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Wilma the Capacitor and Particle Accelerator

CmdrTaco posted more than 8 years ago | from the blinded-me-with-science dept.

Power 238

Sterling D. Allan writes "In a story at the new Open Source Energy Network site, Paul Noel says: "Energetically speaking, the vortex that forms in these storms is also a natural particle accelerator, and a massive capacitor bank. As the harmonic circuit develops, it resonates acoustically and functions as a capacitor, extracting the heat from the storm and transmitting it away. Without this electrical circuit, the storm would fail almost instantly due to the accumulation of heat from condensation of water." He also asserts that understanding these phenomena better could help us harness the power of nature, seen and unseen."

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???wtf (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879586)

huh?

Possible way to kill hurricanes . . . (4, Insightful)

SpeedyGonz (771424) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879587)

before they do any damage to us: Detonating an EMP bomb inside?

Re:Possible way to kill hurricanes . . . (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879637)

before they do any damage to us: Detonating an EMP bomb inside?

Yeah, let's stop hurricanes with nukes!

Re:Possible way to kill hurricanes . . . (2, Informative)

WormholeFiend (674934) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879677)

there are ways to generate electromagnetic pulses without nukes.... not as powerful, but EMPs nonetheless

I can't find the original Popular Science article about it, but the most basic design is an electro-magnet wound around an aluminium tube, with an antenna at the opposite end of the detonator

Re:Possible way to kill hurricanes . . . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13880033)

with dynamite inside the tube, of course

Re:Possible way to kill hurricanes . . . (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879664)

Care factor in Europe ... nothing FB!!!

More importantly... (5, Funny)

fireboy1919 (257783) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879673)

This confirms my long held suspicion that those pseudo-scientific explainations of the Oz effect (that hurricanes, cyclones, and other cyclonic weather phenomena can tear holes in our space-time continuum and send us to parallel earths or back in time) are all totally correct.

Its time to harness hurricanes to establish trade relations with dinosaurs, talking animals, and anything else we can get at through the dimensional rifts torn into existance.

I, for one welcome the chance to become a hurricane overlord.

Re:More importantly... (1)

Progman3K (515744) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879796)

You want to talk to animals?
Frankly, they wouldn't stand a whelk's chance in a supernova.
What does a whelk have to do with a Supernova? It wouldn't stand a chance in one. Sort of like talking animals in a hurricane.

Re:More importantly... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879819)

Oz effect. They made a major motion picture about it, I believe it was...wait for it...

It's the final countdown!
*didudiiiduuu dididi da du*

Re:Possible way to kill hurricanes . . . (1)

jeanicinq (535767) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880039)

EMP or not... Why hasn't the government spent any of it money to destroy hurricanes while they are offshore; instead, they just sit back and watch the destruction. FEMA, SBA, and other agencies make big time bank like billions of dollars for every disaster because people pay to finance or refinance through presidentially declared disaster situations.

Wow (5, Funny)

TheoGB (786170) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879598)

So we could actually find a use for this greenhouse effect we're generating.

Of course, once we use this cheap power we stop making greenhouse gases and our power source dies.

D'oh!

(But no, this is very cool.)

Re:Wow (2, Insightful)

Ignignot (782335) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880041)

You're assuming that the hurricanes are caused by the greenhouse effect. That's quite a leap of faith, in my opinion. We have recently had quite a few hurricanes, but there have been periods in the past where they have been just as bad. If I recall correctly, the year with the record for hurricanes before 2005 happened before weather sats existed, so there were almost certainly storms that were not counted on that year.

And more on topic, I think the big deal would be the ability to stop hurricanes by stopping the electric circulation within them. I can think of hundreds of people who used to be alive in new orleans that would have been alive today with that technology.

Re:Wow (1)

TheoGB (786170) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880091)

Yeah sorry, I was being vaguely flippant with that remark and there's certainly very shaky evidence that it's down to climate change.

Unless you live in 'Day After Tomorrow' land where an Ice Age is more like an Ice Afternoon, so quickly does it happen. :-D

Re:Wow (1)

tdemark (512406) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880327)

Don't confuse the Greenhouse Effect [psu.edu] (good) with Global Warming [wikipedia.org] (bad).

