Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

IBM And Sony Form Linux Alliance

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the everybody-else-is-doing-it dept.

IBM 165

An anonymous reader writes "CNN is reporting that IBM, Sony, and Philips are creating a Linux adoption group. Called the 'Open Invention Network', it is intended to protect vendors and customers from patent royalty fees while using OSS." From the article: "Patents owned by OIN will be available without payment of royalties to any company, institution or individual that agrees not to assert its patents against others who have signed a license with OIN, when using certain Linux-related software. Traditionally, patents have been pursued for two primary reasons -- to defend one's own intellectual property or for barter to trade in cross-licensing agreements to gain access to other companies' patents. OIN represents a new form of cross-licensing that its backers say could spur innovation. "

cancel ×

165 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Frist post bot (0, Offtopic)

lennyhell (869433) | more than 8 years ago | (#13996945)

Now with CSS support!

Sony? (-1, Offtopic)

miknight (642270) | more than 8 years ago | (#13996950)

Get nicked.

Makes sense (3, Funny)

level_headed_midwest (888889) | more than 8 years ago | (#13996954)

Now Sony can make a Linux rootkit too!

Re:Makes sense (0, Flamebait)

WormholeFiend (674934) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997460)

Now Sony can make a Linux rootkit too!

Nah, it's not a rootkit, it's an "Open" Source Protection to make sure that SCO^H^H^Hshameless companies don't impurify our precious bodi^H^H^H^Hcode.

I'm scared... (-1, Redundant)

aurb (674003) | more than 8 years ago | (#13996957)

This might lead to Sony rootkits on Linux...

Re:I'm scared... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13996973)

Gee, thanks for making Slashdot just a little bit dumber this morning.

A matter of trust... (5, Insightful)

harrkev (623093) | more than 8 years ago | (#13996958)

This certainly seems like a good idea, but am I the only one that thinks that seeing Sony in this list is rather out of character, especially given Sony's recent actions?

Re:A matter of trust... (5, Insightful)

strider44 (650833) | more than 8 years ago | (#13996990)

Probably not. However you're forgetting how big a company Sony is. Just think of IBM - on one hand they are fighting against Microsoft through Linux and their servers and services, but on the other hand they are manufacturing chips for Microsoft's brand new console. They're all companies, not a single person. It's not personal, it's business. Noone involved in the rootkitting is also involved in this Linux alliance.

Re:A matter of trust... (3, Insightful)

EulerX07 (314098) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997065)

Hell, I'm sure the "Sony Consumer Electronics" groups has regular disagreements with the "Sony Music" group.

Re:A matter of trust... (3, Funny)

Jonny_eh (765306) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997295)

Ya, they probably have really tense cross-department picnics.

I can just see the SCE guys going to eat the cake, and the Sony Music guys saying "You can't eat that until we say! It's copywritten!".

Oh well, I guess the moral is that Sony Music doesn't want you to have a cake and eat it too.

Re:A matter of trust... (1)

Snowdog668 (227784) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997538)

It's a good thing I don't have mod points this week. I can't decided if this is Funny, Insightfull, or just a bad pun...

Re:A matter of trust... (1, Informative)

Anarke_Incarnate (733529) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997645)

it is a copyRIGHT not a copyWRITE. That means it would be COPYRIGHTED not COPYWRITTEN. These are rights they are taking away from us, not pencils.

Re:A matter of trust... (4, Interesting)

harrkev (623093) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997079)

Perhaps you are right. In the eyes of the law, a corporation is a single entity. I guess that people (myself included) also tend to think of it as a single entity. Maybe I should think of it as having "multiple personality disorder." The only problem is that I like to spend my money with companies who support linux, and I like to not spend my money on companies who support DRM. *Harrkev's head explodes.*

But seriously, I also wonder what the requirements for membership in this group is. This is a "if you don't sue me, then I won't sue you" club. But what if a corporation wants to join without holding any patents? They would get a lot out of joining, but not really have anything to contribute. Would they still be allowed to join?

Re:A matter of trust... (1)

Tanktalus (794810) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997529)

"If you have patents" doesn't seem to be the defining feature of the group. The defining feature seems to be "if you won't sue open source over use of any of your patents." If you have 0 patents, you're not likely to sue anyone, are you.

