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Canada Moves to Keep Skilled Workers

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the she-followed-me-home-can-I-keep-her dept.

IT 1067

ashitaka writes "Just in time for all those who have vowed to leave the United States in response to government policies and mainstream cultural malaise, the Canadian government is announcing a C$700 million initiative to help skilled workers stay in Canada and become citizens. If you had the choice, would you really uproot to a new country especially one where the lifestyle isn't that much different than your own?"

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Lifestyle (4, Insightful)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120921)

If you had the choice, would you really uproot to a new country especially one where the lifestyle isn't that much different than your own?

It seems to me that a lifestyle that includes warm weather would be reason enough.

Re:Lifestyle (2, Funny)

observer7 (753034) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120932)

i am, updating my resume and packing my bags as i read this .

Warm weather (4, Informative)

phorm (591458) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121066)

Pick a season then. In the summer it's about 25-30c (77-86f), in the winter I've been as low as -40c/f, but generally we're in the -10 to -20 (14 to -4) range or milder. Right now it's about 4c (39.2f)

Re:Lifestyle (5, Interesting)

ryanjensen (741218) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121097)

Some parts of Ontario are on the same latitude as northern California ... in fact they have several wineries in that area.

Re:Lifestyle (1)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121137)

Hehehe, had to check google maps ... you're right of course.

Though Windsor DOES get snow just not as much as say Ottawa.

Tom

Re:Lifestyle (1)

Gentlewhisper (759800) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121103)

The one good question that would be on every /.er's mind is.. are IT professionals considered as "skilled workers"?

Re:Lifestyle (5, Funny)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121131)

one where the lifestyle isn't that much different than your own?

Except for that part where we peel our faces off and reveal ourselves to our god. Wait, forget I said that. Everything is fine.

Canada vs. USA (3, Interesting)

Simonetta (207550) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121161)

The question of living in Canada vs USA depends a lot on your skill set (job qualifications), home language, tolerance of bad weather, politics, and intoxicational preference.

    Let's say you have a good job skill set and can get a job more or less either north or south of the 49th parallel. If you speak French as a native language, you'll most likely feel more comfortable in Quebec. If you speak Spanish as a home language, Miami, Los Angeles, or New York would be more confortable. This issue is neutral for native English or other language speakers, eh?

    If you don't really like the cold, but don't mind dark gloomy rainy days (say you're a goth programmer or gamer), Vancouver BC would definitely beat the rest of Canada, New England, California, or Florida (too much sunshine).

    Fascists, either Christian or racial, will definitely feel more at home in the USA. It's your kind of place.

    Cannibus lovers, ('Stoners' to everyone else) will be more comfortable in British Columbia than anywhere in the USA, except possibly Maui. Not even the Humboldt Thunderbolt beats the BC bud. And you're less likely to have a Hummerload of psycho Iraqi vets kicking in your door and sticking machine guns or tasers in your kid's faces at 3am if you smoke in British Columbia instead of the USA. That's important to some people, less to others.

    In general, everything that you buy in a store is cheaper in the USA. Canada has insane sales taxes on top of high prices. This is the big issue for most people deciding USA vs. Canada. Big income taxes too. However the money collected in taxes mostly gets back to the Canadian people in some form, whereas in the US taxes paid go mostly to giant corporations with fat government contracts.

    However if you're gonna get sick, try to get sick in Canada instead. With the new bankruptcy laws in the USA, along with a corrupt and insanely expensive health care system there, you'll be in debt forever if you need medical care in the USA. Like if you get shot. The US has more guns than people, Canada doesn't.

The only catch (3, Funny)

i8puppies (910027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120924)

is that you have to dress like a mountie.

Re:The only catch (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121146)

You can dress up like Inspector Fenwick's daughter Nell if you like. About the only thing you can't do is marry the horse, yet.

Yes (0, Redundant)

bad jerkface (930612) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120926)

Yes

Yes (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14120930)

I would.

Yes. (1, Interesting)

hug_the_penguin (933796) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120936)

Quite simply i'd jump at the chance to get away from this Godforsaken hellhole, and an incentive like this is going to do so much to encourage me.

The question, however, is what is then going to happen to the immigration laws. Presumably they are going to have to do something to prevent just anyone jumping in and claiming. Will this preclude the majority of people? Will they lower the immigration requirements? Who can say?

