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202 comments

What is that? (2, Interesting)

Capt'n Hector (650760) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700817)

What's that thing in the top left hand corner of the second image? It doesn't fit with the rest of the landscape...

Re:What is that? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13700858)

I think it's a fossilized huge sperm.

Re:What is that? (2, Informative)

iamlucky13 (795185) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700890)

Interesting, I didn't notice it before. Could be something tectonic. Plus, that picture is of Tethys, which has already been noticed for having a more obvious peculiar feature. [nasa.gov] That's no moon that's a...no wait, it is a moon, otherwise we'd be dead by now.

Re:What is that? (2)

Seehund (86897) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700898)

Why do you ask? The story submitter and the editors already provided a description. Apparently, you're looking at "nothing else in the solar system".

:P

Re:What is that? (5, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701057)

What's that thing in the top left hand corner of the second image? It doesn't fit with the rest of the landscape...

You mean the words that say, "DB_Session allocated the following problem: DB Error: connect failed"? Something tells me it is an earthy artifact.
       

Straight Line? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13701064)

What's that thing in the top left hand corner of the second image? It doesn't fit with the rest of the landscape...

Yeah. Is it me or does anybody else find that straight line feature suspiciously artificial?

Re:What is that? (1)

cryptocom (833376) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701082)

Interesting. If you look closely, there are three anomalies there. First is the triangular outcropping. Second is the straight line ridge that runs to it. Third is the perfectly rectangular greyish area surrounding the previous two objects. Very intruiging. Any astrogeologists wanna take a shot at this?

Re:What is that? (3, Interesting)

blincoln (592401) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701101)

Wow, that is kind of eerie.

The JPL page says the straight line is probably a fault or other geological feature, but the absence of any others in that area is a little suspicious.

I blew up that section a bit, and it looks a LOT like something diamond- or arrowhead-shaped came screeching along the surface and plowed into the side of a hill, kicking up surface material and burying the leading edge. The "buried" object itself seems to be very sharply defined with straight lines, as opposed to the more "natural" landscape around it.

An alien space probe would be neat, but I'm guessing it's a chunk of rock that impacted the moon at a weird angle. I'm sure Hoagland and his friends will have a field day with it, despite the crappy JPEG compression leading to terrible artifacts when it's blown up.

Re:What is that? (3, Interesting)

blincoln (592401) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701192)

The greyscale clear filter image [nasa.gov] I mentioned in another post is better for this work, and has less compression artifacts.

The line really looks like a depression in that one, whereas in the false colour image it could be a protrusion.

I blew it up considerably in Photoshop and increased the contrast to see details better. There are a number of smaller craters directly in the path of the line. If it were a rock impact, to my (non-astrophysicist/geologist) eye it looks like it behaved like a skipping stone - There are some bigger craters near where the top of the image cuts off the line, and about halfway along there's a pair on opposite sides of what appears to be a hill, as if it were skating along, used the hill as a jump, landed, and continued its movement.

The bigger feature at the end of the line seems more symmetrical in this version. It looks kind of like a Concorde... or a giant bird footprint. Watch out Tethys, Colonel Sanders is too far away to save you.

Re:What is that? (2, Interesting)

BeBoxer (14448) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701242)

The JPL page says the straight line is probably a fault or other geological feature, but the absence of any others in that area is a little suspicious.

Actually, if you look at the Hi res TIFF version [nasa.gov] you can see several more of them. None as large and obvious, but I found at least five or so linear formations in that picture. There is a cluster of three at the bottom beneath the obvious one.

Re:What is that? (1)

Rei (128717) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701112)

Looks tectonic - which would suggest at least a reasonably firm crust.

Re:What is that? (5, Funny)

riffzifnab (449869) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701132)

Its a fish fossil. You see, when God created the earth 3,000 years ago he had some stuff left over, so he just thew it in orbit around other planets, figuring no one would ever find it.

Re:What is that? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13701164)

I see these kinds of comments all the time. Who the fuck is the extremist: the creationist or you? Get over it and let it go, please.... (and you get a score: 1)

The Internet has RESURRECTED interest in space! (4, Interesting)

Work Account (900793) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700821)

And it's a good thing!

Cassini was helped to more funding because WE the geeks of Web/Net WANT TO KNOW. We want to see our world, our Universe. We join advocacy groups and science foundations.

Keep up the good work NASA. Let private groups continue as well.

