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'Type Manager' The File Manager of Tomorrow?

CmdrTaco posted more than 8 years ago | from the no-not-for-fonts-silly dept.

GUI 321

IceFox writes "In the past few years many of us have been introduced to a new type of application, the Type Manager. Most of us are familiar with iTunes, but there are many other Type Managers out there that are gaining market share and a rabid fan base of users such as digiKam and amaroK. Type Managers seem to have that magic combinations of features that makes users love them. I have been taken a closer look at the Type Manager, what makes them so usefull, what they really provide for the user and came to some surprising results. After creating a list of all the traits of a Type Manager I was able to define exactly what a file manager should be and discovered that there are in fact many partial Type Managers out there now that implemented only half of what makes up a full Type Manager."

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FIRST FILE MANGLER POST!!! (-1, Offtopic)

Maxmin (921568) | more than 8 years ago | (#14043971)

bwah-hahahahah!

First (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14043984)

First nubs. Tribes2 4 life.

Fisnt gmmmmmmeh (1)

Helen Keller (842669) | more than 8 years ago | (#14043989)

Gnnnnnmmmmmmehhhhhhhhhh!

Re:Fisnt gmmmmmmeh (1)

chooks (71012) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044332)

This is wrong on many levels and yet...

My tea almost hit my monitor after reading the poster, the title, the contents, and the .sig. Thanks for the laugh. Although I feel somewhat dirty for it afterwards. But I guess that's the way cheap thrills go...

type manager ? WTF ? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14043997)

its a file attribute manager. not a type manager. adobe type manager is a type manager.
who the fuck gave this guy a license to make up new technical definitions on the fly ?

Re:type manager ? WTF ? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044081)

How do you think technical definitions are invented in the first place?

Re:type manager ? WTF ? (4, Funny)

Viper Daimao (911947) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044174)

They're cromulently embiggened of course.

Re:type manager ? WTF ? (2, Funny)

bbsguru (586178) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044292)

At least he didn't create another TLA, (technically, not possible: there were only 26^3 possibilities in English, and we've used them all).

Still, the thoughtless creation of Meaningless Pseudo-Buzzwords (MPB) does run rampant among the illiterati.

In response to this plague of drivel (POD), the international community has decided to adopt new procedures. (um. that's us)

Effective immediately, all MPB's are to be reviewed for acceptance by DIVOT (Departmente Internacional for Verification Of Truth). Just as the creation of TLA's is regulated by the ACT, DIVOT's management of MPB's will help improve global communications.

And stop with the new TLA's, already. We here at the ACT (Acronym Creation Team)don't appreciate this kind of interference by MIA's (Mis-Informed Amateurs).

Re:type manager ? WTF ? (4, Funny)

Snarfangel (203258) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044350)

who the fuck gave this guy a license to make up new technical definitions on the fly ?

Those responsible have been sacked.

Mynd you, møøse bites Kan be pretty nasti...

Small request (-1, Offtopic)

flyinwhitey (928430) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044002)

Drop the "K" stuff, and act like a real product.

It's really getting old.

Re:Small request (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044079)

Yeah I totally agree. Apple tried that with an "i" instead and it did not work - or did it ? :D

'i'..? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044278)

Like iYpe Manager...? WTF?

Re:Small request (1, Funny)

SpinJaunt (847897) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044087)

What is wrong with being KDiff [sourceforge.net] erent?

Re:Small request (0)

Gleng (537516) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044167)

Gou grefer ghe galternatives?

(Heh, reading that out makes me sound like scooby doo.)

Easily accomplished (1)

26reverse (305980) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044294)

All you have to do is create a blog, ramble on for a couple pages about "K", never actually SAY anything except describing the letter and KDE's love for it. And then promote it on the front page of Slashdot.

Obviously that appears to be all too common these days.

And where are all these "partial type managers" (bad vocabulary choice aside) that the author claimed? Steam? Mame? That's ALL? How's about something useful - like documents, bookmarks, etc.

Well your Type Manager... (3, Funny)

City Jim 3000 (726294) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044003)

...should learn to Type Type Manager Less.

Re:Well your Type Manager... (2, Interesting)

mixonic (186166) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044242)

...should learn to Type Type Manager Less.

$ TM=`grep this_article -ioe 'Type Manager'|wc -l`; WC=`cahis_article|wc -w `; echo print\ \(\($TM/$WC\)\*100\) |perl
4.76190476190476


It wasn't that often. only 4.76% of his total words were Type Manager. Of course that is 7/12 of his lines.....

