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SpaceShipOne to Join Smithsonian Collection

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the going-up dept.

Space 82

iamlucky13 writes "After having inspired space enthusiasts around the world and possibly setting the stage for space tourism by winning the X-Prize a year ago, SpaceShipOne is on it's way to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC. There it will join other historic craft such as Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis and Yeager's Glamorous Glennis. The exhibit will be unveiled on October 5th at a ceremony with Burt Rutan of Scaled Composites, the company that built SpaceShipOne, and Paul Allen, the Microsoft co-founder who funded the project."

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Too young for a museum ... (0)

DoktorTomoe (643004) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692277)

Does that mean Scaled Compisute gives away their currently only successful way to get to space? No SpaceShipTwo Prototype yet? Lost interest in space already?

Re:Too young for a museum ... (3, Interesting)

inglishs (825536) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692298)

On the contrary, I think that this will only fuel innovation even more. Having this amazing space ship available for viewing in public will help people to believe in space travel, also from a private, consumer perspective. Take an example, a young engineer student, studies its aerodynamic properties at the museum, and can then create new ideas and spur the development himself. I also take this as a sign that the Scaled Composites team has even more and better ships in their space fleet.

Re:Too young for a museum ... (0, Offtopic)

Henry V .009 (518000) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692362)

Oh God, +5 funny, that was beautiful. Some Trolls achieve true greatness, and you sir, are one.

IMPORTANT! Zonk and iamlucky13 please read!!! (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692664)

SpaceShipOne is on it's way to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

"its".

To the moderators: It is absolutely VITAL that you mod this post up, so that the editor and submitter can see it. (This is why I have posted it as close to the top as I can.) Now I know that, in the past, we have had our differences, and you have seen fit to mod my posts down for some inexplicable reason. Please note that this post is ON-TOPIC, because it refers SPECIFICALLY to the article summary. However, if you still feel that you want to mod this post down, rather than up, then please first consider the following:

If you love your country and don't wish to see Western civilization decline, you MUST mod this post up. Remember what President John F. Kennedy said when he corrected Nixon's grammar during the first televised Presidential debates in 1960: "I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of 100% correct spelling and grammar among all of its citizens. [...] We choose to correct spelling and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard." And, during his inauguration: "Ask not what spell-checking your country can do for you; ask what spell-checking you can do for your country."

Are you a patriot? Do you love your country and eveything for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all? If you do, then MOD THIS POST UP, so that the editors and article submitter can learn from it, so that people everywhere can learn from it, so that those countless heros of the past, who gave the last full measure of their devotion, shall not have died in vain. O say, does that Star Spangled Banner yet wave o'er the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave? If you mod this post up, then the answer is "YES!"

Re:Too young for a museum ... (1)

emandres (857332) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693369)

Speaking of fuel... It's pretty interesting how spaceship one was fueled. It's basically a mix of kerosene and chopped up old tires, but it does the job, and pretty darn well. Another ingenious thing about SS1 is the reentry mechanism. Rather than weighting the craft down with thousands of custom made thermal tiles (like NASA does), it instead raises its wings vertical, which gives a lot of drag on reentry. Essentially, this slows the craft down so quickly that you don't have to worry about it overheating. I bet the guys at NASA are slapping themselves across the face on that one...

Re:Too young for a museum ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13693543)

SS1 can't even reach orbit, and doesn't even try. The speeds they are dealing with are a joke compared to real spacecraft.

Re:Too young for a museum ... (2, Informative)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693652)

Note, SS1 didn't reach orbital speeds (17,500 mph) and thus didn't undergo the tempratures due to reentry that Shuttle and other orbital reentry vehicles go through.

It's not that they out smarted NASA, they aren't doing near as much as Shuttle does in terms of speed and reentry.

When they go to an orbital vehicle then they'll have to deal with that level of speed and temp.

Re:Too young for a museum ... (1)

tm2b (42473) | more than 8 years ago | (#13697360)

SS1 isn't the Shuttle. It's Mercury.

The important thing is that it's a Mercury program that will be able to survive on profits from the free market, not subject to the whims of some political hacks. This is sustainable, and will continue and be built upon no matter what fools take control of NASA's purse strings.

Burt Rutan Speaks at BEA World (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692596)

Burt Rutan spoke at BEA World Tuesday night. It was the night time key note speaker which usually has nothing to do with Java, J2EE, or anything else that BEA might deal with.