Think of the KDE foundation. Allowing them to use these patents is the whole purpose of the excersise. That they probably have no patents themselves is irrelevant. Yet, to be truly open, they are allowing other entities (such as commercial operations) to use these patents as well, allowing use of these patents in any way anyone wants to use them. The only restriction is that you must accept the GPL-like manifesto: you cannot restrict others from using these patents, or restrict any open source software from using pretty much any of the rest of your patents. GPL-like because it sounds viral to me. Even if you don't use an OIN patent with one of your patents, just inviting one of the OIN patents into your business makes all of your patents fair game to open source. That's even more viral than the GPL - and what is amazing is that this is being pushed by some companies that have the most to lose in this endeavour, including IBM who seems to take pride in producing the most patents per year of any company in the world. Obviously, they see some monetary value for their shareholders in doing so, otherwise they couldn't legally do it. And that monetary value must be in the value of IBM's linux services (DB2/Information Management, Websphere, Rational, Tivoli) and linux hardware (xSeries, pSeries, iSeries, zSeries).

Re:A matter of trust... (1)

pubjames (468013) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997563)

In the eyes of the law, a corporation is a single entity.

Sony is huge, with both regional companies and different companies covering different sectors. I expect most legal actions Sony has are brought against these companies, not the Corporation as a whole.

Re:A matter of trust... (5, Insightful)

altoz (653655) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997102)

I'm sure Sony employees are just as outraged as the rest of us are about the rootkit. Fact of the matter is that the entertainment moguls (music, tv, movies) are in a completely different division doing idiotic stuff. Think about it, if MIT had one professor that ran a criminal record on his students, there would be other professors on campus that would be outraged. Same thing here.

Re:A matter of trust... (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997422)

Cue Billy Squier: "Root me, root me...KIT!"

Re:A matter of trust... (3, Insightful)

div_2n (525075) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997121)

Yet as a consumer I can only judge the company as a whole and not the individual divisions since I have no idea how deep the evil streak runs and don't want to chance that some other product or service is equally as nasty.

Re:A matter of trust... (2, Interesting)

Amiga Trombone (592952) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997127)

Probably not. However you're forgetting how big a company Sony is. Just think of IBM - on one hand they are fighting against Microsoft through Linux and their servers and services, but on the other hand they are manufacturing chips for Microsoft's brand new console.

Saying IBM or Sony is like saying United States of America. Are you talking about Texas or Hawaii or Massachusettes?

They're a little bit different.

Re:A matter of trust... (2, Insightful)

xtracto (837672) | more than 8 years ago | (#13998011)

Saying IBM or Sony is like saying United States of America. Are you talking about Texas or Hawaii or Massachusettes?


As a non-USA citizen I often think of USA as Geroge Bush and its government actions. I mean, that is the image you guys give to the world, it does not matter if you are trying to save the dolphins from the tuna nets down there... it is the overall image you give that counts.

Same thing for companies, look at Microsoft. They have several nice technologies and research (and its main CEO donates a hell lot of money to charity), but overall, their image is baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaad as in really really bad.

Re:A matter of trust... (2)

wwwillem (253720) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997660)

Yeah, during the day I'm really a nice guy, but from midnight till 4 AM I'm doing couple of break-ins and rob a few 7-11's. But that is a completely different me!! So "you should put the other half of me in jail".

Re:A matter of trust... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997099)

What recent actions?

that was NOT Sony - it was Sony BMG, a sub-company based here in the UK.

To the public it's one company (2, Interesting)

porkThreeWays (895269) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997177)

It may seem to the public like they are one big entity, but in reality they are a huge company with many opinions within. This is really true of any organization. Even within our own department here there are huge disparities of attitudes. Sometimes a project will arise that only needs one programmer and they get free reign on how to do things. Invariably they will write it in their favorite language on their favorite platform. If an outside person were to see my programs they would think "wow, they really have a commitment to open source". Then later, "wow, a program in VB? This seems out of character for them".

The reason? (1)

News for nerds (448130) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997315)

PS3 Linux [gamespot.com] and the CELL processor, of course.

Sony has got multiple personality disorder (3, Insightful)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 8 years ago | (#13998136)

Most obvious is that japanese sony != american sony. Secondly is that hardware sony != content sony.

Content sony only cares about pushing its wares but so does hardware sony. Hardware sony does not want people to not buy their hardware because it is to crippled while content sony does not want people to use their hardware to duplicate their content.

