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Slashback: Cancer, Cats, ICANN

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the science-as-exciting-as-businesses-are-predictable dept.

Slashback 192

Slashback tonight brings some corrections, clarifications, and updates to previous Slashdot stories, including the demystification of Australia's "Mystery Cat", the US Government backs Microsoft in their battle against Korea, RedHat joins the fun and decides to invest in India's economy, the ICANN community slams the VeriSign deal, and Clinical results from the cancer-killing virus trials - read on for details.

Australia's mystery cat demystified. Bitsy Boffin writes "Back in October Slashdot ran a story from the Herald Sun about the shooting of a mystery "Big Cat" in Australia. At the time the tail (the only part the hunter brought back) of said cat had been sent off for DNA testing. The Herald Sun reports the findings of those DNA tests which show that the mystery cat wasn't a leopard or jaguar, just a really, really big feral cat."

US backs Microsoft in Korean antitrust case. CODiNE writes "Stating that 'Korea's remedy goes beyond what is necessary or appropriate to protect consumers' the Justice Department's antitrust division rejects the recent Korean FTC ruling. 'Sound antitrust policy should protect competition, not competitors, and must avoid chilling innovation and competition even by "dominant" companies.'"

RedHat follows Indian investment trend. An anonymous reader writes "After several other companies have decided to invest in the Indian economy it looks like RedHat will be following suit. According to the article, RedHat plans on hiring about 300 people for an investment of about $20M."

ICANN community slams VeriSign deal. Rob writes to tell us that an overwhelming amount of the ICANN community recently took a stand against a proposed deal that would allow VeriSign to raise the price of .com domain names by up to 50%. VeriSign accused ICANN of illegally "regulating" its business. ICANN had previously blocked services VeriSign wanted to launch on the grounds that they would harm the stability of the internet.

Clinical results from cancer-killing virus. just___giver writes "Results from human clinical trials show that terminally ill patients with aggressive metastasized cancer are receiving benefit from the recently covered virus that kills cancer when it is administered intravenously. They still have higher doses to test in this ongoing study. This safe, naturally occurring, unmodified virus has a remarkable ability to infect and kill cancer cells, without affecting normal, healthy cells. Numerous other third party studies show that the Reovirus should be an important discovery in the treatment of 2/3 of all human cancers. It is patented, easy to manufacture in large quantities, and even increases the effectiveness of conventional chemo and radiation therapy. Numerous phase 2 studies are being planned for 2006." OncolyticsBiotech also has a short video describing the process.

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Also: Podcast beats out Lifehack, Rootkit (3, Informative)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206351)


In the ever hot battle to be included in the Oxford American Online Dictionary [oxfordreference.com] (login reqd.), Podcast [bbc.co.uk] beat out Lifehack and Rootkit (It will be added in 2006)

Oh Crap (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206386)

A cheap, easy cure for cancer? No. It's Patented. It'll still be horribly expensive.

Re:Oh Crap (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206468)

At least it was horribly cheap to produce ... oh wait, no, someone spent millions or, more likely, billions of dollars to create it.

But wait, now what would you pay? (1)

frovingslosh (582462) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206520)

And it's an unmodofied naturally occuring virus. Been around for meninum. May even be responsiable for some of the unexplained "miracle" cancer curse. But now somehow it's patented.

Cancer-fighting virus? (2, Insightful)

Army of 1 in 10 (931706) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206389)

What guarantee is there that this virus won't end up mutating into something worse than the cancer it's supposed to fight?

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (4, Funny)

geekoid (135745) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206400)

how about testing? like they're doing.

How about people stop with the 1/4 baked ignorant alarmest fears regarding something new.
You want a gaurentee, here is one:
Someday, you will die.

+3? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206623)

Come on mods, I almost spit my beer on my keyboard after reading that post. Knock it up some!

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (2, Insightful)

SteveAstro (209000) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206418)

Errrr. Worse than terminal metastatic cancer ? Sorry ? How "worse" ?

Steve

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (1)

Trigun (685027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206433)

It could become sentient and develop atomic weapons?
Thank goodness Gee Dubya can't ever become sentient. (Oh come on, you knew it was coming.)

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206485)

Of course he is sentient.
Only a sentient being could be that irrational.

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (2, Funny)

technoextreme (885694) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206447)

Errrr. Worse than terminal metastatic cancer ? Sorry ? How "worse" ?

Dying from terminal metastatic cancer??

