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Search for Copernicus Over

CowboyNeal posted more than 8 years ago | from the lost-and-found dept.

Space 188

blamanj writes "Nikolaus Kopernik, aka Copernicus, father of modern heliocentric theory, was buried in Frombork Cathedral (Poland) after he died in 1543. However, the cathedral's tombs were a mess, and it was unclear exactly where he was. Archaeologists now believe they've found his remains, and are planning to do DNA testing to verify. The search began in 2004."

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FP! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948550)

Sick

Hmmm (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948553)

"Nothing for you to see here, please move along."

Somehow that error seems very appropriate for this article.

Re:Hmmm-er (what a setup!) (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13949121)

was buried in Frombork Cathedral (Poland)... and are planning to do DNA testing to verify.

In other news, hundreds of Polish women, claiming to have the name Monika Lewinski volunteered to orally participate in the DNA testing of the corpse.

OK, no more polish sex jokes... Sorry, couldn't resist.

will they dig up the bones? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948556)

and auction them off on Ebay?

Re:will they dig up the bones? (3, Informative)

Phroggy (441) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948891)

and auction them off on Ebay?

That's actually against eBay's policy [ebay.com] .

check out that portrait (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948561)

Do you get the impression that old Kopernick was the sort of chap that would run down the street screaming pretty much anything, and maybe he got the heliocentric theory thing right just by coincidence?

"Apples will set your house on fire!"

"Birds and dogs mate and give birth to lizards!"

"By rubbing together two sticks, I created cheese!"

"The Earth revolves around the sun!"

"Bannanas are SATAN!!! SATAN!!!"

"Abolish underwear!!!"

Re:check out that portrait (4, Insightful)

Vo0k (760020) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948612)

Nope. He did a lot of research in order to present the theory. Being a priest, he wasn't in such deep shit as Galileo or Giordano Bruno, but still he was smart enough to have his finding published after he died :)

Re:check out that portrait (2, Informative)

cbv (221379) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948840)

He did a lot of research in order to present the theory.

That is only half of the truth. He actually was kind of a copy cat, citing from Sphaera mundi (among others) written by Johannes de Sacrobosco, and presenting the ideas as his own.

One of the effects of his theft-of-thoughts is the unfortunately still common opinion that people during the so-called Dark Ages believed that Earth was flat -- they did not (the notable exception being Kosmas Indikopleustes, Laktantius and Severianus of Gabala).

Re:check out that portrait (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948925)

Umm. Not quite.

You should not apply current views of knowledge to earlier times when the entire paradigm wa different. Nowadays we prize independent and inovative thinking - as the Greeks did around 500 BC. During the Middle Ages and up to the Renaissance, however, this was not the case. All human knowledge was believed to have already been revealed, either in the Bible or the 'wisdom of ancients', and the job of an intellectual was to extract this knowledge.

So prior authority was not only important - it was critical. You HAD to cite such authority for your ideas, otherwise they could not be accepted. Producing your own ideas with no authoritative backing was seen as a sin similar to fabricating your base data nowadays. Intellectual giants like Roger Bacon fought against this approach in favour of the experimental method, but it was not really overcome until the 1700s. This is why all writings of this period cite earlier authority.

School histories of Galileo and others are always done in complete ignorance of the mediaeval mindset, and end up portraying all his opponents as a set of unthinking morons - they were most decidedly not. However, I suppose simple ideas make better television!

Re:check out that portrait (0)

cbv (221379) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948989)

Yes, but there IS a difference between citing (and indicating that you DO cite) and selling the idea (of someone else) as your own. Kopernikus did the latter.

Mod parent up (1)

Darkman, Walkin Dude (707389) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949149)

Fucking hell, would you PLEASE log in and collect your karma... this is one seriously good comment.

Re:check out that portrait (4, Informative)

Digz (90264) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949272)

Actually, Copernicus was encouraged by the Church. Galileo's fault was that he insisted on calling those people who didn't accept his theory (purported to be fact, even though he could not prove it) morons - including the Pope. During his trial, it was repeatedly stated that the charges would be dropped if he could provide proof for his theory - but he could not. The Church also offered a middle ground - accepting heliocentrism as a hypothesis - even superior to the geocentric one - until more proof was forthcoming.

http://www.catholiceducation.org/articles/apologet ics/ap0138.html [catholiceducation.org]
http://www.catholic.net/rcc/Periodicals/Issues/Gal ileoAffair.html [catholic.net]

Can we let this myth die?

parent not troll (1)

janek78 (861508) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948687)

Come on people, the parent is one of the funniest posts in this discussion and you moderate it TROLL?? Bananas are SATAN!!!