Re:Yes. (5, Insightful)

mordors9 (665662) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120959)

If the US is such a hell hole, why does it have to go to such lengths to keep people out?

Well it's the UK, but same logic... (1)

hug_the_penguin (933796) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121005)

Well i'm not in the US, i'm in the UK, although the same logic applies... That said, we haven't exactly done a grand job of keeping anyone out anyway...

Re:Yes. (5, Insightful)

v1 (525388) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121028)

The upper class seem to do well with the people currently in control in the govt. The lower class does fairly well with the hand-outs. This leaves the middle class to support all three. Immigration is mainly by people in the lower class, where they stand to benefit by moving to the USA. Meanwhile, the middle class that are already IN the usa find their situation going downhill. So you see people that want in, and people that want out.

Re:Yes. (1)

Fyre2012 (762907) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121100)

racial and economic discrimination maybe?

it's not like they have to keep people out, ya know.

Re:Yes. (1)

YukiKotetsu (765119) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121018)

If you think it's such a hellhole, good riddance. I hope you move to Canada. In fact, I'll give you $20 to help you move.

Re:Yes. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121031)

Moron. He isn't in the US. Learn how to read. Typical product of American public schools.

Flights leave hourly, and the borders are open (1)

PenguinBoyDave (806137) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121032)

Feel free to leave this "hellhole." Don't let the door hit you in the ass on the way out.

The lifestyle IS different! (5, Insightful)

MLopat (848735) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120938)

Having done alot of travel to the US, both for business and pleasure, let me assure you Canada's lifestyle is far different. We live in a much more secure, comfortable and friendly environment than most places in the United States. We have very little crime (Toronto, our largest city, has about 70 murders a year), we have the best health care system in the world, we have tonnes of green land, and are well respected by most of the World.

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (5, Funny)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120944)

we have tonnes of green land

Every time I've been to Canada the land has been white.

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (1)

hal2814 (725639) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120962)

I'll take 6 months of good lake weather every year over respect from the rest of the world any day.

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (5, Interesting)

DanteLysin (829006) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120968)

The US is a large country. The "lifestyle of the US" does differ from region to region. To travel to "most places in the US" and get a good appreciation of each would take years. I'm sure Canada is similar.

I moved from 1 state to another and life is very different for me. Turns out I like where I live now, I don't ever want to move back. And if I travel to different parts of my state, life is quite different.

Healthcare is great if you don't get sick (5, Informative)

Stone316 (629009) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120972)

and I don't mean catching a cold or pulling a muscle in your back and having to take a trip to the family doctor. I mean 'sick' and require the attention of specialists.... You can get your dog in for an MRI same day but you'll be waiting months for yours. I believe the average wait for a specialist is about 3 months now... I know I had to wait 6 months (at least, can't remember) to see a specialist last year.

Well respected? Maybe but I keep sensing that other countries find us about as annoying as a nat flying around your head.

Saying that, I love this country and would never move.

You may still have to wait in the U.S. (1)

SideshowBob (82333) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121038)

...and that's if your HMO doesn't deny the request for a specialist outright. And THAT's if you have health insurance at all, which many don't.

Re:Healthcare is great if you don't get sick (5, Interesting)

wizwormathome (760340) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121083)

You can get your dog in for an MRI same day but you'll be waiting months for yours.

For those who are curious, the above is not an exaggeration [onthefencefilms.com] , as shown by this film.

As partially summarized by a Canadian blogger [blogs.com] , "When you have finished watching this film several images will remain with you for some time to come. A woman who spent two years waiting for knee surgery and innocently asks the American filmmakers whether the waiting lists are as long there as they are here. The moment when she begins to grasp that a health care waiting list is a concept alien to most sick Americans, though sadly not health care compelled bankruptcy, is something that cannot be explained. More stories follow of addiction to pain killers brought on by wait times, of the suffering families go through, of men and women calmly contemplating death for ailments which medical science long ago conquered, but which government control has placed out of reach."

Re:Healthcare is great if you don't get sick (4, Interesting)

Valar (167606) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121143)

It takes time to see specialists here in America too. Three months would be rare, but it happens. A lot of it just has to do with the supply and demand for people with specialized medical knowledge. Canada is a little bit worse off because lower wages for doctors->lower # of people willing to be doctors.

