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The Importance of New Ideas

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the no-more-exploding-barrels dept.

Games 50

Next Generation has up the first in a two-part article talking in-depth with members of the gaming industry about the importance of fresh ideas. Also discussed are the challenges of next-gen development costs and the impact of Hollywood/Intellectual Property on future titles. From the article: "Q: What role will original game concepts play in next generation development? A: (Todd Hollenshead) Technology is a gating factor to the experience of playing games. Whether it's visual quality or character interactions, you have to have the processing power to make more sophisticated and interesting entertainment. Certainly the next generation of consoles in the Xbox 360 and PS3 are far more powerful than their predecessors and that gives game developers broad options to do things we haven't been able to do before and provide experiences for players they haven't had before. For example, for our next generation Wolfenstein game, which uses the Xbox 360 as it's primary development platform, we are developing technology that will change the way people play First Person games by doing away with the whole concept of 'levels', which has been the primary progression mechanic every first person game has used."

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50 comments

Hollywood & Gaming (2, Insightful)

devilsadvoc8 (548238) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160345)

Game Developers' willingness to suck at the teat of Hollywood for easy money, marketing and ideas will weigh the industry down until they can successfully wean themselves from it. Hollywood has already fully embraced mediocrity as a method of risk reduction. Who needs to take a chance with a novel script when we can remake King Kong, War of the Worlds, or make Rocky XX. Game Development NEEDS to take risks. Otherwise all the consoles will die on the vine.

Re:Hollywood & Gaming (2, Interesting)

Jupiter9 (366355) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160398)

I agree with you, but I don't think consoles will "die on the vine" by embracing mediocrity. There are too many stupid people out there who will embrace lousy games, just like they do lousy movies. They get brain washed by a flash commercial, and then they half to have.

Re:Hollywood & Gaming (1)

Shad_the_protector (931920) | more than 8 years ago | (#14161310)

Not those commercial that all tell things like this

"The best game of the year" - Gamespot
"10 out of 10" - Ps Magazine

Can someone tell me why each game have the these SAME cote from magazine.

Re:Hollywood & Gaming (1)

kaptron (850747) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160516)

it's difficult to get around because it's the publishers that are going after all of these easily marketable Hollywood licenses, and the publishers are (generally) the ones funding the game development. And you're right, Hollywood is doing the same thing with sequels. The problem, as always, is money. Decent (or even crappy) games tied to popular movies consistently outsell "better" games that are original titles. And apparently sequels make enough money to justify more of them. What we can hope for is that good game developers that do succumb to the hollywood/sequel bug use whatever money and success they get from their hollywood game to go off and make some original titles.

p.s. consoles will not "die on the vine" because of movie-licensed games. Trust me.

Re:Hollywood & Gaming (1)

kaens (639772) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160566)

I think that the problem may not so much lie with game developers themselves, but more with the companies hiring them, or rather with the people telling the game developers just what, exactly, to develop. I mean, in order for a game to be produced and be available for consumption by the general public, a good bit of money has to be poured into it. If the game was released strictly via the internet, the people coding/designing/etc the game would still need paid - unless it was being developed by people in their free time. But I digress. The people pouring the money into the games production - the people that the game developers work for, are probably going to want a say in what gets made, and as their primary goal is going to be turning a profit, they are going to want games to be developed that they know will sell. So we end up with a hell of a lot of games that are nothing but rehashes of games already made, with minor improvements here and there.

There have been some innovative (depending on your definition of innovative anyhow) games that have come out recently, probably due to some companies figuring out that people are starting to get tired of playing the same old games with different faces.

However, the independent design and creation of games (as well as most, if not all other forms of media) is much easier now that it has ever been in the past. This means that people can make their own stuff outside the influence of corporate market schemes, and release it for other people to enjoy. Or sell it. For those that want to make new stuff for the purposes of selling though, it would be very hard to do without working at a game industry though.

Ehh I'm not sure what my point was going to be....there was one though, I fucking swear it.

