Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Ubuntu On The Business Desktop

Zonk posted more than 7 years ago | from the crafty-consultants-club dept.

Linux Business 346

rchapman wrote to mention a Mad Penguin story about a consultant who installed Ubuntu on his work PC, and managed to use it for over a month before his boss even noticed. From the article: "This is not a typical review, because you've read enough of those. Instead, lets pretend I'm a typical worker, who just happens to have a soft spot for Open Source software. I want to use Linux, but I have a job to do. The price of Freedom should not be my salary. I don't have time to fiddle, all I care is whether or not it can do what I want, right now. So what do I want out of my system?"

cancel ×

346 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

slashdot fucking sucks :D (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052333)

open source blows goats :D

first post!

Fascagats Post (1)

Adolf Hitroll (562418) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052338)

Le cochon dans le mais [paroles.net]

Demain, je porte plainte contre l'Amérique
J'ai bouffé du maïs et du chou transgénique
Je n'bande plus ça reste mou comme une chique
José Bové a dit que c'était allergique
Il paraît qu'on est plusieurs dans le le même cas-ca
On ira plus manger au Ricain car c'est caca

Le seul remède c'est une assiette de foie gras
Un verre de rouge, du Roquefort et pas de soda
Demain, je porte plainte contre l'Amérique
L'Amérique
Nous ce qu'on veut c'est du bon et du biologique
Attends tu vas voir, on va leur faire la nique
Faire la nique
Si les Ricains nous embrouillent con:

On leur mettra le cochon
Le cochon dans le maïs
Et on mettra les glaçons
Les glaçons dans le pastis
{x4}

Demain, je porte plainte contre L'Amérique
J'ai bouffé du poireau transformé génétique
Et depuis ma carotte n'est plus énergique
Pourtant ma femme tu verrais comme elle l'astique
Il paraît qu'on est plusieurs dans le même cas-ca

On ira plus manger au Ricain car c'est caca
Le seul remède c'est une assiette de foie gras
Un verre de rouge, du Roquefort et pas de soda
Demain, je porte plainte contre l'Amérique
L'Amérique
Nous ce qu'on veut c'est du bon et du biologique
Attends, tu vas voir, on va leur faire la nique
Faire la nique
Si les Ricains nous embrouillent con:

On leur mettra le cochon
Le cochon dans le maïs
Et on mettra les glaçons
Les glaçons dans le pastis
{ad libitum}

I had a dream (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052347)

Gee, and I actually had a dream last night that everyone I knew was switching to ubuntu with me.

NT AD or Domain? (5, Interesting)

painkillr (33398) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052348)

How'd he get it on the domain?

Re:NT AD or Domain? (1)

mysqlrocks (783488) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052363)

How'd he get it on the domain?

Samba, perhaps?

Ubuntu hype (2, Interesting)

joestar (225875) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052365)

Well... I managed to use Mandrake(Mandriva) for more than 4 years on my business desktop with most people noticing that I rarely have any issue compared to their Windows workstation.

Viva Ubuntu! Glad to see that you are taking care of the Linux desktop! Anyway, it's not really new for me to live without any proprietary software on my business desktop, with minimum hassle.

Re:Ubuntu hype (5, Informative)

AKAImBatman (238306) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052611)

In my experience, there is only one app that makes it impossible for the companies I've worked at to switch over to an alternative OS: Microsoft Access.

Love it or hate it (mostly hate it), it lets companies quickly create interfaces to larger databases. It's so simply and easy to do, that many developers don't realize (or perhaps care) that they'll be paying heavily for their choice later on when either their needs scale beyond Access, or Microsoft releases a new (usually incompatible) version.

Sadly, just about everyone I've spoken with has considered Access support to be unimportant to office conversions. "They should use a real database," they say. While that's a fine stance to take, that doesn't help companies that are already relying on MS Access. And if you take the emulation route to get Access support, you might as well just run Windows in the first place.

It's really too bad that the Access format is so widely ignored. Much of the groundwork [sourceforge.net] has already been laid for reading/writing the format, and StarOffice/OSS have a real chance to make Access work correctly. IMHO, managers given the opportunity to use their existing Access applications on a better platform would jump at the chance to save money and support calls.

Re:Ubuntu hype (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052722)

I made the silly mistake of 'asking' if I can install Linux on an old unused PC at work.

The answer I was given is "Linux? I don't think we're licenced for that. So, no, you can't install it."

Freedom? (5, Funny)

GypC (7592) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052370)

The price of Freedom should not be my salary.

Exactly! That's why I surf porn on the company network. The fascists won't be telling me what to do...

BBL, I have a special meeting in HR to go to. I wonder if I'm getting a raise.

What humourless imbecile modded this offtopic? (0, Offtopic)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052472)

Its quite funny. If you have 2 braincells to rub together and get the joke
which the original mod obviously didn't. Mod it up!

MOD PARENT UP! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052518)

Hey mods
This guy knows what he's talking about!
MOD HIM UP!!!!!!

Re:Freedom? (2, Funny)

paranode (671698) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052542)

BBL, I have a special meeting in HR to go to. I wonder if I'm getting a raise.

Be sure to tell them that you probably only do about 15 minutes of real, actual work. When they get surprised mention that you are not being challenged and have no motivation. That raise will come your way! ;)

2560x2048 ? (4, Funny)

graphicartist82 (462767) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052376)

2560x2048 spread across 2 monitors? I hope he means 2560 x 1024 .. Otherwise that'd be one helluva 17" LCD monitor!