Re:Healthcare is great if you don't get sick (2, Insightful)

ThaFooz (900535) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121147)

Mod parent up. There is a reason weathly Europeans and Canadians often have private doctors (despite the "free" healthcare system) - and flying to Boston is not unheard of for exceptionaly dangerous procedures. While we can argue the merits of applying Capatilism to the health care system - skilled US workers (which would include everyone reading this site in the US) have the best health care. Period.

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14120975)

Yes, the best health care system in the world... until you actually need it. Then you'll realize how crapy it really is: long waits, no choice (try getting a second opinion from another specialist -- you'll have to wait an extra 6 months for the appointment), crumbling infrastructure and not enough doctors/nurses.

Tell me -- how come it is ok for people to pay for food, but it is taboo to pay for health care? Isn't food a much more important necessity that health care?

The "best health care in the world" is just a myth created by the Liberals to keep the conservatives out of office. Sadly, many canadians eat it, probably just out of pride or ignorance.

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14120981)

Here is a complaint I've read from Canadians, regarding relocated Americans and wondering if this is true. That many Americans arrive in Canada and snub their noses at the "traditional" neighborhoods and expect to build McMansions with 3 car garages ... etc. That the relocated Americans have an air of arrogance about them.

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121008)

The rape rate in Canada is more than twice of the US [nationmaster.com] . Property crimes are on the rise. Violent crime is on the rise. All crimes are higher than in all of the concealed-carry states. All thanks to our government's idea of gun control and the left-socialists who are in power. Sure, downtown Toronto is different from downtown Detroit, but the difference is disappearing. Don't come to Canada because it is safer than US, because it isn't. Come to Canada to help us take back our freedom.

And no, I'm not an angry old xenophobic white man. I'm a young immigrant from Eastern Europe hoping Canada doesn't turn in into one.

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121014)

ya rite ... 365 murders per year in Oakland, CA. How does that compare to 70 a year ? And best health care is in US ? This sure is a joke. To get an appointment, you have to wait for weeks. Sometimes the problem is gone even before the appointment date kicks in.

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121029)

Yea, but how many great things have come out of Canada?

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121095)

More than have come out of your mother's womb.

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (1)

AutopsyReport (856852) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121102)

Bacon.

As an american currently living in canada... (1)

Vexorg_q (216760) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121037)

I would argue that the united states has a much better healthcare system, based on my experiences so far with canadian facilities.

Tim Hortons though, its fantastic.

Re:As an american currently living in canada... (1)

ThaFooz (900535) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121067)

Tim Hortons though, its fantastic.

The donuts taste like they're made out of plastic, and the coffee somehow manages to taste morke like ash than Starbucks. But if thats your thing, you don't need to go to Canada for it. They're everywhere around here (here being Southern New England).

Re:As an american currently living in canada... (1)

Vexorg_q (216760) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121135)

I've heard they're down in the US now. Being from New Hampshire, we didnt have any, so that was kind of a disappointment.

However, I think the thing that makes canada unique is the ratio of people to tim hortons, Canada has the US beat there no question.

Re:As an american currently living in canada... (1)

Fyre2012 (762907) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121139)

"united states has a much better healthcare system"

ok, but how much does it cost you to see a doctor in Canada vs the US?

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (1)

CyberLife (63954) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121039)

Coming from the opposite perspective (US to Canada), I'd have to agree. I grew up around Canadians, and I've always found them to be much more relaxed, easy-going, and friendly. These days I travel to B.C. a lot on business. I go back and forth across the border frequently, and there's a noticeable difference in the way people drive, in their approaches to customer service, and just in general demeanor. In short, they seem to be less worried about life and just live it more.

No! You are mis-informed (1)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121043)

> ..we have the best health care system in the world...

I say "NO!" You are either mis-nformed or lying. You [once] had the best health care system in the world, but you are now near the middle I should say. I know because my relative who is a Canadian citizen, had to go India for hip replacement surgery. And thousands are. Yes, and the SARS crisis was mis-handled. The experts in the health care system admitted incopetence with SARS.