Are you serious? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879604)

The author takes painkillers while the storm is thousands of miles away because of the electrical effects of the storm on his body.

Give me a break.

Re:Are you serious? (1)

Poromenos1 (830658) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879746)

It is because of the chaos theory, butterflies and all that!

Re:Are you serious? (1)

AviLazar (741826) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879751)

It's widely known that people suffer various ailments prior to storms. Maybe it's particularly bad in this person?

They are, but they're cranks (5, Insightful)

Engineer-Poet (795260) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879831)

FTFA [opensourceenergy.org] :
During its transit of Florida, satellite photos showed that areas of the high clouds of Wilma covering more than 1/3 of the state were below -135 F. (The lowest temperature for the IR satellite chart). It was actually close in a large area to -175. Some areas exceeded that. This is what happens when you dump the arctic into the tropics. Explosions happen! The forecast of a weak Cat 1 became a strong Cat 3 due to this temperature shock.
Actually, that's what happens when you take huge amounts of air and loft them tens of thousands of feet; they expand and cool (even as they drop moisture and release heat to power the lift process) and get very cold at their tops.

None of this is strange physics. All of it is accounted for by current weather models. Talk of "particle accelerators" and "capacitor banks" is silly; there's a lot of energy converted to lightning in thunderstorms, but it's small and secondary compared to the heat engine which drives it.

The authors of this piece are first-class cranks.

Re:Are you serious? (1)

derniers (792431) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880147)

it may be "widely known" that folks whine before storms..... but this is just another urban legend and there is absolutely no evidence that arthritis etc is worse when storms approach/leave and studies have shown that there is no correlation between symptoms and weather, and by the way going out in the cold and rain does not increase your chance of getting a cold.....

Kill the storm? (2, Informative)

skyshock21 (764958) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879606)

Is there a way to remove that electrical current then before it hits the shore? Then the storm would "fail almost instantly"?

Re:Kill the storm? (1)

chrisnewbie (708349) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879906)

A nuclear explosion could have that effect but it would also kill a lot of people.

Re:Kill the storm? (2, Funny)

Patrik_AKA_RedX (624423) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880218)

It's just going to make the storm more powerful. You've got to find something much more far fetched to deal with a storm. E.g. Scaring hundreds of birds on the beach and have them fly right into the storm. If that doesn't work, try pinguins. If even pinguins don't work, you'll have to have the hero to jump from a plane into the eye of the storm with a bucked of water, ductape, 6 marbles, his trusted knife, some rope and toilet paper. If the hero can't jump, his love-of-his-life is an acceptable replacement.

Re:Kill the storm? (1)

pklong (323451) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879934)

Even if you could would you really want to. You mess with nature at your peril, who knows what long term effects dissipating storms would have. There are enough nutjobs around claiming that cloud seeding is the cause of some historical floods as it is.

At last (3, Funny)

Moby Cock (771358) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879616)

He also asserts that understanding these phenomena better could help us harness the power of nature

At last, a coherent argument for global warming and climate change.

Re:Global warming link to hurricane activity (1)

grqb (410789) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879903)

The link between global warming an hurricane activity isn't quite there yet...they need more data, which means they need more destructive hurricanes.

Here's a good overview [thewatt.com] of the current thinking with the link between hurricane activity and global warming. Basically they can't prove the link between the number of hurricane's that make it inland, but it seems as if a link between hurricane strength and global warming is there. Since the 70's the number of class 4 and 5 hurricanes have gone steadily upwards.

Re:Global warming link to hurricane activity (1)

Neck_of_the_Woods (305788) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880254)


Is it not also true that hurricane patterns run in cycles. Thus every 20 to 30 years there is a cycle and they also believe there is a secondary cycle. In the 120 year range.

We don't have records dating back very far on how stonge hurricane are, we don't have a clue how many there have been outside of the last 100 years, and those are just in 1858 it felt like 140 mile per hours winds!

Anyway my point being we have no constructive data about hurricanes at all in the range that we need them to have any idea if this is just not a normal cycle. By the time we figure it out it will be to late anyway.

Peace out hippies.

Neck_of_the_Woods -- lives in Florida, right in the eye of the storm.