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (1)

b0r1s (170449) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206486)

Dying from terminal metastatic cancer??

Like the terminal implies?

You're going to die anyway. The only worse could be timeframe or quality of life.

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (1)

jelle (14827) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206604)

Wall, afaics, getting to the point of dying from a terminal disease is a little worse than being at the point of having it.

In the former situation, you are at the north pole, in the latter you just know you will be going north only.

Life is a terminal disease, really.

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206543)

Terminal metastatic cancer that's contagious would be worse.

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (2, Funny)

NotoriousGOD (936922) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206586)

A black plague that kills half of western europe would be worse. Or better, if you don't like europeans.

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206616)

What about a virus that spreads to other non-cancer inflicted individuals and feasts on the goo inside, leaving hollow meat sacks in its wake?

CONTAGIOUS terminal metastatic cancer, maybe? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206637)

That might really suck, no?

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (1)

penguinoid (724646) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206499)

What guarantee is there that this virus won't end up mutating into something worse than the cancer it's supposed to fight?

Then if it does, what? Sue god? It's a naturally occuring virus, a green, eco-friendly, tree-hugging cure. Also, how much worse can you get than DEAD?

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206644)

Then if it does, what? Sue god? It's a naturally occuring virus, a green, eco-friendly, tree-hugging cure. Also, how much worse can you get than DEAD?
Being alive and reading slashdot comments, maybe ?

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (1)

NotoriousGOD (936922) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206551)

I think that's why they call it "testing". Instant cynisism to a cure for cancer huh?

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (1)

yog (19073) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206702)

Much more likely a scenario is that the body's immune system will want to attack the virus. Even though we know that it's going after nasty cancer cells and leaving good cells alone, the body doesn't know that and so anti-viral defense mechanisms will kick in.

Cancer cells survive and replicate because they look like ordinary somatic cells to the immune system, except that their self-limiting replication mechanism is broken and they are dividing like mad. The body just keeps on nourishing them, thinking nothing is wrong.

The body, on the other hand, almost always knows a virus is out of place. Probably the trick will be to suppress the immune system through moderate doses of cytoxin or other chemotherapy drugs just long enough to let the virus kill the cancer, and (one hopes) not long enough to allow too many other opportunistic infections to develop.

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (1)

just___giver (708926) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206863)

The body's immune response is a big question that this Marsden intravenous trial is trying to answer. It seems like the reovirus can overcome the immune response long enough to do its work. The higher doses they plan to administer will also help. Immunosuppressants can ultimately be administered too. In animal models, this approach has shown increased effectiveness too.

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206828)

Its a double stranded RNA virus. They don't mutate.

Re:Cancer-fighting virus? (1)

user317 (656027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206839)

since the virus is naturally occuring there isn't much you can do as far as regulating how it mutates.

Really, really big feral cat? (4, Funny)

bhsx (458600) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206391)

From the photos that were taken of the hunter with the catch, I find it hard to believe that a "domestic" style cat could ever get that large. It was huge! Damned, I better watch what I say around Shady. Come here Shady, OMG NO!

Re:Really, really big feral cat? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206411)

maybe the cat was closer to the camera then the man?

Re:Really, really big feral cat? (5, Funny)

Tumbleweed (3706) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206414)

Come here Shady, OMG NO!

That was, perhaps, not the real Shady. Will the real Shady please stand up.

Re:Really, really big feral cat? (1)

The Cydonian (603441) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206654)

Bet he wasn't slim.

Re:Really, really big feral cat? (1)

eggz128 (447435) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206797)

+6 Funny

Please :)

Re:Really, really big feral cat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206422)

Meh. It's Australian.


That's not a cat.

THAT'S a cat!

Re:Really, really big feral cat? (1)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206475)

> From the photos that were taken of the hunter with the catch, I find it hard to believe that a "domestic" style cat could ever get that large.

So you're saying this is all a bunch of kat FUD [typepad.com] ? (Oh, pleasepleaseplease...)

Re:Really, really big feral cat? (1)

ashitaka (27544) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206527)

Ummm. You may want to clean your dryer before posting that kind of pic.

Yes, I got the Larson ref.

Re:Really, really big feral cat? (1)

Mad_Rain (674268) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206531)

I wonder how many slashdotters got that joke? [geocities.com]

Re:Really, really big feral cat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206535)

I'm actually wondering why Verisign wants a cancer killing cat...