Huh? (5, Interesting)

hal2814 (725639) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160358)

"For example, for our next generation Wolfenstein game, which uses the Xbox 360 as it's primary development platform, we are developing technology that will change the way people play First Person games by doing away with the whole concept of 'levels', which has been the primary progression mechanic every first person game has used."

Ok, who's underwhelmed by this revolutionary idea. Looks to me like they're just taking a page from the GTA series. In fact, it looks to me like they're just latching onto the latest fad of openended gaming.

Re:Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14160652)

I think the more obvious and humerous hyprocacy is the fact that they are making another Wolfenstein game.

I love how the new hardware opens the door for more of the same unispired WWII shooters...

Re:Huh? (1)

voice_of_all_reason (926702) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160768)

They'll never do that. Something's gotta prevent you from just walking through the whole game to the boss.

Re:Huh? (1)

damsa (840364) | more than 8 years ago | (#14162722)

Sure you can, once you find the magic whistle and warp to the boss. Once again Nintendo was ahead of the curve in Mario 3.

Re:Huh? (1)

karnal (22275) | more than 8 years ago | (#14163925)

"Welcome to Warp Zone"

SMB :) Of course, you couldn't warp directly to the "boss" castle....

Re:Huh? (1)

astromog (866411) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160780)

Perhaps they've never played Half-Life, which uses a near-continual progression (it only leaps when the story requires it, i.e. when you get captured and knocked out and when you go to Xen). It may have loading screens, but only due to limitations of the technology of the time. From the sounds of it, these people are doing exactly the same thing, only they're making use of threading to load on the fly instead of at specific points. Loading on the fly occurs in quite a few PS2 games I can think of (Shadow of the Colossus would be the most recent one I've played; you can roam around a very large outdoor world without a loading break). So it's not really a new idea. Nice to see it get some attention though.

Re:Huh? (1)

Ford Prefect (8777) | more than 8 years ago | (#14162356)

Perhaps they've never played Half-Life, which uses a near-continual progression (it only leaps when the story requires it, i.e. when you get captured and knocked out and when you go to Xen). It may have loading screens, but only due to limitations of the technology of the time.

Actually, Half-Life's 'seamless' transitions are a really basic, but rather clever extension of Quake's entirely separate maps. Essentially all that happens is that there are two similar-looking sections in the two maps, and when the player reaches a certain area in the first map, it does a savegame, loads the second one and places the player and nearby enemies in it with their relative positions and viewing angles adjusted accordingly.

It works brilliantly well, but it's anything but continuous progression and can't be extended far - for example, if the system loaded the second map in the background as the player approached a transition zone, it would need a heck of a lot of storage space as it would need both maps in memory simultaneously at some point.

Maybe some magical tile-based map system would work, with the system capable of storing (and rendering from) multiple tiles simultaneously, with new ones swapped in as appropriate. For an outdoors renderer, you could have low-detail placeholders in addition to the full versions of the tiles - see a town on a hill in the distance, and when you reach it it's not a couple of cuboids but a massively detailed hunk of geometry.

Something like that, anyway. I'm waiting for another test version of Metastasis 2 to finish compiling. :-)

Re:Huh? (1)

astromog (866411) | more than 8 years ago | (#14163204)

Yes, the HL method is fairly basic, but it's the effect that's important as to whether the idea is new, not the technique. :) I'm assuming some kind of tile-based approach (or room based?) would work well with threaded loading in an FPS. Probably using multi-level-of-detail for things you see out the window depending on how far away they are or something. It would be difficult to design map data for but is doable when you can dedicate an entire processor to loading data. I don't really care about console FPS games but I look forward to seeing how they do continuous play, none the less. I am an engineer, after all. :) Shadow of the Colossus, as far as I can tell, (and probably many others that have continuous wide open outdoor environments - I doubt this is a new idea) uses the ultimate in LoD: the far distance is actually pre-rendered. Examine the really long bridge closely and you can see the transition point, for example. Then just switch in 3D models when the player gets close enough at the necessary level of detail, and standard increases in detail from then on. The big advantage of this is that you don't need to have a fog at 100m from the player (as in Morrowind, for example). But this still requires loading on the fly as the player moves around; the new map and landscape data must be moved into the PS2's very limited memory. In SotC's case the fact that there are relatively few textures probably helps considerably in that regard. If you chucked a town into that landscape with complex textures things would get rather difficult, I suspect. This is all supposition, of course. But it makes sense.