What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell? (5, Informative)

Phanatic1a (413374) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879622)

Could Slashdot's editors please learn to tell the difference between science and pseudoscience? Is it too much to ask that editors, if not posters, RTFA?

Check this bullshit out:

On a more personal note, some years ago I sustained a back injury due to an auto accident, which appears to have made me more sensitive to coming weather changes. In the week before these storms I start swallowing Tylenol or similar painkillers because the symptoms make it hard for me to sleep. This was not barometric because at the time there nothing of that sort had yet been detected in my area. It is electromagnetic.

Here is a clue for the detection of the process. The capacitance charge was forming that set up the storm, and it was this charge causes me pain! It is known as dielectric stress. Because this concept is outside the reductionistic-chemical paradigm that governs the drug industry, this not usually discussed by medical science. But those who work with cellular bio-electricity will understand this concept. This dielectric stress clearly affects chemical reactions and energy conversions in bodily cells, in addition to being well known to engineers for its effects on electrical systems and materials used in electronic devices.

A good indicator for scientific and commercial development is the discovery of a natural process like this. If the number of "hits" from doing a search on "dielectric stress" is any indication, the control and measurement of this process is a subject of great interest for scientists and engineers working in technology development and quality control.


What a heaping plate of crud. This is embarassing.

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (0)

dascandy (869781) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879718)

If the number of "hits" from doing a search on "dielectric stress" is any indication

Nope, it isn't.

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (1)

dascandy (869781) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879730)

hm... then again, it could well be:

http://www.google.com/search?q=%22dielectric+stres s%22&meta= [google.com] => 917 hits.

Wrong (3, Informative)

everphilski (877346) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879782)

That Dielectric Stress your google hits are talking about is "electrostatic force divided by the area" in a capacitor, which is a known system and yes occurs. What this guy talks about is hokey and not at all the same. Pure BS.

-everphilski-

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (3, Funny)

shotgunefx (239460) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879791)

I get 529 hits on google.

Then I typed in "cheese fetish" and got 936, lol

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (1)

BushCheney08 (917605) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879990)

Just make sure you don't use that term in an image search... : p

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (1)

raoul666 (870362) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880188)

From the bottom of my heart, I genuinely thank you. It's been a crappy week, and somehow "cheese fetish" made me laugh so hard I cried. Thanks.

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (1)

jkrise (535370) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879719)

What a heaping plate of crud. This is embarassing.

Actually I found this as lucid and useful as the "Executive Summary" and 'Mitigating Factors' in a Microsoft Security bulletin ;-). Dielectric Stress my foot. I guess if people lack basic scientific knowledge or even a scientific temper, any nonsense can be written as if it were gospel truth!

Unless the author of the piece is himself at the vortex of the storm, he isn't acting as the dielectric in the capacitor that is the storm. His fevered imagination is probly the cause of all the dielectric stress.

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879731)

I'm more shocked that it got through when the article submitter works for the source website. Surely waiting for some qualified thirdparty to confirm the news isn't nonsense would've been wise?

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (5, Insightful)

utexaspunk (527541) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879775)

I'm more shocked that it got through when the article submitter works for the source website. Surely waiting for some qualified thirdparty to confirm the news isn't nonsense would've been wise?

Are you new here? Practically every other article is submitted by a party related to the article source websites. Nothing here is really news, but more just fodder for discussion. Or at least bitching (as the case may be here).

Imagine you're at the nerd table in high school, and people are continually coming up to the table peddling their wares or ideas. Maybe a couple people at the table chime in with something they heard in the news every now and then. In any case, it's all subject for discussion. We can talk about how something is crap, discuss the implications about this or that, or at least see if we can make milk come out someone's nose. That's really all /. is about. If you're coming here expecting a peer-reviewed scientific journal, or actual journalism, I'm afraid you're in the wrong place.

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879834)

Ah, sorry, and yes, I am rather new at discussing here. This one just threw me because I'm just more used to seeing news stories submitted that have been covered elsewhere (e.g. the BBC or New Scientist) which adds an extra layer of editorial filtering.

