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Searchable C/C++ DB surpasses 275 million lines

Hemos posted more than 8 years ago | from the interesting-applications dept.

Programming 328

Sembiance writes "I've been working on a C/C++ source code search database for the past year. It has recently surpassed 275 million lines of searchable open source C/C++ code. The search engine is C/C++ syntax aware so you can search for specific elements such as functions, macros, classes, comments, etc. The site is built upon many open source products including: MySQL and Lucene for the database, CodeWorker to parse the code, PHP and Apache for the website and GeSHi for syntax highlighting. I'm currently looking for suggestions on what sort of 'interesting statistics' I could create from 275+ million lines of open source C/C++ code."

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328 comments

Some statistics to get you started (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186064)

I'm currently looking for suggestions on what sort of 'interesting statistics' I could create from 275+ million lines of open source C/C++ code.


The following "interesting statistics" come to mind:

  • Percentage of functions named "deepThroat" (0%)
  • Number of comments mentioning a "girlfriend" (11) or "wife" (29) to "Natalie Portman" (41)
  • How many variables named "penis" are of type "long" versus type "short" (unknowable!)


You gotta get the variables searchable. Most critical for that last statistic. Also, I'm too lazy to learn Lucene Query Parser Syntax [apache.org] , so the statistics for "Natalie Portman" may include references to "portman."

first (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186073)

i got first!

useful statistic (5, Funny)

kunzy (880730) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186081)

the time from the frontpage acticle on /. to the death of your server?

Re:useful statistic (5, Funny)

Sembiance (124190) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186109)

Well, it's been about 2 minutes on slashdot... my site is already dead. So uhm... 2 minutes?

Re:useful statistic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186207)

You probably saying Fuck!

Using a search of "Fuck"

Well, so are these guys:

void FuckUp 11 GSMP-0.0.6/Plugins/src/Factory.cc
void MindFuckUrquan 22 uqm-0.4.0/src/sc2code/comm/talkpet/talkpet.c
void OS_FreeFuckOver 6 bnserv-1.0.3/services/operserv.c
void * OS_Thread_FuckOver 46 bnserv-1.0.3/services/operserv.c
char * SolveFuckName 25 setedit/install/install.cc

- Moomin

My vote is for... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186090)

How many lines consist of:
}

Re:My vote is for... (0)

Forseti (192792) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186147)

You forgot the semicolon, that ain't gonna compile! ;-)

Re:My vote is for... (1)

Erioll (229536) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186201)

Most closing-statements require no semicolon. While things like class definitions, structs, etc, DO, "typical" programming blocks do NOT, like if, while, and switch blocks. Even functions don't terminate their blocks with a semicolon.

So I'd suspect lines with purely "}" and whitespace would be quite a few.

Re:My vote is for... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186217)

Probably about as many lines consist of: {

Re:My vote is for... (4, Interesting)

epiphani (254981) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186223)

Same type of thing, but indenting styles. K&R vs. BSD, ect. I'm curious how that breaks up.

(Partial to BSD style myself..)

Interesting Stats? (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186094)

Swear Count.

SCO (2, Funny)

cmburns69 (169686) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186100)

With all that code indexed, maybe we'll finally be able to figure out what the heck SCO's talking about.

But then again, probably not...

Wtf? (1, Interesting)

GeckoX (259575) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186102)

What, you've created this wonderful piece of software and _now_ want to figure out what to do with it?

Am I missing something here?

Re:Wtf? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186154)

And he spent a year on it, too. :)

Re:Wtf? (2, Insightful)

Digital Vomit (891734) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186382)

What better reason than to create such a program other than "why not"?

A person who is a true programmer in his soul doesn't ask himself "why". Oftentimes the sheer joy of creating something from nothing is enough.

Statistics: (5, Interesting)

duckpoopy (585203) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186104)

1. Lines per function
2. Comment / command ratio
3. Number of curse word variable names

Re:Statistics: (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186181)

From the stats page if you cannot get to it...

Overall Stats
Number of Packages: 10,931
Total Number of Files: 1,151,819
Total Lines of Code (No comments, no blank lines): 283,119,081
Total of All Lines: 420,355,464
Total Number of Functions: 7,782,468
Total Number of Functions Called: 69,500,700
Total Number of Macros: 9,947,564
Total Number of Classes: 209,361
Total Number of Comments: 38,125,107
Total Number of Structures: 554,178
Total Number of Unions: 19,687
Total Number of Includes: 5,904,187

Measurements I have made (4, Insightful)

derek_farn (689539) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186262)

Source code usage measurements contain many surprises (ie, developers don't always write what people think they do). Some statistics I have collected, on a smaller code base, are available here [coding-guidelines.com] . The source of the tools used to exract much of the data (at least for those tables and figure I produced) is available here [knosof.co.uk] (C only at the moment).