Re:Huh? (1)

alvinrod (889928) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160878)

Revolutionary? Not anywhere near it.

The game industry is putting out the exact same games every year with a few minor tweaks, usually in graphics and added guns, items, levels, etc. It's cheaper for them to do this as they can reuse a lot of code that's in working order for the most part.

I don't really mind if they just rehash the same game and give it a face lift. If I want to play it, I'll buy it. However, don't blow smoke up my ass and tell me that you're doing something revolutionary when you really aren't. As the parent mentioned, it's just a borrowed idea applied to a different genre of game.

If you really wanted to be revolutionary, you'd develope it for Nintendo's next console and let players use the pointer control as their gun. Of course this really isn't all that revolutionary because it's been done arcade games for years and years now.

Personally, I'd be a lot happier if developers just shut the hell up about how great their next game is and how the revolutionary features they've included in it are going to blow everyone away. All the hype they use to build their product up only leaves gamers disappointed when the game they're playing just can't live up to the crap that's been pitched for the last three months.

Re:Huh? (1)

blazzy (923401) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160978)

That came from Todd at Id software.. Id, Epic, Monolith and Gearbox are the companies I recognize on that list. That's not a group that's known for "breaking the mold" in the industry.

Re:Huh? (4, Insightful)

Mr. Sketch (111112) | more than 8 years ago | (#14161118)

we are developing technology that will change the way people play First Person games by doing away with the whole concept of 'levels'

Guess they have never played Metroid Prime or Metroid Prime: Echos. This is not a new idea and has been around for many years.

which has been the primary progression mechanic every first person game has used.

Maybe this is true for every first person that they have played, but certainly not every first person game in existance (see example above).

GTA? (1)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 8 years ago | (#14163358)

If it's got to be First Person, try Halo for lack of level loading. Even more ironic because it did this on the Xbox, the predecessor to the 360. And not because you have monsterous new hardware, but because you thought a little bit.

I'm a big believer in linear games. As the Max Payne developers said, "It's better to have one good plot than an infinite number of bad ones." And the interactiveness of it can be more than just "playing a movie". It's a different medium, after all -- unless it's Stuntman or something equally backwards, a shooter is a shooter. I have to like the Half-Life approach -- the plot is in the environment and the gameplay.

But anyway, I've just lost a lot of respect for id. I like that they release their source and provide Linux versions. I don't like that they are doing something Microsoft has done for a long time. "It's not a bug, it's a feature!" Every time I see a game make me wait, I'm annoyed, because I've seen it done right. Jak and Daxter, a launch title for the PS2, had no loading screens, so gameplay was never interrupted except to save.

Oh, and sequels can have good IP. Jak and Daxter have the only controls I've ever had work for me in a platform game -- GTA, the Matrix games, Street Fighter, all either too sluggish or too much based on button-mashing. It makes you wonder -- Quake had the control set used by every FPS today, and Jak had controls that were responsive but not combo-memorizing or button-mashing. And then they made Jak II -- everything Jak & Daxter had, but auto-saving in a separate thread -- you'd see an icon on the screen to show you it was saving, as you continued playing -- and guns, and carjacking, and skateboarding. Then Jak III -- all of the above, plus open desert with a dune buggy, flight, and open war.

I think Naughty Dog did a better job with that than Valve did with Half-Life 2. HL2 is a different game than HL1 -- new content, new weapons, etc. You can still crowbar headcrabs, but the crowbar is mostly obsoleted by the Gravity Gun, which makes me very sad -- I was a fan. And they made it slower. Jak II is everything you liked about Jak&Daxter, enough to still have a game, plus enough more content to make a new game. Jak III did it again.