Re:2560x2048 ? (1)

CaptnMArk (9003) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052470)

maybe he has 2 pivoted 2048x1280 screens

Re:2560x2048 ? (1)

menkhaura (103150) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052481)

Four monitors perhaps, at 1280x1024 each? That seems reasonable (I don't know if it is possible, though; xinerama may have some way to take care of it)

Re:2560x2048 ? (2, Informative)

Janek Kozicki (722688) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052494)

2560x2048 spread across 2 monitors? I hope he means 2560 x 1024 .. Otherwise that'd be one helluva 17" LCD monitor!

I guess that he is speaking about virtual desktop. Probably he has two 1280x1024 monitors. But 2560x2048 would also work with two 800x600 monitors :>

Good to hear! (1, Redundant)

superdan2k (135614) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052381)

I have a new laptop arriving at my office today (rather than have it delivered to my apartment steps where some shiftless hippie layabout can gank it), and I'm planning on running Ubuntu nearly fulltime (with the occasional venture into Windows to run Civ 3 and Civ 4). Given all the shit with my Windows laptop here, I may just try to make the fulltime switch.

Re:Good to hear! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052443)

which laptop are you getting ? i am planning on buying one soon and mean to run ubuntu on it as well, but i'm not sure which to get.. i realize this is sorta off topic. but it would be a boon to know..

Re:Good to hear! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052702)

I have a Dell Inspirion 6000 running ubuntu right now, have had no problems with it what-so-ever. Wireless words stock, yet there isn't much use for wireless in a dorm anyway.

I did notice that it doesn't default with full dvd movie decoder support installed, but you can just apt-get the packages easy enough.

Re:Good to hear! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052531)

fwiw, I installed Breezy Badger on my Dell 600m and not only was it a perfectly smooth install, even ipw2200 wireless worked out of the box which I had not seen previously

Re:Good to hear! (1)

bigalsenior (869954) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052661)

the ipw2200 installed but it refuses to connect to a wep or wpa encrypted network antone know what im doing wrong? the system is a dell latitude c610 with 256 megs ram.

I rate this story... (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052383)

8/10.

This post was sponsored by Canonical.

I worked at a place one (5, Informative)

saskboy (600063) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052388)

One time I went to fix someone's Windows computer at work. I found it to be very different from the standard machine image, it was missing something like Microsoft Word. He mentioned that he'd installed linux on the machine, and put Windows back on himself. I didn't know what to do, so I told my boss what I'd seen, and it turns out tinkering with the software in that way, at this company, was a big no-no. I don't know to know what happened to that employee, but thumb screws might have been involved.

Before you tinker with a work computer, ask! You won't like the answer, but there won't be any thumb screws.

Re:I worked at a place one (-1, Troll)

l3v1 (787564) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052484)

I didn't know what to do, so I told my boss what I'd seen

You're lucky you're not my colleague. Did you get any pats on your back and promoted for being so "vigilant" ? Look ma' what's his doin'...
 

Exactly (4, Insightful)

dreamchaser (49529) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052503)

You should be modded as insightful. The place to play is on your own machine. If you don't like the standards at your workplace you should find a new job. I'm all for running whatever works on the desktop, but it's the perogative of the *owner* of the hardware (in this case the employer) to decided what is to be run on it.

This reminds me of my teenager who has a habit of decided on her own that certain rules shouldn't apply to her so she'll just do as she pleases. Buy a machine and play with Linux at home. If you feel strongly about running it at work then propose it to your boss.

Re:I worked at a place one (3, Interesting)

liquidpele (663430) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052566)

That's the policy at most large companies. I always thought it was stupid though, since they give you a computer which you can install anything on, but you can't install another OS? I believe the reasoning is that most companies have automatic patch installations on their networks, so they can ensure windows is up to date, but because they don't have anything like that for other OS's, they dont' want an OS they can't ensure is patched on their network.

The penalties for messing with it are ridiculous though.

Re:I worked at a place one (4, Insightful)

jimicus (737525) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052797)

since they give you a computer which you can install anything on

Stop right there. Sometimes IT people and even developers can install anything on, generally everybody else gets the system locked down to a greater or lesser extent.

Fascist? Maybe.
Reduces number of calls to the helpdesk? Definitely.
Reduces the risk of a rather nasty audit by the BSA? Definitely.
Reduces the risk of inadvertantly introducing malware? Definitely.
Inconvenience to users? Only if you haven't got the good sense to find out what your users need and make sure they've got it.

Re:I worked at a place one (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052567)

snitches get stitches, faggot!!!!!!!!!

Re:I worked at a place one (1)

networkBoy (774728) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052587)

Yes, but this guy had the sense to install a spare HDD for the experiment, thus "Undo" was fairly easy.
I use Cygwin at work for the same reason you just mentioned. Since I'm a Dev I get some liberties on my system (I could install Linux and not get yelled at), but I very well may loose IT support. That is something I would rather not do as even though they are nearly helpless, at least they get yelled at when a patch breaks something.
-nB

Re:I worked at a place one (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052616)

Using any unapproved operating system on a computer where I work -- even using a live Linux CD -- is a firing offense. It is considered a risk to the security of the network...seems as though our network people think that using a Live Linux CD can import a virus to bring a Windows network down. Yes, that's exactly what I was told! I was also told that using Linux posed a problem in that they 'didn't have tracking tools for Linux so couldn't tell what web sites were visited or what was downloaded or uploaded.' That did sound more reasonable.

You've got to be kidding (1)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052709)

They don't do tracking at the firewall? I would think they monitor the ports, not the remote applications.

I do see the CD paranoia thing. My wife's company diables the CDROMs and floppies so that nobody can install "foreign" software. I'm not quite sure how they deal with USB , but I think they figure nobody at that office knows enough to use a key or a portable.

Re:You've got to be kidding (1)

BJH (11355) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052806)

Most likely they disable the USB ports in the BIOS and password-lock it, or switch them off in the registry and lock it down with admin privileges.

