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Robotic Patients Used to Help Train Doctors

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the but-doctor-this-patient-doesn't-have-an-off-button dept.

Robotics 127

skeletor935 writes "Due to the increase in the number of medical students in Mexico, medical schools have turned to the use of robotic patients to assist in training." From the article: "The robots are dummies complete with mechanical organs, synthetic blood and mechanical breathing systems."

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It takes a steady hand... (4, Funny)

TripMaster Monkey (862126) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669134)


An image of one of these robotic patient training kits can be found here [yimg.com] .

You are hilarious! (0, Troll)

bit trollent (824666) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669217)

Keep up the great jokes!

Do you think for the next article you could like summarize what the writeup says and maybe post it within the first five posts or so?

Thanks!

Re:You are hilarious! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669684)

Mark as foe, add filter, you fucktard.

Re:It takes a steady hand... (1)

ajlitt (19055) | more than 8 years ago | (#13670003)

The next model also requires a steady hand. [ugo.com]

mmmmm (0)

0110011001110101 (881374) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669138)

mechanical organ.... I could use one of those...

Re:mmmmm (1)

k4_pacific (736911) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669442)

Mechanical Organs? Get with the times! These days, we digital synthesizers.

Re:mmmmm (1)

0110011001110101 (881374) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669470)

well.... I was talking about a bigger pipe... but if it was musical it might just freak girls out...

oh who am i kidding, I freak girls out anyways...

Nice Demo (2, Informative)

eric76 (679787) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669145)

There was a nice demonstration of such a system a couple of weeks ago on UWTV (University of Washington TV).

The robot was used for instruction for surgeons and anaesthesiologists.

Re:Nice Demo (3, Funny)

donutz (195717) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669188)

The robot was used for instruction for surgeons and anaesthesiologists.

"Excuse me, Doctor, but I think you meant to clamp here, and clip there. There you go, now you got it. Oh, by the way, tell the anaesthesiologist that I could really use some more anaethesia. Other than that, doing good."

Re:Nice Demo (1)

eric76 (679787) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669384)

It was much better than that.

Here are some links to the show. You can watch it on-line if you don't have Dish Network or your local cable doesn't carry the channel.

A Kinder Cut: Nintendo Surgery Part 1 [uwtv.org]

A Kinder Cut: Nintendo Surgery Part 2 [uwtv.org]

Learn about the evolution of surgery including the development of "minimally invasive techniques" and the impact of performing those operations using robotics. Watch how "Zeus" a state-of-the-art robot, performs an operation under the guidance and direction of a UW surgeon. Then try your hand at being an anesthesiologist as you help "Chris," a robotic patient, undergo preparation for surgery.

I've only seen Part 1, so I'm looking forward to Part 2. I'll probably just wait for it to be broadcast again rather than watch it from the web cast.

Mechanical Organs, huh? (4, Funny)

Frac (27516) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669151)

I smell an opportunity to commercialize this "mechanical organs" technology with another well-known product [realdoll.com] . Oooh la la!

Re:Mechanical Organs, huh? (1)

Mr Guy (547690) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669320)

Thanks, but the first person who buys one of those and then can't use it for a week a month isn't going to be very happy at all.

Re:Mechanical Organs, huh? (1)

babyblink (615951) | more than 8 years ago | (#13670139)

One day, after installing OS suddenly a robot patient got BSOD. Robot Patient Stephanie: Please press the 3 buttons - beep beep beep A medical student: 3? I see only 2 :( :( :( :(

Poke! (2, Funny)

RUFFyamahaRYDER (887557) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669158)

Hopefully they get enough practice so I don't have a ton of holes in my arm while they try multiple times to take blood!

True story from my life insurance physical... (1)

StressGuy (472374) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669352)

Nurse: Roll up our sleeve please

{jabs needle into inside of elbow joint}

Nurse: Looks like the vein rolled...needle might be dull

Me: {after long pause} My arm is staring to ache a bit...

Nurse: That's probably because the needle went into muscle tissue

Me: {after another long pause} do ya think you can take the needle out of my arm now?

Nurse: Oh yeah..{finally pulls needle out} ...Then, of course, she gets to try again.....Thankfully, coming up with blood this time.