He talked about inovation and how govornment could not give the inovation that is needed to fuel a space travel industry. He seemed to equate inovation in air travel strickly to speed. He also said that Space Travel should have the same sort of backing from private sector that the Air Plane had in the early 1910's.

Although I didn't agree with some of his points he did speak at great deal about SpaceShipTwo and how it will be a huge space liner that will be able to take up to 1 million passengers over a 12 year streatch. He said it would be large, and give lots of room for floating in space for the passengers. His hope is to make it more affortable so that a person could go to space and not have to be a multi-billionaire, instead you could be a upper middle class person.

Besides who really wants to spend all that money go to space to float for a little bit, and then come back. Even if it was a space resort, how much fun could that be to enjoying some of the great sites here at home. It is not like you will be going on a hike on Mars.

Re:Burt Rutan Speaks at BEA World (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692677)

"he did speak at great deal about SpaceShipTwo and how it will be a huge space liner that will be able to take up to 1 million passengers over a 12 year streatch"

I think that you have things mixed up. I also attended that conference, and my notes indicate that SpaceShip 2 will be able to take up to twelve passengers over a one million year stretch.

Seriously, how do you expect to fit one million people, along with supplies for one million people for twelve years, into a spaceship that will be lanched from the ground? The whole idea is ridiculous. I think that this Rutan character has gone bonky, or you misheard him.

Re:Burt Rutan Speaks at BEA World (1)

hanssprudel (323035) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693387)


Umm, if he did say something like that, he obviously meant the total number of passengers to fly over the twelve year period, not all at the same time in the same ship. SS2 is a suborbital plane, so any given flight will just last a few minutes/hours.

If they have 10 SS2s, flying one flight per day with 12 passengers over 12 years that would be more than half a million passengers. If Rutan said one million (the parent and grandparent might both be trolls), then he must have been thinking in terms of a bigger fleet.

Re:Burt Rutan Speaks at BEA World (1)

JLF65 (888379) | more than 8 years ago | (#13695823)

WHOOOOSH!!!

What was that? Something just passed right over my head.

What is it about some folks here? It's like their humor knob is set to 0.

Re:Burt Rutan Speaks at BEA World (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13698429)

Thanks. I wrote The GGP (joke) post. I'm glad that someone got it. I posted as AC because I figured that some humorless mod would mod it as a troll or flamebait, and didn't want to bring down my kharma (as has happened to me sometimes in the past). Some people have no appreciation for dry wit, even if, occasionally, it's not all that witty.

I can't imagine anything more deserving. (1)

NeuroManson (214835) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692279)

And, considering my birthday is October 5, 1969, the addition to the Smithsonian is doubly appreciated.

Re:I can't imagine anything more deserving. (2, Interesting)

rossdee (243626) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692307)

Wouldn't Oct 4th be a more appropriate day, being the anniversary of the first man made object (sputnik) in space.

sputnik (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692413)

Sputnik was not the first man-made object in space. If the boundary between the atmosphere and space is defined as 100 km altitude, then the V-2 beat Sputnik there.

Sputnik's real claim to fame is that it was Earth's first artificial satellite.

Well, that, and also the fact that at it gave red-blooded Americans the heebie-jeebies to have a sinister Soviet satellite beaming out Communist radio signals while whizzing over your head fifteen times a day.

American Blood (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692907)

Everything else aside your post makes me wonder about which americans doesn't have red blood... your smallish grey friends perhaps?

*Oh noes what am I doing talking to myself on slasshy?* AC posting to AC

Re:American Blood (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13694671)

Them Democrats have blue blood in those blue states. It's darn right unpatriotic of them! Bastards... Better send in the military.

Re:I can't imagine anything more deserving. (1)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692651)

That would be promoting a time when a foreign power out-showed America. As a group, Americans don't like to be reminded of such times.

Monty Python (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13707272)

What does Monty Python's Flying Circus [wikipedia.org] have to do with it?

October 5, 1969 [wikipedia.org]

well that was a waste of time, wasn't it? (-1, Troll)

petes_PoV (912422) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692282)

The whole point of the X prize was to make a reusable space craft. It made pretty much the bare minimun number of flights and got stuffed into a museum (it won't make many more from there!) If it was me, I'd want my prize money back

re-usable, but for what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692347)

The White Knight + SpaceShipOne system will not take you into orbit. Why would you want to re-use it?

