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Portable Storage Guide

CmdrTaco posted about 9 years ago | from the thats-a-lotta-bits-and-bytes dept.

Data Storage 184

Elite 4CE writes "If you're like me, you are always transporting data from home to work, and back. I was surprized at how many options there were to facilitate this. Hardcoreware.net have posted their Portable Storage Guide for 2005, covering everything from flash based devices that fit into your pocket, to huge FireWire drives with a capacity of 400GB."

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New Category (4, Insightful)

geomon (78680) | about 9 years ago | (#13678450)

How long until there is a category for embedded DRM as described in this [slashdot.org] article?

It will probably start out with a few devices with DRM, but slowly everyone of the storage vendors will have a DRM solution. It will only be a matter of time, really.

That said, the Seagate 100GB unit looks sweet.

Re:New Category (5, Funny)

Rei (128717) | about 9 years ago | (#13678499)

Why use a 100gb device to haul your files around? You can mod an iPod Nano [uncyclopedia.org] to 200GB.

Re:New Category (3, Funny)

geomon (78680) | about 9 years ago | (#13678541)

Why use a 100gb device to haul your files around? You can mod an iPod Nano [uncyclopedia.org] to 200GB.

Holy crap! that was good.

You had me all set for some elegant looking finished product. This [uncyclopedia.org] is more like Frankenstein's monster!

Re:New Category (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13679296)

When seriously considering a mod like this...higher may not actually be better.

Perhaps we should cut back on the crack-pipe, eh?

Re:New Category (0)

Holi (250190) | about 9 years ago | (#13678569)

But only if you can transfer your files in under 6 seconds.

Re:New Category (1)

justforaday (560408) | about 9 years ago | (#13678612)

You're bus-powered if you're transfering files. It's only after you unplug that you'll get your six minute (not seconds) playtime.

Re:New Category (1)

Holi (250190) | about 9 years ago | (#13678748)

Well thats if you use a 6 pin firewire otherwise your battery powered.
(my bad about the 6 seconds)

Re:New Category (2, Funny)

goodbadorugly (837673) | about 9 years ago | (#13678715)

Obviously their next add-on should be to attach a gas generator to make up for the 6 minute battery life.

Re:New Category (1)

Zeph (91283) | about 9 years ago | (#13678997)

And the whole thing should be buckled to a car, for greater portability.

Re:New Category (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13679392)

As usual Wikipedia is full of blatantly wrong information. Too many people with agendas have editorial control over the information. Too much intentional disinformation is published there to make the system useful. The intentional lie by the assistant to a Democratic congressman during the US presidential election in 2004 is a good example. Wikipedia published their lie that Wyoming had 57 electoral votes. I don't know what the Democrats hoped to gain with that lie, but Wikipedia just happily published that incorrect information.

Re:New Category (1)

TheKubrix (585297) | about 9 years ago | (#13679424)

dumbshit, it was uncyclopedia.org not wikipedia....

Re:New Category (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13678793)

Wow, I addressed that article yesterday, and it almost seems we have another case of did not RTFA. Seriously, sometimes the paranoia about DRM around here is disgusting.

Re:New Category (2)

geomon (78680) | about 9 years ago | (#13678952)

Wow, I addressed that article yesterday, and it almost seems we have another case of did not RTFA.

So if I don't post exactly the same way you would then you assume I haven't read the article?

So much for being objective. Have you considered the fact that people may look at the same topic as you and come to a completely different conclusion?

Why carry something? (2, Insightful)

spyder913 (448266) | about 9 years ago | (#13678470)

I just use the internet, it's great.

I used to ... but thumb drives kick butt. (4, Interesting)

everphilski (877346) | about 9 years ago | (#13678544)

I used to. It worked well. But after having a thumb drive for a month I wouldn't switch back. I have my entire "my documents" and development tree stored on my thumb drive. It is always the latest and most updated version. When I arrive at work, I copy it over. When I leave work, i copy from the computer to the thumb drive. Same as home. The internet worked ... unless internet was out at home. Or if internet was out at work. And the data was too preicous not to have even for a few hours. And when you are in an environment where internet traffic is heavily monitored (and pushing upwards of 100M) the thumb drive reigns supreme.