Offtopic, but IMPORTANT! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669172)



This just in...Tom Delay indicted [nytimes.com] .

Can you imagine. . . (1, Redundant)

smooth wombat (796938) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669175)

the innards of these robots put inside a Real Doll? Geeks everywhere rejoice!

On a side note, can you imagine her face on her body? (shamelessly stolen from The Simpsons)

Re:Can you imagine. . . (1)

smooth wombat (796938) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669195)

Er, replace face with head in the above quote.

Doh!

Re:Can you imagine. . . (1)

clem (5683) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669862)

Yeah, it's always bugged me that my Real Doll had no internal organs. Sure, it's fun at first, but at the back of my mind is the nagging realization that a real woman would have a spleen.

Robotic Patients? (1)

lcsjk (143581) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669176)

You mean---something like Frankenstein?

Re:Robotic Patients? (2, Informative)

Nifrith (860526) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669359)

I'm sure you know that Frankenstein was in fact the doctor, not the monster.
Having not read the article, I can imagine this robot being somewhat like the Medical Reward in The Sims 2, complete with buzzing noises, squishy unnecessary organs and red alarm light.

Futurama quote (4, Funny)

CarlJagt (877688) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669183)

Zoidberg: Oh, the hypochondriac's back. So what is it this time?
Fry: Well my lead pipe hurts a little-
Zoidberg: That's normal. Next patient.

ObSimpsonsQuote (1)

fritter (27792) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669504)

Why? Why was I programmed to feel pain?

the 3 laws (4, Funny)

0110011001110101 (881374) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669185)

iMedicalStudent

A robot may not injure a human or, through inaction, allow a human to come to harm, even if that human has jabbed him repeatedly in the arm with a practice needle

a robot must obey orders given to it by a human, except where it would conflict with the first law, and except when that order is "Hey, get better quick before the professor comes back, and then say I did it!"

A robot must protect itself, as long as that protection doesn't violate either the first or second law. Hmmm, this one sort of limits how many robots will be in the ICU in the first place eh?

Re:the 3 laws (1)

Chris Burke (6130) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669257)

A robot must protect itself, as long as that protection doesn't violate either the first or second law. Hmmm, this one sort of limits how many robots will be in the ICU in the first place eh?

A robot must deliberately place itself in harms way at least once a month as long as the harm does not violate the first or second law, and the harm is limited to that which can be fixed by a medical intern.

Re:the 3 laws (0, Offtopic)

canfirman (697952) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669272)

A robot may not injure a human or, through inaction, allow a human to come to harm, even if that human has jabbed him repeatedly in the arm with a practice needle

Ah, but in Soviet Russia, robots stab humans repeatedly with a practice needle!

Damn it.... (5, Funny)

tktk (540564) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669198)

"The robots are dummies complete with mechanical organs, synthetic blood and mechanical breathing systems."

Why are they using our politians? They should use their own.

Re:Damn it.... (1)

kabocox (199019) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669488)

Why are they using our politians? They should use their own

We should just use them for high school biology instead of frogs.

Relax... (1)

Kyusaku Natsume (1098) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669969)

Politicians at either side of the border are exactly the same type of mindless robots.

Re:Damn it.... (1)

PalmMP3 (840083) | more than 8 years ago | (#13670190)

Why are they using our politians? They should use their own.

That's a good question, indeed. As for why they are using politicians in the first place, though - that I can answer. Check out this recent annoucement from the National Institute of Health:

The National Institute of Health have announced that they will no longer be using rats for medical experimentation. In their place, they will use politicians. They have given three reasons for this decision:
1. There are now more politicians than there are rats.
2. The medical researchers don't become as emotionally attached to the politicians as they did to the rats.
3. No matter how hard you try, there are some things that rats won't do.

Bye bye, karma! (sniffle sniffle)

Robotic Patients and Train Doctors (3, Interesting)

lcsjk (143581) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669204)

Robotic Patients?

Train Doctors?

Do you see what I see!!

Re:Robotic Patients and Train Doctors (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669262)

Train doctors? Thomas the Tank Engine got his MD?