First Prime Factorization Post (1, Offtopic)

2*2*3*75011 (900132) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948566)

1543 is prime.

Re:First Prime Factorization Post (2, Funny)

stud9920 (236753) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948661)

Yeah but the search started in 2*2*3*167

Re:First Prime Factorization Post (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13949327)

Sure, it's off-topic, but 867-5309 is prime.

Somehow I doubt Tommy Tutone knew that.

He looks a bit like.... (3, Funny)

teewurstmann (755953) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948572)

... James Cromwell [imdb.com] , the actor from the movie "Babe" [imdb.com] , you know, the one with the talking pig... I bet Copernicus couldn't understand or train pigs, but he sure understood that the earth isn't the center of the universe.

Re:He looks a bit like.... (0, Redundant)

titla1k (875330) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948577)

Training pigs, understanding the universe isn't the centre of the universe. It was all the same back in those days...

Re:He looks a bit like.... (1)

micpp (818596) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948760)

I think you might have to give up your geek credentials for describing James Cromwell as the actor from Babe rather than as Zefram Cochrane from Star Trek: First Contact.

Re:He looks a bit like.... (1)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948816)

... or even from "Revenge of the Nerds" [imdb.com]

Coulda been worse (1)

Albinoman (584294) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948833)

He couldve described him as the dead guy from I, Robot.

Re:He looks a bit like.... (1)

lotus_out_law (878076) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948890)

Good. Now they know where to search for the relatives...

Why should we care? (5, Funny)

gowen (141411) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948575)

The world doesn't revolve around Copernicus, you know...

Re:Why should we care? (1, Insightful)

ehiris (214677) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948610)

Because he had the balls to stand by what he believed in! It might seem like nothing for you now but it is people like him that got us to this point.

Re:Why should we care? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948663)

We care about his contributions to the world, but why should we care which remains are his?

Re:Why should we care? (4, Funny)

Deanalator (806515) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948690)

Well, if we want to make an all-star physicist basketball team, we don't want to clone the wrong guy now do we?

Re:Why should we care? (1)

Gibberx (631490) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949070)

"Unbeknownst to most historians, Einstein started down the road of professional basketball before an ankle injury diverted him to science"

Gotta love The Far Side.

Re:Why should we care? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13949011)

  Joke >>>>>>>>>>>>

        O
       \|/   <<<< You
       /\

Re:Why should we care? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13949162)

So to honor him we dig him up and drag his remains around the world?

Re:Why should we care? (2, Insightful)

JesterXXV (680142) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949384)

There should be a "-1 (Didn't get the joke)" moderation for comments like this.

Re:Why should we care? (1)

dascandy (869781) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948613)

If the world did revolve around him, would he get dizzy?

Re:Why should we care? (-1, Redundant)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948616)

Insightful instead of funny moderation, plus a snippety comment bashing you for bashing Copernicus?

It's almost like /.'s lost its sense of humor.

Re:Why should we care? (0, Offtopic)

kyrre (197103) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948623)

Insightful? I think parent was going for funny.

Re:Why should we care? (1)

tinpan (591424) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949373)

but the whole world revolves around someone...
Copernicus Was Wrong [apple.com]

DNA Testing... (5, Insightful)

MrFlannel (762587) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948582)

Yes, well, we've got these bones. And we're going to test them to make sure they match with the known DNA sequence of Copernicus.

Alright, so, they track down known relatives... problem is, 500 years? Thats what... 25 generations?
"Yes, this man is Copernicus's Great-great-great-....-great-grandson. We can see they both have green eyes. This woman is his great-great-...-great-granddaughter, twice removed. We can see by this DNA that they're both left handed. So, of course, these must be is bones!"

Not to mention he didn't have any kids of his own. Which just quarters the probabiliy of similarities.

Or did I miss something? Anyone know how accurate this will actually be?

Re:DNA Testing... (3, Informative)

gxv (577982) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948598)

They want to compare Copernicus DNA with the DNA of his uncle Lukasz Watzenrode, bishop of Warmia. But first they have to find his grave. There is a catch though. They dont know where is his grave yet...