Being able to search so much source is also very useful. I was involved in a discussion a while back about the frequency of use of bessel functions in programs (I claimed rare). The handful of uses returned from your database helped back up my argument (dare I say prove it).

Keep up the good work!

275+ million lines (1, Funny)

four2five (645777) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186117)

How about the % of them that would work on a lady in a bar? line 53256 "Hey pretty lady, are you an astronaut because your ass looks out of this world" ....oh....not those kinds of lines....*sigh* and I thought I was so close

Re:275+ million lines (1)

hritcu (871613) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186282)

line 53256 "Hey pretty lady, are you an astronaut because your ass looks out of this world"

Knowing that there are not so many women writing (or *sigh* reading) open source I think it is very unlikely that adding such line to your source code will get you anywhere. You could try though, and of course tell us what happend :)

Are you proud of 275 million lines of code? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186119)

I write code. I have found that correctly using OO techinques reduces the lines of code and while it is more challenging to write than procedural code it often results in better management.

How is is possible for you to maintain and develop close to a quater billion lines of code efficiently? This seems like a logistic nightmare. I am curious to excactly how you amassed this many lines of code for a database program, was the goal to develope the worlds biggest program?

Re:Are you proud of 275 million lines of code? (1)

sparkes (125299) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186182)

Write 'I must read at least the post before I comment' 275 million times and when you are finished you can use slashdot again.

Re:Are you proud of 275 million lines of code? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186420)

He said 275 million lines of searchable code... not the length of his search program. Maybe you should read the post instead...

Slashdot Block (3, Interesting)

Yerase (636636) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186125)

I love the GeShi page, how it blocks everything from Slashdot. Setup a site to advertise a product, then restrict people from using it....
URLs on this server linked by slashdot.org will be refused. Permission is given to slashdot to mirror content as necessary for the purpose of providing its users access to the information on the site. Slashdot should not attempt to bypass the referer block. Use of the google cache page for the site is acceptable as long as the page(s) concerned have no more than 1 image.

Re:Slashdot Block (2, Insightful)

lowrydr310 (830514) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186199)

This policy is employed for the sole purpose of avoiding a huge bandwidth bill that I would have to pay out of my own pocket. Anyone who would like this restriction to go away is more than welcome to send me bucketloads of cash.

If you don't want to pay a big bandwidth bill then don't run a webserver.

Re:Slashdot Block (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186278)

Yeah, no kidding. His first step should have been to not post to /. if he was so concerned about outlaying money.

Re:Slashdot Block (2, Insightful)

b4k3d b34nz (900066) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186312)

Why would anybody WANT to pay a big bandwidth bill? It's called being smart so that he doesn't get the shaft when he has to pay his utilities this month.

Re:Slashdot Block (1)

Anonymous Brave Guy (457657) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186363)

If you don't want to pay a big bandwidth bill then don't run a webserver.

If you want access to a web server, don't run a system that's known to give the provider big bandwidth bills.

At the end of the the day, they don't owe you anything, and anything they offer you is a courtesy, not an obligation. If you don't like that, please feel free to go create and finance your own WWW.

Re:Slashdot Block (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186215)

Ok, everybody get ready to open the GeShi page in a seperate window...
Paste the address now.
Get ready to press enter..... 5... 4... 3... 2... 1... and press.

Anyone still seeing the site is to press 'Refresh' as required.

Their fault for trying to tell me what site I'm not allowed to visit if I want to visit theirs.

Hit Refresh (4, Informative)

everphilski (877346) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186229)

Just hit refresh and the webserver won't get the HTTP_REFERRER (granted you'll have to manually delete the text file he serves you)

-everphilski-

Re:Hit Refresh (2, Funny)

sglane81 (230749) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186399)

Actually, if you click refresh on a page from a link, it will resend the referrer as well. Most browsers do this. One more thing, you spelled HTTP_REFERRER correctly, which is wrong :) It's spelled HTTP_REFERER, only has one R. Reverse grammar nazi FTW?