Then you got japan sony coming from a slightly different culture then the american "lets sue" sony.

But what I think is at the heart of this is the Sony that does not want to be owned by Microsoft. While the internet tv might not have happened I am sure there are people at sony that would dearly love the idea of them producing the "next pc". It is the only possibly explanation for Linux on the playstation sold by sony itself. They can't make a single cent profit on it. So why do it if not for learning wether it can be done?

Might it someday be possible to buy in the store a non-ms computer? Worse perhaps a computer that is not like today's pc's at all but far closer to say, oh a mobile phone?

MS has really screwed over every single company it has dealt with and the IBM Sony's of this world would dearly like to see a future were MS can't dictate so many terms.

It is basic economy. When your supplier controls you you are not in control. At the moment it is MS that control the PC and PC makers like sony don't like that.

So it is not out of character at all. Sony is just trying to get maximum profit. MS being toned down a bit means that sony can better dictate the terms, the terms probably being "we want more cash".

Simple really.

Oh great. (-1, Redundant)

mcgroarty (633843) | more than 8 years ago | (#13996959)

So if we're putting this together with today's other news, this means what...

Sony's going to help IBM sell pre-rooted servers?

Hmmmm, so.. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13996960)

So they're only going to rootkit Windows boxes then? Seems ok to me...

cost of a license (2, Insightful)

Jah Shaka (562375) | more than 8 years ago | (#13996963)

interesting... so how much is a license and are we protected against license costs in the future?

""Patents owned by OIN will be available without payment of royalties to any company, institution or individual that agrees not to assert its patents against others who have signed a license with OIN"

Re:cost of a license (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997084)

Software patents are not acceptable, these companies and others pushing for a stable ABI (binary drivers) are attempting to co-opt linux. To accept this patent pledge we would first have to accept that software patents are acceptable, they are not. If these companies are not prepared to mount legal challenges to patentability of software, this is at best an empty and worthless gesture, at worst an attempt to undermine copyright protection for software authors.

Re:cost of a license (3, Funny)

goldspider (445116) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997116)

My $699 Linux license protects me from things like GPL lawsuits, acts of God, and robot attacks. It sounds a bit steep at first, but SCO assures me it was money well spent!

Noooooooo!!!!!! (0, Redundant)

hsoft (742011) | more than 8 years ago | (#13996967)

Will I have to boycott Linux because Sony is involved?

Potentially awesome (5, Insightful)

Ryvar (122400) | more than 8 years ago | (#13996976)

The idea of an anti-patent patent trust is as old as the hills, but to see this much corporate clout behind it was unthinkable not five years ago. It feels like there's been a sea-change and I like it. More important than helping IBM and Sony fight Microsoft, if this idea gained momentum it could seriously roll back a lot of the current technical stagnation on account of software/algorithm patents.

Color me cautiously hopeful.

--Ryv

Re:Potentially awesome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997037)

> Color me cautiously hopeful.

Is that hot pink?

Re:Potentially awesome (2, Funny)

Ryvar (122400) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997055)

Close, but more of a burnt sienna [crayola.com] .

--Ryv

Re:Potentially awesome (2, Interesting)

htd2 (854946) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997109)

It all rather depends on how many patents end up in the combined pot and what value these patents have in the real world.

The reality of IBM's last foray into patent donation to the OpenSource community was much much less impressive than the publicity it generated. Most of the patents were either irrelevant to the OpenSource community or about to expire or both.

Re:Potentially awesome (1)

Myen (734499) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997785)

On the other hand... Does this mean we now have a giant entity with most of the patents?

Imagine a small business on the wrong end of this. You have a patent that's actually genuinely useful? Well, here's five thousand trivial things that should give you a nice death by paper cut. Oh, and we'd like to take that patent off you as compensation....

too late (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13996977)

Everybody's switching to Apple.

Why? Because it's cooler than Linux. Plus you can run iTunes :)

This sounds like a good idea (1)

RandoX (828285) | more than 8 years ago | (#13996978)

Any drawbacks that my admittedly short sight missed? Can individuals join to avoid getting sued? Do groups need to have patents to join? I assuem they're still allowed to sue non-members, otherwise there would be no incentive for outsiders to join.