Re:DNA Testing... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948667)

We should just clone him and see how smart his pollacks turn out!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copernicus

Re:DNA Testing... (3, Interesting)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948602)

Anyone know how accurate this will actually be?

Seeing that they claim to be able to extract DNA from these bones, I imagine they could raid the burial sites of his known relatives of the day, and their descendants, right up to the present day.

That way you would get a trail of DNA from the past to the present, which would make matching easier.

Re:DNA Testing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948783)

And, when all is said and done, they'll have raided a bunch of grave sites for basically no fucking reason.

Huzzah? Profit!

Re:DNA Testing... (5, Informative)

Oxen (879661) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948658)

I haven't read the article, nor am I at all informed as to the specifics of this case. However, they may be able to find a relative with the same mitochondrial DNA or the same Y-chromosome as Copernicus. Both of these pass unchanged from generation to generation.

A person only inherits mitochondrial DNA from his mother. Using this principle, if we know someone who has descended entirely maternally from a common female ancestor of both him and Copernicus, we can check to see if it is Copernicus.

The same thing goes for Y-chromosomes and men. This is done surprisingly frequently with historical figures. It was done with the Thomas Jefferson/Slave [pbs.org] thing and also with Anastasia Romanov. There is a caveat, however. You cannot distinguish between relatives, so even if it tests positive, it could be Copernicus's brother or another relative in the same genetic umbrella.

-Mark

Re:DNA Testing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948810)

Anastasia Romanov had Y-chromosome ?!?

Re:A Cynical Response... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948944)

Copernicus' brother/decendants wouldn't be buried in this cathedral's crypts.

Re:DNA Testing... (4, Informative)

Max Nugget (581772) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948664)

>> Yes, well, we've got these bones. And we're going to test them to make sure they match with the known DNA sequence of Copernicus.

From TFA:

"The grave was in bad condition and not all remains were found, Gassowski said, adding that his team will try to find relatives of Copernicus to do more accurate DNA identification."

I imagine they're talking about finding the graves of his dead relatives, not living descendants. If you find a skeleton that you have independent reasons to believe is some particular relative of his, and the DNA from that skeleton happens to corroborate that relationship when compared to the "Copernicus" DNA, you've increased the accuracy of the Copernicus skull substantially, because the chances of the relative being misidentified AND happening to have the correct DNA relationship with the suspected Copernicus DNA is miniscule, so long as the evidence leading you to the relative's remains was unrelated to the evidence that pointed you to Copernicus' remains, and provided the remains aren't buried, for example, right next to his (if they are then you've got nothing because any group of people buried together are likely to be related).

And, not from TFA (from me):

They may also be able to examine the DNA for certain genetic features that match up with aesthetic and non-aesthetic traits that are historically known about him.

I was about to say they could also compare the DNA attributes with the aesthetic attributes of the skull, but then I slapped myself in the head for not realizing it would be self-referential since that's where the DNA came from. =)

Re:DNA Testing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948937)

Scientists can't determine physical attributes from DNA yet. There are a few trivial things they can figure out, but complex physical attributes require such a complex interaction that we haven't made any headway yet.

Re:DNA Testing... (1)

drewxhawaii (922388) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948692)

i was also wondering how this was going to be accomplished

Re:DNA Testing... (1)

Vo0k (760020) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948710)

Not to mention he didn't have any kids of his own.

At least ones anyone else than their mother and -possibly- him would know of.
He was a catholic priest. Celibacy, that kind of stuff.

Re:DNA Testing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948787)

choir boys can't have babies

Re:DNA Testing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948863)

Its been proven recently in a study that being left handed is more training than genetic. Nerve centers can be retrained so that you can write with the opposite hand, 10 minutes a day for a month and you can write fluently with the other hand.

Re:DNA Testing... (1)

Nyh (55741) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949077)

"Yes, this man is Copernicus's Great-great-great-....-great-grandson. We can see they both have green eyes. This woman is his great-great-...-great-granddaughter, twice removed. We can see by this DNA that they're both left handed. So, of course, these must be is bones!"

This will be very hard. Being a priest, Copernicus didn't have any childern of his own.