I see a 2nd space renaissance soon!

Expect the unexpected (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13700826)

Was also a quote from Dr Ninestein in the ground breaking sci-fi series "The Terrahawks".

Nothing else? (1, Funny)

eMartin (210973) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700829)

I don't get that second image.

Is that what nothing else looks like, or is that what everything else looks like?

Either way, this article proves we shouldn't make general statements like that, doesn't it?

Re:Nothing else? (3, Insightful)

iamlucky13 (795185) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700914)

I assume it's intended to more generally portray what everything else looks like, that aged and eroded. Contours and features across the solar system generally tend to be smoothed over by erosion or the settling of debris from subsequent meteor impacts. In contrast, Hyperion show's quite a few sharply defined ridges. By the way, I think the second image is taken in infrared, and the color choices for displaying it are even more confusing.

Many uses! (5, Funny)

SkullOne (150150) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700830)

My girlfriend has one of those in the shower, and yells at me when I leave it in the old water :(

Re:Many uses! (2, Insightful)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701029)

My girlfriend has one of those in the shower, and yells at me when I leave it in the old water

That is because you leave all your grimey toy spaceships in the tub
           

Re:Many uses! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13701174)

I guess you're not sponge worthy.

Woah... (-1)

Nuclear Elephant (700938) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700833)

... it looks like uranus.

Re:Woah... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13701067)

No wonder that Cassini returned the photos. I wouldn't want them either. I wonder why anyone sent them to Cassini in the first place? Who's the sick joker at NASA?




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Wrong moon. (5, Informative)

Kjellander (163404) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700849)

The image in the post http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/moons /images/PIA07737-br500.jpg [nasa.gov] is of the moon Tethys and not Hyperion.

It was a double flyby, hence the confusion.

Re:Wrong moon. (-1, Redundant)

CountZero007 (39755) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700899)

That's no moon...

Re:Wrong moon. (0, Redundant)

fakedupe (872465) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701021)

... that's a spacestation! Why was the parent modded redundant and not funny?

Re:Wrong moon. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13701268)

Why was the parent modded redundant and not funny?

Because there a lot of stupid moderators controlled by the Empire

Oh and I AC'd so I don't give a firetruck

Re:Wrong moon. (2, Insightful)

OverlordQ (264228) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700947)

No, it's the 'Right' moon, notice the link text "like nothing else in the solar system", now I'm sure the majority of people might take that to mean "Here's a picture of what other moons look like so you can see the difference", it seems you must have not made that connection.

Re:Wrong moon. (3, Insightful)

uberdave (526529) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701006)

I'm sure the majority of people might take that to mean "Here's a picture of what other moons look like so you can see the difference", it seems you must have not made that connection.

I must not be in the majority then. I took it to mean: "Here's a picture of something you won't find anywhere else in the solar system".

Imagine (5, Funny)

OSXpert (560516) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700859)

Imagine a beowolf cluster of "Thats no moon" jokes...

Re:Imagine (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13701234)

I for one welcome our new joking beowolf cluster overlords.

As usual, slashdot editing leaves a bit (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13700861)

Um, I realize that typing up an article takes work, but perhaps some thought and energy might be used to make things a bit more comprehensible....

The two pictures are from different moons, Tethys (second link), Hyperion (first link). Perhaps reading a caption from the real article at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/index.cfm [nasa.gov] would help

Re:As usual, slashdot editing leaves a bit (2, Insightful)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701049)

Um, I realize that typing up an article takes work, but perhaps some thought and energy might be ...

When you have 99.5% of all your submissions rejected, one tends to lose the motivation.
       

Re:As usual, slashdot editing leaves a bit (1)

Zeph (91283) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701254)

As well, this story was posted six days after the fact [planetary.org].

Anyway, it's a fantastic image of Hyperion. We should launch a manned mission there at once, if only to ski down those pristine slopes of... whatever the hell they are. One of these [starfleet-museum.org] will get us there.

Uh oh... (2, Funny)

slashname3 (739398) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700865)

Travel pictures? Uh, yeah, that would be interesting. It is getting late though. Have a big meeting in the morning. Really, have to go. You have to download the pictures? It will take how long? Their from where?! How far out is that? No really, I have to leave. I can't wait that long to look at trip pictures. Really, big meeting, yes, really big meeting. Bye! [makes a break for the car....]

big crater and then small ones (3, Interesting)

sploxx (622853) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700873)

Having no formal education in planetology does not stop me to spout nonsense on slashdot:

But the first picture looks like there was just big collision (old big crater) followed by lots of small collisions, without any erosion in between. I *think* I have seen similar features on the moon.
To have this picture is nonetheless an astonishing accomplishment.

