screwed up "anomalous cosmic rays" and "termination shock particles". In my own defense, it's their freaking fault for using ACRs for cosmic rays that we understand that come from the termination shock, and TSPs for particles that don't actually come from the termination shock.

Re:Why are they cancelling funding...? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653379)

I say this as a Republican, funding is being cut because a Democrat started the whole space movement. I happen to disagree with Bush on this, but his goal has been to cut funding to everything a Democrat ever started, haven't you noticed this? the COPS program which Clinton initiated putting extra cops on the street to make us safer? cut.

This is one of the main reasons why I didn't vote in 2004, the man is not governing the country effectively, he's simply on one huge "revenge" binge and he's throwing out the good programs with the bad.

Re:Why are they cancelling funding...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653493)

It's not because of some personal vendetta. He's cutting programs because he's increasing the amount the federal government spends (mostly Iraq but also new DHS funding and more recently the hurricanes). At the same time, he's decreasing the amount of money the federal government takes in via taxes. Which means either other programs need to be cut (being done) or the government needs to borrow more money (also being done). You can't have a war in Iraq and your tax cuts AND keep your silly astrophysic research.

Re:Why are they cancelling funding...? (5, Insightful)

swb (14022) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653412)

I'm not a scientist, and it seems weird to me that they would stop spending money on something that still works and gone someplace nothing else has. It just seems wasteful. And it's not like they can justify it by saying they'll have a replacement there tomorrow, either, since they won't.

I also thought it was weird that they had to authorize more spending when the rovers were still working past their estimated useful life. You've got a remote control car on fucking Mars that still works and somebody wants to just switch it off? It reminds me of rich kids who throw out good toys simply because they're bored with them.

I guess the space program has become just like any other corporate entity -- if it can't show glossy, short-term results that look good in :15 on the evening news, it's "not viable." Yay. Another triumph of modern civilization.

How government works (4, Insightful)

Mr. Underbridge (666784) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653569)

I also thought it was weird that they had to authorize more spending when the rovers were still working past their estimated useful life. You've got a remote control car on fucking Mars that still works and somebody wants to just switch it off? It reminds me of rich kids who throw out good toys simply because they're bored with them.

Ya gotta understand how government works. It's not that someone was actively trying to get these projects defunded - it's just that there was no money allocated for that, since no one anticipated they'd still be working. And since all government work has to be charged to specific accounts, someone would have had to redo that, or else the project would have had no way to spend any money.

In other words, this is a matter of bureaucracy, not malignance.

Re:Why are they cancelling funding...? (3, Insightful)

pixelpusher220 (529617) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653621)

The point is called 'budgeting'.

You make an educated (hopefully) guess as to how long your 'rover on fscking Mars' will be operating.
You figure how much it costs to run the rover and it's support systems for that time.
You (hopefully) add in a percentage increase in case it runs longer.

However, you don't budget double or more of educated guess on duration, just not realistic. So after the expected time frame the money is being used somewhere else and you need to apply for a reallocation to continue the misson.

Now throw politics into the equation and well, good luck ;-)

I'm definitely in the 'this is priceless data' camp and would continue funding this over almost anything, but it's just a realization that things are finite and need to be weigh against other choices.


Re:Why are they cancelling funding...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653421)

Why are they cancelling funding...?

So they could build those huge, Category 5-safe levees that now surround New Orleans.

Re:Why are they cancelling funding...? (1)

barawn (25691) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653444)

That'd be a really, really cheap levee. Funding for the Voyager probes is in the single millions.

Re:Why are they cancelling funding...? (5, Informative)

nerdygeek (242847) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653449)

Anomalous cosmic rays are particles accelerated at the termination shock. They are anomalous inasmuch as they have a different spectrum to the incredibly high energy cosmic rays that come from outside of the solar system. No-one knew what caused these particles originally so they were labelled "anomalous". In fact the unrolling of the spectrum of the ACRs was critical evidence that we had reached the TS. And I'm not sure what you mean when you say the energetic particles are "coming from somewhere else that we don't know"?

Whilst there's lots about the TS that is suprising and exciting and that we don't understand, it is not quite as mysterious as barawn makes out.

