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Eight Year Old Physics Student Admitted to College

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the so-much-for-a-social-life dept.

Education 644

paris writes to tell us that The Korea Herald is running a story about Song Yoo-guen, the youngest university student that Korea has ever seen. At eight years old Song is already talking about building flying cars and defying Newton's law of gravity while others his age are attending the first grade. He completed his elementary, junior-high, and high school curricula in just nine months, something that usually takes 12 years, and has been admitted as a freshman to the physics department of Inha University.

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644 comments

Dang! (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961693)

Dang!

Re:Dang! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961704)

Who's that, a close relation?

proof that K1-12 is a crock of pooh (2, Interesting)

cheekyboy (598084) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961733)

K1-12 is designed to keep things slow and to the level of the teachers.

Kids can learn faster and do it all well, its just the system is designed to make
robots and YES MEN.

The system cannot handle dynamic progress per student, its a FORD assembly plant.

Maths can be sped up 50 fold, first 5 years is ridiculously slow/low tech. Kids can learn 8 years in 12months.
History - that takes more effort/knowledge of the earth, tho skip the bit about remembering dates and its faster.
Languages - well , the whole language can be broken down in 1 4hr lesson into a massive 1 foot sized flow chart and rules, the rest are just like learning C++, all the verbs and nouns and functions.

Re:proof that K1-12 is a crock of pooh (3, Insightful)

slashjunkie (800216) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961767)

Languages - well , the whole language can be broken down in 1 4hr lesson into a massive 1 foot sized flow chart and rules, the rest are just like learning C++, all the verbs and nouns and functions.

I don't know what your C++ coding is like, but as a person who has learned three additional (natural) languages, I can say that learning to speak a foreign language is not just about technical grammar. Pronunciation, syllable stress, and most importantly understanding colloquial meaning or implied meaning play a major role. These things are not so easily expressed as a flow chart.

Re:proof that K1-12 is a crock of pooh (1)

Punboy (737239) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961802)

Actually,I'd compare spoken language to COBOL. Seriously, have you looked at a piece of COBOL?

Flying cars are nice but.. (1)

Adult film producer (866485) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961694)

Too bad he's not involving himself figuring out how to make 50% efficient solar panels.. with him on the darpa team, they could probably be making these panels for $1.00 within 3 years. Good luck to him though.

Re:Flying cars are nice but.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961712)

talking about flying cars at 8 years old is nothing strange, i loved transformers

Re:Flying cars are nice but.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961780)

He's off to a good early start towards becoming a harebrained crackpot inventor.

Kidding, kidding.

Re:Flying cars are nice but.. (2, Insightful)

tkittel (619119) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961722)

> Too bad he's not involving himself figuring out how to make 50% efficient solar panels..
> with him on the darpa team, they could probably be making these panels for $1.00 within
> 3 years. Good luck to him though.

One could always hope, but so far he has only proven that he is extremely good at absorbing and using existing knowledge.

Whether he will also be able to come up with new insight and fresh solutions remains to be seen. One can always hope of course!

(Noticed how I tried really hard to avoid the word "innovate"... and failed in the end of course).

Pointless (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961695)

He's so nerdy that he won't be getting laid at all in college.

Doogie Howser, PhD (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961706)

"Dude, did Doogie Howser just steal my fucking car?!"

/Harold and Kumar...

Re:Pointless (2, Funny)

ravenspear (756059) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961707)

Well I would hope not, he's fucking 8 years old.

That would be disturbing.

Re:Pointless (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961833)

Congratulations on...
a) Completely missing an obvious joke
b) Getting modded up of for chiding said obvious joke
and
c) Being the only person on slashdot wise enough to realize that sex with an 8-year-old is "disturbing"

Stay the course, Big Man - You're doing Super!

Prediction: (1)

StarKruzr (74642) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961837)

He'll do great until he hits 11 or 12, i.e. puberty. Then he will suddenly be overcome by impulses he's going to be extremely frustrated by - who out there is going to actually be his equal?

Will self-destruct during adolescence.

Wow. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961696)

And I thought only old Koreans get admitted to college.

In Korea only old people? (-1, Troll)

hobotron (891379) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961698)


Looks like you trolls need to get with the times.
heh.

Re:In Korea only old people? (4, Funny)

marcello_dl (667940) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961752)

You kinda wasted the joke, that way... let's see:

"In Korea only old people don't understand the superstring theory"

or

"Imagine a beowulf classroom of these!"

You insensitive clod.