*yeesh*

Re:Well your Type Manager... (1)

mixonic (186166) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044269)

Sorry!

$ TM=`grep this_article -ioe 'Type Manager'|wc -l`; WC=`cat whis_article|wc -w `; echo print\ \(\($TM/$WC\)\*100\) |perl
4.76190476190476


There we go. damn you bash shell...

Move Along (3, Informative)

Lord Byron II (671689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044004)

Move along, nothing to see here. This is nothing but shameless self-promotion from a guy who can't even spell "useful" correctly.

Re:Move Along (3, Insightful)

Enigma_Man (756516) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044037)

Has anybody tried a type-manager style file manager, and preferred the old, usual way of doing things? I certainly do. Maybe it's just because that's the way I've always done things, and I'm used to it, and have gotten good at it, but I like my files where I put them as files, not as metadata or anything else like that.

-Jesse

Re:Move Along (3, Informative)

JabberWokky (19442) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044284)

I couldn't use a "music type manager" for a chunk of my collection -- my music is mixed up with lyrics, performance notes and tablature for when I actually play it (as in pull out an instrument and use it). Amarok is great to kick back and listen to music with (Wikipedia and related song links are nifty), but the brutal truth is that 99% of the time I'm just listening it could just be any player that shuffles a playlist. When I'm actually *using* the files, I need more than just a single format app.

Same goes for images and text: I organize by project, and most have real world notebooks and folders associated with them. Even the directories full of source code and purely computer related items usually have a physical logbook associated with them and have a dozen file types in a few to over a hundred directories.

There are two major types of applications that handle multiple types of files and let you organize them by directory. They let you manipulate them with a wide variety of tools and other applications. They are called file managers and shells. I'm partial to Konqueror and bash, but YMMV.

--
Evan

Re:Move Along (3, Insightful)

mrchaotica (681592) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044376)

but I like my files where I put them as files, not as metadata or anything else like that.
You do realize that the file path is metadata in and of itself, don't you? The only difference between a file path and, say, keywords is that the former is thinking in terms of the computer (sort of like C), whereas the latter is thinking in terms of the data (sort of like Java).

Re:Move Along (2, Interesting)

xTantrum (919048) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044065)

When I buy a CD my goal is to put the music on my mp3 player. To do that I might have to go through a dozen different smaller tasks before I can achieve my goal. It is not unrealistic just a few years ago (or even today for some people) to first rip the wav file, then encode to a desired format, add id3 tags via cddb, store the files in some home grown system, and finally transfer the files to the mp3 player.

seriously, not trolling, but this really isn't that big a deal to do. most jukeboxes do this for you automatically anyway. Maybe not on linux - i don't know - but jeez even wmp does this. Are we really getting that lazy. Next your gonna tell me you code in JAVA and forgot C.

Re:Move Along (1)

Tony Hoyle (11698) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044088)

Linux too.. at least on KDE - browse to CD, highlight mp3 files, drag and drop on mp3 player. done.

Re:Move Along (1)

Plunky (929104) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044139)

seriously, not trolling, but this really isn't that big a deal to do. most jukeboxes do this for you automatically anyway. Maybe not on linux - i don't know - but jeez even wmp does this. Are we really getting that lazy. Next your gonna tell me you code in JAVA and forgot C.

surely then, most jukeboxes would be considered to be that very thing - a type manager for music
even wmp

Re:Move Along (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044160)

For Linux there exist an abcde script which rips and encodes the files (and adds correct id3 tags). You need to only transfer them to the MP3 player.

This dolt could be the next CMDRTACO! (2, Funny)

MondoMor (262881) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044131)

He's got all the qualifications:

1. Can't spell
2. Horrible site layout
3. Rambling article trying to make himself look smarter than he is.

It's hard to tell if he's got the self-delusion and inattention to detail fully down, but we could be looking at a Malda clone here.

Re:Move Along (0)

gaurzilla (665469) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044148)

AND the grammar is terrible. Was he using babelfish?

"I have been taken a closer look..." [ yeah .. sure ]
"... that magic combinations of features ..." [un-pluralize]
"... and came to some surprising results." [conclusions! not results]
"After creating a list of all the traits of a Type Manager I was able to define exactly what a file manager should be and discovered that there are in fact many partial Type Managers out there now that implemented only half of what makes up a full Type Manager." [MS Word style: Fragment (no suggestions)]

Even in TFA he doesn't know where to use commas.