For skin surgeries, people are going to Mexico. The aboriginals, who are the real Canadians, are being left on reserves with contaminated water. Do not tell me the problem was solved because it came a decade late! Yet the government has been running surpluses for that long.

By the way, how are you treating the skilled immigrants in Canada? Even those who speak and write better English are not treated that well. But everyone knows they are more educated and carry a better work ethic than those they find on the streets.

One thing I find good in Canada is Toronto. It's multiculturalism is awesome. On Toronto streets, you see all shades of people, and on the subway, it's hard to hear English. That's what I see in Toronto and it's good.

Re:No! You are mis-informed (1)

Hannah E. Davis (870669) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121119)

Vancouver is extremely multicultural too -- in fact, I've read that it won't be too many more years before whites are in the minority here. Political pamphlets are all written in English and Chinese, store signs are commonly in Chinese, Korean or Japanese with English added more as an afterthought, and like in Toronto, English is sometimes hard to hear on the buses and trains.

It's neat, but I often do find myself wishing that I could speak Chinese :)

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (2, Interesting)

davecb (6526) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121053)

Our values are quite different: Canada and the U.S. used to have similar ones, back in the years just after the Second Wold War. We worked together, helped each other out, and had just finished smashing the Third Reich and everything it stood for.

These days, Canadians aren't too interested in wars, but they still tend to cooperate and help each other out. The army mostly does peacekeeping these days.

Americans, alas, have distinctly moved towards regarding the world as a dog-eat-dog one, with wars and militias as standard features.

I, for one, think this is a bad thing, and harmful to my American cousins.

--dave

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121065)

I'd rather live in a country that is critiqued than one that is insignificant.

The US is a great nation because it has taken risks. For better or worse, those risks have propelled us forward. A step back here and there is nothing compared to the greatness that has been achieved. The world doesn't look to us for no reason at all. You say we're not well-respected. Since when did respect equal greatness? And no matter the view towards the U.S., we're still the ones called upon when need is perceived elsewhere. Take this as cocky if you must but where would the world be without the U.S. involved in the past 100 years? Two world wars, a Cold War, a world economy, exploration, invention... I would rather live proudly in a country that isn't afraid to face issues than to live in a state of mediocrity.

Best health care in the world? Then why do US patients have greater access to advanced medical technology than do Canadians? The US has double the CT scanning centers, almost triple the open-heart surgery centers, four times as many MRI units, and the list goes on. Canadians come here for these procedures for a reason... your system cannot afford them. Here's some more info: LINK [liberty-page.com] The costs are killing you. Literally:

It calculates that at present rates, Ontario will be spending 85 percent of its budget on health care by 2035. "We can't afford a state monopoly on health care anymore," says Tasha Kheiriddin, Ontario director of the federation. "We have to examine private alternatives as well."

Canada's lifestyle is indeed different. For those who want it, take it. Personally, I prefer to live free and not be stifled by socialism.

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (1)

scowling (215030) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121109)

Canada's life expectancy is higher than that of the US, even within the same demographics, and we spend about half as much on health care per capita as the US does. It is clear that our health care system is more efficient and more effective.

Canada's lifestyle is indeed different. Personally, I prefer to live free and not be stifled by fascism.

And we're far more free than Americans, by a damn sight.

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121153)

Well, the U.S. population is approximately 10 times that of Canada... That being the case, having only 4 times as many MRI units doesn't seem to be a good thing... Assuming your figures are accurate, MRI units per capita in Canada would be higher than in the U.S. The same goes for your other examples...

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121071)

the US has lots of green land too. What's your point?

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121110)

...we have the best health care system in the world...

BULLSHIT! I grew up on the border, state side, near NB and have relatives who live there. The healthcare system is msssively broken. I have had a friend die waiting *years* for heart surgery, only to get it when she was to ill to possibly recover. Relatives who paid out of thier own pocket to get heart surgery in Boston because if they would have waited on the list, they would have also died. I have seen friends in massive pain, in over crowded emergency rooms, waiting in line for hours because it is the ONLY way to see a doctor quickly. If you make an appointment, it is *months* away. The Canadian healthcare system is *rationed* medicine. Compared to what is available here in the states, it sucks.