"could spur innovation." (2, Interesting)

ooze (307871) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997012)

Yep. It's the next best thing to abolishing patents altogether for spurring innovation. And it's the furthest they can get in that area. Noone can abolish any laws in a democracy when there is a rich lobby that depends on them.

Re:"could spur innovation." (1)

LainTouko (926420) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997505)

Noone can abolish any laws in a democracy when there is a rich lobby that depends on them.

Not in a democracy. That word implies that power rests with the people.

More accurate would be "if no one can abolish any laws when there is a rich lobby that depends on them, then it's not really a democracy."

America is of course a plutocracy.

Re:"could spur innovation." (1)

civilizedINTENSITY (45686) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997797)

Would you accept that the US of A is a plutocratic/democratic republic? Not so sure about Canada, which is also in America.

Re:"could spur innovation." (1)

ooze (307871) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997811)

Well, they try to spread their sytem everywhere, and they call it freedom and democracy. Who am I to argue with them? They have big red buttons to press on.

Everione's invited :-) (1)

c0007031 (919859) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997013)

I'm actually glad that Sony wanted to join this grup. If any company has interest in it, why not? The group will possibly grow even bigger... maybe companies like Microsoft? :P I heard Philips say "Everyone's invited", so...

Re:Everione's invited :-) (4, Insightful)

wpiman (739077) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997052)

These three companies make their money in services and hardware-- ie. not software. I can't possibly imagine Microsoft joining given this. It would be like Microsoft and Oracle starting a group which would give out free hardware, and use the Open source community for free services (obviously hard to do). These hardware and service companies would want nothing to do with it.

Re:Everione's invited :-) (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997285)

If you're selling hardware, most likely you're selling software, too. What do you think POWERS that Philips CT scanner?

Re:Everione's invited :-) (1)

wpiman (739077) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997609)

Sure there is software involved- but if they make use of alot of FREE software on the CT scanners, or MRIs- they can either charge less (sell more in the process perhaps), make more profit, or get the product to market more quickly. The cost of the hardware is not going to fall very much unless there is a competitive force.

The cost of the software development is passed along in the form of hardware costs or maintainence contracts.

Actually (1)

PeDRoRist (639207) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997113)

"Everyone's invited" is from Samsung.
IIRC the catchphrase goes like "Samsung. DigitALL. Everyone's invited"

Just nitpicking.

pig talk (0, Offtopic)

middlemen (765373) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997020)

Well now I guess I can happily say OINk OINk !!

Groupthink clarification requsted (-1, Redundant)

goldspider (445116) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997026)

Are we still supposed to hate Sony because of DRM and their membership in the RIAA?

Or are we supposed to love them because they are helping open source?

Something tells me the former still applies, but I wanted to check with the Hive first. Thanks!

Sony is an Equitable Partner (4, Funny)

Dareth (47614) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997078)

They will provide "Root Kits" for any operating system!

Re:Groupthink clarification requsted (0)

bhtooefr (649901) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997115)

It's the former.

Re:Groupthink clarification requsted (3, Interesting)

bperkins (12056) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997325)

Keep your friends close, and your enemies closer.
        --Sun-tzu

I think in this case Sony sees a threat from Microsoft, and wants to gang up as much as possible. For Sony, DRM and patents are largely orthogonal. DRM has to do with copyright and the enforcement mechanism is primarily the DMCA.

I think it's worth noting that if Sony had to choose between ditching DRM and protection from death by patent litigation, it would choose the former. Content, especially music, just isn't as big a business as consumer electronics.

Either way, you can still hate Sony if it suits you. It's a pretty big company, it's probably OK to like one division and hate the other.

The hive mind has spoken.

Linux rootkit (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997057)

Sony just wants IBM's Linux knowledge to develop a better rootkit for their CDs.

Protection racket (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997061)

First impressions, this stinks. Let's extrapolate. What happens when this 'protection club' gets a little competition? Instead of one universally broken patent system for all we then have several competing gangs all trying to form the biggest group, each further partitioning knowledge into feudal provinces. Besides which, Sony are involved. Who of sane mind is ever going to trust a company with Sonys record now? To me a big point of Linux is a the 'fuck you' to the nasty big corps. To be honest I'm quite glad the Novell SuSe thing is going south, and I don't know what IBM have to offer really. Sure it has a feelgood factor to have a heavyweight apparently onside, but at the end of the day when I saw that IBM ad with Linux portrayed as a child I couldn't help thinking of IBM as a child molester walking the kid out into the woods. At the end of the day they are only after control and profit. I hope a lot of these big companies fail in their Linux exploitation attempts and the OS continues to grow steadily on its merits as a community development.