-everphilski-

Re:I used to ... but thumb drives kick butt. (2, Funny)

Minwee (522556) | about 9 years ago | (#13679148)

Plus if you ever felt like stealing a few hundred megs of software, documents or source code from your employer, it can be a real pain to transfer it over the Internet.

Having a portable device small enough to hide in a body cavity makes like so much easier.

Re:Why carry something? (1)

chris09876 (643289) | about 9 years ago | (#13678565)

I have to agree that the internet is great. That being said, sometimes you don't want to upload a 2 GB database file or a 700 MB movie, just to have to download it when you get home. Also, it's hard to believe, but sometimes you find a computer that *gasp* doesn't have an internet connection! Even if it does, if it's not broadband, it could suck up a lot of time downloading your data. There's a time and a place for using personal storage devices to move data around.

Re:Why carry something? (1)

mrbooze (49713) | about 9 years ago | (#13678979)

You posit what happens if the computer doesn't have broadband. I posit what happens if it doesn't have available/working USB ports?

Portable storage devices also introduce the risk of physical damage, loss, or theft.

Portable vs online both have their merits, but you can't ignore the potential downsides of portable storage while highlighting those of online storage.

Re:Why carry something? (3, Insightful)

Surt (22457) | about 9 years ago | (#13678645)

I think the main reason is this:

You have 400 megabyte of data. You want to take it with you to work on (or maybe listen to) at another computer. You can:

Flash drive: Copy to flash drive at 10megabytes/sec. Call that a minute with overhead. Requires the destination computer have USB.

Internet: Email it through google mail, using googlefs at the speed of your internet connection. Typically, most people today are living with 5 megabit per second or less. Call that 15 minutes, more if you can't max out your connection, or are living with a slower connection. Requires destination computer have (fast!) internet service. 15 minutes or more likely to extract your data at the other end. This is all assuming there is no overhead for google mail. If you have static ip, maybe you are hosting this data directly, still requires a typical 15 minute one way trip, but how many people have a static ip for their home machine?

Portable hard drive: Copy to portable hard drive at 20 megabytes/sec. Call that 30 seconds, but costs more than the flash option.

I'll take either of the carry it with me options over the internet most days. Even more so on days when my data set that needs to travel is 30 gigabyte.

Re:Why carry something? (1)

AKAImBatman (238306) | about 9 years ago | (#13678745)

Some really cool inventions you may find handy:

1. DynDNS [dyndns.com] (Give your dial up/DSL computer a DNS address!)
2. SCP [jfitz.com] (Copy files securely to and from any computer!)

In case you're wondering, these significantly streamline the Internet option.

Re:Why carry something? (1)

Surt (22457) | about 9 years ago | (#13678961)

Thanks, scp i use already, but didn't know about the windows version, and dyndns is new to me. OTOH, I am one of those rare people with a static ip at the moment, so not as needed. Streamlining the internet does unfortunately still leave you with a long wait unless you have an awfully fast connection.

Re:Why carry something? (1)

temojen (678985) | about 9 years ago | (#13678712)

Because my files are too big to download quickly (think 25Mpixel, 16 bit/channel tiffs).

Re:Why carry something? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13679254)

I'll bet you can really easily count the number of hairs on her pussy with image files like that!

Re:Why carry something? (1)

radish (98371) | about 9 years ago | (#13678924)

I agree. I'm not sure exactly what it is that people carry around on their flash drives and whatnot. My work data stays at work, I have no real desire to access it at home, and if I do need to (like if I decide to work at home for a day) I just use the VPN. Likewise, my home data stays at home, with the notable exception of music which is on my DAP. I guess that's a portable drive really, but I only ever use it for music and it only ever docks with my home PC. If there's the odd file which I do need to transfer, I either email it or throw it on a web server.

I'm sure if you do need to carry around 100's of megs all the time they're very useful, but I just don't see how many people need to do that. Not to mention all our USB ports are locked down at work for security.