As for Voyager 2 - it has a fully working plasma instrument that will give direct measurements of the plasma temperature, density, pressure, flow speed and so on, something we didn't have for V1. Is was the lack of proper plasma measurements that led to some teams claming V1 had crossed the TS and then recanting these claims.

Re:Why are they cancelling funding...? (1)

barawn (25691) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653521)

They are anomalous inasmuch as they have a different spectrum to the incredibly high energy cosmic rays that come from outside of the solar system.

Wait, I mixed up the ACRs and the TSPs, didn't I? Whoops.

In fact the unrolling of the spectrum of the ACRs was critical evidence that we had reached the TS.

Yup, I think I mixed up the termination shock particles and the anomalous cosmic rays. I thought it was the TSPs that were seen to unroll, but the ACRs didn't, but now I think it's the other way around. It's in my notes, but they're at home.

Re:Why are they cancelling funding...? (2, Informative)

barawn (25691) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653614)

Hey, wait! I'm right! The ACRs do not come from the shock itself. They didn't unroll at the termination shock - see Ed Stone's Science paper here [sciencemag.org] . Quoth I:

However, in contradiction to many predictions, the intensity of anomalous cosmic ray (ACR) helium did not peak at the shock, indicating that the ACR source is not in the shock region local to Voyager 1.

Carbon units will now give V'ger the information. (2, Funny)

loggia (309962) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653295)

The carbon units will now provide V'ger the required information. V'ger travels to the third planet to find the Creator. V'ger and the Creator will become One.

Re:Carbon units will now give V'ger the informatio (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653440)

seems like V'ger has been obsoleted by the Borg in the mind of the Carbon units...

Who cares.. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653298)

About some hunk of junk float aimlessly in outer space. Can't we talk about something more down to eart. Come on!

Re:Who cares.. (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653340)

About some hunk of junk float aimlessly in outer space. Can't we talk about something more down to eart. Come on!

How about we talk about your atrocious grammar? Is that down to Earth enough for you?

Too bad they're going to stop listening (5, Insightful)

AdamBlom (798285) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653301)

As mentioned [slashdot.org] on Slashdot in April of this year, NASA is planning to terminate funding to the Voyager programs. SpaceDaily has an article [spacedaily.com] from earlier this year that says that funding is not available for the seven older missions (Voyager, Ulysses, Polar, Wind, Geotail, FAST and TRACE) beyond the end of NASA's fiscal year, which ends in October. Given the fact that Voyager only costs $4.1M a year, hopefully someone will realize that it's not really an effective cost saving measure before they pull the plug!

Re:Too bad they're going to stop listening (4, Insightful)

Karma_fucker_sucker (898393) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653348)

Here's another article about the funding cut. [washingtonpost.com]

I just don't get it. Multi-billion dollar projects and/or pork just sail through Congress, but something that's actually producing some unique and useful (redundant?) data has to struggle for a few million dollars.

Must...stop...now...rant...coming...on...and...p olitical...aaarrrrgggg!

(redundant) (1)

Karma_fucker_sucker (898393) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653367)

What I meant by that was "useful" being redundant to "unique". In other words, the can be useful without being unique. Or, ALL data is useful. Fury has made me retarded.

Re:Too bad they're going to stop listening (4, Insightful)

FlynnMP3 (33498) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653476)

To think that something manmade is at the outer limits or our solar system boggles the mind! Instellar distances are almost unfathomable, but now we have a small inkling of what they are. It would be great to get empirical data from that region.

I am saddened to the extreme that useful, scientifically important research is going to be cancelled because of lack of funds. What makes this even worse is is takes so long to get out there, and these are the only 2 satellites that are close. Another opportunity won't come for decades!

I am sure each research project has their own concerns and ideals, but COME ON! Can't this at least count for something?!? Just a little bit more to count in it's favor?

*sigh*
Now I am depressed.

Re:Too bad they're going to stop listening (5, Funny)

standards (461431) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653486)

Given the fact that Voyager only costs $4.1M a year, hopefully someone will realize that it's not really an effective cost saving measure before they pull the plug!