Re:Protection racket (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997124)

, but at the end of the day when I saw that IBM ad with Linux portrayed as a child I couldn't help thinking of IBM as a child molester walking the kid out into the woods

Actually they chose a child because it best represented the mentality of most Linux fanboys.

Funny how it's "control and profit" minded companies employing most of the people working on OSS (not necessarily to work on OSS, but most OSS developers have to earn a living to allow them to "play"). Gee, I wonder how /. manages to pay for all the bandwidth and keeping folks like Taco employed? Maybe there's a "profit" minded company that allows it to occur?

To me a big point of Linux is a the 'f**k you' to the nasty big corps

That's right, increasingly a lot of OSS isn't about creating better software, it's about the politics. Nice that you have your agenda and then go run off at the mouth about other peoples simply because they don't match yours.

I'm not surprised. (1)

MtViewGuy (197597) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997092)

Especially given how Sony so well-embraced Linux with the available Linux development toolkit for the PlayStation 2.

Does anyone know will Sony offer a Linux development toolkit for the upcoming PlayStation 3?

Re:I'm not surprised. (1)

HalAtWork (926717) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997167)

Yes. They are also said to offer Linux as an end user OS on the PS3 [theinquirer.net] .

Re:I'm not surprised. (1)

packslash (788926) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997615)

Yes there will definitely be a rootkit for the upcoming ps3

I knew it... (0, Flamebait)

ccozan (754085) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997131)

they want their rootkit under linux, ha!

Are Free Software Patents Good? (1)

trollable (928694) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997135)

Honestly, just because the patent (under what terms exactly?) is available at no cost doesn't make it good. There is a lot of reasons to dislike software patents: price is one of them but not the only one. Additionaly, what about the completely broken USPTO? the lack of research for prior art? tre triviality? What about the complexity of the patent itself? How will you know what is exactly covered? As an analogy: think Freeware vs Free Software.

Re:Are Free Software Patents Good? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997201)

Of course this doesn't make patents "good" . . . but the truth is, they're here to stay for the foreseeable future. If the "good guys" can use their patents to fight the "bad guys", it's a better world.

Not that the USPTO doesn't still need a good overhaul, but until then, this will help spur innovation.

Sony has its own /. logo?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997142)

Why does Sony have its own /. logo, but not Philips? Is it because all of their product recalls, or because of their DRM-crippled products?

Hooray for Sony! (5, Funny)

Slashcrap (869349) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997144)

Oops, sorry. I seem to have mis-spelled "Fuck you Sony, you rootkit spreading scum suckers". The keys are right next to each other.

Rootkit = Support For Linux (1)

wowbagger (69688) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997672)

No, you misunderstand Sony's motives - the rootkit is showing their support for Linux!

You see, the rootkit only infects Microsoft Windows, and the "DRM" only stops Microsoft Windows from playing or ripping the music - Linux is splendidly unaffected by the code, and can play (and rip) the music effortlessly.

So, what Sony is doing is giving people more reasons to NOT run Windows but instead run Linux.

So, the actions of the two groups are in harmony - they are both supporting Linux at the expense of Microsoft.

You all just don't understand the deeper strategy of Sony.

(NOTE for clueless /mods - the above was humor, and should not be taken as literal support for Sony, nor as an actual suggestion that the Sony rootkit was done in support of anything other than Sony's perceived bottom line.)

Re:Rootkit = Support For Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997952)

(NOTE for clueless /mods - the above was humor, and should not be taken as literal support for Sony, nor as an actual suggestion that the Sony rootkit was done in support of anything other than Sony's perceived bottom line.)

NOTE for clueless/mods!

The above note was just added by him to cover his real motive that should obviously been modded down if not only for being stupid. He's a troll that's obviously trying to get modded up by adding that part!

Never forget your tinfoil hats!

Wait I'm confused.... (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997194)

Aren't we suppose to be hating Sony now?