Re:Robotic Patients and Train Doctors (1)

Wilson_6500 (896824) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669763)

Clearly. We need more robotic doctors training patients how to take care of their damn selves.

Hardly news . . . (2, Informative)

SpeedyGonz (771424) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669208)

I remember reading an article in a scientific magazine back in the late eighties / early nineties, about animatronic dummies designed to train medics. I think it was in germany or the UK

Can they fix my Optimus Prime? (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669222)

The dog got a hold of him and chewed em up real good :-(

MOD UP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669568)

Heh!

Wasted all my mod points earlier, but this post really cracked me up! Mod this up somebody!

More Doctors? Amazing! (1, Interesting)

dada21 (163177) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669237)

We could only wish our medical students in the US needed robots as test patients. Unfortunately there is a monopoly on doctors, and the problem will only get worse.

The AMA is a lobbying organization with complete control [lewrockwell.com] (last paragraph) over the number of doctors.

Mexico has not enacted these same licensing restrictions, and surely allows for more doctors who can be used outside the country. Mexicans are well known to send a great amount of income back home.

The downside is that our AMA is working to prevent foreign doctors from coming over so easily. This could mean lower medical prices in Mexico though.

Oh, it had to be said:

"I got gonorrhea!" -- Cosmo Kramer

Re:More Doctors? Amazing! (1)

cc-rider-Texas (877967) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669436)

When I was an undergrad, one of my professors told me that 20-30 years ago the army tried to institute a program whereby they would give you schooling to be a doctor in return for a extended stint in the army (sorry, I don't have a link to verify). But the upshot was that the AMA lobbied against it, so it didn't pass. If it had passed, then there would be quite few more doctors than there are now, which presumably would give us cheaper medical care.

Re:More Doctors? Amazing! (1)

dada21 (163177) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669493)

If you saw everything the AMA lobbies against, the RIAA and MPAA wouldn't scare you.

Re:More Doctors? Amazing! (1)

smazzle (918543) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669593)

I don't think it's the doctors that drive up the cost of healthcare. It's the entire structure, the monstrosity, known as HEALTHCARE that makes medical care so expensive. This encompasses everything from the cost of getting into and through medical school to insurance companies, hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, lawyers, and the industries that support them. such a tangled web we weave...

Re:More Doctors? Amazing! (1)

dada21 (163177) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669702)

Its not the doctors, its the AMA.

For 150 years they've lobbied for every item that drives up medical costs. I came across this article [lewrockwell.com] about 7 years ago, my first LRC article ever :) Great history of the nemesis I feel is worse than the RIAA, MPAA and DoD combined.

Re:More Doctors? Amazing! (1)

AuMatar (183847) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669864)

Aye, the problem with US healthcare isn't the doctors or AMA, its the insanely high number of middlemen making huge profits. Especially insurance organizations- they take a large cut out of the middle, and actually produce nothing of value. Thats why we need national health care- cut out the middle men entirely, and you could see prices cut in half, with no difference in service than you see from an HMO or PPO today.

Re:More Doctors? Amazing! (2, Interesting)

TheTwoBest (317203) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669892)

I'm not sure exactly what program you are talking about. But there is currently a program, though both the Army and the Navy, that will pay for your medical school in exchange for your service. It works out that you serve one year of active duty for every year they pay, with a minimum of three years. They not only cover your tuition, but they also pay for your books and supplies, and give you a living stipend. So while it might not be the exact program you describe, it seems pretty close.

Re:More Doctors? Amazing! (1)

vertinox (846076) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669577)

You could always fly to India or Thailand for a more qualified doctor, better health care facility, and a fraction the price of an American doctor.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/04/21/60minute s/main689998.shtml [cbsnews.com]

However... If you needed to sue for malpractice then your up the proverbial creek.

Re:More Doctors? Amazing! (1)

aktzin (882293) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669733)

Mexico has not enacted these same licensing restrictions, and surely allows for more doctors who can be used outside the country.