Nyh

Re:DNA Testing... (1)

LaughingCoder (914424) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949122)

Of course this only works if it *ISN'T* the OJ Simpson Trial jury doing the analysis. A perfect match - odds are one in a zillion - nope, I still don't believe it's him. What else ya got?

Re:DNA Testing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13949321)

The problem is that he was a friar and he shouldn't has any relatives.

Comments and Documentation (5, Funny)

GodOfCode (878337) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948584)

This shows us how important it is to properly comment and document the code we write!

how they found him... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948585)

did they use copernic search?

He must still be alive! (5, Interesting)

stirz (839003) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948589)

I've seen two photos of the reconstructed head over at German "Spiegel online [spiegel.de] " and I the first thing that came to my mind was: "That's James Cromwell". Just compare some photos [google.com] on your own. The similarity is really amazing:-)

Regards,
Stirz

Re:He must still be alive! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948723)

Dunno about looking like James Cromwell but in the reconstructions, he sure looks pissed about something.

Re:He must still be alive! (1)

clockmaker (626182) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948791)

Maybe they got James Cromwell's DNA by mistake.

Re:He must still be alive! (1)

stirz (839003) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948849)

Clockmaker, you must be watching too much sci-fi series... :-)

Read carefully: they did not clone Copernic, but only reconstructed his face like by forensic means. If you are interested in a quite similar case (and dare to open another German website [rp-online.de] :-) ), you might be interested in the reconstruction of a pirate's face, which could be the famous German pirate "Klaus Störtebeker". They used a nearly 600 year old skull and quite similar procedures. However, DNA-analysises are still an option to clearify ancestory aspects.


Regards,
Stirz

Finally! (4, Funny)

nihilogos (87025) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948605)

I'm sure we'll all sleep better tonight.

I didn't even know he was missing? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948636)

I didn't even know he was missing?

Wrong - Mikolaj Kopernik (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948647)

It should say Mikolaj Kopernik aka Nicolaus Copernicus aka Nikolaus Kopernik

This just in... (4, Funny)

aussie_a (778472) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948648)

the search for people who care has now begun.

Re:This just in... (1)

Auckerman (223266) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948866)

"the search for people who care has now begun."

I really don't see a reason for digging this guy up. I wonder how many graves were desecrated to fullfill someones desire to look at his bones and say "yup, that's him". They are going to need DNA of close relatives, they're gonna get dug up too.

Death is a very private experience, one that is between a person and their god(s) (or lack thereof for that matter), and in my humble opinion, there really should be a compelling reason to go digging up someones grave. I don't think seeking conformation of where his bones are centuries after the fact qualifies.

Maybe I'm just a radical, one of those people who think Indian burial sites are sacred ground (someones known religious views override a valid scientific interest). It's a shame someone was so intent on finding his body, they showed no respect for their death.

Re:This just in... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13949346)

What exactly do Indian burial grounds have to do with a Polish priest?

DNA testing? (1)

the bluebrain (443451) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948665)

... so maybe they can clone him. And set him up ... in orbit around something.

But seriously - how do they test his DNA? "Yup. It's DNA alright!". Do they compare it to a vial of authentic Copernican spit they acquired on 5th avenue? Do they round up his offspring and run a poll? (or should I just RTFA and shuddup?)

Wanted Dead or Alive (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948674)

This man has been accused of corrupting the youth by claiming the Sun is at the centre of the Universe and by instigating revolutions. Considered extremely dangerous. If you've seen this man, please call your local law enforcement or scientist.

Intelligent Falling (2, Funny)

stud9920 (236753) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949058)

If you agree with heliocentrism, you have to agree to Kepler's law, and to explain them you have to approve the THEORY of gravitation, which is bullshit. Everyone knows the one true model is Intelligent Falling.

We're not in Kansas anymore (2, Funny)

totallygeek (263191) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949164)

This man has been accused of corrupting the youth by claiming the Sun is at the centre of the Universe and by instigating revolutions. Considered extremely dangerous. If you've seen this man, please call your local law enforcement or scientist.


I thought they would have disconnected Internet access to Kansas by now!

Damned smartass historians. (3, Interesting)

Vo0k (760020) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948676)

I'm Pole, and obviously we had more focus on Copernicus in our schools than the US kids (not to mention our schools serve about thrice the amount of knowledge...)
So we were taught the life and findings of Copernicus, and as for his death, we were informed that his corpse lies in the Frombork Cathedral.
Now I wonder if any kid on a visit to Frombork asked the teacher to see Copernicus' tomb, what would they do? "ups... well, we KNOW he is in the cathedral... somewhere..."