(Go ahead and mod redundant, just like you did the FIRST POST that made this joke)

This is great but... (2, Interesting)

ankura (769374) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997225)

Patents owned by OIN will be available without payment of royalties to any company, institution or individual that agrees not to assert (my emphasis) its patents against others who have signed a license with OIN, when using certain Linux-related software.

... would OIN be willing to counter-sue (backed up with its patent portfolio) say an 800 pound gorilla who find Linux violating some patents and sues linux users.

That doesn't seem to much sense so here's an example scenario:
- MSFT decides Linux kernel violates some of their patents.
- Sues some-non-commercial-linux-distro users.

So, would OIN be willing to assert its patents against MSFT?
-ankur

Here we go... (1)

vrta (905538) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997260)

Platform independent rootkit.

Two Words (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997284)

Linux rootkits

Linux Alliance? (2, Funny)

poningru (831416) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997378)

Does that mean tux can yell out: LINUX ALLIANCE ASSSSEEEEEMBLEEE and have big blue and sony fly from the sky to fight crime?

They forgot to mention Novell and RedHat! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997379)

CNN missed a few of the big players. I do think they will be willing to counter-sue since both Novell and IBM have already countersued SCO!

Re:They forgot to mention Novell and RedHat! (1)

LnxAddct (679316) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997844)

Red Hat also countersued. I believe both Novell and Red Hat have their cases on hold until IBM destroys SCO.
Regards,
Steve

Sony's Recent Actions (1)

Techguy666 (759128) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997456)

Considering Sony Music/BMG has been in Slashdot an awful lot lately, before we cheer or scream "DOOOOOOM", I want to know how much of Sony-BMG interacts with Sony the computer company? How much will Sony-the-Bad influence Sony-the-Good?

I suspect (hope) Sony is a big enough corporation where the left hand and right hand are fairly independent of each other...

Trying to avoid the usual /. knee-jerk reaction. :)

Re:Sony's Recent Actions (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997600)

Their right hand has absolutely no idea the left hand even belongs to the same being. I think Sony Music tried suing their computer side once.

A tad bit offtopic pondering about Sony & Linu (0)

Tenement (94499) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997465)

but I wonder if this is a prelude to Sony porting their media software suite [sonymediasoftware.com] to Linux?

Revenge (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997475)

IBM is does these things to get back on all of us that supported Microsoft through our hatred for IBM's tyrany. I, for one, feel more humbled each day.

Full Text of the press release (2, Informative)

LDAPMAN (930041) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997476)

OPEN INVENTION NETWORK FORMED TO PROMOTE LINUX
AND SPUR INNOVATION GLOBALLY THROUGH ACCESS TO KEY PATENTS
- - -
Investors Include IBM, Novell, Philips, Red Hat, and Sony

New York (November 10, 2005) - Open Invention Network (OIN), a company that has and will acquire patents and offer them royalty-free to promote Linux and spur innovation globally, was launched today with financial support from IBM, Novell, Philips, Red Hat, and Sony. The company, believed to be the first of its kind, is creating a new model where patents are openly shared in a collaborative environment and used to facilitate the advancement of applications for, and components of, the Linux operating system.
          "Open collaboration is critical for driving innovation, which fuels global economic growth. Impediments to collaboration on the Linux operating system seriously jeopardize innovation. A new model of intellectual property management for Linux must be established to maintain advances in software innovation - regardless of the size or type of business or organization," said Jerry Rosenthal, chief executive officer at Open Invention Network. The company will foster an open, collaborative environment that stimulates advances in Linux - helping ensure the continuation of global innovation that has benefited software vendors, customers, emerging markets and investors, among others.
Patents owned by Open Invention Network will be available on a royalty-free basis to any company, institution or individual that agrees not to assert its patents against the Linux operating system or certain Linux-related applications.
Open Invention Network believes that creating a new system to manage and ensure access to key patents for the Linux operating system will have a significant economic impact. According to International Data Corporation, the worldwide Linux businessis expected to grow 25.9 percent annually, doubling from $20 billion in 2005 to more than $40 billion in 2008.
"Open Invention Network is not focused on income or profit generation with our patents, but on using them to promote a positive, fertile ecosystem for the Linux operating system and to drive innovation and choice into the marketplace," said Mr. Rosenthal. "We intend to spur innovation in IT and across industries by helping software developers focus on what they do best - developing great Linux-related software with greater assurance about intellectual property issues."
-more-

Among Open Invention Network's initial patent holdings is a set of business-to-business electronic commerce patents that were purchased from Commerce One by JGR, a subsidiary of Novell.