This isn't an even comparison. Health care in the US is privatized for the most part, with only a small percentage of health care facilities and professionals dedicated to socialized work for lower-income patients. In Mexico there are at least 3 large entities providing socialized medicine for various types of employees:

ISSTE - "Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado"

IMSS - "Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social"

PEMEX - "Petróleos Mexicanos"

(Sorry I didn't include URLs, kind of in a hurry as I type this. Feel free to Google the acaronyms for more details)

In addition to these large organizations there are lots of private hospitals, clinics and independent doctors. This makes for a much more diverse health care "market" (if we can call it that) in Mexico than in the US. The doctors people see will depend on the industry/company where they work, or on their income level if they can afford private care.

Mexicans are well known to send a great amount of income back home.

This may be true for Mexican workers whose families are still in Mexico, but it's somewhat of a generalization. There's a lot of Mexican immigrants in the US and other countries who don't send money "back home" because home, and their family, are now in the country where they reside.

This could mean lower medical prices in Mexico though.

Medical care in Mexico costs much less than in the US. But you have to balance that against the fact that the average income in Mexico is also much lower, taxation levels are different, and the cost of medication is also different (sometimes higher, sometimes lower) in Mexico than in the US.

Obligatory... (1, Offtopic)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669238)

Please allow I, C3PO, to be the first to welcome our new Mexican medical overlords. I'm sure I can be of great assitance to you as besides Spanish I am fluent in over six million forms of communication.

Mod parent funny! (1)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669668)

I found this overlord post to be not only hilarious, but intelligent as well (except for the bad grammar, heh). Definitely on-topic.

A comparison of Mexican and American health care (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669253)

Since we're discussing medicine in México, I would like to chip in my two pesos about the experience of receiving medical care in México versus getting care in the US; I got care in both countries in the last month or so.

In México, the care I received was excellent. After being sick for three days with Montezuma's Revenge, my friend's cousin, who happens to be a doctor came by, asked me a number of questions in Spanish, looked me over, and gave me some antibiotics to stop the sickness along with a couple other medicines to help me. The examination and care was done very well. Total cost: $25 for house call doctor visit, $5 for medicines. By the evening, I felt great again.

When I came back to the US, I saw a doctor through Kaiser. The nurse treated me like a mechanical doll instead of a person. The doctor was good, but only very briefly examined me before telling me I had a virus and that there was basically nothing they could do. The cost for this care $25 co-pay, plus $200 a month to be on insurance to get this kind of care.

In México, they don't have to worry about malpractice lawsuits. A person can be a full-up doctor at 26 years of age (such as the doctor I saw down there). Here, one has to be about 30 before they can be a doctor; they spend more time in medical school and less time getting real-world hands-on experience. Most drugs can be obtained without prescription (the exception being addictive drugs like valium and what not)--this causes people to get antibiotics when they have viruses, unfortunatly.

Which one is better? I prefer the Mexican system; less HMO BS and more real care.

Re:A comparison of Mexican and American health car (1)

jokach (462761) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669365)

To counter your good experience in Mexico, I had a friend who got hurt in Cancun Mexico this past summer. He got a couple of cheap stitches to stop the bleeding, and a shot of some pain-killer (that he said didn't work anyway) for $450 CASH. He got told that for $25 more, he can be assured he got a clean needle for the shot.

Real care? I dunno, guess its a matter of opinion, but I like to know that if I'm getting a shot, I'm getting a clean needle ...

Re:A comparison of Mexican and American health car (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669770)

Sounds like he got the "stupid tourist treatment."

Re:A comparison of Mexican and American health car (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669868)

Since he was in Cancun, I'd say it's a 99% chance that was the case. Which is fine, stupid tourists should be deprived of money so that smart locals can have a better life (cynical, me?)

Re:A comparison of Mexican and American health car (1)

five40kix (853950) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669374)

Mexico isn't the only place with a public health care system...try (Korea, France, etc.). Just an FYI

Mexico Not Public (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669462)

Mexico is a well.. poor country. Its cheaper there because the market can't afford to pay for $400 doctor visits.

$25 is Mexico is unfortunately out of the range for most of its poor. They're probably in alot of the same boat as our poor, except our hospitals are required to treat the indigent while I have no idea what Mexico's hospitals are required to do for the poor.