OK I give up (5, Funny)

guardiangod (880192) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961700)

He surprised professors by explaining the Schroedinger equation, which is of central importance to the theory of quantum mechanics.

Oh my god, to think that a 7 years old best me when it comes to learning the good old Schrodinger equation...

Someone please bury me.

Re:OK I give up (5, Insightful)

tct25 (615976) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961713)

Hang on, explaining or regurgitating what his parents told him? All this smacks of publicity stunt... both for the anxious parents (it'll help junior in our hyper-competitive society) and a middling Korean university (at best).

Re:OK I give up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961726)

Yoo-geun's dream is to make flying cars, based on the superstring theory - an attempt by science to explain all particles and forces of nature by representing them as vibrations of tiny strings.

Case closed.

Re:OK I give up (1)

Mathiasdm (803983) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961741)

Oh my... We just talked about this in Chemistry, but we're not supposed to even know the equation.
*dies*

(1st year Engineering student)

mm delicious (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961701)

gotta be the kimchee

Blow Job (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961702)

Did he get a blow job when he graduated high school? I did. If you grow up too quickly you'll miss the best things in life!

Re:Blow Job (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961746)

Did you really have to tell us what your mother gave you as a graduation present?

Re:Blow Job (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961758)

I've heard of parents buying their kids cars when they graduate, but a blow job? You mum must really love you... ewww....

Re:Blow Job (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961776)

his mom really loves me too!

happy for him (2, Insightful)

sontek (927618) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961703)

Although this is a great opportunity for him, Kids at that age have a lot of development ahead of them and jumping right into college might hinder some social growth

Re:happy for him (1)

erbmjw (903229) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961742)

Depends on the conviction of his parents ... I know of one family who has an exceptional son {though not at this level} and the mother required him to regularly attend activities for children his age. He was against it at the time, but after about half a year he became very interested/involved in his "kids" activities { scouting, basketball, hockey}. It allowed him to relate better to his sisters and for the older kids he went to school with to realize he still was a little boy.

Re:happy for him (2, Insightful)

HappyEngineer (888000) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961753)

You honestly think this kid would grow up normally if you let him stay with other kids his age? When I was growing up I always felt like I was surrounded by idiots. I'm sure this kid would feel that only times a thousand. It'd be like forcing an average kid to spend 12 years in special education classes with the mentally handicapped.

Re:happy for him (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961801)

When I was growing up I actually was surronded by idiots...

Re:happy for him (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961823)

Yes, throw him in with the other kids so he can learn about cooties and kickball for 8 years, and then be ostracised to the /. crowd.

No friggin way. Eulers and Newtons are once in a generation, it's in his/our best interest to give him a chance to unlock his full potential.

ah well (2, Insightful)

Triv (181010) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961705)

So much for letting the kid grow up.

Re:ah well (5, Insightful)

MoonFog (586818) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961738)

Is this worse than drafting or buying a very young sportsman? Whether you play soccer in the English Premier League at the age of 16 or you get a PhD at the age of 16 you will not be able to grow up in the same way as others, but with that kind of talent comes certain issues. If they hold him back and force him to "be his age", it will most likely severly hurt his intellectual growth.

Re:ah well (2, Insightful)

RoboPimp_3000 (921614) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961794)

I can see several differences. One is that an athlete only has a limited amount of time to make use of his gifts. A scholar, if he isn't overworked, will presumably be as talented, if not more so, as he gets older. So there's really no need, IMO, to rush through education. Another difference is that a 16 year old athlete probably has spent a healthy amount of time growing up with kids his own age. I don't know if a kid who enters college at 8 has that same opportunity.

And really, once he gets his PhD, what's he gonna do? Work? You've got the rest of your life to work, kid. Enjoy your childhood while it lasts.

Of course, if this is what he really wants to do, and isn't being forced into by his parents, then good luck to him.

Re:ah well (4, Insightful)

HappyEngineer (888000) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961788)

Why do so many people think it's so awesome to be a kid? Being a kid sucks! Life doesn't get good until you get into college. It sounds to me like this kid is skipping the crappy parts of growing up.

Annoying (2, Insightful)

rm999 (775449) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961708)

I really hate it when kids rush through their education. What some people don't realize is school is just as much about growing maturity as it is about growing the mind. Yeah, this kid may be smarter than the average college student, but he is going to miss important aspects of life like having friends and interacting with other people his age, which is arguably more important than college.