Re:Damned smartass historians. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948771)

I'm a New Zealander, we were taught Copernicus at school on this this lunar lander game for the Amiga 500. It was arcade and quiz, and the game must have only had about 10 questions because Copernicus came up dozens of times. And, at the age of 9 or something, Copper-nickers was pretty damn funny. -- stupid story guy

Re:Damned smartass historians. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948913)

I'm Pole

Is that a kinky way of saying you're gay?

Re:Damned smartass historians. (0, Flamebait)

pstils (928424) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948920)

I'm english and we were taught that pythagoras had already devised his heliocentric theory and copernicus just copied it and got the credit. does anyone care where pythagoras is buried?

Re:Damned smartass historians. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13949062)

"Thrice"... is that like ice, but different? I wish they wood hav taught me that at skool.

Re:Damned smartass historians. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13949253)

I love comments like these. So you've done an analysis and schools there serve 3x more information, eh? If you think that's a measure of quality, then I pity you. I've gone to school in both Europe and the States and I didn't think it was any more challenging over there... There are a lot of factors that determine the quality of education in either place, but I guess that's over your head. Sheesh! And Europeans think that WE'RE arrogant, dumb and ethnocentric...

Sorry, I don't mean to denigrate the achievements of the great nation of Poland...

It is now official - Astronomy is Dying (2, Funny)

bugg (65930) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948714)

One more crippling bombshell hit the already beleaguered astronomy community when slashdot confirmed that Copernicus, in fact, is dead.

You don't have to be a Galileo to predict astronomy's future. The hand writing is on the wall: Astronomy faces a bleak future. In fact there won't be any future at all for astronomy because Astronomy is Dying.

Astronomers are the most endangered of them all, with over 90% of all great astronomers dead. There can no longer be any doubt: Astronomy is Dying.

Let's keep to the facts and look at the numbers.

Re:It is now official - Astronomy is Dying (1)

micpp (818596) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948857)

Netcraft confirms it!

Who is this guy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948718)

He seems to have no importance what so ever...

If his dead body doesn't contain the cure for .... (-1, Flamebait)

Zeio (325157) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948728)

If his dead body doesn't contain the cure for cancer, something is wrong with the world.

I'm all for hearkening to the past and knowing how history, culture and famous individuals gave rise to things, but seriously.

Cancer, HIV, science, medicine, fusion, fuel cells, efficiency issues - you name it - we got problems that can be solved. I don't see how marking Copernicus' grave is going to help one whit.

Re:If his dead body doesn't contain the cure for . (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948847)

Yes, let's invade Iran, it's more cheaper and will get a cure for cancer!

bi7ch (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948735)

As the old verse says (4, Interesting)

Flying pig (925874) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948779)

(Apologies for spelling errors this is from memory)

Der Himmel nicht die Erde umgeht
Wie die Gelehrten meynen

Muss jeden Mann sein Wurm gewiss
Kopernikus des seinen

(roughly The heavens do not go round the Earth as the learned held. Every man will get eaten by worms, even Copernicus)

I'm an American conservative christian... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948794)

and, dammit, now we can get him to answer for all this heliocentricity gobbledygook.

Can someone explain (1)

hapoo (607664) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948797)

Can someone explain how a DNA test is going to prove he's Copernicus? What are they going to compare it to? Do they have a sample of Copernicuses DNA from the 1500s on hand?

Burn Heretic Burn (1)

chiok (858005) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948803)

Father of modern heliocentric theory? BLASPHEMER!!! BURN HIM!! (Cremation will do)

I for one.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948814)

I for one welcome the ebay auctions =)

I happen to live in Via Copernico, in Milan Italy. (2, Interesting)

spamhog (705867) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948834)

...and Leopold von Sacher-Masoch
grew up on Copernicus Street in Lvov,
which I think was part of Austria-Hungary at the time.

We have a 6-m wide paraboloid for space comms right atop the condo here.

Time to plan a street party.

Who do I write to if I want to borrow a relic for the occasion?

A phalanx or a pair of teeth would do fine.

Was search perhaps founded by... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948845)

http://www.copernic.com/ [copernic.com] ?

Copernic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948875)

How many freaks out here use the software Copernic Agent as a search tool?