Re:Are you sure the first doctor was right??? (1)

technoextreme (885694) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669375)

Most drugs can be obtained without prescription (the exception being addictive drugs like valium and what not)--this causes people to get antibiotics when they have viruses, unfortunatly. Which one is better? I prefer the Mexican system; less HMO BS and more real care.
Yeah, I'd prefer the American system because giving out antibiotics when you probably didn't even need them to start with is stupid, idiotic, and quite risky for everyone else. Eventually, those drugs will be rendered useless.

Re:A comparison of Mexican and American health car (1)

dada21 (163177) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669444)

Our medical industry is in the shitter due to the AMA restricting doctor numbers (driving costs up and demand up) and the HMO Act of Congress. Both of these statist mechanism force costs up and quality/safety down.

The freer a business market is to accept competition, the better cost and safety gets.

Re:A comparison of Mexican and American health car (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669626)

by limiting the number of medical students you think... the medical students get shittier?

Re:A comparison of Mexican and American health car (1)

dada21 (163177) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669753)

No, but I believe service and price do. Students get wealthier. As the article [lewrockwell.com] I point to shows, you don't see many poor bad doctors but you see many lawyers fail. The AMA keeps bad doctors wealthy, the ABA doesn't wield much power.

Re:A comparison of Mexican and American health car (2, Informative)

chooks (71012) | more than 8 years ago | (#13670049)

Do you really think that the AMA is restricting doctor numbers? If so, could you please provide a reference? I would think that doctor numbers are limited more by the following:

1) High barriers to entry including:
        a) Large education costs (~$54k a year (tuition + living expenses) for a top private school)
        b) Years and years and years of training
        c) Extensive (and continuous) licensing requirements (from the government, not the AMA)
2) Big red target for lawsuits
3) Increasing operating (no pun intended) costs (e.g. malpractice)
4) Long hours, large workloads, large responsibilities,

I have never heard of the AMA discouraging people going into med school to keep numbers down. And as far as practicing medicine, that is regulated by the state medical licensing organizations (AFAIK).

Re:A comparison of Mexican and American health car (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669701)

Could the difference not be related to the fact that the Mexican doctor was a friend of a friend versus the "faceless" American doctor? It's easier to care about a person (and to lessen the costs) with whom you have some connection.

Also, and this is more of a personal philosophy of mine, perhaps the American doctors didn't prescribe any drugs 'cause you didn't really need them. I never use drugs when I'm sick, myself (I'm actually sick right now) not 'cause I'm a Christian Scientist but because I prefer to let my immune system do the work (if the work isn't too hard, as in Montezuma's Revenge, most flus, etc.)

Speak for yourself... I live in Mexico. (2, Interesting)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669712)

Poor people in mexico have to go to the IMSS (a hospital system dedicated exclusively to Social Security). The service is awful, the medicines you have to buy them yourself, and most of the money is leeched for retired workers. There was a case where a woman had to buy the oxygen for her mother because there weren't O2 tanks at the hospital :-/

The management system is so bad that it needs a billionaire rescue before it collapses. And you thought the american social security was hard to maintain. Heh.

Just like real patients, but... (1)

HikingStick (878216) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669254)

The reason I think these will be universal? They're just like real patients with one big exception: THEY DON'T HAVE LAWYERS!

The question I have is.... (1)

8127972 (73495) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669263)

..... Is it FULLY functional in EVERY way?

Why... (2, Funny)

geekster (87252) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669268)

Why was I programmed to feel pain!!

Robotic patients + doctors (1)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669273)

This will make things more efficient, but what they really need to do is pair up these robotic patients with robotic doctors [thejournalnews.com] and cut out the middleman!

In Soviet Mexico (-1, Offtopic)

0110011001110101 (881374) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669277)

In Soviet Mexico, Robot Trains Doctor You!

Re:In Soviet Mexico (1)

halivar (535827) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669403)

Please. Not even a beowulf cluster of robot doctors can save that dead horse.

Riverside Hospital (1)

PMuse (320639) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669285)

Riverside Methodist Hospital in Ohio began using these patient care simulators [ohiohealth.com] earlier this summer (June 9, 2005) [ohiohealth.com] .

heh... (1)

Shads (4567) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669304)

... be more fun if they had it shock the hell out of the doctors for each mistake. Say bout like a cattle prod.