I think that simply the lighting makes this view impressive :)

Re:big crater and then small ones (2, Interesting)

idlake (850372) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700985)

A big crater like that on a little moon would probably have torn it apart if created by a collision. More likely, all the craters, big and small, are the result of the thing blowing up again and again from the inside.

Weird (1)

EpsCylonB (307640) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700875)

It looks like a microscopic picture of a grain of salt or something, wonder what it would look like if you were standing on the surface...

Re:Weird (4, Interesting)

null etc. (524767) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701042)

It looks like a microscopic picture of a grain of salt or something

If it's a microscopic picture, I have to ask - what browser are you using to view it?

Bad jokes aside, this is what a magnified grain of salt looks like:

(it's pretty enough to make desktop wallpaper)

Re:Weird (1)

jedimark (794802) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701083)

I reckon it looks more like a muddy rock with a couple of barnicles/whatever they are called from the beach..

Well, at least thats what I think they look like.. I can't remember last time I left the comforting glow of my CRT and stood in the searing heat of that bright yellow thing in the sky that makes it difficult to sleep during non-coding periods.

Re:Weird (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13701206)

Obviously they forgot to clean the lense.

conjecture (0)

globaljustin (574257) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700893)

I bet these strange erosion patters are from 'space' itself.  What we think of as space actually has an ambient temperature and isn't a total vacuum, and anything with mass causes friction...so given enough time that could explain the appearance of these rocks.

I have a very bad feeling about this... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13700925)

That's no moon! It's a space station.

Oh please (5, Funny)

colonslashslash (762464) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700900)

Everyone knows NASA faked the moon landings, and this is just a black and white close up of a rice crispy in Mike Griffin's morning cereal! ;-)

Re:Oh please (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13701000)

Mods are mentally retarded.

this asteroid has been renamed (1, Funny)

GoatPigSheep (525460) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700904)

After viewing the pictures of the highly eroded surface, NASA scientists realized it bears a striking resemblance to EDWARD JAMES OLMOS and have renamed the moon in his honour. The moon will now be known as the "EDWARD JAMES OLMOS MOON" in honour of the Battlestar Galactica and Miami Vice star.

Any photos of... (2, Funny)

AnonymousYellowBelly (913452) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700918)

... the Shrike??

Re:Any photos of... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13700939)

:) I'm looking for the Sea of Grass myself....or perhaps the Time Tombs

Re:Any photos of... (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701026)

I heard He was cruising the net, harvesting IIS deployers and impaling them on the Tree of Pain. This is why Apache has > 60% market share now.

Ive scene this. (3, Funny)

Adam Avangelist (808947) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700940)

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/moons /images/PIA07737-br500.jpg [nasa.gov] Iv'e scene this in the toliet bowl after a hard night of drinking and Taco Bell.

Re:Ive scene this. (2)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701088)

Iv'e scene this in the toliet bowl after a hard night of drinking and Taco Bell.

How about we avoid works from The Goatse School of Visual Articulation.
       

something similar on asteroids, (to some extent..) (1)

Bigos (857389) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700953)

The link below shows few strange photos of asteroids. One of them has a strikingly similar (compared to size of the body, and if you take off small craters) big hole like your moon. http://www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/2005/arch05/0507 14asteroids.htm [thunderbolts.info]

Re:something similar on asteroids, (to some extent (3, Interesting)

HermanAB (661181) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701036)

One thing that I have never seen in discussions of cratering, is elastic collisions. Everybody seems to assume that collisions are necessarily plastic: A smaller body smashes into a larger body and the smaller body is pulverised in the process.

However, in the asteroid belt especially, many collisions may be elastic, with bodies bouncing off each other like billiard balls, leaving behind large indentations. This could happen, as these bodies are moving in essentially the same direction and therefore collisions may not always have much force.

Re:something similar on asteroids, (to some extent (3, Informative)

Crouty (912387) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701179)

You don't get craters with elastic collisions as they are a sure sign of absorbed energy. I doubt anything solid ever came out again from craters like these.

Uhmmm. We sure about these? (-1, Troll)

rtrifts (61627) | more than 8 years ago | (#13700965)

I got to admit - these photos look suspicious and alsmot fake.