It's a case of natural selection (1)

hayden (9724) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206526)

It's nature verses Steve Irwin down here you know. Eventually we're likely to have Bilby's [wa.gov.au] that feed on cattle.

Re:Really, really big feral cat? (1)

nytes (231372) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206645)

I'd like to welcome our new feral cat overlords...

Re:Really, really big feral cat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206648)

I'm having trouble finding those pics. The original link died. Anyone?

Re:Really, really big feral cat? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206682)

Tomcat, castrated while still juvenile. It messes with their growth hormone production and they just don't stop growing.

Check out the snopes article. (1)

AltGrendel (175092) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206871)

The original Herald Sun article has been arcived. I would suggest checking out the snops.com [snopes.com] article. At the bottom is a follow up from October where they think it's a fake.

India filling with open source programmers (1)

Trigun (685027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206392)

Well, I guess that they won't be that far below the poverty line.

Re:India filling with open source programmers (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206462)

Well, I guess that they won't be that far below the poverty line.

The good thing is you can be below the poverty line and still afford it. Unlike a certain Redmond, Washington company, whose products I can't come close to justifying the expense of so do without.

More Corrections (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206393)

Slashdot posts a triplicate that linked to an article over a year old. [slashdot.org]

A plagarist trolls slashdot so badly, they even get a story posted. [slashdot.org]

Beatles-Beatles is a scammer that used slashdot to promote his own site. [slashdot.org]

These are the real interesting stories that slashback neglected to tell you about.

Feel free to add more updates here.

Re:More Corrections (1)

penguinoid (724646) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206525)

Slashdot posts a triplicate that linked to an article over a year old.

How about you complain about the triplicate status when they figure out how to turn brain cells into a supercomputer. What with the quantum limits we are hitting in the silicon dept., where will we get our new computer power?

Beatles-Beatles is a scammer that used slashdot to promote his own site.

You mean "Slashdot is 'paying' beetles-beatles* with a link in exchange for some decent articles"?

Chilling (1)

daeley (126313) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206394)

and must avoid chilling innovation and competition even by "dominant" companies.'

"...and by 'chilling innovation' I mean producing actual software products rather than stealing them, buying their companies, or employing grossly underpaid engineers to copy them."

Re:Chilling (1)

gid13 (620803) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206783)

Yeah. The attitude of an American government division going so far as to condemn a decision by another government begins to explain why the antitrust suits brought against MS in the US don't seem to have done anything.

Let the trolling begin... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206403)

RedHat follows Indian investment trend. An anonymous reader writes "After several other companies have decided to invest in the Indian economy it looks like RedHat will be following suit. According to the article, RedHat plans on hiring about 300 people for an investment of about $20M."

Let the trolling begin! I predict the following comments:

1. OMG! They're taking away our jobs.
2. India is dirt poor, why are they doing this?
3. India is absolutely unstable and nobody in their right mind should be investing there.
4. Most Indian coders suck.
5. It's only a matter of time before the Indian IT industry crashes.
6. Indian accents, Indian tech support and other related topics.
7. Jokes on Apu, Indian accent and the like.
8. Can someone explain to me WHY $company is doing this? (forgive me, I do not know anything about economics, however that does not stop me from putting forth such deeply philosophical questions)
9. Miscellaneous racist/nationalist/prejudiced statements.

Patented Virus? (2, Interesting)

Mecdemort (930017) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206405)

How do you patent a naturally occuring virus?

Re:Patented Virus? (1)

Trigun (685027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206420)

1) Pay off patent office
2) ????
3) PROFIT!

Re:Patented Virus? (1)

wherrera (235520) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206467)

The same way you patent a rose--you have a strain of the virus and convince the patent office that it is unique. And anyone who wants to do the same, starting with wild virus, can likely (barring stupid DNA patent tricks, as in the human genome) do the same. Fortunately.

Re:Patented Virus? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206806)

not quite. Plants come under a different category of IP law called Plant Breeders Rights. You cannot have a patent or copyright on a living organism, the virus itself is not patentable however the method of its use in fighting cancer is. (I study IP law at university)

Re:Patented Virus? (3, Informative)

Cipster (623378) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206496)

- You patent the method of isolating it
- You patent the method of delivering it
- You patent its use as a cancer treatement etc.etc.

I don't understand (4, Insightful)

mr_zorg (259994) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206413)

This safe, naturally occurring, unmodified virus... It is patented...