It has already served its purpose as a demonstrator of and testbed for relatively new technologies and materials.

Re:well that was a waste of time, wasn't it? (5, Insightful)

ocelotbob (173602) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692354)

The X-Prize was designed to spur invention and get people looking at private spaceflight and funding deals. SS1 is way too small to be commercially viable. It did it's job, and is now obsolete. Life is short when you're a prototype in an evolving industry.

Re:well that was a waste of time, wasn't it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13698755)

It did it's job

"its".

it is one of the most significant planes ever. (1)

YesIAmAScript (886271) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693679)

It is the first private plane/spacecraft in human history to reach space. Once space travel becomes commonplace this vehicle will be as prized as the first Wright Flyer.

I was slightly suprised when they reused it to try to take the X-Prize. What if they had crashed it?

I definitely belongs in a museum, and now.

The way composites work, it wouldn't be all that expensive to make another shell on the same plans. They could take all the parts ouf of SSOne and put them in that shell and fly it at a very low cost.

So don't fret, it's there because it's more valuable as a museum piece than as an airplane now. That won't be the case with the 2nd one built I don't think. Although the 2nd may very well be the first private vehicle to actually carry a paying passenger to space.

Re:it is one of the most significant planes ever. (1)

SheeEttin (899897) | more than 7 years ago | (#13694896)

I definitely belongs in a museum, and now.

Bad grammar aside, why? Are you going to die soon?

linux is for homos (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692291)

linux is for homos! yeah that is right, it is. stop denying it.

Re:linux is for homos (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692329)

Ok. And what's your beef with us homos, then? Hatemonger.

Re:linux is for homos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692381)

You guys are always trying to plug things into the wrong ports.

Re:linux is for homos (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692417)

If it fits, it can't be wrong.

Besides, as long as it itsn't your port, you've got no say in this.

You're going to hell (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692416)

Repent [godhatesfags.com]

What??? (3, Interesting)

FlipSideXp (692564) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692303)

How does this affect the star trek timeline? I just don't get it??

mod parent funny not troll (1)

Afecks (899057) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693093)

lol how the fuck was that a Troll...stupid mods...anyways, at least I laughed...

Re:What??? (1)

smartalix (84502) | more than 8 years ago | (#13703018)

Burt Rutan is Zephram Cochrane's Great-grandfather.

yes, but... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692374)

does it run Linux?

not so reusable, eh? (0, Troll)

CannibalSmith (684531) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692409)

This proves that SpaceShipOne's sole purpouse was winning the X-Prize. Seems to me it's not so reusable after all. Otherwise why donate it away to a museum?

Re:not so reusable, eh? (2, Insightful)

nsasch (827844) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692599)

So they paid $30 million to win a $10 million prize? They donated it to inspire others. They're currently working on SpaceShipTwo.

Re:not so reusable, eh? (1)

Cruciform (42896) | more than 7 years ago | (#13694513)

The 10 million is just icing on the cake. Being known as the winners of the X-Prize is sure to be worth a lot more than the prize or even the money they invested themselves.

Re:not so reusable, eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13698479)

B.R. is already the most famous (still working) aircraft designer on the planet. He doesn't really need any more publicity.

Re:not so reusable, eh? (1)

JeffTL (667728) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693295)

Perhaps its historical value as the first private-sector product to cross the threshold qualifies it for museum display. If it blew up on another flight(accidents happen) they couldn't very well give it to the Smithsonian.

Re:not so reusable, eh? (1)

forkazoo (138186) | more than 7 years ago | (#13694186)

Well, it is certainly capable of being reused. It's just that nobody actually has a use for a thee man suborbital spaceplane. There was never any question about whether of not it was built for the X-Prize. It was. No sane person ever said otherwise. Now, they are starting to build other space ships for the Virgin Galactic partnership.

There will be more (4, Insightful)

mcraig (757818) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692429)


It's not like they've thrown away the blueprints and with all the extra money from Virgin their going to be able to quickly fabricate many more with all the kinks from SpaceShipOne worked out, after all it is a prototype albeit a very good one. I can't wait to see the new version they make that comes with cup holders and leather trim interior.

Besides they probably felt they had a good chunk of flight data to analyze and could further refine the engine on the ground, traded against the risk of pushing it further to the limits and losing the ship and possibly pilot, at which point everyone would berate them for destroying a piece of history. Nope sounds like they made the right call to me.