"... I was able to define exactly what ..."
[I don't like the word "exactly". It makes him sound like a person with high authority in the subject, and I highly doubt that.]

Sigh

Re:Move Along (1)

Alphabet Pal (895900) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044211)

I have been taken a look at his grammar, and it's on par with his spelling.

Type Manager? What? (5, Funny)

Agermain (255096) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044008)

I hope I'm not the only one that had to wonder what iTunes and amaroK had to do with Adobe Type Manager [adobe.com] and Suitcase.

Re:Type Manager? What? (1)

dbolger (161340) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044052)

So you put 'wikipedia "type manager"' into your address box too, yeah?

Re:Type Manager? What? (1)

mjpaci (33725) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044069)

That's the first thing I thought of. I really wish he would explain what at Type Manager really is in the first sentence or two or at least give a few more examples of one. I didn't feel like RTFA because the blurb wasn't compelling enough.

--mike

Re:Type Manager? What? (2, Insightful)

xlr8ed (726203) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044084)

I hope I'm not the only one that had to wonder what iTunes and amaroK had to do with Adobe Type Manager and Suitcase.


I think a better name would be MIME Manager

Re:Type Manager? What? (5, Funny)

BushCheney08 (917605) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044168)

The best (and only) way to deal with a mime is with a gun.

Type Manager? What?-Mimes (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044251)

That would make it a MAIM manager.

The missing question (4, Funny)

TheConfusedOne (442158) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044336)

Do you have to use a silencer on the gun?!?

iTunes (1, Interesting)

Yahweh Doesn't Exist (906833) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044022)

I know a lot of people bitch that iTunes "does too much... I use LAME to rip mp3s I don't need my mp3 player to do it.. wah wah wah..." but iTunes was one of the things that made me switch to Mac. I was very impressed with how it did so much yet was very simple, especially the part where it keeps music files names and arranged according to tags.

before iTunes I used Musicmatch on Windows which I liked a lot because of its library management, though it started getting bloated towards the end (bloat doesn't mean adding lots of features, it means adding features at the cost of ease of use).

Re:iTunes (1)

Chicane-UK (455253) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044324)

I begrudgingly began to use iTunes for more than just encoding my CD's when I dabbled with a Powermac G4 a few months back, and have to admit that it gradually won me over. I prefer the Winamp way of playing my music and could find no similar product for OSX at all so I just got on with getting familiar with Itunes.

The only time it falls down is if your MP3 collection hasn't quite got the MP3 tags like some of mine has.. mixes i've pulled down from the net, etc - but if you have a very precisely organised MP3 collection, you'll be in heaven.

Nice software and a real bonus that its a freebie.

Re:iTunes (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044343)

One big failing of iTunes is it's lack of ogg support, despite it being a free codec. Sure, there are workarounds, but they don't work with the airport.

Re:iTunes (1)

afd8856 (700296) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044360)

wxMusik (open source), the best in my book, iTunes for Windows.

If you want to justify your move to Apple, try something else.

Adobe was there first ;-) (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044023)

Adobe Type Manager Light [adobe.com]

Next time, check prior art before appropriating a phrase and giving it whatever meaning you feel like.

Not to mention, "Type Manager" is a terrible name for "application that manages files of some type".

Objects was there first ;-) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044126)

"Not to mention, "Type Manager" is a terrible name for "application that manages files of some type""

Object Manager.

Re:Adobe was there first ;-) (1)

Snarfangel (203258) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044261)

Not to mention, "Type Manager" is a terrible name for "application that manages files of some type".

I suppose "AMFiST" is out of the question?

old news (1)

BushCheney08 (917605) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044031)

I've been using Adobe's version for years...

I have been taken a closer look (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044032)

Ah, you must be from Russia!

In Soviet Russia, closer look takes you!

Type Manager - EMail! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044034)

Email is a "type manager" and it has been around forever. Please don't add to fuel to stupid buzzwords...

Note to software developers (2, Insightful)

bheer (633842) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044042)

there are many other Type Managers out there that are gaining market share and a rabid fan base of users such as digiKam and amaroK

(especially KDE developers) For the love of God, it's not cute to insert arbitrary uppercase Ks into app names anymore. Yes, it's called KDE. Yes, there's that big K where the start button ought to be. You really love K. We get the idea. Now name your apps sanely instead of making them sound like they were named by 13-year olds trying to be cute.