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879757)

Yeah, I'll go with pseudoscience on this one. It's pretty interesting how it combines good science with out-of-this-world inferences ("tidal forces of the moon" becomes "zomg! moon causes aftershocks!" and "dielectric stress" (which isn't even a true "stress" in the mechanical sense of the word) becomes "hey, my knee hurt before the hurricane therefore the storm must be a capacitor because only dielectric stress could have hurt my knee")

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (1, Interesting)

CyricZ (887944) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879807)

While his analysis might be incorrect, how do you know that his back is not affected by weather changes? Indeed, that is often something that is reported by people who sustain injuries.

When I was young, there was a farmer down the road who took shrapel in his knee in WWI. Just before a storm came his knee would swell up, and right after the storm was gone it'd stop. You could sit there watching it happen. Now, I'm not sure why it happened. But it did happen, and it happened frequently.

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (2, Interesting)

Phanatic1a (413374) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879827)

Indeed, that is often something that is reported by people who sustain injuries.

No shit, really? I've never heard that.[/sarcasm]

Sparky, what makes it bullshit is his analysis, which involves claims that it's because of the dielectric stress of a storm that's hundreds of miles away. Pretty much every single statement in his article is purest, unmitigated, grade-D bullshit.

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (0)

CyricZ (887944) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879893)

Well, now you know.

And no, his potentially incorrect analysis does not make this phenomenon itself "bullshit" (to use such an uncouth word). Much like the incorrect analysis of alchemists didn't "invalidate" the various phenomena of chemistry. After all, perhaps in the future we'll find that he was correct, and you were not. It's something that has happened many times before in the history of science. He who is wrong violently attacks those who suggest alternative theories, and yet the alternative theories turn out to be completely correct.

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (4, Informative)

Phanatic1a (413374) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880027)

Yeah, yeah, yeah. They laughed at Einstein, they laughed at Edison, but they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.

This guy's in the Bozo brigade. I'm not disputing that his back aches. I am disputing the wealth of bullshit in the article:

However, managing dielectric stress on the body is "controversial" i.e. pooh-poohed by authorities. But this does not stop independent inventors from creating and offering for sale various devices which are intended to mitigate this stress, whether to make interior spaces more comfortable for sufferers (ref.), or to attach to cellphones (ref.), or to be worn on the body such as purple plates (ref.), orgonite pendants (ref.), and diodes (ref.). It is up to users to examine the data presented in support of these devices, and to decide for themselves whether to get these devices and run them through various investigations of their own, and or to use them personally. The "Harmonic Protector" (ref) did not register any activity using an "orgone meter" (ref). However, a reading taken using a sophisticated software package known as "Life Assessment" technology (ref), which is designed to analyze the balance of energies in the meridians, indicated a modest beneficial effect from this HP when it is interacting with a human body. (Ref)


He's a bullshit artist, and he's selling a product. No different than Simpson & Son's Patented Energizing Moisturizing Tantalizing Romanticizing Surprising, Herprizing Revitalizing Tonic. The term might be vulgar, but it's a hell of a lot more to the point than just calling it "snake oil."

Alternative theories (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13880077)

There is nothing wrong with having an open mind to alternative theories.

However, alternative hypotheses require strong evidence to be accepted.

Let's look at the facts here. Paul Noel had back pain in the weeks leading up to Wilma hitting Florida. We don't know how often he has back pain, but lets assume that this pain was distinctive, call it "storm pain". So Paul is having storm pain in the weeks before Wilma hits Florida. Now, where was Wilma during this time? Wilma was a tropical depression in the middle of the Atlantic. Currently, there are a number of tropical storms in the middle atlantic (Alpha and Beta). Is he having the pain right now? If his pain truly has a range of many thousand miles, how often does his pain pick up snowstorms in Canada? Or Pacific cyclones? Does the range depend on which storms are being covered on TV?

In addition, his idea that it is electromagnetic in nature is easily testable. The electromagnetic spectrum is easily measured by someone with the proper equipment. I understand that he may not have access to this kind of equipment, but he shouldn't be telling us that it is electromagnetic in nature as some kind of default. There are plenty of things going on in the world, and just because you don't know what it is doesn't make it electromagnetic. Perhaps he is actually picking up hurricanes with his pain, but he is doing it with seismic waves. Too bad that he 'just knows' that it is electromagnetic - he could be looking in the correct place if he didn't 'just know' the wrong answer.