Re:I worked at a place one (2, Informative)

meringuoid (568297) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052732)

seems as though our network people think that using a Live Linux CD can import a virus to bring a Windows network down. Yes, that's exactly what I was told!

Well, they can. In theory. It would be insane to actually do it that way, mind...

I was also told that using Linux posed a problem in that they 'didn't have tracking tools for Linux so couldn't tell what web sites were visited or what was downloaded or uploaded.' That did sound more reasonable.

That actually sounds less reasonable. Surely they should be logging your internet activity at the network gateway? Isn't that a hell of a lot easier than maintaining spyware on every individual machine?

Re:I worked at a place one (2, Interesting)

SmellTheCoffee (808375) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052800)

My wife works for an electronics company and they are trying to bring some linux servers in the company. I've been using Linux at home for about 2 years now and she's been watching me work and tinker while listening my occasional rants about the **OS-with-biggest-market-share**. She naturally got interested over time and wanted to use Linux on her office IBM Thinkpad but she wanted to start out with installing it herself. Knowing how enterprises have PC's with don't-touch-it policy, I suggested that she talk to the IT person in her company about her plans. I was pretty sure she would get a no-no but to my surprise the IT department said GO AHEAD! do what you want to. We will reimage your laptop with windows...but don't forget to backup your stuff first.

Why the boss didn't notice (1)

external400kdiskette (930221) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052389)

Any boss that can look at a desktop for a month and not notice a completely different operating system is an idiot, but it explains why he didn't notice for a month, "and that was only because he happened to glance at my screen". Not very surprising.

Having said that if your entire business and profit revolves around profit even if you can work on Ubuntu or whatever it's probably a better idea to work with Windows since your dealing with clients and windows related issues. But whatever makes him happy.

Re:Why the boss didn't notice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052583)

Maybe I'm reading too much into your comment, but are you saying Windows may be more profitable for consultants?

Re:Why the boss didn't notice (3, Funny)

Otter (3800) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052658)

Yeah, I once had a coworker who simply stopped showing up to work altogether and it took well over a month for our boss to notice. I don't find this story quite as astonishing as "Simon" seems to think I should.

Linux Addict (5, Funny)

kspiteri (599317) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052394)

My name is Simon, I am a Linux addict, and this is my story.

So long for Linux Anonymous.
--
Run for Fun [blogspot.com]

Me too (5, Interesting)

psbrogna (611644) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052395)

I'm an IT professional that's been using Unbuntu at work for about 2 months know. Everything works fine (email, internet, Office compatible applications, etc). I do miss MS Access (Ubuntu doesn't have latest version of OOO which would have included an Access counterpart). MySQL CC or MySQL Admin+Query Browser aren't as easy to use (though they are faster because all queries are pass through).

I've been using Suse OSS 10 at home and like it a little better- more robust repositories slightly more stable.

I will say that when the next desktop o/s upgrade occurs at my company it may not be as hard as I thought to put Linux on the candidate list because the number of non-IT employees that are switching to Linux at home on their own (without any evangelizing by me) is pretty high. This will certainly make it an easier sell if I want to consider Linux on the desktop at work rather than the PIA-Du Jour from Redmond.

Re:Me too (2, Interesting)

LDoggg_ (659725) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052559)

(Ubuntu doesn't have latest version of OOO which would have included an Access counterpart).

I have very little experience with ubuntu(mostly fedora user), but I know this isn't true.
I installed ubuntu in vmware the other day was able to have it upgrade to open office 2 without any problems.

Re:Me too (1)

psbrogna (611644) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052684)

Well one of us is leaving something out.

My Ubuntu did not come with OO 2 and with the standard repositories, I have not been offered it as an option when using the Ubuntu Upgrade Manager. I'm not saying I couldn't go get it myself but this trial is to see how Ubuntu works if I keep the packages reasonably close to what Ubuntu expects. Most issues w/Linux (or for any o/s for that matter) arise when you start dumping all kinds of unmanaged, un qa'd combinations of components on the same box. Part of the value of a distro in a workplace to me will be managing the package selection for me.

Re:OO2 separate package (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052777)

OO2 is a separate package from OO1 and the update manager wont automatically change it, I believe the current comes with both installed at the same time(at least the iso I downloaded did). You may need to uncomment the other repositories in /etc/apt/sources.list to be able to stat and apt them.

Re:Me too (1)

arkanes (521690) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052790)

The thing neither of you are saying is which release of Ubuntu you used and what timeframe you installed them in. The current version of Ubunut includes OO 2, and it has been backported to the previous version, which didn't ship with it. I do not believe, however, that the OO 2 packages are considered upgrades for the OO 1 ones, because it's possible to run them in parellel. So if you installed from an older release you would have OO 1, and you would not have been prompted to upgrade. Installing OO 2 from the repository via Synaptic will probably work fine.

Re:Me too (2, Insightful)

DoctorPepper (92269) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052699)

Um, perhaps you should upgrade to 5.10, that includes OOo 2.0 (1.9.129 pre-release, actually), and OOo Base, which is the Access counter-part.

Re:Me too (1, Flamebait)

AppyPappy (64817) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052708)

I do a lot of Access development and it's a waste. I'm a programmer. Access is supposed to be an end-user tool. The end-users can't figure out Access for snot. So I have to do all the devlopment of reports, forms, modules and queries. I SHOULD be using a better tool and database than Access but we are sold on Access because it is a good end-user tool.

Freaking circular logic. We would be better off creating a real database in MySQL or Postgres or Oracle and using an ODBC link into Excel since the users understand Excel...somewhat.

Access is a PIG. It pisses me off.

And I'm not using Ubuntu because it just don't sound American.

look into crossover office (1)

jasonhamilton (673330) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052785)

Crossover office can bridge that gap by letting you run ms office, photoshop, dreamweaver, etc.