<grumble> ...and then the KDE-ers complain KDE gets too little traction in the market compared to Gnome. Feh.
</grumble>

Re:Note to software developers (1)

FidelCatsro (861135) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044071)

Gno I think it's oK
(Really sorry about that)

Re:Note to software developers (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044130)

iAgree

Re:Note to software developers (2, Funny)

sg_oneill (159032) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044134)

Gnyeah! Its Gnot as if Gnome or Gnu Gnvelopers are StickiGn arbitrary K'sgn everywhergn! Gnumericly speaking.

Re:Note to software developers (2, Funny)

Gleng (537516) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044298)

I think you just summoned Cthulhu with that.

Re:Note to software developers (1)

Dionysus (12737) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044319)

I thought iPod, iMac, iTunes was a marketing decision. Never knew the developers had a say in the naming.

Mods on crack (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044405)

How's it offtopic when it refers to something brought up in the submission itself? Dumbasses.

Nothing to see here... (4, Informative)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044048)

A couple of pages of rambling is far from "news". This might be an interesting read for someone who has never thought of content or contextual organization before, but it's really old hat.

Now, if this goober had coded up a new manager which integrated all the functions he talked about, or had an extensble base manager to replace the native file system, with a defined api for plugins that would allow you to customize the environment, that would be news.

Re:Nothing to see here... (1)

morgan_greywolf (835522) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044295)

Now, if this goober had coded up a new manager which integrated all the functions he talked about, or had an extensble base manager to replace the native file system, with a defined api for plugins that would allow you to customize the environment, that would be news.

Hmmm...that sounds an awful lot like Nautilus [gnome.org] with GnomeVFS [gnome.org] .

Hey that's a good idea (1)

Tetravus (79831) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044337)

I think I'll swipe it! ;-)

I bet 80% of the plugin API could be based around an XML ontology explaining to the manager what the 'types' and 'properties' of interest are. There would need to be some custom code for content display and editing but everything else can be pushed down to the filesystem/db.

STOP THE PRESS! (5, Insightful)

sg_oneill (159032) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044053)

New must-have! metadata!

Coming soon! The macintosh.

'Type Manager'? Worst. Buzzword. Ever. (5, Funny)

hoggoth (414195) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044062)

Could he come up with a more generic and confusion-prone buzzword than 'Type Manager'?!

Re:'Type Manager'? Worst. Buzzword. Ever. (1, Insightful)

IceFox (18179) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044191)

How about:
Content Interface
Topic Manager
Type Organizer
Theme Manager ...

There are no good choices, trust me I looked.

-Benjamin Meyer

Couldn't we come up with a NEW name for these? (1)

httpamphibio.us (579491) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044070)

A "type manager" is already a piece of software that manages fonts and such... shouldn't the category that software like iTunes, etc. (including traditional font-managing type managers) be called something like a "File Type Manager" to avoid confusion?

Re:Couldn't we come up with a NEW name for these? (1)

mjpaci (33725) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044121)

Adobe Type Managaer is a Type Manager (it manages type faces) AND a Type Manager (it manages files of a defined set of particular types -- postscript, TT, BMAP, OT). Wow, my brain hurts.

I might be old and grumpy (2, Insightful)

grazzy (56382) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044089)

.. but I really dislike all the "managers", picasa [google.com] , nero [nero.com] , hell, I _stopped_ using ACDSee [acdsystems.com] when it became to cluttered (in favor of irfanview [irfanview.com] ofcourse).

Frankly I just dont see the advantage of having one heavyloading utility for each aspect of your work. Explorer does it's work, if I wanted more power on my workstations I'd be slapping Linux on them where I have amazing powers at my tooltip with some help by perl and bash.

And for the shameless plugging of his own article I can only say: tsk tsk.

Re:I might be old and grumpy (1)

value_added (719364) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044326)

Explorer does it's work, if I wanted more power on my workstations I'd be slapping Linux on them where I have amazing powers at my tooltip with some help by perl and bash.

Agreed that Perl and shell are generally preferrable when you know WTF you want/are doing, but Windows Explorer? Single threaded featureless toy with next-to-zero customisability, problematic relationship to the desktop shell and progress dialogs that range from the "very rough" to "braindead" to "absurd" are just a few characterisations off the top of my head.