Oh, and the graphics, while they aren't technically as detailed as Doom 3 or Quake 4 on Ultra, are artistically better and look better than anything id has done, and are at least as original as most of what Valve has done.

Re:GTA? (1)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 8 years ago | (#14165998)

Jak II is everything you liked about Jak&Daxter, enough to still have a game, plus enough more content to make a new game. Jak III did it again.

Eh, Maybe everything YOU liked. I didn't dig the whole "Jak Theft Auto" thing in Jak II.

   

Not exactly a huge change (4, Insightful)

AuMatar (183847) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160380)

So you want to get rid of levels. Well, we can make one big world, and only load the part immediately around you. When you get close to the edge, we load the next part in the background. To stop you from going where we don't want you to go, we can put giant walls/buildings to keep you in one area until you finish it. We can call these areas "levels".

No reason they couldn't do this on current hardware- just noone has chosen to. Not a big change.

Re:Not exactly a huge change (1)

chris_mahan (256577) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160403)

Morrowind: Elder Scrolls did this, when, in 1994?

Yes I still have the original floppies.

Re:Not exactly a huge change (1)

AuMatar (183847) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160469)

Morrowwind is recent. Do you mean Daggerfall? Yeah, they did it too. They also made the record for most bugs in a PC game, but thats another story :)

Re:Not exactly a huge change (1)

chris_mahan (256577) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160555)

I mean Morrowind: Elder Scrolls. Bought it in 1994 at Egghead at the corner of Tujunga and Oxnard in North hollywood.

It was 8 floppies and ran great on a 386SX.

(except that at the end of the prison with the mini-trolls and the rats, you had to have to booklet because you needed to give some word on some page... Or was it a spell question. I forgot, but you had to have the book. (I may still have it too!)

The white wolves near the ice castle were bitching.

Re:Not exactly a huge change (1)

kaptron (850747) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160619)

I definitely didn't sound all that revolutionary to me either, especially in the cut off description in the summary which made me say "um... Half Life 1 and 2?" But I guess Half Life even has levels in the sense that you are essentially on rails the whole time, they are just seamlessly connected and there aren't any "level complete" screens.

But, if it really is one big world that you run around in, sure the idea isn't all that revolutionary but it is definitely something different for an FPS game. I can't think of an FPS that was just one big world like that. And I'm curious as to how the game progression works since there aren't any levels... surely it is more than just running around shooting things. :)

Re:Not exactly a huge change (1)

Yoyoson (928225) | more than 8 years ago | (#14161375)

A game released in 1985 had an algorithm for world-loading that was very similar to what you describe. It was called Super Mario Bros., and it was developed for the NES.

SWIV & Jak and Daxter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14162738)

"SWIV" a vertical two-player shmup, was a single level continuously loaded from a floppy on a 7.14Mhz Amiga with 512MB of RAM.

"Jak and Daxter" by Naughty Dog did the whole single world thing on the PS2.

New Ideas (3, Insightful)

SquisherX (864160) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160411)

I was planning on saying something interesting, but Im fresh out of new Ideas :p Seriously though, to me, the elimination of levels isnt revolutionary. Getting rid of load times, changes of scenes, and getting rid of mission objectives. Thats all there is to levels. Several games get rid of a few of these three elements. All wolfenstein is planning to do is get rid of all three? It doesnt seem all that revolutionary to me.

So... New ideas are important? (2, Funny)

mangu (126918) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160484)

Is there an IgNobel prize or anything like that for obviousness?

Seen this before? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14160531)

I'm pretty sure Valve did this with Half Life about 8 years ago... but that's just me.

Processing power (2, Interesting)

AlltheCoolNamesGone (838035) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160532)

I though the new consoles (I know the 360 was described as such in an Ars article) favored graphical power. That they really didn't offer any advances useable in more sophisticated AI or such? Bigger and better graphics are nice, don't get me wrong, but are we really going to actually see anything fresh and new until the hardware is capable of doing more than eye candy?