Re:Why carry something? (1)

in-tech (912144) | about 9 years ago | (#13679325)

come on have a back up plan.

Can never have enough (1)

captnbmoore (911895) | about 9 years ago | (#13678472)

Can never have enough space to keep all you want.

Surprizing? Hardly... (4, Funny)

ggambett (611421) | about 9 years ago | (#13678476)

I'd say it's more like "amasing"... really, typos are not that "amuzing".

Beware Large Externals (5, Informative)

Shadow Wrought (586631) | about 9 years ago | (#13678478)

We have used some of the 250GB Western Digitals here and a known fault is that, if you remove the drive improperly, it will corrupt the entire drive. Rendering useless all 200+ gigs of info on there. But yeah, other than that, they work great! So be careful how you unplug and always use the "Remove Drive" feature.

Re:Beware Large Externals (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13678530)

Unfortunately, the "Remeve Drive" option is right below the "Format Drive" in the pull down menu. Oops!

Re:Beware Large Externals (1)

0rionx (915503) | about 9 years ago | (#13678539)

That's a very timely warning...I've personally been witness to the death of two Western Digital hard drives (in external enclosures) due to improper removal. The few seconds it takes to use the Remove Hardware option is always less costly in the long run...even if your data is backed up, recovering it and replacing the drive is often a major inconvenience.

Re:Beware Large Externals (2, Informative)

fm6 (162816) | about 9 years ago | (#13678562)

I once bought a LaCie USB drive. You had to format it before first use. And the power socket was badly designed — so the power lead fell out halfway through the formatting. There's no way to fix that on a USB drive without taking the whole thing apart. Between that and LaCie's lame support and warantees, I will never go near any of their products again!

Re:Beware Large Externals (1)

lar3ry (10905) | about 9 years ago | (#13679018)

Most of LaCie's drives are intended for Macs, therefore don't have a Windows file system on it, hence the need for formatting. That shouldn't take a long time, though.

I've never had the power lead fall out of my LaCie drive, but my example is probably just as anecdotal as yours.

Be that as it may, the parent post that says to beware large externals is still a good point. It's a single point of failure. Sure, you have 250 gigs of video/music/etc. but if that drive goes...!

Re:Beware Large Externals (1)

fm6 (162816) | about 9 years ago | (#13679105)

I've never had the power lead fall out of my LaCie drive, but my example is probably just as anecdotal as yours.
The whole thing was covered with foam padding, and they didn't leave enough clearance around the power plug for the thing to seat properly. Undoubtedly, this was a mistake they only made once. I wouldn't be so thoroughly pissed at them if I could have gotten some support or the item replaced.

Thanks. Is that a software or hardware thing? (1)

Work Account (900793) | about 9 years ago | (#13678756)

I have one at home so thanks a lot for the warning. Is the "Remove Drive" thing some software thing I activate thru my XP laptop or is it a button on the drive itself? I currently have my USB2.0 external drive connected directly into my router thru USB and then I map it as a network drive on my Centrino wireless laptop.

Re:Thanks. Is that a software or hardware thing? (1)

Shadow Wrought (586631) | about 9 years ago | (#13678954)

It will be a little icon on the tray of your task manager bar. Typically in the lower right corner. When you click it it brings up any drive which is attached externally (and on laptops sometimes internally) and asks if you want to stop the drive. After clicking it will let you know that it is safe to remove the drive.

Re:Beware Large Externals (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13678842)

This has nothing to do with the specific model of drive. Not telling the OS you intend to remove the drive will corrupt the file system for the exact same reason as if you shut down your computer by pulling the plug out of the wall. The OS does write caching. It must be given the opportunity to flush that cache.

Kids these days don't know nothing...

Re:Beware Large Externals (1)

markass530 (870112) | about 9 years ago | (#13678844)

I concur, I bought a little eide=>usb adapter for my 160GB driver, one time I was copying something, as soon as it said done, I pulled the usb plug. Bam, fuck you, no more hard drive. I even used Ontrack Easy Recovery, and could only recover files without the file system intact (I.E some files, no file names, VERY messy).