On a Windows system, the only file manager worth discussing is Directory Opus [gpsoft.com.au] , which aside from having more features and possible customisations than anyone has time for, actually works better than most Win32 apps, that despite the fact that it actually compensates for Explorer's deficiencies. And the multi-pane approach offers a preview window with a plugin architecture (text, html, images, pdfs, etc.) that substitutes nicely for anyone in the habit of using ACDSee, etc. for file management. The irony for me, at least, is that many of menu items and/or toolbar buttons run bash or Perl scripts.

My idea of a "type manager" is a full-featured file manager with a customisable display that accommodates file/directory filtering.

Re:I might be old and grumpy (1)

grazzy (56382) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044404)

90% of the time I only use ctrl-c and ctrl-v. Thats what I use explorer for. Filtering? Sure that's nice, but I dont keep that many files in my directories.

For my pictures I simple use camera\-\*. I end up with a sortable list of directories by date that I can also quickly use to localize a certain happening.

Most of my stuff is organised in this way, my project-folder is simply sitting on my desktop with subdirectories for every project I have or currently is working on.

Sure, I sometimes use filtering with midnight command on my live projects where I have thousands of files in a directory.. but never on my workstation. If you need to have previews to see what kind of content a file contains I think your problem is with your naming scheme really..

Type Manager (4, Insightful)

FooGoo (98336) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044117)

This is article is idiotic and totally misses the reason why these types of applications are a success. It's not about the type of data being managed it's about ease of which you can share that data with other people who have the same interests. It's about building a community of simiar interests.Microsoft Word is the "type manager" of doc files but I don't know that many people who sit around trading doc files and discussing the differences between how Word 6 rendered text versus Word 95.

The author should dig a little deeper...it's not about the data stupid.

Re:Type Manager (1)

Prophet of Nixon (842081) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044145)

Hey, my job seems to consist mostly of trading doc files!

Re:Type Manager (1)

FooGoo (98336) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044177)

Watch out...someone somewhere may be writing a script to replace you.

Re:Type Manager (1)

Prophet of Nixon (842081) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044225)

I could probably be replaced by a sufficiently advanced grammar checker/ARMY jargon translator, as long as it could also spontaneously generate rambling technical justifications for crazy projects. And make colorful spreadsheets with lots of budget and performance forecasts drawn from tenuously connected data.

Re:Type Manager (1, Funny)

xTantrum (919048) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044172)

now we need a /. type manager to edit out the dupes and shitty articles bumble heads put up here. I shall dub it the SLASHCRAP manager.

Assumes Type-based work (4, Interesting)

G4from128k (686170) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044128)

I always organize my files by project. I remember seeing the file system of a friend at work. He had carefully segregated all his files by type. He had a folder full of word processing files (separate folders for each word processors that the company routinely used at the time), another for spreadsheets, another for MATLAB files, another for graphics, etc.

My friend had basically created a Type Manager-like approach. I thought it was crazy because the engineering projects that we did used multiple files of multiple types. On his system the files of any given project were scattered across all these type-based of folders.

My point is that Type Managers can be very useful if a given activity only uses one application or type of file (e.g., rip/mix/burn/listen with music). But when the activity spans multiple types it drives the user back to using a general file manager. In such situations, existing Type Managers fragment the user's access to files and become a hinderance if the project's files are scattered across an email client, a photo manager, a sound file manager, etc.

Re:Assumes Type-based work (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044237)

Some of these applications aren't actually "type-based".

Music applications use multiple file types: music file types, image file types (album art), playlist file types, and probably more (I don't listen to music on my computer so I'm not up-to-date).

I like organization by project. I use R (www.r-project.org) for statistics, and its package organization lets you keep all relevant file types in a single directory, keeping your data, description and help files, scripts, and analysis histories in predictable places.

I think these examples (and the above posts) together suggest that "Type Manager" is a misnomer. They're really all project managers.

Re:Assumes Type-based work (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044383)

My friend had basically created a Type Manager-like approach. I thought it was crazy because the engineering projects that we did used multiple files of multiple types. On his system the files of any given project were scattered across all these type-based of folders.

Symlinks are your friend. :-)

In fact, one point this article didn't make very well is that having many, quite different, views of your data can be very useful.

Re:Assumes Type-based work (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044384)

Exactly.

This reminds me of programmers who put all their ".h" files in one directory, and all their ".c" files in another directory. I would go nuts having to type "vi ../headers/module.h" all damn day.