I have an alternative hypothesis also. I think that his back pain is caused by something other than hurricane Wilma. I think that something in the local conditions in Alabama (which had a cold front come through at the same time that Wilma hit Florida, which dropped the temperature by a good 20 deg F) may have had more to do with his pain than a storm which got lots of media coverage. He could record which days he had back pain and what type, so that he could then draw correlations using weather records. That would be a good beginning. After he has correlations then he could make a theory of what the mechanism was, and try to test it. Then random people on the internet wouldn't be calling him so pseudoscientific, and his alternative theory might have a chance. Until he does something like that, you are wasting your time with him.

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (1)

XenoChron (855784) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880020)

I thought his bull warranted a much higher grade than a D!

Hmm... the submitter... (2, Informative)

Cl1mh4224rd (265427) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879830)

Here's his website [sterlingdallan.com] . Quite an interesting mix of websites he administers there...

Re:Hmm... the submitter... (2, Informative)

swillden (191260) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880195)

Quite an interesting mix of websites he administers there...

That's an understatement. Check out some of his articles:

George W. Bush was Complicit with the 911 Attack on America [patriotsaints.com] .

Was President Bush Behind Katrina? [greaterthings.com] . Lest the title fool you into thinking Allan considers this a question:

U.S. Black Ops and other colluding extra-governmental shadow-entities have obtained significant mastery of weather engineering after decades of practice. The same cabal that brought us 911 has now brought us Katrina, to push the U.S. and the rest of the world closer to Marshall law.

This guy is a fruitcake. And he doesn't know how to spell "martial law".

sounds like text from a course (2, Funny)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879908)

taught by the local Life University here in Georgia, oh they teach "Chiropractic science"

http://www.life.edu/Chiropractic_and_Wellness/what _is_chiro.asp [life.edu]

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879927)

Dude. This guy knows what he's talking about. When I was a kid, I used to cut electrical cords in half, strip off the contacts, plug into the wall and touch the bare leads to my tongue. Ever since then, I've been ultra sensitive to approaching hurricanes. However, there is a capacitive effect, so I have to "recharge" every so often. Here, let me demonstrate... *snip* *strip* *strip* *plug* ... ok, ready or not, here goes ... @#*(@#$+--=+++ATH NO CARRIER.

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879951)

This must be a new form of advertisement in Slashdot...it's basically a blatant ad...

Re:What the hell is this? Seriously, what the hell (1)

phlegmofdiscontent (459470) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880094)

"Because this concept is outside the reductionistic-chemical paradigm that governs the drug industry, this not usually discussed by medical science."

Of course it's outside the reductionistic-chemical paradigm, because it's crap! I'll file this one in the same place I file the Electric Universe theory and the UFO's-riding-behind-Comet-Hale-Bopp theory.

Particle Accelerator (2, Funny)

kevin_conaway (585204) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879626)

Well, I guess as long as Wilma doesn't cross the streams with Alpha, we should be OK.

Re:Particle Accelerator (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879706)

Total protonic reversal.......

pooh pooh (-1, Redundant)

Wargames (91725) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879632)

'nuff said.

I call bullshit (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879642)

don't bother to rtfa - just another rant by some kook that failed high school physics

(spend the 30 seconds on something a bit more meaningfull like solitair)

I call BS (3, Insightful)

kyle90 (827345) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879646)

This looks like it's a lot of big words (which the article writer doesn't even understand) and not much science.

Functions as a capacitor (5, Insightful)

JumperCable (673155) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879660)

"and functions as a capacitor, extracting the heat from the storm and transmitting it away." -Article The author doesn't have a clue what a capacitor is.

Re:Functions as a capacitor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879765)

Maybe Wilma will be used to produce a flux-capacitor and travel back in time in order to prevent global warming and therefore possibly Wilma herself...? Still capacitors store energy rather than transmitting it (or whatever this article's trying to say) so this article's lost me.

Similarly, I thought a "particle accelerator" was something like a cyclotron, where you have large currents and magnetic fields causing charged particles to feel a force that gets them to near the speed of light...