Re:Annoying (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961747)

er...why ? what gives?

its not the end of his life . he can still play with the neighbourhood kida , go camping and all that jazz....

for a kid like that college would not be too taxing and he will have plenty of time to do what he wants.

and this is what he has chosen, not something forced upon him.... if he wants to reprioritise his life.. then good for him

Re:Annoying (1)

rm999 (775449) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961799)

In my experience, people like him won't take college lightly and will not have free time to go camping with his non-existant friends.

Re:Annoying (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961750)

I think that at this point this transcends rushing through ones education. Rushing through ones education means being in college at 16. This kid is 7 and knows what most people don't as adults. I think that it would be stupid to keep him in the sandbox for another 10 years when he is clearly capable of more.

Re:Annoying (1)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961768)

pfft, as if that could ever happen. I mean, come on, who's ever heard of a scientist [stephenwolfram.com] becoming a smug bastard because he was rushed through highschool and allowed to enter college early. Seriously, it's not like you can just be a jerk and still be treated with respect. You're certainly not gunna found any multimillion dollar companies [wolfram.com] and publish your own book [amazon.com] because everyone with half a brain thinks you've lost it -- whilst the other half of the scienfic community think you might be onto something if only they could figure out what [usf.edu] .

Re:Annoying (5, Interesting)

arvindn (542080) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961789)

I'm from India, and we have kids doing this a lot back there, especially in math. I once talked to a math professor who's met some of these kids and who actually knows what he's talking about, and he says most of the time they are not even remotely qualified to be enter university, even though they might be somewhat precocious. Usually the parents make the kid do it because they are publicity whores, and the university plays along for the same reason.

Re:Annoying (1)

Dogun (7502) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961811)

Don't be so quick to judge. If he's that far above his classmates, there's a damned high chance he'd not fit in so well. He's already destined to be screwed up if that's the case, so you might as well make sure that his young adult life is productive and get him working towards that Ph.D and out of his flying car dreams.

Re:Annoying (4, Informative)

addie (470476) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961819)

As an English teacher in Korea, I can assure you that this isn't unusual. Most of my students go to school from 8 am to 8 pm every day, and come home to study. Missing out on developing social skills and never learning how to have fun is the norm, rather than the exception. That aside, you're absolutely right that putting this child in University is not at all the best thing for him. Until Korea's voracious appetite for over-education calms, there will only be more of this. Someday they'll notice a correlation between time spent learning/working to their suicide rate.

That said, many schools are phasing out school on Saturday over the next two to three years.

Not so fast.. (2, Insightful)

mikerm19 (809641) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961709)

Actually, at least in America, this could be a bad thing. There is a lot of experience you gain and a lot of things you learn about friendships, daily life, and relationships that is only obtainable by going through what everyone else goes through.

Not that I don't think that it is awesome that he is a prodigy as such, but will he not be lacking a lot of "street smarts?"

I know, spelling and grammer...

Re:Not so fast.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961723)

BS. The only thing I learned about dealing with people in school was that nobody liked a smart kid and how to avoid being bullied incessantly by looking nobody in the eye and walking with my head down.

If this kid is around older kids who've grown out of bulltying he might actually grow up to be more normal than I did. Sure he might not know what Pokemon #101 is, but I think inventing faster than light travel is a better goal in life. :-)

Re:Not so fast.. (1)

cdn-programmer (468978) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961829)

I had the same experiances. In addition to having to sit for literally years in a class full of people who could not understand the maths - and hense I was not challenged - I was bullied as well. In the adult world this would have been called assult and battery which is a criminal offense.

What social benefit is there for having to endure a prison system.

Re:Not so fast.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961737)

> Actually, at least in America, this could be a bad thing. There is a lot of experience you gain and a lot of things you learn about friendships, daily life, and
> relationships that is only obtainable by going through what everyone else goes through.
wait, does that mean you DIDN'T get beaten up all the time in high school while having no friends at all?

Re:Not so fast.. (3, Interesting)

RITMaloney (928883) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961774)

but will he not be lacking a lot of "street smarts?"
You're right. He'll surely need to learn how to shuck and jive if he's ever going to make it on the mean streets. Hopefuly he takes time to play Grand Theft Auto.

Stupid Kid (0, Troll)

sljgh (742290) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961716)

I could totally kick his ass. Man, that would be fun - just pushin' him down over and over again. And don't give me any of that Korean martial arts crap, I'd just spend all day pushin' him down. Maybe kicking him some, yeah kickin' sounds good too.

Stupid Mods (-1, Troll)

sljgh (742290) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961734)

I'll push you down too. One push to a mod, one push to a korean. Laugh, laugh, laugh then repeat.