A module-based organization is much more useful. I have "module.c", "module.h", "module.txt" (for documentation), etc., all organized in one neat folder called -- to nobody's surprise -- "module".

And I thought a type manager was... (2, Interesting)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044135)

...another name for a keyboard designer.

Adobe Type Manager 3.0 Easter Egg:

Open Help/About, double right-click on it and will see the designer's photograph. FUN!!!

KimDaBa (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044140)

Good article. I think that's the way to go. People shouldn't have to bother with file management if they don't want to, but it should still work if they want to. As an example, I use KimDaBa (KDE Image Database) to manage my 10 000 pictures, and with this lovel tool, I can very quickly search every set of pictures I want to just by clicking on a name, a location, a keyword, or a combinaison of it, and (very lovely !) an incremental search. I also use not very often my file hierarchy *BUT* I can rename the files, moves them in another folder or whateve, and it still works (in contrast to iPhoto or the like). This the kind of apps that deserves more publicity. Think of it as Amarok applied to your digital camera.

From the website :
If you are like me you have hundreds or even thousands of images ever since you got your first camera, some taken with a normal camera other with a digital camera. Through all the years you believed that until eternity you would be able to remember the story behind every single picture, you would be able to remember the names of all the persons on your images, and you would be able to remember the exact date of every single image.

        I personally realized that this was not possible anymore, and especially for my digital images - but also for my paper images - I needed a tool to help me describe my images, and to search in the pile of images. This is exactly what KimDaba is all about.

        With KimDaBa it is today possible for me to find any image I have in less than 5 seconds, let that be an image with a special person, an image from a special place, or even both.

        There is of course no such thing as free lunch - with KimDaBa this means that you have to annotate all your images before you are set. KimDaBa is, however, highly optimized for annotating images, so annotating 100 images in 10 minutes are no way impossible.


Check out KimDaBa Demonstration Videos [kde.org] for details

Adobe? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044144)

I could swear I used Adobe Type Manager years and years ago. But hasn't the world progressed beyond that now?

I have mod points and i want to use them (-1, Offtopic)

Amouth (879122) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044146)

is there any way i can mod this front page posting to "WTF be gone now"

Re:I have mod points and i want to use them (1, Funny)

ZachPruckowski (918562) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044300)

you posted in the article, you can't moderate it. RTFM, n00b. It's right here http://slashdot.org/faq/com-mod.shtml#cm1800 [slashdot.org] . Geez. n00b.

Oh, wait, I just dissed a moderator didn't I? Braces for a few comments to get bitchslapped.

Stop the presses! (1, Troll)

Willeh (768540) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044164)

People on Slashdot really like iTunes? That same software that is bloated, sneaks quicktime into unsuspecting installations, rips to vendor locked-in AAC, etc. etc?

I for one really hate iTunes for various reasons. I can manage my own mp3 collection in a sensible manner, and i don't want to have to navigate your braindead library. Call me old & grumpy again, but sheesh. Not to mention iTunes is an evil kludge gui-wise on both OSX and Windows.

OT: ITunes commentary (0)

British (51765) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044195)

The biggest strength of ITunes is being able to clean up multiple MP3 file tags in one sweep. Highlight several MP3s, and you can set them all to the same Artist, year, Album, etc. This is quite helpful when I have numerous tunes by the same artist show up as several artists on my "artists" list. (ie bands with "and" in the title sometimes have &, and it's considered 2 different artists).

I also like the "play next in party shuffle" when you have a hankering for a certain tune.

on the downside, iTunes has created file name pollution on p2p networks with the "03 - Ronnie's song.mp3", ie mp3 files missing the artist name, but with a vague track number. I re-name them as soon as I get them.

Re:OT: ITunes commentary (0)

aleander (95485) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044250)

Wow. So impressive. But I thought you could do that even in Windows Media Player ages before iTunes? And now for mass-renaming at least we Linux guys have things like EasyTag, which can semi-automatically retag, rename and organize the whole collection into proper folders.

But I do like Rhythmbox and it claims to have UI based on iTunes. Therefore, iTunes must have a decent UI :)

Re:Stop the presses! (1)

BenjyD (316700) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044260)

What is there to hate? I put the CD in and come back in five minutes and I can put the music on my iPod in about three clicks. Omnipresent search, drag-and-drop and type-ahead find, easy-to-access auto-playlists (recently added etc) and file sources/sinks on the left. I don't want to have to care how my music is stored on my hard disk, although itunes stores it in a fairly logical manner when I've looked. It will rip to MP3 (or Ogg, with a plugin IIRC). I can play my non-DRMd AACs on my linux machine with faad2.