Definitions (1)

bradleyland (798918) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879941)

Capacitor - An electric circuit element used to store charge temporarily, consisting in general of two metallic plates separated and insulated from each other by a dielectric. Particle Accelerator - A device, such as a cyclotron or linear accelerator, that accelerates charged subatomic particles or nuclei to high energies. It's almost ridiculous the way the author used the terms. Here's how I break down his relationships: Capacitor - A hurricane gathers energy from the warm ocean waters as it crosses the equatorial Atlantic regions. It releases this energy as it hits shore. Particle Accelerator - I don't know. Maybe he read the dictionary.com definition and picked up on cyclotron and though, "Cyclotron, tropical cyclone.... ah hell, same difference. Let's run with it!"

Old Expression (0, Redundant)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879665)

What was that old expression .... "Don't screw with Mother Nature"?

Re:Old Expression (1)

Maavin (598439) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879869)

In this light, most politicians look like milfhunters nowadays...

Of course he's right! (4, Funny)

Dekortage (697532) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879693)

The thing he's wrong about is the causes of these electrical phenomena. It's definitely Russian-made electromagnetic generators operated by the Yakuza [mosnews.com] . If we really want to harness the power of hurricanes, we simply need to find these generators and either (a) destroy them or (b) sell them to Third World dictators to destroy each other with.

Re:Of course he's right! (1)

qwertphobia (825473) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879767)

I heard it was the Japanese...

Check out Weather Wars [weatherwars.info]

Re:Of course he's right! (1)

utexaspunk (527541) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879818)

The Yakuza are the Japanese Mafia [google.com] .

Re:Of course he's right! (1)

Technician (215283) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880116)

It's definitely Russian-made electromagnetic generators operated by the Yakuza.

From the article;

The generators emit a soundwave between three and 30 megahertz and Stevens claims the Russians invented the storm-creating technology back in 1976 and sold it to others in the late 1980s.

HF shortwave radio anyone? I seriously doubt you can spawn a storm with a shortwave radio.

Ironic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879697)

That a site called opensourceenergy uses IIS. (Well that and the tylenol thing)

Whisky Tango Foxtrot? (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879707)

The storm supposedly needs to lose heat energy to keep operating? I thought it was the other way around.

Re:Whisky Tango Foxtrot? (1)

PGC (880972) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879801)

maybe its processing is based on an exothermic chemical reaction :P

That's about the only thing they got right. (2, Informative)

Engineer-Poet (795260) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880057)

A hurricane is a heat engine. Heat engines need heat sinks to get rid of their waste heat. Ergo, a hurricane needs to lose heat, QED.

Re:That's about the only thing they got right. (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880068)

Thanks, (non-chemical) thermodynamics isn't my strong suit.

Re:That's about the only thing they got right. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13880226)

Don't think I'd put it as loosing heat - it is moving heat from a hot place to a cold place. Thermodynamics requires that the entropy increase, not that the enegy is lost.

I was inside Wilma (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879729)

With winds gusting to 125MPH I was inside of Wilma as it battered Ft. Lauderdale. I can tell you for a fact and from personal observation that this guy is one of those psuedo intellectual types that does not know squat about what he speaks.

Just for the record, although I was able to get to Jacksonville after the storm, there are still millions of people in the greater Ft. Lauderdale and Miami area that have no power. The lack of power makes it so that they are unable to get gasoline and therefore they can't even leave. There are other shoratages as well and the damage is massive.

As usual, Slashdot reports on "news that matters", some twat prattling on about hurricanes as particle accelerators. Real funny when the particle is an aluminum car port coming at you at 105MPH.

Re:I was inside Wilma (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13880157)

I'm glad to see you were able to raise your electromagnetic shields in time to avoid being crushed by this aluminum menace, and survive to tell the tale!

Re:I was inside Wilma (1)

dzarn (760066) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880257)

There are other shoratages as well and the damage is massive

It almost seems as if someone should have foreseen this, and ordered an evacuation!

Seriously, what happened to personal responsibility? CNN's front page has a quote - "All that time. This is all we get?" You've been watching this happen for the last THREE MONTHS in EVERY OTHER STORM. Did it not occur to anyone that if they were too stupid/lazy/egotistical to evacuate, they should have gathered some basic necessities (i.e. water & food) to last them a few days until FEMA could get their shit together. If you are too stupid to evacuate, and too stupid to fill your bathtub with water, and too stupid to buy an economy pack of batteries and flashlights, then QUIT BITCHING about how the rest of the country isn't jumping fast enough to slow down evolution by helping you live.