Re:Stupid Mods (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961786)

You try it and I'll push you down a flight of stairs.

*crosses fingers that anonymous posting doesn't undo my mods*

flying cars? (3, Interesting)

cryptoz (878581) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961718)

I thought *all* eight year olds talked about building flying cars? Seriously, I know I did! I swore I'd never have to learn to drive since by the time I was old enough, we wouldn't even have cars anymore. So much for that. And poor, poor child. Pretty soon I bed he'd give anything to be "normal".

Re:flying cars? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961760)

Yes, there's error in the original article. It should read: He's still talking about flying cars and flying like a superman.

Ok ok... I'm a bit envious.

Lacking (1, Interesting)

WhatsAProGingrass (726851) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961727)

"The interview was conducted mainly with the senior Song since Yoo-geun is lacking in his ability to communicate with adults."

How can he be a college student if he can't communicate with adults? If his parents forced education on him, which the interview doesn't really say they due but you can only guess, isn't that a form of child abuse?

Re:Lacking (3, Interesting)

yfkar (866011) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961790)

It seems to be the nature's law that if you're really a genius in some aspect, you must suck at something else.

Re:Lacking (1)

Errandboy of Doom (917941) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961821)

Yeah, I hear DaVinci was absolutely wretched at royal tennis [wikipedia.org] .

And it's an old anecdote about Einstein's struggles with... what was it... yeah, mortality.

Benjamin Franklin: very embarassing laugh, terrible dancer.

Stephen Jay Gould: liked quiche. Very sad.

Re:Lacking (1)

Errandboy of Doom (917941) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961830)

Stephen "Ironman" Hawking is the only exception, he's a perfect specimen. But he's mostly machine now anyway, so that's hardly fair.

Re:Lacking (1)

tavilach (715455) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961841)

Gosh: If only it worked backwards, too. What a genius I'd be in one area what with sucking in all the others!

with all due respect (5, Funny)

dermusikman (540176) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961728)

At eight years old Song is already talking about building flying cars and defying Newton's law of gravity while others his age are attending the first grade.

i was dreaming up flying cars and defying gravity in first grade. and riding dinosaurs... oh ya.

Re:with all due respect (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961839)

LSD is a crazy drug man...

What's the hurry? (1)

RoboPimp_3000 (921614) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961739)

I always hear about child geniuses entering college before they hit puberty, only to never be heard from again. Seriously, what do they do after they graduate? Most likely, they burn bright for a few years and then are burnt out by the time they're in their teens. Why not give them time to let their emotional maturity catch up to their intellectual maturity? What's the rush?

That's a really intersting question (4, Interesting)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961754)

I wonder myself from time to time - what happens to these people you hear of accellerating through school like this? It seems like they must be capabile of some incredible things... do they just end up in some really esoteric sidetrack of acadamia? Are there any books or studies detailing what has happened to past kids like this?

While this is wonderful and all... (3, Insightful)

USSJoin (896766) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961748)

I'm sorry, but I can't help but wonder how screwed up this kid will be at oh, say age 25 or so. One of the most important things my parents did for me when I was young was prevent my school district from having me skip... well, about 10 grades. Not as fast as this child, but nonetheless.
The reason? Simply that there are other things in life besides simply rushing through academics. There are issues which can't be handled simply from an academic perspective-- each day the engineers among us solve some new problem while thinking "outside the box," and this kid won't be able to do that. Because he doesn't have an "outside," he has what he's learned in books.
So I'm of mixed feelings on this one: on one hand, I'm happy for him, because he obviously has great potential, and parents that support him.
On the other hand, the best superstring theorists in the world, can't work for more than a few, perhaps 5 at a stretch, years from their start at that level. They simply burn out, every one. So if at 14, this kid's entirely burnt out... will it have been worth it?

Re:While this is wonderful and all... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961763)

What do you mean he can't think outside the box? THe kid is talking about making flying cars possible using string theory by creating anti-gravity because he believes that if gravity exists, then an opposite force must also exist.

I know a lot of so-called scientists who merely scoff at the idea of this, and scoffed a the concept of string theory, and still scoff at it.

This kid doesn't scoff at the idea. Maybe he doesn't scoff at any ideas. IMO, that's thinking outside the box. Being open to new ideas, and then investigating them without prejudice which blinds you to ideas which sound crazy, but turn out to be right. This kid has an advantage over other scientists, not a disadvantage.