Re:Slashdot Block (2, Interesting)

wampus (1932) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186238)

Thats why I use Cacheout [thetechgurus.net] . Its a Firefox extension that adds a context menu item to coralize any link. Bypass the restriction AND not kill the site, all at the same time.

Re:Slashdot Block (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186239)

Wow...sounds like someone actually RTFA.

You must be new here.

Re:Slashdot Block (1)

teslar (706653) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186342)

Wow...sounds like someone actually RTFA.
You must be new here.
You on the other hand must be a veteran. The link the parent is talking about is not TFA ;)

Of course.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186130)

how many lines contain the word 'fcuk'

d'oh!

Choice of db? (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186137)

So, this is not a flame, but I'm curious about your choice of dbs.
I've used mysql for some small projects, but generally it does handle
millions of rows (although the upper limit on rows can be patched with
some additional behaviors). So, for big dbs, I use postgresql.

How did you decide to use mysql? (Was it that the project started,
and grew, or did you know it would handle large numbers of rows
from the start)?

Just curious. This is probably going to be viewed as a flame by many
(particularly those who don't really use dbs very much, but use them
enough to have strong opinions).

Re:Choice of db? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186232)

Tell that to the 23 million row table I'm currently playing with - no tweaking or patching needed. What version of MySQL have you tried "large" databases with (23 million rows isn't large)

And then... (1, Troll)

guaigean (867316) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186139)

Stay tuned for our reaching 280 million lines, followed by 285, 290, 295, and 300. Expect a new Slashdot post soon, as we need to advertise!

Re:And then... (5, Interesting)

Sembiance (124190) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186176)

Advertise? No, I'm just a single coder doing this for fun and hope that some people will find it useful.

Just a couple... (1)

nexxuz (895394) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186146)

Most frequently searched items, number of searches per min. (or after /. per sec.)

Statistics TM (c) (5, Interesting)

chunews (924590) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186162)

It would be interesting to see the number of different copyright notices contained within all that source code, and then to present the notices in groups, like GPL GPL2, etc..

Also, I would really like to find "patient 0" for sourcecode. For example, is there a common library or utility function (perhaps Hex2Ascii?) that *everybody* uses? Well, who wrote it first?

And in a similar vein, who are the "top 5-10-100" authors of open source code by use, reuse, KLOC, etc.. Not of too much use unless I were awarding the Nobel prize for programming, or perhaps creating a list of individuals for the RIAA to sue, after their done with their other useless lawsuits. :)

Interesting Statistics (5, Interesting)

iso-cop (555637) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186174)

In the software engineering world, people will be interested in all sorts of code metrics such as cyclomatic complexity, operator/operand counts, lines of code per module, and such as well as object oriented metrics for the C++ code (depth of inheritance, for example). If you can marry these sorts of metrics with defect data (bugs) for each of the modules then you have a useful data repository for predicting defects in source code. Keeping around different versions of modules changed is also valuable here. If you can gather information on how long it took to produce the module and how long it took to correct defects in the module you are getting even better. If you make it easy to reuse the C and C++ modules...even better.

Amazon style statistics (4, Interesting)

tod_miller (792541) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186180)

I was very impressed with Amazon, who for each book say which phrases and words were particularly unique to that book. (reminds me of that google game where try try and get any two words with only 1 hit).

So show code with coloured background to the lines, from green to red, green being 'normal every day boiler plate' code, red would mean this code must be more specialised, or written by some half-wit l33t h4x0r at least.

I forgot what they called it, but they had 3/4 visible stats based on the semantics of the stuff, probably more under the 'hood (omg lol).

word. Oh some adhesion stats would rock!

please type the word in this image: adhesion
random letters - if you are visually impaired, please email us at pater@slashdot.org

Pro Words (1)

SpinJaunt (847897) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186203)

Obviously we geeks really want to know is, how many "F" & "S" profanity words there are, amongst other useful and descriptive comments.

Several basic stats (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186216)

Number of non-comment, non-blank lines
Number/percentage of each C/C++ control structure (if, switch, variable assignment, etc.)
Average size of functions in lines and min/max.

The basics and more (2, Insightful)

PetriBORG (518266) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186227)

Start with the basics, and then move on..
  1. Whitespace to code ratio
  2. Counts for each of the dirty 7
  3. Line counts that just contained () or {} or []
  4. A list of projects the code is from
  5. And then more interestingly, I'd like to run some sort of program on it to find similarities in code, to see how much one code base overlaps with another. It would be interesting to see if OSS actually does share code between projects or if its all NIH (not invented here).

interesting stat (3, Funny)

bsdluvr (932942) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186241)

1) randomly select 2000 lines of code
2) compile
3) execute
4) ???????
5) PROFIT!