Re:The lifestyle IS different! (1)

yesheh (862579) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121129)

As a fellow canadian, (who has also done significant travel in the states) let me dispell a bit of rosieness.. I agree, Canada's lifestyle is different but maybe not so much in the west. We live in a naive comfortable, freindly enviroment, with more gun crime than the US per capita (actually has risen since the advent of gun control legislation by 25%), our health care system is awful (but still better than that of the states), we have tonnes of green land ( where we aren't using it for sububia such as Richmond (both Toronto and Vancover)) and our citizens are well respected by the rest of the world. Unfortunatly this isn't so with our government....

ho (2, Insightful)

mr_tommy (619972) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120940)

Psst... I think the similarity is part of the atraction....

Rather to Alabama (0, Troll)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120941)

I'd move to Alabama rather than Canada just for the weather

Re:Rather to Alabama (2, Funny)

mordors9 (665662) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120950)

What are you a Hurrican chaser?

Re:Rather to Alabama (1)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120958)

No, but i'd still like it better than Canada, i think..

Re:Rather to Alabama (1)

Monkofdoom (928921) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121134)

He may be, but then the Canadians want to keep all there skilled staff including those

Oh, Canada! (4, Informative)

Hiro Antagonist (310179) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120952)

Given that I travel up to B.C. about twice a year, and that I'm going to be looking for employment up north after I graduate (two years down the road), I say 'Hell, yes!'

No worries about healthcare, low crime, fantastic local beers, hockey in the winter, Tim Hortons...er, what am I not supposed to like, again?

Re:Oh, Canada! (2, Interesting)

CarlinWithers (861335) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121121)

Consider Alberta as a place to look for work. Our two major cities (Edmonton and Calgary) are the fastest growing in Canada. There's lots of IT employment available if you have the skills, heck there's lots of most kinds of employment. We currently have a shortage of skilled workers, and a jobless rate of less than 5%. It's not quite as beautiful or warm as BC, but it's still nice. I'm a Calgarian myself. When I compare the quality of life in Calgary to most other places, the results are enough to motivate me to tough out the weather. Course, sometimes I've got to take holidays to somewhere warm.

Empty promise (5, Informative)

uncleO (769165) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120956)

For those unaware of Canadian politics, the government faces a non-confidence vote Monday or Tuesday. It is expected to fall and call a December election.

For campaign reasons, the government has announced a flurry of new spending over the last week, most of which is expected to never materialise, whether the governing party wins again or not.

Re:Empty promise (2)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120973)

Very true, mod parent up. This is right up there with the cancellation of the gun registry and GST...

Of course where is the gun registry office? [hint: How do you keep unemployable easterners happy...]

That said, I'd rather live in Canada than the USA. Mostly because it's so cold the terrorists are few and far between. Who the fuck would bomb an office in -20C weather? :-)

Tom

So what are geek wages like? (1)

Elrac (314784) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120961)

Are there jobs available in reasonable numbers and at reasonable rates for, umm Java/J2EE programmers? Sysadmins? Systems architects? Other geek professions?

I'd go in a heartbeat if I could get my girlfriend to uproot.

Re:So what are geek wages like? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14120993)

Uproot your Girlfriend? ahhh you mean your boxen/porn collection is too heavy to ship canada ;)

Re:So what are geek wages like? (2, Interesting)

Hannah E. Davis (870669) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121048)

I think it depends on what part of the industry you're looking at. The games industry, for example, is very big here in Vancouver -- my boyfriend works for EA, and I'm going to be doing a co-op job (that's an internship, for you American types) in January at a small startup game company. To my knowledge, a lot of American companies, particularly those of the video game persuasion, are actually outsourcing to Canada because thanks to public healthcare and other perks, we're cheaper to employ.

Also, it probably doesn't mean much, but all of my friends who are recent computer science grads managed to find jobs very soon after graduation. I don't know how their wages were, but I haven't heard any complaints.

How about giving up the Socialism, eh? (0, Flamebait)

jcr (53032) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120965)

People leave Canada for a country with a better economy, and the government's solution is to spend more tax money! Brilliant move, eh?

-jcr

Re:How about giving up the Socialism, eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121001)

As opposed to a country that tries to kick start its economy by starting a war?