Re:Processing power (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 8 years ago | (#14161743)

What are you talking about? Each of these platforms is at least twice as powerful as the previous generation in terms of IPC and the size of main memory, not to mention bus bandwidth.

Re:Processing power (3, Insightful)

NanoGator (522640) | more than 8 years ago | (#14162249)

"That they really didn't offer any advances useable in more sophisticated AI or such? Bigger and better graphics are nice, don't get me wrong, but are we really going to actually see anything fresh and new until the hardware is capable of doing more than eye candy?"

Though I agree that the 360 is pretty mediochre, I think your statement is a little misleading. Yes, it has more doodads for throwing polygons and texels on the screen, but it also has a lot more number crunching power needed to have more sophisticated AI. One of the buzzwords being thrown around a lot with the next generation of games is use of the Havoc physics system so stuff falls realistically. I've also read developer statements saying they have more complex AI governing NPCs and such. In simpler terms, I would expect the next-gen GTA game to be considerably more diverse in terms of what the character can do. There's even some hints of that in the games coming up down the road.

All that said, those idiots at Sony and Microsoft seriously dropped the ball by making their controllers virtually identical to their previous generation systems. Thanks a lump, guys. San Andreas was fun so long as I didn't actually have to aim my gun. Now you want me to play WWII games with the same hinderance. But at least it's prettier! Maybe the added AI will make my team-mates fight the battles for me.

Woo new ideas! (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14160541)

In summary:

"New ideas are awesome! Just check our next sequel for proof!"

Disapointed (1)

Azarael (896715) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160753)

I'm kind of disappointed that they choose the 360 as the primary development platform for the next Wolfenstein game. I really like the series, but I'll be kind of disappointed if the game gets to arcadified for the console audience. New ideas or not, I sure hope their ideas still cater to the pc gaming audience.

Metroid Prime (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14160927)

Hasn't that already been done with Metroid Prime? Not exactly a new idea.

Technology vs. Gameplay (5, Interesting)

uNople (734531) | more than 8 years ago | (#14160971)

FTA:
...I once asked Mr. Miyamoto about Nintendo's strategy when it comes to making games. I was surprised when he said that Nintendo only makes games to sell hardware units


I think this is a really good point. Nintendo's primary goal is to sell Nintendo consoles. They do this by not only having good games, but having a good console as well. They focus on what matters (selling consoles) and adjust everything else so they can acheive this goal.

Companies like ID are already innovating, but in a different way. ID is not a game company. They are a technology company. They make engines for games which they sell to make money. They make games to sell the engine, picking up quite a profit on the way mind you. A good example of this is Doom 3/Quake 4. They used Doom 3 as a technology demo, and Raven software and Activision liked it so much that they wanted to make a game using that engine.

Innovative things that I am exited about:
A Metaverse [wikipedia.org] type of game, using Virtual reality.
This guy's [pointlesswasteoftime.com] vision of Virtual reality to come true. I think it would be fantastic.
S.T.A.L.K.E.R. [stalker-game.com] - I am really looking foward to this game. It is exactly what I want: a RPFPS Game (Role Playing First Person Shooter Game). It has the kind of fully interactive gameworld that I want out of a metaverse (only smaller). AI that reacts depending on the situation (another innovative technology?). Really good physics (watch the demo movies). And the gameplay looks good; you interact with the world in pretty much the same way that you do in real life (with obvious limitations, of course).

I believe that the next innovation of games will be to make them as realistic as possible. We are already getting that now, with the game engines. Soon, I hope, we will change the way we interact with the games themselves (Virtual Reality). Hollywood (may) actually write good original stories (doubtful, I know), rather than re-hashing old ideas. We may get to decide how the story goes (like a choose-your-path book), and the game can go in different directions according to our choices.

As the technology gets better, hopefully the ideas will follow.

Re:Technology vs. Gameplay (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14161763)

Role Playing First Person Shooter
and
AI that reacts depending on the situation
and
We may get to decide how the story goes (like a choose-your-path book), and the game can go in different directions according to our choices.

You mean like Deus Ex?