They have a free trial too. I'm impressed with it.

a 2560x2048 desktop? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052398)

a 2560x2048 desktop spread across two monitors

Isn't that supposed to be 2560x1024?

Haven't used Windows... (4, Informative)

eno2001 (527078) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052407)

...on my desktop for about five years here at work now. To be honest, if you know what you're doing with computers, there's no reason to stick with Windows on your desktop in a Windows environment. For those apps that you HAVE to have, there is Wine and 'rdesktop'. When I need to do some Windows admin stuff, I just connect to one of our servers with 'rdesktop'. And I got most of the basic apps installed under Wine if there was no Linux equivalent. Linux gives you everything you need and more than Windows ever could. And of course uptime and reliability... we won't talk about that. Suffice it to say that when my Windows using co-workers are scrambling to apply critical updates, clean up worm/virus issues and griping about malware, I'm always up and running without a glitch.

Re:Haven't used Windows... (4, Insightful)

Alworx (885008) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052482)

Please help me guys...

I really can't understand all these issues with Windows desktops! At my (very small) company we have 4 windows pcs and a Linux file/mail server. We have never had half a minute's worth of downtime since 2001, except maybe when during the summer I switched the last PC over from 2K di XP.

Malware? Never. Virii? None. Patches? Just a question of clicking "next" a couple of times.

The trick? No one is allowed to install anything and all users run with minum priviledges. Sounds banal? It should! :-)

Add RDP and SSH and you can administer anything with out burning calories!

Re:Haven't used Windows... (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052629)

say it with me........Viruses.... There, wasn't that easy? Virii and Viri are made up words that have nothing to do with the the word virus. They are a bastardized fake latin pluralization. The correct plural of virus is viruses.

Re:Haven't used Windows... (1)

Skye16 (685048) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052500)

>> To be honest, if you know what you're doing with computers, there's no reason to stick with Windows on your desktop in a Windows environment.

I have a really good reason. I'd be fired. End of story.

Re:Haven't used Windows... (1)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052506)

"those apps that you HAVE to have, there is Wine and 'rdesktop'."

*cough* Yeah , WINE is so 100% compatible *cough*. Sorry , much as I despise
windows , you'll find lots of firms require various windows apps to be used
(no , not just virus checkers) that WINE simply isn't up for. In fact from my
own experiments running WINE , it has enough problems running common apps like
Office , never mind more esoteric , possibly in-house programs.

Re:Haven't used Windows... (1)

arkanes (521690) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052721)

In-house stuff tends to work *better* than Office under Wine. Office makes extensive use of rare and obscure API calls (even when there are better ones) and for reasons unknown to me provides all of it's own (extensive) widget and UI scaffolding. In-house apps tend to use Windows provided interfaces (mostly via MFC). Really, Office is almost a platform of it's own - it installs a lot of "platform" style stuff, like hooking & replacing the standard clipboard, the "find fast" crap on older versions, etc.

Office may be common, but it's hard to emulate. More "normal" apps, especially your standard "whipped up in MFC in 3 months by our in house dev team" stuff is far more likely to run without a hitch.

Re:Haven't used Linux... (4, Funny)

DogDude (805747) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052605)

...on my desktop ever. To be honest, if you know what you're doing with computers, there's no reason not to stick with Windows on your desktop in a Windows environment. For those apps that you HAVE to have, there is no real replacement for a real Windows machine (point-of-sale software with hardware). When I need to do some Windows admin stuff, I just do it. All of the basic apps installed under native Windows with no problem. Windows gives you everything you need and more easily than Linux ever could. And of course uptime and reliability... we haven't had to talk abuot that since Windows 2000 came out. Not an issue. Suffice it to say that when my Linux using friends are scrambling to figure out how to get their machine to boot, figure out how to do simple things like change the screen resolution and griping about .config files, I'm always up and running without a glitch.

Re:Haven't used Linux... (0, Flamebait)

eno2001 (527078) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052815)

Suffice it to say that when my Linux using friends are scrambling to figure out how to get their machine to boot, figure out how to do simple things like change the screen resolution and griping about .config files, I'm always up and running without a glitch.

Apparently they don't know much about computers then. Do they? And neither do you...

Re:Haven't used Linux... (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052835)

So what's your point, that Windows and Linux really are interchangeable? I'm pretty sure MS doens't see it that way, and they certainly don't want their customers to see it that way.

Re:Haven't used Windows... (2, Interesting)

jdgreen7 (524066) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052714)

To be honest, if you know what you're doing with computers, there's no reason to stick with Windows on your desktop in a Windows environment

Once again, I call BS. I hate Windows problems as much as the next guy, but there are certain applications that only run in Windows environments. In fact, there are MANY applications that only run in certain environments. WINE, as good as it may be, still falls WAY short of making every Windows-based app work successfully on Linux (let alone trying to get it working on a 64-bit machine at all - see Ubuntu 5.10's repository for AMD64).

In my industry, there are no applications designed for any OS but Windows that handle all of the government regulations that we need to comply with. There are a couple of web-based products, but either their quality is very poor, or you are required to store your data on their servers. Unacceptable. At the moment, unless you have a ton of free time to devote to writing all of your software in-house, and you also have the skills to make that software cross-platform, easy to use, etc., some people/companies are forced to remain on Windows.

You also mention rdesktop, which is fine, but you still have to have a Windows terminal server configured to make that happen. Some software doesn't run nicely in a Terminal Server environment, plus, if your users need to access that software, you still have to pay for a Windows File/Print CAL in addition to the Terminal Server CAL, so there's no cost savings that way, either.