Re:How about giving up the Socialism, eh? (4, Insightful)

JohnWiney (656829) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121080)

Better economy?? The Toronto Stock Exchange index is up 20% so far this year - the Dow Jones is down. The past few years have had similar results - and that is without taking into account the changes in the currencies. The Canadian federal government has posted a surplus each of the past seven years. The US government, uh, has not. Canadian unemployment levels are nearing record low levels....

Re:How about giving up the Socialism, eh? (1)

shobadobs (264600) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121157)

Canadian unemployment levels are nearing record low levels....

And your "record low level" is 6.6%. During our "recession," we hit a high of 6.3.

slashdot (2, Funny)

queef_latina (847562) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120966)

so you guys really like computers? you guys like to talk about lunix?

To become a real Canadian... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14120967)

To become a real Canadian they would need to cut your head in half. Kick the baby!

Nice (5, Interesting)

smartin (942) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120978)

As a Canadian living and working in the States, I wish the Canadian government would have done more to keep skilled citizens rather than attracting skilled immigrants. Unfortunately it is really just too easy to max out in the Canadian market place and the only option is to move south.

Re:Nice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121004)

Don't half the people who live in Canada work for the government?

Half of everyone I meet in Windsor works for the gov and the other half want to work for a Crown Corporation (the gov).

Wanted! Moose herders/maple tree tappers (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14120979)

And lots o' lumberjacks!

Christ, sign me up. Fuck Texas. (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14120980)

After over three quarters of my state voted with the fucking Klan to write discrimination into our motherfucking state constitution, I'm quite ready to leave this state.

Any takers for a drug-design oriented chemist with high-level systems administration and Unix development skills? Texas sure doesn't seem to want to hold onto its 21st century workforce, favoring 12th century social mores instead. :P

Healthcare (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14120983)

To be allowed to pay for my own healthcare in Canada, do I have to be of noble blood, or just rich enough to fly back to the USA? Because I don't want to die because the state wanted to have a budget surplus in some fiscal year.

And I don't give a shit about being able to go get tested for colds or sinus problems; I'm worried about major medical procedures, which are available in Canada only on a state-alloted basis, regardless of how I scrimped and saved to have a nest egg (while some stoner down the street blew all his money on crack, after not believing marijuana was a gateway drug).

Skilled workers? (0, Troll)

griffm (448056) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120988)

I guess that rules out Streisand and the Baldwins.

Quick question.... (4, Insightful)

Neuracnu Coyote (11764) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120991)

If American citizens are frustrated and annoyed with their government's behavior, can someone please explain how expatriating will do anything but make the problem worse?

If they have any interest in achieving their goal, shouldn't they be sending a loud message to the rest of the world, inviting like-minded individuals to come live there instead? Or perhaps convince their neighbors to read a newspaper?

Oh, wait. That would involve effort. Never mind - I forgot who I was talking about.

The Real Question (5, Insightful)

CyberLife (63954) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121084)

What's your feeling about people immigrating TO the United States? If one applies your position equally to all countries of the world, nobody should ever leave their native land. Are you advocating that? This country is largely populated by immigrants and those descended from immigrants. I don't know the details of your family background, but chances are they were immigrants at some point. Should they have stayed in their home country? Should you have instead been born and grown up there instead of here?

Re:Quick question.... (1)

xilmaril (573709) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121104)

expatriating solves their problem immidietly, though, instead of hoping that passing out fliers on a street corner to support voting or whatever will have an effect.

the people who expatriate are doing it for their own good, not the good of america. want to see some true, patriotic, proud americans? go to a greenpeace rally.

it's funny, what a reaction this kind of suggestion usually gets.

I wonder what so many americans have against protestors anyway... I've met so many people who say the kind of thing you are, but bitch about 'damn hippies' all the time. (not accusing parent of any such thing)

Re:Quick question.... (1)

back_pages (600753) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121145)

If American citizens are frustrated and annoyed with their government's behavior, can someone please explain how expatriating will do anything but make the problem worse?

See sig.

It's a cop-out (4, Insightful)

sam_handelman (519767) | more than 8 years ago | (#14120999)

As an American I am in a better position to fix the problems than anyone. If I move to Canada (and even if I become a Canadian subject, or whatever) I have given up on influencing the course of events because I don't want to deal with some sort of guilt over my failure to do so recently?