For more information go to www.openinventionnetwork.com

Investor Statements

IBM
"The formation of Open Invention Network signals a growing movement where companies today are looking beyond their own organizational boundaries," said Jim Stallings, vice president of intellectual property and open standards at IBM. "They are strategically sharing their intellectual property and building broader industry partnerships in order to accelerate innovation and drive new economic growth."

Novell
  "We are proud to be a founding member of the Open Invention Network,"said Jack Messman, CEO of Novell."While Novell has been a major contributor to the open source community and has shown its commitment to promoting and fostering the adoption of open source and open standards, this initiative raises our leadership to the highest level. With this new initiative, users of open source software will have access to a broad set of technologies that will help foster an even more robust community of developers, customers, business partners and investors. This is a breakthrough idea whose time has come."

Philips
"Philips is actively involved in the creation and funding of Open Invention Network because we believe that OIN will make the Linux platform more attractive for users. This will stimulate developers to focus their resources on creating high-value, innovative software on this open platform," said Ruud Peters, chief executive officer of Philips Intellectual Property & Standards. "We believe that this initiative will widely boost the use of the Linux platform and its applications."

Red Hat
"By providing this unique collaborative framework, Open Invention Network will set open source developers free to do what they do best--innovate," said Mark Webbink, senior vice president at Red Hat. "At the same time, Open Invention Network extends to distributors and users of open source software freedom from concern about software patents."

Sony
"Linux is clearly an important technology for Sony and the global community in general," said Yoshihide Nakamura, SVP, Corporate Executive of Sony Corporation. "We believe Linux and open standards will provide companies with more options for the development of innovative products. We have and will continue to support initiatives like Open Invention Network that promote a positive environment for these developments."

Re:Full Text of the press release (1)

escay (923320) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997595)

IBM, Sony and Philips have come together to form the Open Invention NetworK, fondly known as OINK!

COIN (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997501)

In other news, SCO and the RIAA have joined forces to form Castrate the Open Invention Network (COIN) whose sole purpose is to claim prior art on all OIN owned patents and/or prove the patents were downloaded illegally. While some have championed this new organization, skeptics say the underlying plot is revealed in the organization's acronym.

define Linux (1)

CAPSLOCK2000 (27149) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997528)

This isn't really interesting without their definition of Linux. Probably it's just the Linux kernel, otherwise they would call it Open Source. If it's just about the kernel there is hardly anything new here.

Redhat and Novell are Linux companies. They will not use patents against the linux kernel, that would hurt themselves as much as anybody else.
Sony, Philips and IBM don't care about operating system. Sure, all those companies sell operating software, but that's not there main bussiness. They make most of there money from hardware and services. An operating system is what helps them sell those. Besides, kernels are becoming a commodity. Most people wouldn't care less if it's the Linux, FreeBSD or Solaris kernel driving there desktop environment. They only see the applications.

If this alliance adhers to the definition linux=kernel they might sue over the rest of the software on your system. For example, sue KDE for copying ("stealing") a Gnome idea, thus forcing all KDE based distributions out of the market.

Re:define Linux (1)

civilizedINTENSITY (45686) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997862)

Don't you mean GNU/Linux? Even Solaris is OpenSource...

Philips (1)

DrugCheese (266151) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997540)

Was Philips just not worth mentioning in the title? Or too hard to spell correctly compared to the other two?

sony moving software for linux ?? (1)

Ducho_CWB (900642) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997560)

well, maybe someday I'll be able to make atrac3 files and record them on my md-player. It's really boring that sony's interface run on win machines only. Ah, drm is another thing, or 'feature' :P

what happens (2, Insightful)

sad_ (7868) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997586)

what would happen if sony (or any other company, sony just taken by example) suddenly decides it was a bad idea to begin with and leaves this organisation?
will they be able to sue all the projects that made use of sony patents or will the patents used during the period a company was member stay 'free of use'?

Trustworthy? (1)

Asmodai (13932) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997588)

The same Sony of the Playstation 3 patent for making a game work on only ONE console.

The same Sony of the current issue of the audio CD protections.

Yeah, I feel REAL happy now...