(Not necessarily directed at the parent, just at everyone down there who is complaining)

Particle accelerator (2, Funny)

PGC (880972) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879734)

Energetically speaking, the vortex that forms in these storms is also a natural particle accelerator ... you can say that again ...

See also (1, Funny)

tenaciousdRules (518041) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879736)

Heat. Friction/Wind Resistance. Gravity. Barometric Pressure.....dsa zx xasdsfht Oh, I fell asleep, slammed my head on the keyboard, and awoke to realize this is really boring. Sorry.

To: CmdrTaco: Re: Your recent story submission (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879742)

Wilma the Capacitor and Particle Accelerator ... Rejected

Wilma's in the Spacetime Continuum (2, Funny)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879763)

As soon as the cyclonic windspeed hits 88MPH, spacetime is warped back to 1985 [imdb.com] . Turning slightly within the eye as it passes allows jumping to various other babyboomer moments in the 1950s. Surf's up!

Re:Wilma's in the Spacetime Continuum (1)

Old Sparky (675061) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879810)

Instead of a modified DeLorean, maybe Mr Noel needs a Moller Skycar!!!

Energy problems solved (1)

squoozer (730327) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879774)

So what this guy is trying to say is that we should attach a piece of wire with a key on the end to a kite and fly it into the storm thus tapping the stored enegry. This will not only provide us with a huge amount of free energy but disapate the storm as well. Cool.

I'll wait while this numb skull goes and tries his ideas out.

Hurricane = Heat+Water Engine (3, Insightful)

LaCosaNostradamus (630659) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879786)

"Without this electrical circuit, the storm would fail almost instantly due to the accumulation of heat from condensation of water."

The flow of heat and water in hurricanes is well enough understood. I'm sure electrical discharges play a part in most storm mechanics, but even if a hurricane had ZERO discharges, its massive "humidity engine" would still run.

I don't know where these guys come from, where they think that electromagnetics are the ultimate macro-scale drivers of weather events.

Re:Hurricane = Heat+Water Engine (1)

kyle90 (827345) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880177)

"I don't know where these guys come from, where they think that electromagnetics are the ultimate macro-scale drivers of weather events."

He must be one of the "electric universe" types.

Nutters (4, Informative)

igb (28052) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879794)

The "Harmonic Protector" (ref) did not register any activity using an "orgone meter" (ref). However, a reading taken using a sophisticated software package known as "Life Assessment" technology (ref), which is designed to analyze the balance of energies in the meridians, indicated a modest beneficial effect from this HP when it is interacting with a human body. (Ref)

Since when did Slashdot become home to new age nutcases? Orgone Accumulators make great songs for Hawkwind and Kate Bush, but as physics it's not a basis for anything other than providing something to laugh at.

ian

Open Source Energy Network (1)

CyricZ (887944) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879857)

Actually, this person is somewhat involved with the Open Source Energy Network [freeenergynews.com] . It's open source, even if it isn't software, so it's on-topic here at Slashdot.

Re:Nutters (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13879946)

Orgone Accumulators make great songs for Hawkwind and Kate Bush, but as physics it's not a basis for anything other than providing something to laugh at.

Hmmmmm, Einstein's theory of relativity anyone? (:

Re:Nutters (2, Funny)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880001)

I, for one, welcome our new crystal-meditating, homeopathic, dope-smoking, touchy-feely, psuedo-scientific overlords.

Re:Nutters (4, Funny)

meringuoid (568297) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880124)

I, for one, welcome our new crystal-meditating, homeopathic, dope-smoking, touchy-feely, psuedo-scientific overlords.

Hey, me too. New Age girls are easy.

I don't get it (1)

weegiekev (925942) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879828)

I don't point of this post? I looked at the article, and thought it was a comment on how abused the phrase 'Open Source' is becoming. What exactly has that site got to do with licensing and source code? It gets even more amusing given that the site appears to be run on a prepackaged microsoft product. Bizarre.