Bull. Shit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961749)

It doesn't take just intelligence to become an outstanding mathematician, physicist or other scientist. These fields require a lot of knowledge on top of that, and you just don't have that at age eight, not even if you spent your whole life at the library. The kid might have impressed some people with his cognitive abilities, but there's no way he's learned everything that is asked of every other student. Also, when was the last time you took propaganda from a country like Korea at face value?

Re:Bull. Shit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961792)

Also, when was the last time you took propaganda from a country like Korea at face value?

South Korea.. not North..

Re:Bull. Shit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961838)

Not the same, I know. But South Korea is technically at war with the mother of all enemies, communism, so excuse me while I order a metric ton of salt.

Like many other kids... (4, Informative)

Dark Coder (66759) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961755)

he will grow up to be socially retarded.

Many studies have shown that rushing kids through grade levels without adequate peers will result in socially developmental retardation and, in some cases, detoriation.

Small price to pay to get the brain for the society as a whole.

Re:Like many other kids... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961824)

It's not going to matter if he went to college or rotted in school with kids his age. The fact is he's too smart to be with them as they can't relate to what he's talking about, so he's going to be messed up either way. Better not to stifle his mind let him talk to some people who can communicate with him about some things and get him a good shrink to keep him from going nuts. Hopefully, his social skills won't suck and he can learn some hobbies that he can share with people his one age as he gets older.

Hah! (5, Insightful)

msormune (808119) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961756)

I talked about building flying cars at the age of 6. In fact, I built one. It amazing what legos and some good old childhood imagination can do.

Re:Hah! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961772)

I suspect at that time you couldn't simultaneously pass an equivalence test for high school.

Something Missing? (5, Insightful)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961764)

"The interview was conducted mainly with the senior Song since Yoo-geun is lacking in his ability to communicate with adults."

Something tells me that he might no be ready for college just yet. . .

Common problem (1)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961806)

Ok so the term common is a little loose here since there aren't many prodigies like this, but he's not the first. Social and communication problems are fairly common. Why? Well these kids aren't born with an adult brain. Their logical side is, hell it's that of a very bright adult. However the emotional side is not, it's still that of a child. It makes for a really weird disjoint that leads to social problems.

I mean try to imagine, if you can, posessing the knowledge you do now, but without the experience that has come with it. Then further try to imagine being ruled by the strong emotions of a child. Look at the things that upset children, the things they need, that are so different from adults.

Re:Common problem (1)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961828)

I think kids like this are similar to child actors. Sure, this is their time to shine, but ten years from now they'll be washed up drug attics wishing they could have their childhood back. It's not fair.

Re:Common problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961836)

imagine...posessing the knowledge you do now [while] being ruled by the strong emotions of a child.

And this is different from how I am now in what way?

Wanna see my tallywacker?

This is great but... (3, Insightful)

knightrdr (685033) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961770)

I feel pretty bad for this kid. After all, he will never have a normal life. I've known a genius who burnt out and worked a crappy job. I'm not saying that will happen with this kid, but I fear that there is a strong chance that he will crack at some point. Imagine living your whole life around people who are so much "slower" than you that they might as well be retarded for all intents and purposes. He will likely relate to adults better than kids, which is going to be hard because so many will envy him. There will be many who are threatened by his precociousness. Think of Good Will Hunting x 20. He will never know what it is to have a normal life and that may cause him to envy "normal" people to an extent. That being said, I really hope he does well and can find a good core group of people who will guide him and treat him well. This kind of makes me think that reincarnation truly happens....

Not necessiarily a prodigy! (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961778)

This feat has been accomplished before. Children of only average intelligence, if they are drilled at early enough age, can master the basic GED curriculum by eight years old. They tend not to do well in university however as they usually have not developed the abilty to think critically and independantly. A teenager coming up with a nobel prize worthy idea is a prodigy. An eight year old who gets into university is just an example of a yet to be identified form of child abuse.

oh the jealousy (1)

atari2600 (545988) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961782)

You guys are all jealous because he gets to meet all the older chicks without having the Tom Hanks machine and stuff. *ducking and running*

Re:oh the jealousy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961805)

You should be ducking and running. That was the dumbest thing I've ever read.

Re:oh the jealousy (1)

atari2600 (545988) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961810)

Dumbest thing you heard eh? I already feel sorry for you nerdling. Oh the power of an AC. *more ducking and running*

Hmmmm (4, Interesting)

Jesus IS the Devil (317662) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961784)

Ok every once in a while we would hear about these child prodigies that accomplish a lot while they're still young. Rather than put them down so quickly to salvage your own egos, wouldn't it be better to ask for a study to see what happens when they actually grow up?