Typical Slashdot answers (1)

Stu L Tissimus (873928) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997602)

Wait a second, Sony supports Linux? A) I'm never using Linux again! B) OMFG EVARQWEST 2 4 LINX???lolol kekekekeke C) Now we'll ahve to worry about rootkits in our kernels!

Re:Typical Slashdot answers (0, Offtopic)

xaque (869340) | more than 8 years ago | (#13998027)

I believe the correct spelling is "KERNAL!!!!!11`!!"

Alterior motives? (1)

Xtravar (725372) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997617)

So... what particular patent is IBM scared shitless of?
Who are they trying to fool into accepting this, and why?
The article isn't very clear about the mechanics of the agreement...
Can it be abused beyond the scope of open source software? Say, a hardware company uses some of OIN's patents, can IBM then use any of the hardware company's patents?

Sony is the reason I can't adopt Linux (1)

RiotXIX (230569) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997647)

My netmd won't work (4 years and counting), and it's drm'd to fcsk. While I agree that drm may be viable in linux (I don't mind), I hope future models of netmd will be linux compatible. I guess it means I'll have to upgrade to a different model though (this is what you get for supporting a company early on..)

SONY: SUPPORT THIS PROJECT: http://www.minidisc.org/NetMD_faq.html [minidisc.org]

I'm sick of rebooting.

Re:Sony is the reason I can't adopt Linux (1)

Nutshell_TA (830986) | more than 8 years ago | (#13998095)

I've seen somewhere (can't find it now) that Sony will discontinue it's MD line from next year... so no hope for a linux compatible version.

For all those bringing up the CD rootkits (2, Informative)

hkb (777908) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997665)

Yes, the name is Sony, but this is an entirely different branch of Sony. Sony BMG is the one who released the rootkit-like CDs.

"Linux-Related Software?" (1)

faqmaster (172770) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997754)

I've read through it but it doesn't seem too clear. If I take the guts of some Linux sub-system which is covered by this group's patents and dump it into my version of Plan9 or onto a ROM for my Super Happy Fun Robot toy and make a ga-jillion dollars off it, they won't sue me? Or they will sue me because it's not related to Linux?

If the former, then good, I guess. If the latter, then I'm not so sure it's such a good idea. If it's the latter then it would just be the Linux patent bully.

Pre-installed (1)

GweeDo (127172) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997800)

Will it come with a rootkit preinstalled?

OINK (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997854)

Yeah, why not Open Invention Network Knowledge? OINK! OINK!

The same Sony we know? (1)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997875)

Is this the same Sony that's using [eff.org] a) DRM to promote their products for playback and b) to restrict fair use rights, while c) recommending a Linux-incompatible ripper (heck, a PC is even defined as running Windows there)?

What a strange twist of irony that they were to become a backer of... Linux

Can the GPL slow down software patents? (1)

sstidman (323182) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997903)

This brings to mind a curious question: would it make sense to include in the GPL a statement requiring that anyone who asserts software patents is not allowed to use the GPL'd software? As open source software grows into greater prominence, such a clause might make companies less inclined to assert software patents if there is a real downside to doing so.

(Why do I suspect I am going to get flamed badly for asking this question? ;-))

Novell and Red Hat also (2, Interesting)

eGuy (545520) | more than 8 years ago | (#13997975)

Novell and Red Hat are also founding members of Open Invension Network. I'm not sure about Red Hat but I know that Novell has a slew of valuable patents that would help prevent lawsuits. This is really neat. As more companies become members of the network, the stronger open source will be - legally. This is worst case scenario for companies like Microsoft. For example, would Microsoft shy away from launching a patent infringement battle against red-hat? I don't think they would flinch. But would they launch the same battle against the combined patent portfolio of IBM/Sony/Phyllips/Novell/Red-Hat?

mod Down (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#13997992)

TurNed over to yet member. GNAA (GAY

From DRM to Linux (1)

abertoll (460221) | more than 8 years ago | (#13998124)

I guess they're trying to make up for what they did with the DRM. Although to be fair, it only affected Windows.

Freedom....Can somebody explain... (1)

sweetnjguy29 (880256) | more than 8 years ago | (#13998162)

...how this arrangement would protect me as a Linux home user using a non-RedHat or commercial distribution. And would these licenses and patents or what have you be free as in beer or meet the criteria for the GNU scheme? GPL? Something else?
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?