Virgin Galactic (4, Informative)

tm2b (42473) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692430)

To the people asking about the reusability of a craft that's being put on display...

SpaceShip One was the testing prototype. The production models are already being built, for Virgin Galactic [virgingalactic.com] .

Yeah, that's right. A real company, run by someone who owns a real world-wide airline, will be using these babies for (near-) space tourism.

Re:Virgin Galactic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692658)

SpaceShip One was the testing prototype. The production models are already being built, for Virgin Galactic.

Excitingly, tomorrow I put my panniers on my Segway and ride on over to Rutan Spaceport for a trip on Virgin Galactic. They have a TV on the back of every seat - pretty cool.

I plan to spend a couple days at Gates Space Port (hear they have an excellent spa), and from there I go to Branson Palms on Mars. Sadly, I can't afford to go to Titan yet, but with space fares falling so quickly, I'm sure I'll be able to get there in a few years.

Re:Virgin Galactic (1)

izomiac (815208) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693751)

But everyone who's seen Evangelion knows that the test type is better than the production version!

Re:Virgin Galactic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13693979)

A real company? There is demand for going into space for people with the financial resources, but do you really believe this will happen in the next 5-10 years? Negative.

Are you willing to take a rollercoaster ride into space in a damn kite with a rocket strapped to it? Not me, you only have one chance to land one of these things.

Re:Virgin Galactic (1)

Radak (126696) | more than 7 years ago | (#13694401)

A real company? There is demand for going into space for people with the financial resources, but do you really believe this will happen in the next 5-10 years?

Virgin is still on track to begin commercial launches in 2008. Obviously it's too early to predict with any great deal of accuracy the realism of this estimate, but so far things are going very well for them.

They've got plans on the drawing board (which, amusingly enough, considering the humorous post higher in this thread, do include a LCD screen for every seat, but of course it's for telemetry, not for inflight movies). They've received the necessary clearances from the US government to begin their work, and the first drawings of SpaceShipTwo are complete.

Space travel and ship design aren't easy, but don't underestimate Burt Rutan and Richard Branson. Many have before.

Are you willing to take a rollercoaster ride into space in a damn kite with a rocket strapped to it?

Yes. No question. There are few things for which I'm willing to put my life at risk, and being one of the first 1000 people in human history to escape the atmosphere is absolutely one of them. I obviously don't want to die, but it's a chance I'm willing to take.

Read my journal [slashdot.org] entries for my ongoing process of relieving myself of a great deal of cash for this opportunity to die.

Re:Virgin Galactic (1)

iamlucky13 (795185) | more than 7 years ago | (#13695056)

Are you willing to take a rollercoaster ride into space in a damn kite with a rocket strapped to it?
Yes. No question. There are few things for which I'm willing to put my life at risk, and being one of the first 1000 people in human history to escape the atmosphere is absolutely one of them. I obviously don't want to die, but it's a chance I'm willing to take.
While that would be absolutely awesome, I just don't think I can justify $200,000 on it. This is the part where I complain about "the man" using his money and influence to keep the little guy out of the history books. Oh well, I guess I just have to keep trying to get NASA to hire me as a test monkey for the first CEV launch.

Re:Virgin Galactic (1)

Radak (126696) | more than 7 years ago | (#13695116)

I just don't think I can justify $200,000 on it. This is the part where I complain about "the man" using his money and influence to keep the little guy out of the history books.

I think that's an overly pessimistic interpretation. The fact is it ain't cheap to develop the technology necessary to do this, so the ticket doesn't seem unreasonably priced to me. Out of the reach of most, sure, but not unreasonable given the R&D costs.

But here's the thing... It won't always be that way. It is because there are people out there who can spend $200,000 on a roller coaster ride that you will be able to do it for $20,000 in 10 years and $2,000 in 20 years.

I am very lucky to be in the position to be able to afford this. But I'm not just doing this for me. I'm doing this because I know that it's this initial outlay of cash from those who can that will open the field up to so many more people in the future. I want everybody who wants to go to space to have that opportunity, and so I'm glad to help lay the groundwork for more affordable space travel in the future.

So I don't think The Man is using his money to keep you out of the history books (and I hate the thought that you might be lumping me in with The Man--trust me, I ain't). I think there are a lot of people involved with this project who are very excited about it and who want this kind of adventure to be available to as many people as possible at as reasonable a price as possible.