Re:Beware Large Externals (1)

MrSteveSD (801820) | about 9 years ago | (#13679227)

I've have a 250Gb Maxtor OneTouch for some time and it has never failed on me despite lots of punishment and accidentally unplugging it etc etc. They have a sturdy thick solid metal case and I would certainly recommend it to any US Marines that need some extra protection for their Humvees.

Lately I've been using (1)

leather_helmet (887398) | about 9 years ago | (#13678489)

my Zen Micro (5GB) as well as an external (duh) 80GB USB Western Digital USB drive when needed - between the two I have not had any problems tranferring data - for the most part I've been using my micro, creating a 2.5 GB partition for data and the remainder for my music

Large RAID at home (4, Interesting)

Mad-Mage1 (235582) | about 9 years ago | (#13678495)

With the ability to push to my house from work at over 8 Mbps, I rarely worry about this

Re:Large RAID at home (1)

parasonic (699907) | about 9 years ago | (#13678554)

Even when your connection(s) fail?

...I work in IT in an Atlanta company, and we have even had a T1 (momentarily) go down. Always have a backup for a backup.

how to get to it. (1)

Erris (531066) | about 9 years ago | (#13679341)

With the ability to push to my house from work at over 8 Mbps, I rarely worry about this

That's cool but I get by with 60KB/s download from my house. The local IP, Cox, has bowed to Windoze problems. If they did not crimp the upload, the botnet would soak up everyone's bandwith and no one would have anything. Curse you and your stupid OS, Bill Gates!

My main concern with work to home connections is also Windoze. Putting a secure shell client on Windoze is kind of like putting a pad lock on paper bag. With all the full auto Microsoft worms carrying keyloggers and the half life of windoze on a network being 12 minutes, it would not take long at all for my home box to get rooted out. I won't Windoze to do anything but connect to my http server so windoze communications are one way.

The cure is to use a bootable CD or laptop at work, if your employer is clueless enough to still be using windoze. Right now, you can use knoppix, mepis or even the FSF bootable ID card to get things back and forth. Then you boot off your employers choice of pain an suffer another long and unproductive day of single screen GUI, no place keeping reboot daily, BSoD hell. At least the data transfer will go well.

With Paladium or sufficiently stupid corporate policy, you won't even be able to do that. That's the way things go.

um... I have a life away from work (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13678506)

"If you're like me, you are always transporting data from home to work, and back."

No, I'm not like you. I like to keep work at work, and out of my home, where I have better things to do than work.

Re:um... I have a life away from work (1)

Lord Dimwit Flathead (668521) | about 9 years ago | (#13678583)

Exactly. The last thing I need is for Slashdot (work) to intrude on my programming time (home), or vice versa.

Re:um... I have a life away from work (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13678677)

Well thanks for sharing, but he did say "if." Some people actually enjoy their job, I know I do.

Re:um... I have a life away from work (1)

Le Marteau (206396) | about 9 years ago | (#13678830)

No, I'm not like you. I like to keep work at work, and out of my home, where I have better things to do than work.

Ommmmm... just because you want all your data with you wherever you are dose not mean you can't keep work and home separate. The two are not mutually exclusive.

My data is valuable, and the latest and greatest versions of ALL my digital efforts, logs, spreadsheets, documents, text files, scripts, are always where I am.

Re:um... I have a life away from work (1)

radish (98371) | about 9 years ago | (#13678975)

My data is valuable, and the latest and greatest versions of ALL my digital efforts, logs, spreadsheets, documents, text files, scripts, are always where I am.

My data is valuable as well, to my employer. Not to me. They provide SAN storage with multiple redundant levels of backup archived for 10 years. I don't really see how a $30 thumbdrive is going to add a great deal of reliability there. Additionally, the likleyhood of it falling into "unfriendly" hands increase very greatly when I take it out of the building. I'm amazed your employer allows you to walk around with company data in your pocket.

Re:um... I have a life away from work (3, Interesting)

Le Marteau (206396) | about 9 years ago | (#13679188)

You probably work for a true IT company. I don't. I work for a traditional publisher which happens to require and have IT people.