I love Linux's philosophy and general framework as much as the next geek, but to make a blanket statement like "There is NO reason to run Windows" is a bit far-fetched. There are plenty of reasons to run Windows, just as there are plenty of reasons to run Linux. It's still a choice, and Windows will remain until every vendor starts designing apps to be cross-platform or specifically targeting Linux/MacOSX, etc. But, for now, Windows is where 90% of their clients are, and they need to pay bills, too. Hopefully, that will continue to change.

Re:Haven't used Windows... (1)

eno2001 (527078) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052784)

Where I work there is only one application that matters that runs on Windows and it runs very well under Wine. So in my situation, there was no reason to stick with Windows. We don't use Exchange, so I don't need Outlook and even if we did, I'd use Evolution instead. Of course I'm also not an "underling" who would get fired for making such a decision. That IS a valid reason for sticking with Windows and it's not a technological one, it's political.

Huh? (5, Funny)

GypC (7592) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052415)

The fonts are so smooth I want to spread them all over my body.

Nausea forced me to stop reading at this point.

Re:Huh? (3, Funny)

Skye16 (685048) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052532)

I had to stop reading too, but that was because I was too aroused.

Oh Arial! Arial! (2, Funny)

winkydink (650484) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052578)

my dingbats are aflutter!

Um, Well (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052424)

It should be noted that by default, Windows Server 2003 is configured to allow unencrypted connections.

Well, if you don't check the box that says 'require encrypted connections' when you set it up.

Now, lets rewrite that to the actual truth.

'It should be noted that by default, Windows Server 2003 does not allow VPN connections at all. Once you enable remote access, you actually have to spend 1.3 seconds to turn encryption on.'

http://www.multihack.org/downloads.html [multihack.org]

Exchange integration (4, Insightful)

fm2503 (876331) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052427)

"However, all was not lost. Exchange server is fairly happy to deliver e-mail, and even meeting requests, via IMAP. I quietly crept onto the Windows server, turned on the IMAP virtual server, and thus set up my Evolution mailboxes."

All very well and good, but no organization with decent change control would allow this to happen. If the policy is MAPI only does anyone have a better solution that fetchmailex ? At least for use with Thunderbird?

Ta,

Matt

My experiences with Linux (of all flavours) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052431)

I have an Biostar iDeq 200N computer with an NVIDIA nForce2 IGP + MCP-T chipset + 1GB ram + a 3GHZ Athlon, and Linux fails.

Suse 9.3, 10 fail to install at all, crapping out at random points, I have tried installing using all the available install options.

Ubuntu at least gets a clean install, though it fails to detect the ethernet connection/any PCI card installed. Indeed, once it is up and running it falls flat (goes back to the login screen) at random intervals.

Though it sounds like a hardware failure, it must be pointed out that Win 2K/XP work perfectly.

Could anyone suggest a solution to this problem?

Re:My experiences with Linux (of all flavours) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052685)

i have a solution for you:

quit lying. you just made up like half of your hardware. there is no such animal as a mcp-t chipset.

Is M$ paying you for posting this crapfest on /.?

enjoy your shill money you lying liar.

Re:My experiences with Linux (of all flavours) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052765)

Rare animal [biostar.com.tw] this one [nforcershq.com]

I've heard this sentiment before... (1)

Caspian (99221) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052432)



Speaking as a Unix geek: This is usually the sort of sentence one hears from Windows people in defense of Windows. It's very ironic that someone is using the very same argument in defense of Ubuntu, a Linux distribution. I think this is actually a good thing. (It's certainly a pleasant change.)

Google Truthalizer Translation ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052450)

I managed to work for a month and a half before the Boss noticed I was using Linux

Translation:

I managed to surf the web, email and IM for a month and a half before the Boss noticed I was coming in on time.

Just wanted to get things done?? (5, Insightful)

bakreule (95098) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052459)

Don't let the /. blurb fool you. The article has as many "damn it didn't work" moments as "woohoo!" moments. Hell, he couldn't even get Evolution connected to Exchange. That right there would be a death blow to any Linux-in-a-Windows environment migration.

Don't be fooled, Linux has a long way to go before being a drop-in replacement for Windows on the desktop.

Re:Just wanted to get things done?? (1)

Descalzo (898339) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052588)

I think it said that he had to turn on IMAP and it worked just fine.

Re:Just wanted to get things done?? (4, Insightful)

at_slashdot (674436) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052644)

"Don't be fooled, Linux has a long way to go before being a drop-in replacement for Windows on the desktop."

Of course, there's a long way till 50,000 viruses will be written for Linux.

Now being serious, I'm kind of tired of "Linux it's ready" or "Linux it's not ready" kind of posts. It has been ready for me 1 year ago, for some was even earlier and for some it will never be -- it depends on the usage, what are your needs and what programs you use taling generalities doesn't make much sense.
 

Re:Just wanted to get things done?? (1)

horza (87255) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052727)

Don't be fooled, Linux has a long way to go before being a drop-in replacement for Windows on the desktop.

And vice versa.

Phillip.

Re:Just wanted to get things done?? (1)

Hymer (856453) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052754)

We are not fooled... but you probably are...
Pls. tell me when do you consider something a drop-in replacement for something else ???
Do you buy a new car as a replacement for the old one ?? ...so you can use the same tires and wheels and other leftover from the old one ??

I would love to... (1)

sammy.lin (930751) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052520)

Switch to a Linux enviornment, but the work I do just cant allow it. Our system runs on M$ applications (SQL server, and ASP.NET). Moving to a Linux desktop means I dont get Enterprise Manager, Query Analyzer and no Visual Studio (Im aware of Mono). This is somewhat hard since I use Gentoo at home. But if the person FTFA is able to do his work for a month, and still have his Linux, bravo!