Re:Stop the presses! (1)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044305)

"rips to vendor locked-in AAC, etc. etc?"

There is on DRM on AAC files you rip yourself and no such option to even enable DRM on music you rip from CD. iTunes also has built in support for ripping to MP3.

Creating type managers (5, Funny)

Hal_Porter (817932) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044205)

What's needed is a class library which speeds the creation of Type Managers. It should have a Document base class which applications could extend to contain document info, and a View base class which would abstract the user interface. Both would have base methods for all the common stuff, and you'd extend them with the specifics of what you're trying to do. There'd be Views derived classes based on common widgets, like dialogs and lists.

Additionally, there'd be a way for software components to register as viewers of file types in some global database, so that they could integrate with the default shell and display previews. They should also be able to open the type manager or print, perhaps integrating into shell's context menus.

Yup, welcome to Windows 95 with a bunch of MFC applications, COM components and the registry.

Feeping creaturism (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14044212)

After creating a list of all the traits of a Type Manager I was able to define exactly what a file manager should be

So you just look at all the software that fit category XYZ, take the union of their feature sets, and voila, you've defined the perfect XYZ application? Riiiiiight. Software design is just that easy [catb.org] .

You know what, I've created a list of all the bridges I'd like to sell you...

Excellent choices of hackneyed responses. (3, Insightful)

ahem (174666) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044216)

Maybe I'm the only one who sees some irony in people using the Comic Book Guy style of response to mock and belittle an interesting work. The small minds living in Mom's basement can only denigrate a reasonably well organized treatise on an interesting subject. Commenters have pointed out that "there's nothing new here", "this guy chose a bad name", "this is only novel to someone who hasn't thought of this before."

So what, people? A refinement is a refinement. It's stepwise by nature. This is news because someone's aggregated their perceptions of the world and the ideas they sparked into one place. One of you complained about, "why didn't he publish an actual piece of code with an api for plugins?", and I suggest that maybe someone who reads this, who hadn't thought of all this before, might take this as a launching point and actually write something useful.

Let's enjoy the journey. If we happen to visit a few points along the road more than once, it's no big deal. Seeing the same vista from a different viewpoint can be refreshing.

Re:Excellent choices of hackneyed responses. (0, Troll)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044316)

Sorry, but Philospher as a title just doesn't really fly with this crowd. This kind of piece ranks right up there with the dozen or so OQO articles before the launch, or Cringly's article on how things should be. We want results, we want product. If we wanted "this is a neat idea, somebody should do it" we'd grab a pack of nabs and a coke and find the geek table in the lunchroom. The number of replies (most of which should be "redundant", not "insightful" or "informative"...including mine by the time I posted it) confirms this.

Re:Excellent choices of hackneyed responses. (1)

HisMother (413313) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044333)

Wish I had mod points. Well spoken, ahem!

Worst post ever (2, Funny)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044359)

Just kidding.
I agree....instead of criticizing the guy, maybe people could add some insight on to how to quickly and easily manage their own files besides using iTunes?
C:/DOS/RUN
http://www.actionfig.com/simpsons/cbg_dos.jpg [actionfig.com]

Well if it were insightful... (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044389)

People might be more accepting if the idea had not been repeated a million times in the past twenty years.

The real problem is that to many, it looks nothing like refinement and instead rather like a reshuffling of old ideas.

Why... (0, Redundant)

shish (588640) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044219)

Why do I get the feeling that this is secretly a test to see how many times a summary can have a meaningless buzzword repeated before people start complaining?

MAGIC NUMBER: THE GATHERATING (0)

blair1q (305137) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044222)

This was solved with a 2-byte code in the 70s.

Anyone got any news?

Type Manager? (3, Funny)

AyeRoxor! (471669) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044236)

I have been taken a closer look at the Type Manager, what makes them so usefull, what they really provide for the user and came to some surprising results.

When it manages basic spelling and grammar, count me in.

Calm it down. (1)

vlad_grigorescu (804005) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044243)

To all the people out there complaining about this being the same as a font type manager, first off, relax. It's kind of scary that so many people are having problems by getting them confused, and apparently the problems are big enough that you feel the need to add a post about it. Secondly, next time you might want to take a look at the line: "from the no-not-for-fonts-silly dept." I mean... it even comes before the text, so there is really no need to get confused, and if somehow you still manage to get confused, please stop bragging about the fact.