I'm amazed your employer allows you to walk around with company data in your pocket.

Not only do they allow us, they GAVE us flash drives as tokens of appreciation after completion of some project (with the company name and project title silk screened on it).

Not everyone with IT skills works for a tech savvy company. I do all my work on my 1 gig flash drive, pop it out and take it home, then plug it into my home machine, where it gets backed up every night. It's a much more reliable solution than their network backups, which are iffy.

Re:um... I have a life away from work (1)

Jack9 (11421) | about 9 years ago | (#13679199)

Much of the data, multimedia, and code that I use is *MINE*. If I discover something developing at home and want to share it at work, thumbdrives are best. If I need to apply a windows patch without hosing a small network, I transport it around on a thumbdrive. My life and work is intertwined because I make a living doing what I would be doing anyway. Cliches in 3...2..1

you know what's really surprizing? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13678518)

that no one even bothers with a simple spell-check. I hear they even make machines that do that sort of thing these days.

Slashdotted (4, Funny)

mysqlrocks (783488) | about 9 years ago | (#13678528)

Slashdotted already. Maybe they can put the article on one of these devices and send one to each of us?

Re:Slashdotted (1)

Phreakiture (547094) | about 9 years ago | (#13678594)

Slashdotted already.

Even worse, it's one of thos f^

Re:Slashdotted (1)

Phreakiture (547094) | about 9 years ago | (#13678808)

Wow, that was lame. I was trying to say it is one of those f^<k!ng Mirrordot-proof sites that insists on putting each sentence on a different page.

Huge? Pah! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13678534)

huge FireWire drives with a capacity of 400GB
Well that might be enough to store the thumbnails of my porn collection, but I'll wait for the portable TB storage, thanks.

Re:Huge? Pah! (1)

Ziviyr (95582) | about 9 years ago | (#13678638)

You may want to scan for duplicates then. GQview is kinda awesome that way if you're a Linuxer.

Further you can get a few percent savings with a lossless JPEG optimizer.

Carrying data? (2, Interesting)

sameerdesai (654894) | about 9 years ago | (#13678538)

I just VPN into my work PC and use mapped drived to move data. No need to move data and risk losing it because of some bump on the road.

This is all BS.. Everyone quit lying.. (5, Funny)

brxndxn (461473) | about 9 years ago | (#13678550)

I swear.. we're all guilty here. Please stop lying. We all use the floppy disk. I don't care who you are (but more likely so if you're a government employee), you have a green floppy disk in your briefcase that has a masking-tape label on it written with pencil..

I see this all the time.. people thinking they're cool on campus with their laptop and 1GB USB thumb drive.. plugging in a floppy to get at the 1.44mb of data they really need.

LONG LIVE THE FLOPPY! *salute*

Re:This is all BS.. Everyone quit lying.. (2, Funny)

Rhoon (785258) | about 9 years ago | (#13678766)

*pets his floppy*

My precious...

Re:This is all BS.. Everyone quit lying.. (2, Interesting)

lelitsch (31136) | about 9 years ago | (#13679059)

Not all of us. We (300+ employee ISV) had a external presenter at our user conference last year who needed a blank floppy. After 30 minutes of fruitless searching in our IT department and an email to all our employees, we had to point him to the nearest Office Depot.

Re:This is all BS.. Everyone quit lying.. (1)

dalutong (260603) | about 9 years ago | (#13679217)

Unfortunately, I don't have a floppy disk. [ibm.com]

OK, that's true. (1)

Erris (531066) | about 9 years ago | (#13679446)

We all use the floppy disk. I don't care who you are (but more likely so if you're a government employee), you have a green floppy disk in your briefcase that has a masking-tape label on it written with pencil..

That label idea has merit, but I'm too lazy to follow through. Once upon a time, I labled one "transfer disk."