Re:Virgin Galactic (1)

iamlucky13 (795185) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700840)

Whoa, calm down there. I was being sarcastic. Perhaps not very effectively, but trying anyways. If well-to-do people didn't invest in this sort of thing, the benefits would never become available to the common man. I'm excited about it, too, and I think it's completely awesome that you have this opportunity. Have a blast...pun intended.

Re:Virgin Galactic (1)

Radak (126696) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700909)

Whoa, calm down there. I was being sarcastic.

Don't worry. I got it. Just didn't say so.

Re:Virgin Galactic (1)

tm2b (42473) | more than 8 years ago | (#13697348)

A real company? There is demand for going into space for people with the financial resources, but do you really believe this will happen in the next 5-10 years? Negative.
You're a fool. It will clearly happen in the next few years, composite craft just don't take that long to manufacture. The technology is already proven, Rutan just needs to crank 'em out.

I wouldn't spend my last $200K on it, but even if prices stabilize at $200K, I'd probably spend it if I had a mere $1M and felt I couldn't wait. And there are a lot of people with a mere $1M. As is, I'll wait to see if the prices start to come down, but if they don't I'll probably pony up the cash in a couple of decades. If I were 60 or 70 instead of 35, I'd pony up the cash right now.
Are you willing to take a rollercoaster ride into space in a damn kite with a rocket strapped to it? Not me, you only have one chance to land one of these things.
Big deal. I've done 280 landings of normal aircraft according to my log book... haven't blown one yet.

In any case, that's fine. Cowards will inherit the Earth - the bold will go to the stars, sooner or later.

Great car (2, Funny)

Kaorimoch (858523) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692470)

Sounds like a great idea. I can see myself flying to work one day in one of these babies. I can also see myself getting arrested when I land for violating airspace.

SS1 has been at Smithsonian since July (4, Informative)

chopkins1 (321043) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692541)

This is actually an old story. It had been reported earlier in the year that this was going to occur.

The SS1 Prototype has actually been at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Annex (Udvar-Hazy Air and Space Museum (UHASM)) in Dulles, VA since late July / early August awaiting transfer to the downtown Washington, DC center.

For those who would have wanted to see it there, while it was not on active display, it was there at the west end of the building under a great big blue tarp. They had it under the tarp because the director of the UHASM did not want to allow it on display because he "did not want to upstage the downtown facility's unveiling". For what it's worth, since it was there (and its not hard to recognize it under the tarp), I thought that it would not have hurt to have been not on active display but out from under the tarp and just have a temporary placard stating "Awaiting transfer to downtown facility for official showing".

Link to Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Homepage:
http://www.nasm.si.edu/ [si.edu]

Link to Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center:
http://www.nasm.si.edu/museum/udvarhazy/ [si.edu]

Re:SS1 has been at Smithsonian since July (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692604)

And last month I spotted it in the DC center under a cover. Nobody else seemed to notice it though, but you could clearly make it out.

Re:some pictures... (2, Informative)

Spydr (90990) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693550)

I was there last weekend, and it was already hanging up in the lobby, but still covered in the blue sheet.

I took a few pics of it: Smithsonian pictures [flickr.com]

Re:some pictures... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13694244)

Ah, its hanging now is it? it was lying on the ground when I went.

It's already there (4, Informative)

uniq (109504) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692565)

I took my 4.5 year-olds on their first visit to Air & Space when we happened to be
near Washington last weekend. SpaceShipOne was hanging in the main entrance hall,
but it was under wraps. The shape is distinctive, but I was disappointed that we
couldn't actually see it.

Re:It's already there (1)

jcnnghm (538570) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693549)

I'm just glad to see that the musuems are finally getting some new stuff. I probably go in every 5-7 years since I'm only a half hour or so outside of the city, and for the most part the content is static and nothing really changes.

I'd say the best trip (most interesting) to DC I ever took was when I went to the House to watch the impeachment proceedings for Clinton. They used to allow anyone into the upper deck seating above the house with a pass from your congressman. I don't think they still do that after 9/11 though.

Re:It's already there (1)

DavidTC (10147) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693792)

Yeah, that was cool. I've done that. (It was really easy to get a pass from your Congressman. Basically, just find his office, tell his people you're from his state, and, tada, pass to the house.)

The only odd thing was the rule against reading. Huh? No reading while sitting in the house?