Best... understatement... ever. (2, Insightful)

lpangelrob (714473) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879897)

It did damage and frightened people.

Best understatement for a major hurricane hitting a populated area... EVER.

Stop this insanity. (1)

TREETOP (614689) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879928)

I call shenanigans on the author. Everybody line up in two rows with your baseball bats ready and we'll start him running down between you. First one to knock him down gets his name here in the hall of fame. Remember, allow for swing room with your neighbor! (This is how we should take care of psuedo-scientists who post idiocy for the world to read)... In other news today, the US Supreme Court overturned a car....

Electric Universe again? (2, Informative)

alanw (1822) | more than 8 years ago | (#13879938)

Sounds very similar to the bunkum proposed by the Electric Universe nutters, and mentioned in many previous Slashdot postings.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_Universe_mod el [wikipedia.org]

The most desirable woman who ever lived (1)

ishnaf (893700) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880014)

Hurricane Wilma was (at its peak), the most intense hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic Basin. In all probability, Wilma Flintstone is the most desirable woman who ever lived [reddwarf.co.uk] . Coincidence? No. They both have large electromagnetic fields, which causes dielectric stress (Energetically speaking).

WHY!!! (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880078)

Why is this on slashdot? This is just as bad science as many creationism sites.
Why can't we moderate the actual stories! This should be a -3 Stupid.

On killing hurricanes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13880126)

A lot of people are talking about "killing" hurricanes as if it's not something that has been tried before.

It was previously theorised that if you could induce a hurricane to precipitate it would lose energy and dissapate. They tried this out by chucking some powder stuff into a hurricane. The hurricane did stop sooner than they expected, but not before drastically changing direction and devastating an unprepared area.

I'm sorry I don't have any sources for this as I read it in a book when I was little, but I'm sure somebody here should know about it.

-RadioElectric

On the same topic (1)

kurbchekt (890891) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880202)

Here's another interesting article [weeklyworldnews.com] about Katrina.

Global Warming relief? (2, Insightful)

NewKimAll (923422) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880208)

I've read articles that claim hurricanes actually help expend the energy built up in the oceans from the sun. If we were able to stop hurricanes from forming and could just keep them as Tropical storms, could the Earth gain too much energy over time? I don't really have the answer as it is just speculation, but maybe, just maybe, hurricanes happen for a good reason. So if we mess the weather too much, I expect bad things to happen far worse than just a few hurricanes every year.

Slashdot needs a new category icon: the duncecap (3, Informative)

Engineer-Poet (795260) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880269)

This article is bunkum.

The proper role of an editor is to properly categorize material which is suitable for the publication, and reject that which is not. Taco's judgement in this case is, shall we say, questionable. The source website is full of logical and scientific garbage, so it doesn't belong in the science category. The talk of "particle accelerators" is bunkum too, unless you are talking about phenomena like sprites and jets [alaska.edu] which also occur in thunderstorms (and are at least somewhat understood but still under research), or perhaps if you are talking about particles from shingles and 4x8 sheets of plywood up to whole trees accelerated to 150 knots. Thus it doesn't belong in the hardware category either. And it takes itself far too seriously to be funny.

There really is no legitimate Slashdot heading under which this piece fits. Accordingly, I suggest a new one: the duncecap. This is for articles (or editorial decisions to post articles) which are too stupid for words, and to properly categorize such errors in judgement rather than throwing them down the memory hole.

Any editor posting a mis-categorized article which really ought to be filed in "It's stupid. Ask your editor why this is here" should have to wear a real duncecap during the performance of their duties for the next 24 hours. That sort of reminder is necessary to keep editors from shirking their responsibility to be, you know, editors.

Obviously, /. needs a new icon (1)

wowbagger (69688) | more than 8 years ago | (#13880303)

Obviously, /. needs a new icon.

Well, what /. needs is editors who have some background in the scientific method [wikipedia.org] .

Well, what /. really needs is editors [wikipedia.org] .

But I digress.

What /. could use is a new icon for stories like this. I propose this [wikipedia.org] (suitably cropped). /. also could use a new section for stories like this - may I suggest "sqrt_minus_bs_squared.slashdot.org" - for "imaginary [wikipedia.org] bullshit [wikipedia.org] ".
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