Linux at school (2, Interesting)

Descalzo (898339) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052524)

I teach, and use Mac OSX 10.2 and these are the things I don't think I can live without: iChat (Rendezvous client) and PowerSchool.

I am sure PowerSchool doesn't have a Linux port, but I know they make a Windows version. I am very hesitant to try to run the Windows version in wine, as I have never used wine. Also, the only computer they have given me (so far) is an old iMac. Can you run windows apps in wine on a Mac?

Also, I have heard that you can use Trillian to be a part of Rendezvous, but I tried it and it didn't work for me. Am I doing something wrong?

I see these (and the time it takes to install) as the 2 things stopping me from moving over to Linux at school.

Re:Linux at school (1)

SpiritGod21 (884402) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052851)

I believe you have to have Trillian Pro to use Rendezvous. I do (purchased it to support them a while back), and I don't remember having Rendezvous on Trillian Basic.

My recommendation? Take your own computer in and hook it up :-P I've been thinking about doing the same in response to being handed a crappy computer, but don't expect them to give you tech support if you do.

Sounds like a nightmare... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052533)

Stick with Windows. Save yourself all the hassle.

Coral Cache if needed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052538)

http://madpenguin.org.nyud.net:8090/cms/?m=show&op [nyud.net] t=printable&id=5557

cp karma /dev/null

Office computer != your computer (2, Insightful)

Viol8 (599362) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052539)

Whatever someone may feel about Windows or some other OS, if thats what the
company requires you to use then you have to use it. Its their computer, they're
paying you money , you do what they tell you. You wouldn't expect to get away
with repainting your desk , or putting down a new carpet around where you sit
"because I don't like grey" , so why do some people think they can get away with
messing around with the company computer. Its not your property. Yes , Ubunto
is a great distribution , but pissing off your boss this way is not a good way
to spread the Open Source message. IMO anyway.

Re:Office computer != your computer (2, Insightful)

KiroDude (853510) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052827)

I agree with you that it is the company's computer, but I disagree in the fact that they force you to use this or that tool.

You should be able to use any tool you need as long as it is free or you paid for the license yourself, if these tools allow you to be more productive your boss shouldn't do anything but agreeing.

The goal is getting the job done. Period. if your boss does not understand that, ten better switch quickly!

Re:Office computer != your computer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052842)

I agree that the office computer is company property, not one's own property, but occasionally some people can actually improve office operations and save the company money by some rather "free" approaches.

I was inspired by Payal Rathod's Linux Success Story (http://payal.staticky.com/success1.html [staticky.com] ), which involved switching the mail and internet connections to Linux ... without the staff being aware of it. In this case, her job was saved by the fact that it was a noticeable improvement. Plus, having the boss's daughter as a good friend helped, no doubt. It's a story worth reading.

Convincing my boss... (1)

rufus_sd (872392) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052564)

I will try to convince my boss with this quote from TA...

Now I have my dual screen desktop and it is a lovely sight to behold. The fonts are so smooth I want to spread them all over my body. It's like butter on the eyeballs, it is.

Prior to getting fired (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052575)

Our company was running Windows 2k on the desktop and I took the liberty to install OpenBSD on my desktop (to try it out). Now I didn't have to worry about the stupid "Administrator" password, or not being able to use certain programs. The only problem was that I had never used it before and I couldn't get Wine to work correctly or compile programs very well. My boss found out that day and called me into his office. He asked me what the hell was I doing to company property and I told him how more secure and better OpenBSD was. He had no clue what I was talking about and said: "You don't need to be messing around with our company's computer equipment and you're not even in the IT department. You're a customer support rep." He also stated something regarding company policy, destroying company property, or something to that effect (I wasn't listening). So needless to say I was asked to clean out my desk and leave that day. I wasn't pretty, but I never reformatted OpenBSD off of my computer, so the IT guy had to see the OS on the desktop and must have thought I was a bright guy for doing what I did. Now that was years ago, but I still feel proud for what I did. Although, now I live at home with my mother and haven't found a new job since.

Re:Prior to getting fired (1, Insightful)

Datamonstar (845886) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052622)

You're an idiot. Always ask before you make a change. Especially if you're not even in IT. I've got a Linux box that I fiddle with here in th data center I work at, but you've better believe that I asked my boss if I could put it up before I partitioned the box.

You do realize the above AC is trolling right? (1)

StressGuy (472374) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052700)

Surely you can smell the heavy aroma of BS...

Linux on the Desktop (3, Interesting)

mchawi (468120) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052600)

I run multiple machines at work - some native and some on VMWare. Either my Windows XP machine or my SuSE 10 machine can basically do anything that *I* want. RDP is easy with SuSE - none of the problems mentioned in this article. Kerberos and AD authentication was not very problematic - just go into YAST and the kerberos setup, then edit the config file. Windows administration - just RDP to a Windows desktop and use almost any tool from there. A few apps here and there that are Windows only - Citrix. So for it would work fairly well. I also have no problems at home or work with viruses, spyware, etc - mainly because I don't run as an administrative user.

The problem that prevents Linux from being used where I work is (1) with an Enterprise License Agreement for MS versus one for Redhat/Novell - the cost is about the same (**costwise - not sure who has better support). Number (2) and the main issue is that we have many departments that have 'must have' applications that are Windows only. We're not talking one or two applications - but probably about 60 of them. We can run a few on Citrix or some other platform - but that adds up very quickly. Our view of Linux not being ready for the desktop is -only- related to applications. I don't think our users would care about any of the other stuff. IT is going to set it up - so they don't care how hard it is to install drivers, software and hardware. They only care how it is to use. However, the first time you tell them they can't have their business critical application - it's all over (*a lot of these apps were written in-house, but I'm not responsible for the dev team...one of the other critical apps is our point of sale system...which is Windows only).