Planning to visit SSO? Read this for more info! (1, Insightful)

standards (461431) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692637)

SpaceShipOne is on it's way to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC. There it will join other historic craft such as Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis and Yeager's Glamorous Glennis.

I am planning a group trip to the Smithsonian to visit this incredibly innovative machine of the 21st century. As I'm sure you know, the noble genius of Burt Rutan has once again improved the American way of life by developing this impressive ship. Soon we will all be traveling to space, and we'll remember Rutan as the leader that made it happen.

The craft was honorably donated to the Smithsonian by the Scaled Composites shareholders so that all Americans can bask in their stunning glory. They are the true American Heroes, easily meeting and sometimes exceeding the accomplishments of Lindbergh, Yeager, Glenn, and Armstrong. SpaceShipOne should be your first and last stop when visiting the Smithsonian.

A bill in Congress is now focusing on how to best teach space science to our country's children. A key part of this bill is that schools will be required to honor the investors of SpaceShipOne, and give those investors equal time with the government-funded NASA. All chilrdren should be made aware that SpaceShipOne supports the American way of life in terms of Freedom and excellence. Unlike NASA, which is a dismal failure of big government policies funded by a Kennedy that sends single-use rockets to Mars. Dumb.

The SpaceShipOne exhibit is co-sponsored by Kraft Macaroni & Cheese: another American Hero loved by all kids. When you think of SpaceShipOne, think of the heros of Rutan and Allen, and think of the delicious wholesome goodness of Kraft.

You lay it on too thick (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13692768)

One gets the impression you'ld much rather go visit the grave of Karl Marx in London than go to the Smithsonian...

Translation if needed: you make yourself sound like a nutjob rather than making the point that SSO isn't the be-all end-all of space travel.

Re:You lay it on too thick (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13693095)

One gets the impression you'ld much rather go visit the grave of Karl Marx in London than go to the Smithsonian...

This guy is an advocate of the Smithsonian, and doesn't mention Marx or the Russian space program at all! What is your problem: stupidity or illiteracy?

Read before you post, frikin' anonymous trolls...

Re:Planning to visit SSO? Read this for more info! (1)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693410)

whilst what rutan achived is commendable calling it spaceflight is a bit of a stretch. Its a bit like comparing an object thrown in the air with an aircraft.

The only feasible way to stay out of the earths atnosphere is to go into orbit but orbit is far far harder to achive than the little stunts runtan has been doing.

Re:Planning to visit SSO? Read this for more info! (1)

p3d0 (42270) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693548)

Its a bit like comparing an object thrown in the air with an aircraft.
I wouldn't say that's fair. It's more like comparing an aircraft with the General Lee [wikipedia.org] jumping over a broken bridge. SpaceShipOne reached space under its own power; it wasn't "thrown".

Re:Planning to visit SSO? Read this for more info! (1)

jcr (53032) | more than 7 years ago | (#13694360)

So why are you being so sarcastic? Did Rutan steal your girlfriend or something?

-jcr

Re:Planning to visit SSO? Read this for more info! (1)

standards (461431) | more than 7 years ago | (#13694790)

So why are you being so sarcastic? Did Rutan steal your girlfriend or something?

Ah yes, in fact he did steal my girlfriend, and that leads directly to sarcasm. As you too have obviously experienced.

Honestly, I'm damn tired of hearing about Rutan on Good Morning America and all the other faux news shows. He is a commendable engineer, but the marketing aspect of this particular achievement is very much over the top. There are plenty of engineers and scientists that have accomplished amazing things, but they go very much unpraised.

Scaled Composites simply won't let this one fall out of the news. If they keep their focus on the engineering accomplishments, they wouldn't need such a full-press marketing push.

Don't get me wrong - it isn't Rutan himself; it's the investors* trying to capitalize on their investment in attempts to augment their engineering accomplishment. They're using Rutan as a tool and a personality to further their own agenda. Show Rutan with some failures - all engineering is full of "lessons learned". Show us that he's a smart guy who takes good risks that don't always work out right.

Show me reality: I don't want a sugar-coated made-for-TV mini series that's merely based on reality. Rutan has some great accomplishments, but please don't compare the SSO success with Yeager and Limburgh.

* yes, I know Rutan is an investor too

Re:Planning to visit SSO? Read this for more info! (1)

jcr (53032) | more than 7 years ago | (#13694867)

Ok, I think I see where you're coming from. You really should see a shrink about your jealously issues.