Bishop, stop saying "Type Manager"! (1)

marsvin (84268) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044274)

It doesn't mean anything.

Type Managers... (1)

flokati (926091) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044279)

are full of use!

hate 'em (1)

timothy (36799) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044310)

I have a file system / organization already -- not that it's perfect, or that I'm not constantly shifting it around in a confusing attempt to clarify my thought pattern, but I have an organizational system such that things are clasified the way I want them to be, roughly. And when something is not, I messed up, so can in theory trace the error. These "type managers" tend to stash files places where I don't know that they are (and rely on files being in those places), etc.

It's annoying to be forced into someone else's paradigm -- what if I want to view my files in a different way than someone else's "type manager"? This is not to say smart people aren't making intelligent choices, for them and even for other people, but that doesn't mean any *given* person is going to like their choices.

I don't use Mac OS X much any more, and one reason is that (while again, I know a lot of people *do* like them) I don't like iTunes or iPhoto. When using a modern UNIXy desktop, I'd rather navigate to files (whether GUI or CLI) and then choose an app with which to manipulate ... whatever it is I want to manipulate. I might open a text file in any of a dozen programs, might open a photo with The GIMP or with a dedicated viewer program, or a slideshow program, or a browser.

Tim

Implied metadata (2, Insightful)

MaestroSartori (146297) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044341)

Maybe it's because I'm just weird, but many of my files have implied metadata based on how I organise the filesystem they're in.

MP3s are in directories of the form Artist - Album, file names are TrackNumber - Title. I've been doing this ever since an early version of iTunes for windows screwed my id3 tags, but since my MP3s are all tagged as a matter of course when I rip them, it means there's a level of redundancy in there. However, should something else wipe the metadata again, I still have the filesystem-level organisation to fall back on. I even have a tool which can strip this information out and refill the id3 tags with it, so it'd take me less time.

I'd be concerned that letting a manager program handle all of this might result in a hodge-podge of files outwith my control, then if something should happen to the organisational data, I'd have a pile of files with little, no or maybe even unintellgible organisation... :(

How I find and fiddle with my data (1)

QuatermassX (808146) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044362)

I'd really like to read through some research on alternate ways to explore digital data. I'm no technical boffin but do spend heaps of time in front of my Mac Mini working on "stuff".

Now this stuff is comprised of: Photographs - .jpg's, .psd's, etc Essays, film reviews, stories - .doc, .txt, e-mail messages Day job stuff - all the above file types

Now, I think a previous post pointed out that in the real world, the activities in which we engage generally are grouped together as "projects" - a heap o' photos, some line art, copy, maybe movie files.

Finding by 'type' does very little to improve my organisational abilities and really doesn't help me find things easily and neatly. Good ol nested files and folders does the trick nicely.

But when I assign the proper metadata to my photos, iPhoto (looking forward to Apterture) is a killer way to visually organise and interact with (and bloody find) my photos.

Same with iTunes - great to batch toggle the metadata that goes along with the .mp3's - although I do remember being hacked off about SoundJam's demise as (if I remember rightly) it used the Finder's file and folder info to organise the .mp3's.

Seems to me that something like Apple's Spotlight - which is one of these Type Manager apps - is just another, very simple way to display data that really isn't all that useful in the real world.

How do you organise data and find things? If by project, do you use files/folders - shove everything into some sort of database - ?

So, what the article really says... (1)

johnlcallaway (165670) | more than 8 years ago | (#14044373)

We currently have applications like iTunes and MusicMatch that enable us to hide the details of where our files are in the file system, and present them in a means other than sorting by name/date/size. And that in the future we will have more. These applications no longer require the user to be intimate with the hierarchical structure of a file system;

Wow ... thanks ... really appreciate the heads up.

It's funny that these same apps usually use a hierarchical approach to display the data back. The two music ripping apps I use store the data under directories that have chosen because I have specific drives where I store 'data', and then stores them by in artists and album directories.

So all that is really done is provided a means to resort data by tags and edit those tags. I think the author should have gone the next step and suggested that maybe the standard file browser should provide for the ability to add plug ins to display certain directory and file types.

Now THAT would be revolutionary!!! Opps, forgot that Firefox (and other browsers and graphic tools and music players) already support those also.

Ok, evolutionary. Microsoft, are you listening???
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