What? Millions of code? (0)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186242)

As a programmer myself, though not that serious, the greatest number of lines of code I have written is 13,671 in a VB application processing costs for chemical analysis in a lab. This makes me wonder...How can one write over 200 million lines of code? How does one debug the beast? Believe me, even 1 million lines of code is a lot of code. How long does this thing take to compile? There are so many questions that just leave me to respect these programmers.

Re:What? Millions of code? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186266)

It's not all written by one guy.

In case you weren't being serious, "heh". +0.1 funny.

Re:What? Millions of code? (4, Informative)

tgd (2822) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186276)

Its a searchable database OF code from other products, containing 275 million lines you can search across.

Its not a searchable database written in 275 million lines of code.

Re:What? Millions of code? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186279)

This is a database of many multi-purpose code sections. This is not a single application.

Re:What? Millions of code? (1)

masklinn (823351) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186291)

Whoa, not only you didn't RTFA (well, that's slashdot so it's ok) but you didn't even read the headline?

Re:What? Millions of code? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186303)

The main problem you have is that VB takes a lot less lines to code the same.
For example:
On VB you do: 'msgbox "I don't read the posts"'
On C++ yo do:
main
(
int
argc
,
char
*
*
argv
)
{
etc..
etc..

I hope you get the picture.

Re:What? Millions of code? (1)

Quiet_Desperation (858215) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186427)

That's why I moved on to higher level stuff like VB, or RealBasic now that VB has been sucked into the .Net singularity. I don't write 3D games or supercomuter simulations of galactic collisions. Most of what I write is toolware or interfaces to my own hardware designs- very GUI oriented stuff that needs to go from idea to working application in, like, one day. But I still get the "serious coders" asking "why aren't you doing that in C?" Or the message board trolls with "Dur! You couldn't write a FPS in RB! Dur!" Yeah, no shit, Sherlock.

At this point, I just laugh at them and put dirt in their hair.

Re:What? Millions of code? (1)

Shimmer (3036) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186377)

This project didn't write the 275 million lines of code, they collected code written by others.

Unfortunately (1)

aztektum (170569) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186255)

All the code was just /.'ed into oblivion. Time to start from the beginning all over again. :(

Statistics? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186285)

"I'm currently looking for suggestions on what sort of 'interesting statistics' I could create from 275+ million lines of open source C/C++ code."

The obvious statistic would be: how many of these are copyrighted by CSO?

cout "why bother" (1)

micromuncher (171881) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186286)

I'm currious, when people are looking for code, what do they do as a first resort? Maybe this should be a poll. Me, I'm a bit funny...
1) look in my library (books)
2) do a deja search
3) ask smarter people than me
4) do a web search (usually on specific sites)

Find all buffer overflows please (1)

G4from128k (686170) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186295)

I can only hope that this database has good metadata on which code fragments contain/don't contain various common species of exploits (buffer overflow, stack overflow, mal-formed input vulnerabilities, etc.). It would be nice to know which code fragments have all the needed input/size checking needed to be safe for exposure to the outside world and which are "for internal use only."

Koders dot com (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186310)

Searching 225,816,744 lines of code...

interesting stats .. (1)

torpor (458) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186316)

.. how many times the same code appears with different function names (i.e. how plagued by NIH are you)? .. how many times the same function_name() appears with different code? .. how much of the code fails to compile?

Most important search term (1)

Boom11 (111153) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186336)

The most important search term would be "functionality", ie. show me functions which do this or that.
Without the ability to find the needle, the big hay-stack you have collected will only give you huge bandwidth bills, and give us with very little that cannot be found elsewhere.

Not working well -- TRY AGAIN LATER (1)

putko (753330) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186349)

It is hosed.

I tried searching. Here's what I got:

XML Parsing Error: junk after document element Location: http://csourcesearch.net/performSearch.php?type=Fu nctionTypeReturned&search=(&ignoredRandomNumber=11 33805159922.7798 [csourcesearch.net] Line Number 2, Column 1:Warning: mysql_connect() [function.mysql-connect [slashdot.org] ]: Can't connect to MySQL server on '127.0.0.1' (4) in /home/csourcesearch.net/include/php/GraphXML.php on line 309
  ^

Please check for this: comma in brackets in C++ (5, Interesting)

Animats (122034) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186354)

C++, for historical reasons dating back to C, has wierd semantics for commas in brackets. The operator precedence for commas is different inside of "()" and "[]".