Do these kids just max out at age 10 and eventually are equalled or even surpassed by their peers later on down the road? How are they when they are say 25, 30, 40?

Now that is what I really want to know. The final form of the adult.

i saw this on digg.com like 4 days ago (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961791)

digg.com had this story like 4 days ago. slashdot is dying.

I see.. (5, Funny)

deep44 (891922) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961803)

He's just getting all this school mumbo-jumbo out of the way so he can concentrate full-time on playing Starcraft once he turns 14.

More power to him (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961804)

String Theory, in all of its flavors, is giant torrent of "hot-topic" published papers invoking fairly esoteric math. Those guys are very competitive, so if this kid really is as amazing as they say, I hope the "string-theorists" give him a chance.

The reality to his genius will be his ability to stay focused. It is so easy to become distracted by other things (The Internet, Video Games, Friends, Growing Up... etc.), that without some level of maturity, college will be a very difficult task to surmount.

Also, someone needs to tell him to forget about flying cars and instead to work on Faster Than Light travel. That and he really wants to "break" General Relativity, not Newtonian Physics; Einstein (Special Relativity) already did that task.

I'm impressed... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961812)

I'm impressed... he even managed to learn Korean! Wow. I could never learn a foreign language... ;-)

Maybe google wants to hire him for some Amazon, pay-per-character, open-office, xml/ajax cross-marketing software complete with a chair-throwing dancing monkey kinda thing.

Let's see...
1. go thru school fast
2. ???
3. profit!

He should fit in with us... let's see:
- no girlfriend: check
- geek: check
- cannot communicate: check
- still lives with parents: check
- does not have a job: check
- student: check

Let's see if we can get him id#8 for slashdot! I'm sure that ol' fogey doesn't need the number...

At least he'll be able to use Windbloze... oh wait... maybe not!

--- *PROUD* anonymous coward

Super geniuses and savants (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961814)

The unfortunate thing is that people with this kind of intelligence very often suffer from serious health problems, and have relatively short lives. Savants normally have critical mental problems that can make living a normal life next to impossible. Humans are not really meant to be this smart.
This is all on top of the issues this child will experience with being out of place. A great many people they meet will be envious, and envy is rarely a good thing.

Basically, while its neat and fun for us to hear about it, the kid has to live with it. Its likely they'll have a very difficult and abnormal life, and its also likely this will have a serious emotional impact on the kid. They essentially have no chance of having a pleasant life...

I personally do not envy him. I feel somewhat sorry for him..

I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961825)

I wonder, what with his difficulties in communicating with adults, how well he will do at university.

Demonstrating your understanding of certain topics at university requires communication with the assessors by way of reports and so on; good report writing seems to only come through experience and practice, I guess if he really is such a genius he should have plenty of spare time to master this skill in the first year of university...

As for all the negative posts regarding lack of social exposure to his peers, would you really want to force this kid through the usual mincer and waste so much opportunity he could have by developing his intellect early? It isn't a perfect scenario for sure, but there's certainly no guarantee he would be happier spending longer with his peers either... I know there's 4 years of my own school life I could have done without.

Career timeline (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13961827)

If 1-12 took 9 months, he'll have his BS and MS by June 2006 and his PhD in December. He can then work four years (that's 48 years for you and me) and retire just in time for puberty. Then he'll have plenty of time to mature socially and launch his second career as an actor/singer heartthrob.

Poor kid (5, Interesting)

Jessta (666101) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961834)

The poor kid is not going to have much contact with other kids his age. I'm guessing he's going to grow up a bit anti-social and with a lack of understanding of general social rules and rituals.
- Jesse McNelis

Another Sidis in the making? (2, Informative)

lotus_out_law (878076) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961835)

Another sidis [wikipedia.org] in the making?
I really really hope not ...

How much is this guys IQ? No mention of the same in the article.

Another issue with child prodigies are that they grow up fast, but in the end have the same intelligence as a normal human being.
Anyways, here, I don't think that's an issue since I dont know too many [ normal :-) ] people completely understanding shrodinger's eq at 30 let alone 7 years of age.

Do they really graduate ? (2, Insightful)

managedcode (863136) | more than 8 years ago | (#13961842)

He is a specialist. Mastering Physics is no doubt the best choice. But how do these kids fair say when they are 20 or more ? Do they really go ahead and get a P.hd ? I have known some extremely bright students in high school now flipping burgers. I don't know what happened to them but they derailed.

eBay Sucks!
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