Re:Technology vs. Gameplay (1)

Deltaspectre (796409) | more than 8 years ago | (#14161899)

I thought everyone had forgotten about S.T.A.L.K.E.R.

Hopefully it fulfills all promises above expectations (especially the AI being able to finish the game if you aren't quick enough)

What really matters (2, Insightful)

Yoyoson (928225) | more than 8 years ago | (#14161294)

To provide more context for the Todd Hollenshead quote in the /. post:
For example, for our next generation Wolfenstein game, which uses the Xbox 360 as it's primary development platform, we are developing technology that will change the way people play First Person games by doing away with the whole concept of "levels", which has been the primary progression mechanic every first person game has used. The Wolfenstein game world will be one large environment that you can move freely about and explore without ever having to "load" the next area or map. In that way, you're never pulled out of the game environment because of a level change, and the game is presented to you as one seamless experience.
Sure, technically, this has never been done before. The transitions between Half-Life's "levels" froze the action for a few moments at the conclusion of a level and presented the player with the overlay text "L O A D I N G . . ." which was quickly followed by a similarly non-intrusive introduction of the name of the level they just walked into.

Sure, this will increase immersion at the cost of robbing the player of the sense of accomplishment and reward he/she feels at the completion of a level.

But there is something Hollenshead doesn't mention in the admittedly small space he is given to talk about the admittedly sensitive topic of forthcoming features in his company's future product.

Is it going to be one long linear roller-coaster ride to the end of the game, or is the Wolfenstein world going to feature multiple paths to victory, increase replay value, show signs of innovative thought, and possibly broaden this well-worn genre?

Return to Castle Wolfenstein was great, but Quake 3, Doom 3, Quake 4? Hollenshead may be right: he's going to change the way I play First Person games. At the current rate.. I'm not going to play them anymore.

Re:What really matters (1)

juletre (739996) | more than 8 years ago | (#14161756)

I never encountered "loading" during Meteroid Prime I or II.
Given, sometimes the doors would wait a second or two before opening, but loading was never anything that interferred with the gaming experience.

Re:What really matters (1)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 8 years ago | (#14166032)

Given, sometimes the doors would wait a second or two before opening, but loading was never anything that interferred with the gaming experience.

Except when you didn't look before you leapt and were running away from metroids or those @#$!!! turrets. ;)

Re:What really matters (2, Interesting)

XMunkki (533952) | more than 8 years ago | (#14163106)

Sure, technically, this has never been done before.

Well actually, that sounds very much like in-game content streaming. Many console games already do this. Granted, may be there no FPS games as such, but still games with massive seamless areas into which the gameplay is fitted nicely.

Some of them DO have fake loading screens, but they are hidden well enough (or are so far apart) thet the player rarely even notices it. One example is the Jak&Daxter game for the PS2. The game streams the next "levels" while you play, and the whole game is integrated into one smoooth running/riding excersice. Pretty sweet. And GTA does this as well, though for example the GTA:VC is divided into two parts. As for PC games, there are some. World of Warcraft springs to mind first :). So as far as I can see, this is nothing new (technically) and people have been doing this for well over 5 years. Heck even my personal engines have had this feature for quite some time. Haven't seen it in a lot of FPS games, but no reason why it wouldn't work directly in an FPS style game as well (cannot confirm this but I think the GameCube Metroid Prime has a streaming level structure?).

Just copy FEAR. That is all the innovation I want (5, Insightful)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 8 years ago | (#14162515)

Just for once I would like to see game companies not so much innovate as just take the best bits out of games that game before and not constantly de-evolve.