-jcr

Re:Planning to visit SSO? Read this for more info! (1)

blincoln (592401) | more than 7 years ago | (#13694697)

Psst. The Smithsonian has an Enterprise model (from TOS) on display too.

Nice :) (1)

Kranfer (620510) | more than 7 years ago | (#13692781)

Nice to see SS1 going to the smithsonian in DC. It will be a nice spot for a piece of american innovation. I shall head down there for that since space is always going to be my #1 interest.... but I could never make money at it... But its nice to know this historical piece will be kept around for us all to see :)

But it's already there... under a tarp. (2, Informative)

TheMadReaper (608403) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693218)

The sentence "SpaceShipOne is on it's way to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC." seems a bit inaccurate. A friend of mine who was there a week or so ago said that SpaceShipOne is already there, albeit under a tarp. Doent's seem like there is much traveling left for her to do. Naturally, a throng of people (including my friend) were there looking at the tarp, and probably taking pictures too to show to their kiddies/grandkiddies.

Just another awesome thinnnnnnnnng... (1)

higuy48 (568572) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693884)

... about being a college stuuuuuuudent innnnnn DEEECEEEE... with no classessssss on Wednnnesssssday. I am SO there. Hell, I'd go just to see Paul Allen and to get out of the dorm.

AU '09

"Doent's" ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13698532)

"Doent's seem like there is much traveling left for her to do."

"Doent's" ? Well, all the letters and punctuation are there, but you seem to have a very creative way of ordering them.

thank you Paul Allen (1)

YesIAmAScript (886271) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693441)

I want to say thank you to Paul Allen for the funding first.

I want to say thank you again for donating the ship to the Smithsonian. For those who don't know, Paul Allen has his own recently-opened Sci-Fi museum in Seattle. It would be very tempting to not give SSOne to the Smithsonian, instead to give it to his museum and loan it to the Smithsonian (so it would mention his museum on the plaque and he could bring it back from time to time) or to exhibit it at his own museum for a while to generate traffic/money.

Paul Allen didn't do these things.

Thank you very much Paul.

It's be great to see this exhibit/web page updated soon:

http://www.nasm.si.edu/exhibitions/gal100/gal100.h tml [si.edu]

I've actually seen SSOne, I was there at its first flight into space. But I'd really like to see it next to the X-15 (which the Smithsonian also has) so I can see how much things have changed (and what hasn't) over almost 50 years.

Bob Dole! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#13693511)

Bob Dole wants to fly a spaceship! Bob Dole!
Bob Dole likes its style!

Bob Dole! Bob Dole!

Its already there. (1)

kraemer (637938) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693594)

Its not on its way, its been there for three weeks already. Its sitting under a blue tarp near the Navy exhibit at the far end of the museum. They got pretty torqued when I lifted the tarp up and checked it out....

Re:Its already there. (1)

Lobo_Louie (545789) | more than 7 years ago | (#13694351)

Yeah, it began its journey to the Smithsonian a few months ago before AirAdventure up in Osh Kosh. She stopped here in Albuquerque 2 days before the show and was on display for about 5 hours. Our whole company (Eclipse Aviation) stopped by and gawked at it and took lots of photos.

Nerd Check: We noticed on the left landing gear pod, a port for Dylithium Crystals. :)

The Burt Rutan Wing of the Smithsonian? (1)

MDMurphy (208495) | more than 7 years ago | (#13693965)

I know Voyager is already there, and now SS1. Are any more of his planes at the Smithsonian? GlobalFlyer?

Re:The Burt Rutan Wing of the Smithsonian? (1)

iamlucky13 (795185) | more than 8 years ago | (#13695613)

It took me a second to figure out which record-setting Voyager you were talking about: the first plane to fly non-stop around the world [scaled.com] (although it took 9 days!) or the one that left our solar system [nasa.gov] (depending how you define it) a couple months ago. That would've been a really fast return trip!

It's already there! (1)

Dr. Zowie (109983) | more than 7 years ago | (#13694737)

I was in D.C. two weeks ago and took pictures of myself and my wife next to it. It's in the aviation wing of Air & Space, at the end, covered with a not-so-opaque blue tarp.

Already there (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13695650)

I just got back from a brief intellectual journey to see the various Smithsonian museums in DC, and my brother & I already saw Spaceship One at the Air & Space museum -- tho, it was covered with a tarp. The shape was obvious, and some smaller details like the circular windows were clearly visible thru its veil.
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