Yeah, I carry a floppy as a last resort in the world of pain. You need several layers of prophylactic to get anything off a windoze box. [slashdot.org] A boot CD may not always work well with Bill Gate's fucked up device specs (think winmodem, wep, etc) or idea of the interweb (aka LAN) where you are. I could email to gmail, but that would be followed by a stream of spam. Many big dumb companies take away your USB devices. Sometimes you are left with nothing but that 1.44 MB to do your job.

Most of the time, I just use my nice little Debian laptop. Konqueror's built in sftp support blows everything else away.

iPod Nano (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13678576)

I was going to suggest the iPod Nano as a good portable storage device, but now I am having second thoughts. Better scratch that idea!

Re:iPod Nano (1)

PhoenixPath (895891) | about 9 years ago | (#13679028)

That one really cracked me up.

Security Risks? (5, Informative)

MandoSKippy (708601) | about 9 years ago | (#13678626)

Not saying Poster is security risk. But as someone who does security audits for banks, "taking data home" ie becoming more and more of a Security risk. It is easy for an employee to copy, burn, etc information with customer data with it. Another issue is smaller banks don't have the dedicated resources to devote to proper DRM and OEMS like Dell often include CD-Rs and make USB flash drives so cheap that it gets more and more troublesom to block it.

Re:Security Risks? (1)

sconeu (64226) | about 9 years ago | (#13678699)

That's what I was trying to get at with this article [slashdot.org] .

Re:Security Risks? (1)

exi1ed0ne (647852) | about 9 years ago | (#13678737)

Clear nail polish or superglue in the USB port usually fixes this issue.

Also, anyone that puts a PC with a CD burner into an environment where you need to control who has the data should be kicked in the privates.

Re:Security Risks? (1)

temojen (678985) | about 9 years ago | (#13678813)

Good thing not everyone works in a bank.

PQI (2, Informative)

Solder Fumes (797270) | about 9 years ago | (#13678636)

I use a 1GB PQI Stick, I don't think there's a smaller, cheaper, and more reliable option for the same capacity.

email (2, Funny)

slackerboy (73121) | about 9 years ago | (#13678647)

If you're like me, you are always transporting data from home to work, and back.

And if you're a cheap, lazy bastard like me, you just email everything back and forth. (I mean, sure I can use my 512MB MuVo TX FM as a flash drive, but that's so much effort...)

They forgot (3, Funny)

OverlordQ (264228) | about 9 years ago | (#13678656)

I see they missed the most important device of all, the mega-uber-1337-6.7GHz, eleventy-billion TB laptop [atomchip.com]

Re:They forgot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13678892)

I can't wait for the look on you unbeliever's faces when that laptop goes on sale.

My 4GB thumb drive (2, Funny)

Fen14 (917322) | about 9 years ago | (#13678705)

Very useful. Have it in my wallet. Anybody have any problems with premature removal? Hope it doesn't blow out all the rest of my data if I have to run quick and disconnect while ul/dl.

Re:My 4GB thumb drive (1)

temojen (678985) | about 9 years ago | (#13678857)

Anybody have any problems with premature removal? Hope it doesn't blow out...

He he he... Freud...

Seriously though, you must unmount ("safely remove hardware", in windows-speak) it before you unplug it, or you will eventually lose all the data on the drive.

Re:My 4GB thumb drive (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13678936)

This is just plain wrong. As posted previously (i do not remember by whom), this only affects Win2k in it's default state. WinXP by default will immediately write data to the disk so that the moment it is done, you can remove it... Win2k (I forget the setting) will hang on to it, not writing immediately, which is what causes the "data loss".

Keep in mind, even win2k won't wipe your drive. This only concerns new data.

Re:My 4GB thumb drive (1)

Bake (2609) | about 9 years ago | (#13678989)

Nope, I've gotten bad data in XP with a USB stick-drive having pulled it out once the file copy dialog had closed. Tried again, same bad data, and then tried once more and finally unmounted the thing and the data was good.

Re:My 4GB thumb drive (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13679144)

Did I forget to mention that some 3rd party programs will alter this setting to "increase the speed" of the system?

Gotta quit playing with those tweaking utils.