One looks like a squash or some other type of gourd - the other like rendered coral or a pumice stone.

I'd have a hard time believing these for "real" if they were on Galactica. I'm having just slightly less of a hard time now - but only slightly.

Re:Uhmmm. We sure about these? (4, Informative)

blincoln (592401) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701129)

I think there are two factors at work:

- In space, the lack of atmosphere gives things an "unreal" look in photographs. See if you can dig up the movie that was done by Messenger as it left Earth. It actually looks less "believable" than a modern Hollywood movie in some ways.

- The images are false colour. This is useful for conveying more information, but it does make them look a little "wrong."

For comparison, here's another version of the Tethys shot [nasa.gov]. It looks a lot less surreal, because it's greyscale.

Hate to break it to ya... (1)

null etc. (524767) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701014)

It's weirdly eroded surface looks like nothing else in the solar system seen so far

That's a patently false statement. Walk up to any person with a printout of this photo, and ask them, "Hey, does this look like anything you've seen in the solar system so far?" They'll probably say, "Yeah, it looks like a sponge" or "Yeah, it looks like pumice" or "Yeah, it looks like my mother-in-law's face".

Perhaps it doesn't look like any other celestial body we've seen so far.

Erosion- more like a beating (1)

dreadlocks (637491) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701043)

Erosion? This thing has been beaten up badly by tons of impacts from Saturn's gravity pulling (or intelligently falling for you IDers) all sorts of cosmic debris down onto it.

It looks worse than Noriega's face

Is it too much to ask... (0)

Skreems (598317) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701050)

for a site with however many hundreds of thousands of readers as /. to have correct spelling in its stories? I'm not usually a grammar nazi, but come on.

It's weirdly eroded surface...

You failed it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13701069)

No soup for you!

Re:Is it too much to ask... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13701255)

Sorry, wrong. The story has the correct article form of "its". "It's" is a contraction for "it is".

I'd stick to not harping on other people's grammar if I were you. It is annoying and pointless when people are correct in their complaints. When they're wrong, it is simply obnoxious.

Dan Simmons (0, Offtopic)

Audent (35893) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701052)

For those of you who haven't read Dan Simmons' Hyperion cantos I can't recommend it highly enough...

one of those books (and then series) that actually deserves all the awards/praise heaped on it.

Dan's home page http://www.dansimmons.com/ [dansimmons.com]

The artificial object in the Tethys photo... (0)

Tsar (536185) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701055)

Doesn't that linear object in the upper left of that image [nasa.gov] look like a mass driver [wikipedia.org] of the type that we plan to put on our own moon someday? Perhaps someone's been there before...

<music="xfiles.mid">
Perhaps we've been there before!
</music>

Just kidding, I'm sure it's just an image-processing artifact...

<music="twi_zone.mid">
maybe...
</music>

Looks Like Sublimated Ice (2, Interesting)

Derling Whirvish (636322) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701087)

It looks like the remains of sublimated ice/dirt from hoarfrost or something like that. Or the leftovers from a half-melted snowstorm on the side of the road. I've seen similar effects in the frost of my non-frost-free freezer. Definately not rocks/dirt like the moon or Mars.

IMHO (2, Interesting)

TheHawke (237817) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701139)

I think that this was a bubble of magma that spun off of a world, bubble and seethed close to the sun, then cooled down to a pockmarked, gas bubble fulled rock. Then a asteroid hit opposite of the picture seen here, blasting a good sized chunk off of the surface, leaving that odd bump in the middle of that crater.

A bit much? (1)

lamasquerade (172547) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701194)

While I think it is a good idea for a well regulated market economy to investigate mergers and acquisitions thoroughly, I think sending multi-billion dollar probes to scrutinise Hyperion [hyperion.com]'s recent purchase of Brio [brio.com] to be a bit much...

Thats One Ugly mutherfck... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13701198)

eom

hey, I've played there before (2, Funny)

dlockamy (597001) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701215)

Does the second pic look like a Total Annihilation map to anyone other than me?

wow I know what it is (0, Troll)

sydres (656690) | more than 8 years ago | (#13701298)

that first is an image of a calcified or silicified fossil spongiform the second is an image from a geological cave feature both are being made to look like images from space using black backgrounds and slightly filtered color lenses . just a little of the conspiracy theorist in me speaking
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