My guess is that as more and more stuff becomes web enabled, you'll see more and more people migrating to Linux. I think when most people talk about being enabled for the desktop and how 'difficult' Linux is to setup for the 'typical' user they never consider that the 'typical' user never sets up anything in a corporate environment.

Install time. Eh? (4, Insightful)

squoozer (730327) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052613)

WTH is this obsession with install time and boot time all about? I couldn't care less if install time was 15 minutes or a day. I've always got plenty of other things to be getting on with. Even if I didn't have one day out of the amount of time I would generally be working with the machine would be tiny

The thing that takes the time for me is upgrades and configuration. I run Debian so upgrades are probably about as smooth as they get for any Linux distro but the number of times a little something goes wrong and needs manually fixing is amazing (yes I could run stable and not suffer as many problems but I like to be at least fairly up to date). I suppose the reason this doesn't happen on windows is simply because you rarely update the installed applications. Even so it would be nice if updates were less likely to mangle the system.

Centos4 on desktop is a breeze.. (1)

slashmojo (818930) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052617)

I've been running centos4 (4.2 now) on my desktop for ages and its a breeze to install and configure.. a recent disk failure forced me to reinstall again and unsurpisingly it was still flawless.

Only downside was the ugly fonts but thats very easily fixed after a visit to TLDP Font-HOWTO [tldp.org]

Day to day use is great.. never any problems, never any time 'wasted' configuring anything.. everything 'just works' - its almost like windows! ;)

I also have it running on an old toshiba laptop.

Everyone raves about ubuntu (perhaps rightly) but I had no luck with it as it refused to install on my desktop or laptop although maybe the new version would.

Similar situation, only with Suse (2, Interesting)

Ransak (548582) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052643)

Three weeks ago I received a shiney new Dell Latitude D810 for a new position within my company. For the record, my company is a 100% Microsoft Windows shop. Since I have some Linux experience on the server side (and some nifty ceritifcation papers from Redhat to line my birdcage with), I decided to bite the bullet and try using a Linux distro as my full time desktop.

I chose Suse 10 since it's fairly new and I knew I'd need support for newer technologies (wireless, etc).

So far, I've only ran into a few problems... Wireless WPA-EAP connectivity being the biggest issue. I haven't been able to get it straightened out. In fact, wireless support on Linux (in my experience) has been flakey, sometimes it works perfectly and other times it's an exercise in frustration. And with Suse 10, there are a few annoying bugs [gnomesupport.org] that crop up, but for the most part they're survivable.

The number one issue I've seen while trying to run Suse as my business desktop in a 100% MS Windows world has been the 'compatibility curve'. Something it would take me 10 seconds to do in XP sometimes takes me 10 minutes (half the time simply due to my unfamiliarity with the distro/Linux desktop environment, the other half reconfiguration time just to make it compatible).

It isn't for the lazy or undetermined, but it can be done. There's something to be said for taking the road less traveled, and in the end I'm sure I'll be richer for the experience.

Or fired.

Fonts (2, Funny)

RasendeRutje (829555) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052662)

"The fonts are so smooth I want to spread them all over my body."
That does it, I'm installing right now! I want to spread fonts all over my body too!

Misleading title (5, Insightful)

Ctrl+Alt+De1337 (837964) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052670)

This is not your average office worker running Linux from his workstation, as if he was like the vast majority of office workers in the world.

"It is a simple fact that most of our clients run Windows 2003 servers and that it's my job to administer those servers..."

It's cool that he could still do that incognito with Ubuntu, but how easy was it really? Let's find out:

On getting the monitors to work: "I had to install the restricted Nvidia drivers and read the official documentation to get both monitors working, but that wouldn't be too troublesome for anyone used to mucking around with their xorg.conf file." Yes, it is Nvidia's fault, but for the uninitiated, "mucking around" in an xorg.conf file sounds scary.

On networking: "So, not exactly a quick and painless set up, but having done it once it would probably only take five minutes or so to do it again... though I'm a little concerned about the practicality of rolling out a large number of Ubuntu clients in an enterprise environment."

On email: "Ubuntu's default e-mail client, Evolution, is supposed to play nice with Outlook. It actually turned out to be very simple to get Evolution to connect to our Exchange server... That's precisely when things started going wrong. Exchange support seemed to be rather buggy and crash prone, and because Evolution is integrated into parts of the desktop, my desktop was soon littered with the burnt, twisted corpses of panel applets and daemons." He had to change a setting on the Exchange server to get things to work correctly.

On remote administration: "There is a bug in pptp-linux that prevents it from negotiating a secure connection after Windows offers to allow an unencrypted connection, but this behavior is easily solved by configuring the RRAS service on Windows Server to only allow encrypted connections."

On the office suite: "It is tempting to treat 'Base', the database application, just like Access. However it is not Access, and lacks many of Access's features. I was particularly chagrined to find it is not possible to import data from a CSV file into a table... If you rely heavily on local database files, and the Form and Report functions of Access, Base probably won't cut it for you."

That's a lot of issues that could scare away, rather than encourage, Windows-based offices from adding Linux boxes to their networks. I would love to read that article and come away thinking that Linux is ready for business, but unless everything gets switched to *nix is appears to be a big hassle to add Linux to the mix. Whether that truly is right or not I don't know, since I'm not that experienced with Linux and because a lot of the problems are with Windows not playing nice and not Linux, but if a PHB reads this article he might swear Linux off entirely. Sure, the Base functionality loss can be fixed with Cedega + Access, but does a manager who's never heard of Linux know that? It looks like Linux is not yet ready for the client side of a business, but at least the atricle outlines where the work for making that happen needs to go.