Hint: Disable write-caching. Instructions [pcstats.com]

Did not intend the puns (1)

Fen14 (917322) | about 9 years ago | (#13679327)

Had this problem before at work! Sometimes puns elude me.

Noone cares what a portable flash drive looks like (2, Insightful)

hattig (47930) | about 9 years ago | (#13678709)

So when your iPod nano is so scratched you can't read the screen, treat it as a 2 or 4GB flash drive with integrated iPod Shuffle functionality!

In fact for a 2 or 4 GB flash drive it isn't a bad price really, although most sensible people would jump up to a portable 2.5" Firewire drive at about the same price and not worry about the extra size.

Coralized (3, Informative)

Milican (58140) | about 9 years ago | (#13678710)

Coralized [nyud.net]

JOhn

makeover time!!! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13678761)

ewww that site needs a drastic makeover asap!! Sorry Janne (the credited site designer) hang your head in shame, it made my eyes twitch and my head hurt.

my back hurts... (1)

jpardey (569633) | about 9 years ago | (#13678784)

One large laptop, two power bricks, and a 160 gig usb 2 drive go with me whenever I want to use my laptop at school. I can watch napoleon dynamite any time I want, though.

Data encryption on portable device? (1)

PiotrK (16050) | about 9 years ago | (#13678797)

How do you encrypt your data on portable storage devices?

Re:Data encryption on portable device? (2, Informative)

L. VeGas (580015) | about 9 years ago | (#13678869)

For Windows, the best option is TrueCrypt [truecrypt.org] .

I've got a review of it here [nedwolf.com] , if you're interested, as well as some other portable security tools. I've a bigger list [nedwolf.com] portable software tools as well. (shameless link, but on topic)

Re:Data encryption on portable device? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13678960)

I bought a jumpdrive secure (256MB small/cheap usb flash), it came with the encryption software - which they put on the drive itself.
The jdsecure software mounts the secure partition on Mac, PC and Linux.

I barely use the secure partition, it takes too much time to type in the password and mount.
Project files and college homework for the past month only takes up 64MB.

What is the perfect size/form factor? (1)

slipnslidemaster (516759) | about 9 years ago | (#13678877)



I've been thinking about this problem for a while now and trying to find the perfect balance between physical size of the device and the amount of storage that it holds.

I have approximately 20GB of data that I wish to transport back and forth to home, work and whereever there is a computer that I can work on. I've cut out all the misc. stuff and the music files and have gotten it down to less then 4GB but there isn't a cheap thumbdrive that I've seen yet for the capacity.

Really though, I would like to carry ALL of my music and misc. stuff because I'm a packrat and just like having everything with me. I've been using a USB hard drive but this is comparatively bulky and really only appropriate for semi-permanent places like taking home on the weekend. I would really like a thumbdrive.

What products have you found that fill this?

Carrying Data is very, very dangerous (0)

kianu7 (886560) | about 9 years ago | (#13678896)

Folks, If you are like the author then you have made a habit of carrying data on your person.

This is a very, very bad idea. Unless you have a "shoot to kill" license, you might want to think twice about making yourself an easy target for the Hong Kong Style Warlords who will do anything to get their hands on your personal spreadsheets, porno, and other sensitive data that could make or break their underground operations.

I am told that these gangs live in the subway system and have automatic weapons.

The only safe way to transport sensitive data on your person is not to do it.

Be vigilant and don't get caught being a victim!

My beloved phone (1)

shaka (13165) | about 9 years ago | (#13678923)

I use my phone to carry data with me. I always bring it with me anyway, and it's got a 512 MB MemoryStick in it. When I feel a little bit more rich, I'll get a 2 GB one in it's stead.

Yes, I need a data cable but there's always one or two to borrow from co-workers.

Oh and it's got a very nice mp3 player and a 2 Mpixel camera to boot! I love that little thing... It's a Sony Ericsson W800 [sonyericsson.com] .

Re:My beloved phone (1)

joelsanda (619660) | about 9 years ago | (#13679001)

Oh and it's got a very nice mp3 player and a 2 Mpixel camera to boot! I love that little thing...