So from now on every single player FPS game will have the following:

  • Quicksave, at any point unrestricted. If you feel they ruin the challenge, don't use them.
  • Grenades are not a selecteable weapon instead can be thrown with main weapon equipped like Halo/Fear.
  • NO close combat fast moving enemy takes more then 1 clip of ammo to kill. Especially melee. (Am I the only one who hates having to reload/switch with some ankle biter gnawing you?
  • No ankle biters. I want my enemies human sized. Head crabs are out.
  • No random spawns behind me when I walk into the pool of light to get an ammo resupply EVERY GODDAMN FUCKING TIME (Doom3 I am talking to you.)
  • No Ammo grab. You know it you hate it, the moment you cleared a difficult room of baddies you have to visit their twisting corpses to grab half a clip of ammo from each so you can kill the next batch. Is every video game secret army short on funds or something? Brothers in Arms and Vietcong showed how it can be done differently.
  • Give me some backup. Yeah yeah, I am the lone soldier hero who saves the day but just at 1 or 2 points in the game make it less bloody obvious that today's game all focus on graphics and not on AI. Brothers in Arms, Vietcong and Call of Duty showed the way.
  • No more trash talking bosses, co-workers without the option to beat them up. I am for one sick and tired of being the rooky who has to prove himself. Can a real writer please come up with a more original setting then your are the newbie but somehow have to do all the critical missions without any help?

FEAR was short and the story not exactly original BUT it was beautifully executed. It simply incoorperated a lot of good design decission. The only baddie I found was that you still were alone and badly equipped. I would at least to have liked to see a couple of mission starts and ends with some real backup and not just story plot cannon-fodder. I could also have done with a better supply of ammo so I would not have to loot every damn corpse. Oh and the "hidden" health/slow-mo boosts were lame as well. Can you make it any more obvious I am playing a game then having power-ups lying around in sewers?

I find it amazing to see wolfenstein and the word innovation linked however. Sure they were the first but the last wolfenstein to me was an extreme case of mediocore FPS design. Oh well, the punters loved it so who am I to critize.

What the...? (1)

wilgibson (933961) | more than 8 years ago | (#14163293)

For example, for our next generation Wolfenstein game, which uses the Xbox 360 as it's primary development platform, we are developing technology that will change the way people play First Person games by doing away with the whole concept of 'levels', which has been the primary progression mechanic every first person game has used.

Sorry to quote this one more time, but WTF? Since when is getting rid of the concept of levels a new idea? I know someone said this already but did this guy not play Metroid Prime?

Unless he means giving people the abilty to freely roam an environment without limitations on where they can go based on items, this has been done already! With little or no load times on top of that. And, Retro Studios was able to do it a second time with MP2. They want to really innovate, let's see them do something with that is amazing gameplay wise. Let's see them hype up something other than load times, graphics or ragdoll physics like these companies do half the time. The Big N showed a demo to the press earlier this year of Metroid Prime 2 played with the Revolution controller. When it comes to an FPS, that is innovation and I can't wait to play Metroid Prime 3 becasue of it.

Original gameconcepts, and leaving out the Rev ? (2, Interesting)

88NoSoup4U88 (721233) | more than 8 years ago | (#14163521)

Q: What role will original game concepts play in next generation development? A: (Todd Hollenshead) Technology is a gating factor to the experience of playing games. Whether it's visual quality or character interactions, you have to have the processing power to make more sophisticated and interesting entertainment. Certainly the next generation of consoles in the Xbox 360 and PS3 are far more powerful than their predecessors and that gives game developers broad options to do things we haven't been able to do before and provide experiences for players they haven't had before.

Ahyes: the expert... what about the Revolution though? Funny if you talk about the change in next gen consoles, and then leaving out the -only- company that's really trying to come forth with new ideas/experiences to play games.

For example, for our next generation Wolfenstein game, which uses the Xbox 360 as it's primary development platform, we are developing technology that will change the way people play First Person games by doing away with the whole concept of 'levels', which has been the primary progression mechanic every first person game has used.

You're not unique,Mr. Hollenshead. In fact, the Unreal engine announced thise feature -ages- ago (streaming level content on the fly, thus creating endless levels without loading). Nice feature nonetheless.

Wow, Way to NOT answer the question... (2, Insightful)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 8 years ago | (#14165722)

They ask about "original concepts" and in response, they get a page and a half of marketing blurb for a "Wolfenstien Meets GTA" game?!

Geez. They're not even trying to be subtle about it anymore.
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