Re:heh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669949)

Riiight, and then when they get to real patients...

Surgeon: "Now, I make a cut in the heart... Oh, damn, I misse---uh? I didn'T get shocked?!"
Cue to looking through the window door, to see the doctor stabbing the patient over and over with a scalpel, singing "No more shockings, no more shockings!" hysterically.

On a fun note, the anti-bot word I have is "Fatality". Fun stuff ^_^;;;
(...I really need to make an account...)

Hehe (1)

Have Blue (616) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669315)

"All right, robot, what seems to be the problem?"

"Well, I've been having this terrible pain in all the diodes down my left side..."

what (3, Insightful)

elohim (512193) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669318)

The article is, of course, extremely light on details. The only difference between this and "SimMan" which has been in use for years and years seems to be the inclusion "artificial blood," whatever that means.

Also, this is pretty funny: "I would feel nervous if this was (a) real patient," said Mendoza after drawing blood from a plastic arm.

"With this (dummy patient) I can practice many times."

Because jabbing a needle into plastic is just like jabbing a needle into human flesh.

The sorts of simulators are very useful for simulating emergency situations, but aren't really suitable for things like surgery. It's nice to have the motions of checking pulses, barking commands for IVs and epinephrine, and setting up a defibrillator down pat for when a patient is crashing before your very eyes. Since there is very little actual manipulation of the patient, this is exactly for what we use SimMan (cardiac arrhythmias, emergency intubations, and the like). The monitor values (projected on a screen for all to see) are changed by a preceptor as you do things like move from nonrebreathing masks to bag mask ventilation or add a second IV. I just don't see how this would be used to do surgical simulation at all.

Re:what (2, Informative)

PMuse (320639) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669404)

Info on the current capabilities of a patient care simulator can be found here [ohiohealth.com] and here. [meti.com]

Re:what (1)

elohim (512193) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669566)

well, looks like the only difference between this and our SimMan is the pupillary response and the blinking. A favorite of our CCM profs is to press a button and have the larynx clamp down right after extubation :)

and on that page you linked to, there's a description of the surgical simulation, which is just for endoscopy. i played with that about 10 years ago at a science center. fun and useful, but certainly nothing new.

not a new idea. (1)

TheHawke (237817) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669321)

But a vast improvement over what the medical industry had back in the 60's and 70's. They had simple manikins that had rubber ateries and veins for students to try to draw blood or start IV's. Other manikins had electricial impulse generators that simulate any kind of heart rythium that the tester wishes.

On the downside, these ancient units required large amounts of support gear and broke down frequently. Not to mention the COST! At the time of introduction, a typical patient simulator ran nearly a million dollars 60's money. Pretty much the only institution that could afford these units was the military. Very few were bought and subsequently were not used very much due to the massive amount of downtime due to the mechanical and electronic complexity.

These newer units have shown a marked improvement in realisim, and dependability have resurrected the patient simulators as a new tool to educate a intern or student on new problems or new procedures. Hospitals are buying these units to provide CE (continuing education) for their staff for loss prevention and quality assurance of care.

train doctors? (1)

justforaday (560408) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669322)

Where I'm from, we call them engineers...

Really! (0, Troll)

Nuttles1 (578165) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669324)

I think it is kind of sad that I and I assume most U.S. citizens disregard our neighbor to our south as an irrelevant dog at the table of the U.S. waiting for our table scraps.

Good for Mexico! I hope that this is part of a much larger trend for Mexico where they start to take the technological lead from the U.S.. I think it would not only be good for Mexico but for North America in general. I think the North American countries would have much more effect on the world if the countries other than the U.S. were much more economically and intellectually powerful.

What I want to know is: (1)

ChocoBean (890202) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669343)

how common is the use of these 20-few robots in the university?
-is it only the first years that are using them, or upper classmen as well?
-What percentage of their med school prep classes will involve real live human beings? ---->I know from the article that they are using robots, but not how they are using them

I also find it hard to believe that they have more doctors than needy patients who need medical care or hospitals. That they'd have to "resort" to robots because there are too many doctors. Why can't they just practice small things on human beings?