Wow! At what points do we stop calling these things phones and start calling them somthing else? What is it? A storage device, MP3 player, digital camera, or phone? Sooner or later someone will have to come up with a decent name for these things!

Re:My beloved phone (1)

in-tech (912144) | about 9 years ago | (#13679066)

why dont we simply call it driver. a storage driver in this case.

Re:My beloved phone (1)

joelsanda (619660) | about 9 years ago | (#13679210)

With an onboard MP3 player, phone, storage capacity, probably bluetooth, probably an address book and calendar, probably some games, wallpaper, and so on we should just call them ... computers! ;-)

My suggestion (1)

Anita Coney (648748) | about 9 years ago | (#13678925)

I use this [newegg.com] USB enclosure for only 15 bucks shipped, combined with a cheap laptop hard drive. It fits in your pocket, is dirt cheap, does NOT need an external powersupply, and can be as nearly large (in capacity) as you want.

Re:My suggestion (1)

MirrororriM (801308) | about 9 years ago | (#13679328)

I had one of those and used a 6GB laptop hard drive. After only two weeks and one instance of plopping it in my desk, it killed the hard drive. That clicking noise is just an evil sound...

They would be much better if there was some better kind of padding or buffer between the drive and the case. Yeah, the small case is nice, but it leaves your hard drive exposed to abuse as if there wasn't a case there.

Cave? (0, Troll)

MITDude (767140) | about 9 years ago | (#13678926)

Have you been living in a cave?

Best storage depends on your needs.. (2, Insightful)

phelix_da_kat (714601) | about 9 years ago | (#13679009)

What is best depends on your circumstances.. what you need to do? If you want to carry your home drive, a 100G Seagate momentus in aluminium compact case/caddy and FW/USB2 connector is cool! If is day-to-day data, pics or photos may I suggest..

http://www.sandisk.com/pressrelease/20050219a.htm [sandisk.com]

It's a 1G SD card.. an SD card you say.. what's so special.. OK

1. is x66 speed - great for video/continuous frames on a camera

2. compatible with my Canon compact and TREO 650

3. It has a built-in USB connector!!!!! No need for extra adaptors!!

A great idea.. as a SD card dual use it with an MP3 palyer, camera or phone etc.. plug it in to your USB at work or home!!

Software for your portable deviced (4, Informative)

leftyfb (71398) | about 9 years ago | (#13679048)

For those of you who have USB flash drives or just about any other type of portable media, check out http://www.no-install.com/ [no-install.com] Tons of applications that you can run from your portable media and not have to worry about losing your settings betweeb different machines.

Apparently Windows Only (2, Informative)

mardoen (557915) | about 9 years ago | (#13679096)

It seems they only tested the hardware on Windows; there is no info on Linux or OS X support/testing. I'm not sure if all drives mentioned can even be used on other OSes, or if there still are driver issues. This is especially bothersome as they seem to install any software provided by the respective manufacturers before benchmarking the drives; but they don't mention if this includes installing custom drivers, or if the software in each case consists simply of data management tools.

TeraStation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 years ago | (#13679252)

Since they are already reviewing the 400G firewire drive, they might as well go one step up and review the Buffalo TeraStation too! What I really want to know is if the unit's four drives can be swapped out for bigger capacity ones, and not a single review mentions this - the only cheap RAID5 out-of-box solution and hardly ever a mention on /.

Ask Slashdot: Redundant external storage (1)

dalutong (260603) | about 9 years ago | (#13679255)

I have been looking for decent answers about this for a long time, so here i go:

What is a good way to have redundant external storage with linux? I'm thinking like mirroring "RAID" with two external USB hard drives.

I ask this because I recently lost a good deal of data when a harddrive failed when I didn't have a copy of a lot of my stuff on my laptop. I recovered some, but I'd like to not have to worry about it again.

Suggestions?

Thank you.

so many options (2, Insightful)

MooseTick (895855) | about 9 years ago | (#13679293)

What is the point of this article? To lists ways you can carry data? That is news?

What about books(printed material), CDs, tatoos, etc?
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