Again /. is late! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13948897)

It was discovered a long time ago [www.ne.jp] . No wonder.. it's rather big!

trekkie quote: (1)

toQDuj (806112) | more than 8 years ago | (#13948949)

He's dead jim, but not as we know it. not as we know it. not as we know it. He's dead jim, but not as we know it. not as we know it, cap'n.

(cue refrain)

Plus ca change (2, Insightful)

FishandChips (695645) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949032)

These days they mess up old bones in old cathedrals in order to put somewhere on the map and provide an attraction for thousands of credulous visitors from all over the world.

In the Middle Ages they messed up old bones in old cathedrals in order to put somewhere on the map and provide an attraction for thousands of credulous vistors from all over the world.

Let the old guy rest in peace. Why should he want a thousand cheap busts and other trinkets knocked out in his name in the local tourist shops? Modern scientists: the religious relic traders of yesterday had nothing on them.

State of the tombs (3, Funny)

base_chakra (230686) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949064)

... the cathedral's tombs were a mess

I can vouch for this. Dirt everywhere! It was appalling.

Copernicus, dead at 532 (4, Funny)

Ph33r th3 g(O)at (592622) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949131)

I just heard some sad news on talk radio today. Famed astronomer and scientist Copernicus was found dead in his cathedral tomb today. There weren't any more details. I'm sure everyone in the Slashdot community will miss him - even if you didn't enjoy his work, there's no denying his contributions to popular culture. Truly an heliocentric icon.

search is over ?!? (1)

GreekPimpSlap (925925) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949134)

i love how the Title states that the search is over but TFA says that it could possibly be the remains. sounds like the author of the story purchased the following:

Tom Smykowski: "It's a 'Jump to Conclusions Matt'. You see, you have this Matt, with different CONCLUSIONS written on it that you could JUMP TO."

Michael Bolton: "That is the worst idea I've ever heard."

Samir: "Yes, this is horrible, this idea."

heliocentric theory (0, Flamebait)

RoverDaddy (869116) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949139)

Gee, if it's just a theory it could be wrong! Our schools should be open-minded and teach the geocentric theory as well!

Re:heliocentric theory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13949386)

SHHHH! You want them to hear you?

Bah! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13949192)

You could at least try to get his name right!
If you want the Polish, it's Mikolaj Kopernik.
Or if you prefer German, Nikolaus Kopernikus.
You've got a mixture of the two.
Bah!
AND Bah! for not letting me put in a Polish striped l too!!!
BAH!

coincidence? conspiracy? (2, Funny)

TreeHead (553584) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949211)

Copernicus [yimg.com] ...looks strikingly similar to... Dr. Zefram Cochrane. [absolutenow.com]

Uncanny resemblance! (1)

parasonic (699907) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949236)

Wow, does anyone else find Copernicus's reconstruction to look a lot like Zefram Cochrane?

Copernicus [yahoo.com] looks a little too much like Dr. Cochrane... [planetspace.de]

Scar (2, Funny)

flatass (866368) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949289)

Gassowski said police forensic experts used the skull to reconstruct a face that closely resembled the features -- including a broken nose and scar above the left eye
 
In the computer generated image, the scar is actually above his right eye.

James Cromwell in Copernicus - The Movie (2, Insightful)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 8 years ago | (#13949370)

http://www.nndb.com/people/144/000024072/james-cro mwell.jpg [nndb.com]
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/40982000/jpg /_40982156_portrait_afp203.jpg [bbc.co.uk]
Separated at birth? You decide....
In any case it is interesting that Copernicus or Kopernik continued his studies of astronomy as a hobby and not as a profession.
Good Copernicus quotes:

For I am not so enamoured of my own opinions that I disregard what others may think of them.
I shall now recall to mind that the motion of the heavenly bodies is circular, since the motion appropriate to a sphere is rotation in a circle.
Moreover, since the sun remains stationary, whatever appears as a motion of the sun is really due rather to the motion of the earth.
The earth also is spherical, since it presses upon its center from every direction.
The massive bulk of the earth does indeed shrink to insignificance in comparison with the size of the heavens.
We regard it as a certainty that the earth, enclosed between poles, is bounded by a spherical surface.
and finally....
To know that we know what we know, and to know that we do not know what we do not know, that is true knowledge.

BRILLIANT!
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