I know this sounds horrible, but they can always practice on the really poor people, when they're somewhat good enough. If I were dying of a horrible injury or whatever, and I have absolutely no health care program or money for hospitals, I wouldn't mind taking a chance on free medicare by students.

Re:What I want to know is: (1)

smazzle (918543) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669682)

Poor people don't deserve less quality care, but the reality is that right now they have minimal to no care, especially in rural areas. I volunteered in a 3rd world country for a few months. When i told the hospital that i had my Bachelor's degree in science/ psychology, they were ready and willing to not only let me see patients as a Psychologist, but also prescribe medicine. In the end I proved useful after some on the job training.. if i can do it, a medical student certainly could be utilized. Why waste the labor on a robot?! Plus, in real life the students won't have the luxury of stabbing their patients' arms dozens of times. Don't teach the students that patients are objects, and maybe they won't treat us like that when the graduate!

I've seen this. (0, Redundant)

NoMoreNicksLeft (516230) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669356)

Check out the gynecological model [realdoll.com] .

MOD DOWN PORN LINK (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669621)

Bastard... some of us are at work.

No wonder they have no infrastructure (1)

Rodness (168429) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669373)

I'm so glad to see that a country that can't afford to even provide good living conditions for its citizens can afford to spend 1.3 million on a robotic hospital. I'm sure that's money better spent than on, say, roads and sanitation.

If the Mexican government spent more money on their infrastructure and less on "pie in the sky" robotic hospitals, maybe their citizens would stay there instead of border jumping.

Retarded Rodness (1)

javcrapa (594448) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669689)

LOL, have you ever been outside the city where you live? have you been to mexico? you have no idea of what you are saying. Most mexicans go "border jumping" because luickily there are amny LAZY us citizens that will pay very well for many basic chores

robot suit (1)

cafucu (918264) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669377)

In other news, a robot has filed suit against the Mexican Medical Board. The robot has accused a medical student of removing its central I/O system instead of the rubber tumor that was scheduled for removal. There are also complaints of robotic harrassment from other medical lab droids...

yikes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669385)

After reading the subject of the post, I thought TFA was about steam machine repairmen using robotic patents in their jobs!

Do they come with Lawyers? (2, Funny)

Numbah One (821914) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669425)

Do the robotic patients come paired with robotic lawyers so students can get used to the malpractice lawsuits?

Re:Do they come with Lawyers? (2, Funny)

maotx (765127) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669528)

Do the robotic patients come paired with robotic lawyers so students can get used to the malpractice lawsuits?

From the summary:
The robots are dummies complete with mechanical organs, synthetic blood and mechanical breathing systems.

I thought that they were lawyers...

Doctor, He's Crashing! (3, Funny)

Watchman_ds (238262) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669429)

Doctor, He's Crashing!

Give him 5 mg of ativan, start an epi drip, and somebody get me an emergency boot disk, STAT!

Dr. Dave? (1)

flatass (866368) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669439)

What are you doing Dave? I am afraid I cannot let you do that.

Correct Headline (1)

Linker3000 (626634) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669460)

"Robotic Patients Used to Help Train Doctors, search for Sarah Connor"

As soon as I read this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669567)

...the Operation board game commercial started playing in my head.

The finest medical training in mexico (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669620)

This will provide the finest treatment of robotic patients anywhere!

Re:The finest medical training in mexico (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669837)

Same here. Has it stopped for you yet? Mine won't.

Limited Resources (1)

DongleFondle (655040) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669656)

You would think that with the limited resources and high level of unemployment in Mexico they would have figured out by now that they could save a lot of the money they are spending on robotics by just substituting volunteers to be real patients.

Do Not Want (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669732)

Vader: Nooooooooo!

human touch (1)

foobari (227908) | more than 8 years ago | (#13669746)

The robots won't help train doctors in good bedside presence and patient communication. "Its inoperable, i'm sorry - You have a month to live, at most."
verses "This unit is hosed, the permission bits are screwed up and its down to 18% - i'm sorry."

Oh Great... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13669995)

I guess dead people are now totally useless.

Funny Bone (1)

Captain Necro (911679) | more than 8 years ago | (#13670026)

The nose should light up red if they make a mistake. :)
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