So tab(i,j) is a function call with two arguments. But tab[i,j] is an invocation of the "comma operator", then a function call with one argument. The default "comma operator" ignores the first argument and returns the second. It once had some uses in C macros.

I've argued with the C++ committee about this. If "operator[]" had the same syntax as "operator()", we could have support for multidimensional arrays in C++. But there's a concern that somewhere, someone might have code that depends on the current semantics of the comma operator inside square brackets.

This new archive offers the opportunity to eliminate that possibility. So, do this search: Find, in non-comment standard C++ code, any occurences of a comma operator within square brackets. Eliminate any where there are parentheses within the square brackets enclosing the comma. Can you find any? In any production code? In any open-source project? Anywhere?

Yet another source code search engine? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186356)

Source code search engines have been extremely helpful for me. I prefer www.koders.com, but there are quite a few other decent ones out there. What does this engine has to offer that the others don't? It seems like this one doesn't index code repositories but only indexes files local to the server. Neither does it allow you to click on words in the code and search for them. I also sorely miss bookmark friendly URL:s and free text queries. On the positive side, I note that your search engine is totally free from ads! Very nice! Although I wouldn't mind having to look at a few ads (which I might even click on) because running a search engine is expensive and a good source code search engine is a very useful service. I sincerly hope that we will see some upgrades of the site.
 

best_idea_ever (3, Insightful)

l33t-gu3lph1t3 (567059) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186359)

charge for a premium service that allows Computer Science and Software Engineering profs to perform a somewhat intelligent search of the code to see just how much of their students' code is lifted off the 'net ;)

Statistical artificial program (1)

yttrium (88756) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186364)

Use statistics to construct what an "average" program looks like, and see what it does. :)

Function (1)

ninthwave (150430) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186365)

Compare functions looking for library routines that need to be created.
Look for common code structures that are not in libraries to create more libraries.

More libraries.

Does it compile? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14186370)

I wonder if the entire code-base complies... and if so, what comes out? Windows Vista, or some Linux/BSD merge?

See also: Codase.com (2, Informative)

kriegsman (55737) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186371)

See also Codase.com [codase.com] , another "Source Code Search Engine", which lets you search by method names, class names, variable names, free text, etc..

-Mark

interesting statistics (1)

Ylleks (807103) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186372)

"I'm currently looking for suggestions on what sort of 'interesting statistics' I could create from 275+ million lines of open source C/C++ code."

That one's easy. Just tell us how many bugs are hidden in the code, and give us a code/bug ratio.

Koders.com (2, Informative)

knipknap (769880) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186376)

Don't know, koders.com [koders.com] supports a lot more languages and also lets you narrow your search to specific licenses. The few extra lines of code just don't seem too do it, especially because such measures highly depend on the chosen method.

grep++ (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186394)

I'm surprised that Perl's CPAN archive [cpan.org] doesn't have structured searching at smaller granularity than module name or freeform metadata. Maybe once the archives let us find code by content, we'll get version control databases that store each line in a record, each block as references in a separate table, maybe even referential integrity of variables as foreign keys. I'd love my editor to pull code from DB storage, padding whitespace only in the presentation layer per my preferences.

I'd really love to see datamining techniques for factoring, optimizing and profiling code. Not to mention the enforcement efficiencies for source license "due diligence" comparisons beyond grep. It's bizarre that programs are still so united with a hierarchical directory filesystem that scopes are enforced per-file, while class scopes have only lexical (not purely structural or referential) implementation. Relational math is rigorous enough that its direct combination with a compiler ought to produce even more revolutions than it would with an editor.

Markov Chains. (1)

GuruBuckaroo (833982) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186400)

Run the whole shebang through a Markov Chain [wikipedia.org] analyzer, then have it generate some new code. Hell, ought to work as well as anything else put out these days...

Interesting statistics (1)

thisisauniqueid (825395) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186414)

You could calculate the percentage overlap between the 275 million lines of code and SCO's source code. For additional interest, you could plot that percentage as a function of time. You should see it go up right before every major new SCO filing.

How about a potential buffer overflow index? (4, Informative)

raddan (519638) | more than 8 years ago | (#14186429)

You can start by seeing how often people use gets(), strcpy(), strcat(), etc... Look for all the fun little common mistakes that people make.
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