We don't know how much worse things might have been, either. We say, and it's true, that the domestic opposition didn't prevent the administration from invading Iraq. Well, that was a failure. There is literally no way of knowing what else they might have done if given free reign - Miers on the SCOTUS is only the start of it.

In case you haven't been paying attention - the two last US elections have been very close, and their outcomes (especially in 2000) have had a tremendous impact on the rest of human history. In spite of those election results, public opinion here in the US still plays a big role in determining what the administration can and cannot get away with. If you're really concerned with human civilization, and not with melodrama, you move to a purple state, not to Canada.

Re:It's a cop-out (2, Insightful)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121114)

MOD UP.

For once someone gets it. If we ever meet in person I'll buy you a beer [or whatever ya drink].

As a Canadian [and fellow North Americaner] all I have to say is it's good to see someone gets it. Too many foreigners flee their country for safety reasons then just pursue the culture that bred it here [often with the problems just following behind them].

Moving China to Toronto, Vancouver and a few other cities won't fix the problems they have in China.

That said, if you guys don't open up the poles to a "third" option you're doomed for another four years of "Iraq SMASH! Iran PHEAR!". Demo == Repub.

Oh and to CNN ... your system of government is NOT a democracy it's a republic and it's not bi-partisan no matter how much you say that word. Open up your fucking eyes and report the world the way it ACTUALLY is not the way you'd like it to be. For a 24 hour news station you'd have more to report [e.g. less repetition] if you actually investigated [and presented] the other parties. You know, your, "job" ...

Tom

Funny this should pop up on slashdot... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121016)

Just as I am researching what it takes to immigrate to Canada, job opportunities, quality of life, housing prices, etc.

I come from Europe and, no offense to our American friends, find Canada a much more appealing choice than the USA - exactly because I perceive Canada and Canadian mentality to be much closer to a European mindset.

I admit this may just be a whim, but coming from a country where everybody under 40 years of age is suffering from financial rape from the older generation, Canada sure does look appealing.

Just in time for.... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121020)

My departure to the United States of America from Canada, a move which I partially am doing because of my opposition to Canadian government policies and mainstream cultural malaise.

Canada's more like the US than ever (2, Funny)

p3d0 (42270) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121021)

Nowadays a guy can go a whole day in Toronto without ever seeing a single igloo.

Prepostorous! (5, Funny)

nxtr (813179) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121024)

>>Canada Moves to Keep Skilled Workers

No one can move an entire country, not even Superman!

Re:Prepostorous! (1)

Tapi (908902) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121108)

But he can turn back time by reversing the rotation of the earth!

Look at who this applies to... (2, Informative)

KJE (640748) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121033)

From TFA:
"Ottawa will spend $700 million over the coming years in a two-pronged initiative to make it easier for skilled immigrants to stay in the country while at the same tackling a big backlog of people waiting to get into Canada."

Also:
"Immigration Minister Joe Volpe will join the flurry of pre-election promises with his announcement today."

The minority government in Canada is about to fall, this is just one of the many, many promises the Liberal Party is making before they lose a no confidence vote next week, think of all these spending promises as the beginning of their campaign and react accordingly.

Goodbye Canada (1, Flamebait)

Zutroi_Zatatakowsky (513851) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121035)

I'm a Canadian (Quebecois actually) and plan on moving to France in a couple of months. So long, square heads! No government subsidies will keep me here!

Re:Goodbye Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121072)

Fan of rioting, are you?

Re:Goodbye Canada (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121073)

Good riddance!

Re:Goodbye Canada (0, Troll)

tomstdenis (446163) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121074)

What the fuck is Quebecois? You're Canadian. I live in Ontario, I'm still Canadian.

Maybe you should go study a fucking map you dumbass frog.

That said, enjoy France. But don't ruin it with your "habitant" talk. Learn some proper French and speak with dignity. :-)

Tom

First we take Manhattan, then we take.... Toronto? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121040)

I've already uprooted and left the US for another country.
Japan in this case.
I just couldn't get past America re-electing the failed
ideologues in the White House. Pity the people have seen the err of
their ways all too late. (ref: Bush's declining approval rating)

Barring stumbling into marriage over here, I can't see myself
staying forever though. A place like Canada is *extremely* attractive
to me on a number of levels - it's similarity to America being just one.