User agreements (1)

Chayak (925733) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052686)

Most companies will have you sign user agreements that prohibit this type of thing. At work I use windows because I have no choice. The military is like that, and I need connections to exchange. I would be installing linux in a heartbeat if I could. I have managed to get a linux server into our network by waiting until our end of fiscal year budget was tight and the need for a file server was high. I used an older machine with CentOS and it worked better than the other server we have here. It pretty much has command support now so it's here to stay.

In a cubicle far, far away... (5, Funny)

Billosaur (927319) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052687)

Boss: What's that? [pointing to screen]

Worker: Ubuntu. Been using it for a while. Works so much better than Windows and I'm much more productive.

Boss: Excellent! Good job! Keep it up!

[Boss shuffles off to his office, closes the door, and kneels before raised, circular object on the floor. Hologram of hooded figure appears.]

Figure: What is it?

Boss: My Master, there is a Linux-user here!

Figure: I see. The Rebels are becoming bold, moving faster than anticipated. No matter!

Boss: What shall we do?

Figure: Do nothing. I will send Darth Ballmer to deal with this "Linux-user."

Boss: Very well, My Master.

[Hologram disappears]

I did the same thing last January (3, Informative)

digidave (259925) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052694)

After installing it an IT guy noticed and my boss got a bit of shit for what I did and I was asked to justify using Linux. I'm a Linux programmer, so that got solved very quickly.

We use DeskNow (http://www.desknow.com/ [desknow.com] ) for email and collaboration so Exchange connectivity was never a problem. Luckily we have a lot of sales reps who don't have a company computer, so at minimum we'd have to have OWA running for them even if we used Exchange. I still don't authenticate with the AD server, but that doesn't really present a problem for me and if it does, I'll figure out how to set that up. Because I'm on Linux I don't even have an AD user, so right now my only problem is accessing the shared drives, although I have never needed to do that. They won't let me dump several GB of server backups there anyway.

I can honestly say that using Linux hasn't caused me any trouble at all. I work with a lot of Excel spreadsheets, but while they're very large (one dataset often is split in several 65000 row files) they aren't very complicated. The one that is complicated works fine in OpenOffice 1.x and 2.0. From Linux it's much easier to manage my Linux servers and test my code. I use Wine to run IE so I can test application web front ends in multiple browsers for the apps that support a web front end.

All in all it's been a smashing success for me. Several people in the office have commented about how much they love my desktop -- how nice it looks and how easy it is to work with different types of files. Even the designers on Macs are impressed. I also got someone else from work to install Ubuntu at home. I just handed him an Ubuntu Live CD and he loved it. After installing the Windows apps like OpenOffice that came with the CD, he took the plunge and couldn't be happier.

i agree but some parts missing.. (1)

mayhemt (915489) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052724)

the author didnt convey how he dealt with NTFS rw access issues (or he didnt have to??!)... also..did anyone try MS exchange server/webmail thru firefox? & how crappy it is? i dont know if its prob with FF or with MS exchange server's dodgy asp. just to access my corporate email, i have to logon to windows box...(YUCCCK!)

I'm dual booting to it. (1)

airjrdn (681898) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052743)

I manage a team of .NET/SQL Server devs (I was a dev here previously) and now that my time is spent mostly in office type applications, I can generally get through a day using Ubuntu only on my laptop. Wireless works, but only on open access points, so not here at work. Strangely, I don't have to take the laptop to that many meetings right now, so that's not a major problem. While I can get away with it though, my devs couldn't. I'm certain other departmental staff probably could though.

Sack of lies (2, Insightful)

philmack (796529) | more than 7 years ago | (#14052772)

Call me a troll or a flamebaiter if you must, but with the intent of installing linux in the workplace of "I don't have time to fiddle, all I care is whether or not it can do what I want, right now" there is no way to call this a victory. No exchange connectivity, locking out all other network clients, having to change the exchange server configuration... no way.

i work at a small company, and i can only imagine what would happen if even for 10 minutes all 70 employees didnt have access to the network shares or God forbid locked out of the exchange server. Or if someone "sneaked" onto a server to change what it serves. That last one doesnt actually take too much imagination... people have been fired for doing that.

This setting of this story seems more than a little fishy.

And i like open office plenty, but it is an alternative to office, not a substitute... when word/writer and excel/calc and powerpoint/impress documents dont look the same you cant effectivly collaborate with customers.

I love and use open source whenever i can, but at work i neither can nor may switch off of windows. ~Phil

men (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052845)

lol "ubuntu"

You are a wage slave, deal with it. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14052859)

Hahahahahahaahahahahahahah!

You... think... you get..... a.... CHOICE???? HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAA!

You use whatever tools the company uses. You are a WAGE SLAVE, nothing more, nothing less. Keep your Open Source dreams in your basement at home, and when you go meet with other geeks.

Corporate America (and probably every other state) will NEVER adopt Open Source technologies without accountability. Period. If there isn't a single phone number the boss can call to say "Your database software just crashed and wiped a month's inventory... fix it today or pay for our losses", they'll never use it.

Small business.. sure. They can't afford all the big gun software, so they'll take the risks. Internal mail servers... yeah, again... it's the guy doing the backups that takes the fall if the internal mail server eats the CEO's golf digest newsletter. Multi-billion dollar transaction servers that handle credit cards, banking services, or missile defense codes? Not a chance.

I'm not saying Open Source is better or worse quality, I'm just saying that business always wants a place to point the finger and expects immediate response times. Filing a bug report in bugzilla and waiting a week for it to be acknowledged by the dev team of a free project is NOT acceptible to upper management. They want a live human they can scream at and get reassurances (and that's all the get usually) right now.

So until there's a 1-800-GNU-HURT number the pointy hair boss can have you call and get an immediate response, just learn to live with BillyOS and keep collecting that fat paycheck so you can buy Open Source toys at home.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>