Whoa! I think you need a SERIOUS reality check. Do you realize what one can do with $4.1 MILLION a year? You crazy space cadets only think of yourself, and not the needs of this country:

  1. We could rebuild Trent Lott's house in New Orleans
  2. We could give a federal tax rebate to a person that earns $15 million/year
  3. We could have a series of meeting with the oil industry executives - including a nice catered lunch
  4. The government could support a mismanaged airline for an entire day


So before you just jump around throwing away our hard-earned money, please think of those in need.

Re:Too bad they're going to stop listening (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653588)

Don't forget about buying stuff for people who intentionally lived in a hole next to the Ocean, and who totally missed the suggestion that they get the hell out of there before that giant storm showed up...

Re:Too bad they're going to stop listening (1, Redundant)

drsquare (530038) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653642)

Why should someone who earns $15 million a year have their wages forcibly confiscated so some scientists can find something out that doesn't actually matter?

I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653304)

I wonder if they're having a hard time figuring out if it's actually sending data or just nothing. I mean, is the blank data they're receiving much different than no signal at all?
-Acercanto

They don't make 'em like they used to... (0)

RUFFyamahaRYDER (887557) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653308)

I'm amazed this thing has been out for so long and still sending back data useful to us.

Don't They? (1, Interesting)

dsci (658278) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653586)

Both Mars rovers have exceeded expected life AND generated a lot of useful, intriguing data. That's a purty good record, too.

Re:Don't They? (1)

RUFFyamahaRYDER (887557) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653687)

This shouldn't be marked off-topic... wtf? Space exploration is space exploaration people. Anyway, I was referring to our space crafts not so good record, but good point about the Mars rovers.

About TFA (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653320)

Why am I forced to read it in one big 825-pixel-wide column?

Message... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653345)

... CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW?

Attitude Control Propellant ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653353)

"...with adequate electrical power and attitude control propellant to keep operating until 2020..."

Man.. yeah dont wont those things to get an ATTITUDE and get out of hand do we ?

Voyager's message to the extraterrestrials (5, Informative)

jzeejunk (878194) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653355)

from TFA The Voyagers each carry a message to any extraterrestrials they might encounter. Each messages is carried by a phonograph record -- a 12-inch gold-plated copper disk containing sounds and images selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth.
To find out more about the message - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voyager_Golden_Record [wikipedia.org]

Go Vger...go!!! (0, Redundant)

PortHaven (242123) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653381)

Er...I forget does anyone know which Voyager "Vger" was formed from?

- The Saj

Re:Go Vger...go!!! (1)

jcuervo (715139) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653404)

Six, I think.

Re:Go Vger...go!!! (2, Informative)

Dogtanian (588974) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653568)

Six it is.... which took me about fifteen seconds to check on Google.

According to wikipedia, it was launched in the 1980s or 1990s [wikipedia.org] ; I've a funny feeling the film must have said the "late 20th century", though I can't remember for sure, but we're certainly behind schedule. By the time we've launched Voyager 6 and got it back, Persis Baldgirl isn't going to worth getting taken over.

Seriously, a pretty good film; less "Star Trekky" than the others IMHO, which might be why some hardcore fans dislike it (I'm not that big a fan of the original series, personally).

Still Running Huh (2, Funny)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653386)

Still running, huh. At what point does Voyager go out of warrenty?

"particle intensity" (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653457)

Those aren't particles, that's an asteroi...@#$&)@#% {NO CARRIER}

Just imagine (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13653549)

If we would have to do it over again we would not even be able to decide on putting on a golden HDVD or Blue-Ray disk...

I know why.. I know why (1)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653623)

I know why they are cancelling funding... NASA doesn't have any bald chicks, so when they saw the movie, they knew that Voyager had to be stopped... Since no one can reach the power switch, we'll just ignore it till it returns and wants to meet the creator.

SAy... (0, Offtopic)

mayhemt (915489) | more than 8 years ago | (#13653696)

Hi to Zaphod .. ooh tell Marvin that his brain is being GPLed on earth i.e. Alpha3ZoneDelta
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