Having spent a bit of time in Toronto and Vancouver, they're both places
I can easily see myself living in. They're not New York or Tokyo, mind
you... but they do seem to be everything America believes itself to be -
with Jesus wonderfully absent.

The only problem I can see being an issue is that I don't particularly
care for hockey... Is that a deal-breaker on naturalization?

Canadian Cockroaches are friendlier... (1)

creimer (824291) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121042)

If you had the choice, would you really uproot to a new country especially one where the lifestyle isn't that much different than your own?

It's not like people are being asked to move across the border to Mexico. There's a world of difference. The Canadian cockroach speaks English and French when saying, "You fat, ugly American!" :P

What seperates Canada from the US (3, Interesting)

Jorkapp (684095) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121056)

I can see this initiative as targeting the citizenry of the United States. It makes perfect sense to target them, and here's why:

US citizens already speak english, work with dollars and cents, drive cars on the right, etc. At the core, they're basically the same (less some cultural differences) as Canadians. Less government money spent on teaching them english or how to drive.

Right now the Canadian dollar is at $0.85USD. The minimum wage in Ontario is at $7.45CDN/hour for an adult (slightly less for people who serve food/beverages and are subject to gratuities), which is more than $6.25USD/hour. Bear in mind too, that minimum wage is typically only paid to entry level jobs, and most other jobs pay more. I've heard horror stories of US Wal-Mart workers making maybe $5/hour - come up here and get a pay raise!

Come on up boys, We've got plenty of room!

Not really (1)

brunes69 (86786) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121117)

At the core, they're basically the same (less some cultural differences) as Canadians...

You can't say that Canadians are "basically the same" as Americans simply because you drive your car on the right hand side of the road. That is like saying you are "basically the same" as a polar bear because you are both mammals.

Canadians and Americans are very different when it comes to politics. What is considered a liberal politician in the U.S. would normally be called a conservitive politican in Canada. Canadian citizens generally swing far more to the left than Americans on most issues.

There are also huge differences in economic policy ond diplomatic policies between the two contries. There are also huge culterual differences between them, mostly due to the fact that Canada was founded by people who *wanted* to remain loyal to the Crown, while Americanw as founded based on the idea of seperating from the Crown.

Oh, and Canada has less fat people per capita :)

Should USA bring in foreigners? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121058)

The real question is: should the US try to follow suit, and move to keep its skilled foreigners?

You may recall the Congress recently moved to cut H1-B visas significantly. It is ever harder to get a non-immigrant student visa to come to US. The backlog on some types of immigrant visas is currently 10+ YEARS.

Is the legal immigration not the answer to outsourcing? Instead of screaming "they took our jobs", why not consider what happens now: the skilled foreigners cannot come in, so they stay at home and take our jobs by working for pennies an hour. Is it not better to bring them here so they can ask for fair wages.

Would I? (1, Insightful)

pair-a-noyd (594371) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121061)

Sure.

Why not? America has become hostile towards it's citizens, I mean obviously the government has chosen to bite off the hand that feeds it.
What with all the outsourcing and offshoring and imported crap from third world countries, it would seem obvious that the US Government doesn't care about the people, only about the profiteers on Wall Street and the Elite Banksters that pad the pockets of the politicians that make the laws that keep making the rich richer and the poor poorer.

If there is a country that is intelligent enough to understand that the well being of ALL it's citizens is the key to it's survival then I would say that sounds like a pretty good place to be.

Policy Changes (2, Informative)

JohnWiney (656829) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121087)

Please note that these changes are directed at people already in Canada - foreign students, for example. Canada already has the highest levels of immigration in the world from outside the country (at least on a per-capita basis).

Is immigration good or bad for Canada? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14121142)

What I am curious about is what Canadians think about immigration.

I know 30% of Americans are really against immigration, maybe 10% strongly favor immigration, and the other 60% do not give a crap either way. But the 30% against are vocal enough to skew the overall public and government oppinion, so that in general Americans are against immigration.

Do Canadians mostly want foreigners coming in?

You can be a thief, too! (2)

dada21 (163177) | more than 8 years ago | (#14121159)

The Canadian government wants to rob the citizens of $700,000,000 and give it to programmers. Why not just arm yourself, go to your neighbor's house in the U.S., and take their money?

It is the same thing. Don't believe the hype, read deeper.
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