I guess I really don't understand the purpose of a patent. If it is a naturally occurring, unmodified virus, why on Earth should you be able to patent it? But I suppose if they can patent the human genome...

Or is it really the application of this virus as cancer therapy that's been patented?

Re:I don't understand (1)

marcushnk (90744) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206443)

makes zero sense to me as well.. perhaps the guys on groklaw could explain?

Re:I don't understand (4, Insightful)

Shadow Wrought (586631) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206454)

why on Earth should you be able to patent it?

Without reading TFA, I'd guess that the patent is not on the virus itself but on the large scale production and use of it in a clinical manner.

Re:I don't understand (1)

iabervon (1971) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206823)

They've got patents [integratir.com] on the procedures for using it to cure cancer, testing the purity of the preparation you're going to use, generating it efficiently, getting the patient to not kill it before it kills the cancer, and the process of killing cancer with reovirus as a whole.

Few thoughts on that virus thingamy.... (1)

mrRay720 (874710) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206417)

Really cool info on the virus. I've always thought that they're a significantly underinvestigated and underestimated part of biology. Taking over, changing, and otherwise messing with cells in ways that we just can't otherwise do - and there are untold trillions of trillions of trillions of them at it every minute of the day. There's so much potential there for both beneficial and evil purposes, and such flexibility.

But hey, real and significant news about a possible cure for many cancers gets relegated to last mention in a list containing:
a really long cat's tail! OMG!
The US getting involved in the internal affairs of another country (as much as I agree with what they're saying, it's not their business)
Yet another boring international outsourcing press release
More ICANN soap drama.

I guess others have different ideas of what's important in the world. :)

65cm is TWICE the largest recorded cat tail? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206421)

They say 65cm is twice the largest recorded domestic cat tail. That's about 26", so they are saying 13" is the record longest cat's tail? I don't have a cat handy, but that's just silly, I know my old cat had a tail longer than 13" and she was a normal sized 8 lb Siamese.

WTF?

Re:65cm is TWICE the largest recorded cat tail? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206456)

I bet you use that same ruler to measure your 8" penis too, right?

Re:65cm is TWICE the largest recorded cat tail? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206554)

I don't know or care about the original AC's penis length, but I just held my cat up to my laptop screen (15 inch diagonal) and his tail went from one corner to the other no problem. He's a big guy but far from the largest house cat I've ever seen. Those people are on crack if they think 13 inches is a world record tail for a house cat!

Re:65cm is TWICE the largest recorded cat tail? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206598)

It depends on the type of cat, I guess.

2 out of 3 (4, Insightful)

moosesocks (264553) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206429)

It is patented, easy to manufacture in large quantities, and even increases the effectiveness of conventional chemo and radiation therapy.

Well, 2 out of 3 ain't bad.

But seriously. If it's 'naturally occuring' and easy to manufacture, how the hell do they have a patent on this? I'm a hardcore capitalist, but being as how this could be the holy grail of modern medicine, I think the government definitely needs to step in to make sure us mere mortals can afford it (no pun intended).

Cancer-killing virus (0, Redundant)

porcupine8 (816071) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206431)

While it sounds like very promising news, it does leave me with two questions:

1) Is there any chance of the virus mutating and becoming more difficult for normal cells to kill?

2) In patients that are also undergoing chemo or radiation, will their suppressed immune systems make the virus more dangerous?

I'm not a doctor or biologist or anything, so if someone more knowledgeable has any clue on this please post. I'm just going off of what is in the article, video and the list of clinical trials they're doing. I see that they're doing one trial of the virus + rads, so I guess the answer to #2 will be coming up soon.

Re:Cancer-killing virus (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206529)

1) It's been around for billions of years and not mutated any worse than any other DNA virus (RNA Viruses like HIV and influenza are the ones that mutate fast). It's in dirt and sewage and only infects prokayotes and tumors, for gosh sake.

2) That's why they're doing trials of combined therapies. But it doesn't appear to be the immune system that blocks infection in healthy cells. It's the healthy cells natural growth inhibition. Which makes me wonder about it's effect on bone marrow and zygotes.

Nothing to be seen here (5, Funny)

Lars T. (470328) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206435)

It's just a COUS.

Re:Nothing to be seen here (3, Funny)

The Good Reverend (84440) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206725)

Cats of unusual size? I don't believe they exist.

Cancer (2, Insightful)

Lord_Dweomer (648696) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206448)

This is absolutely fantastic. And frankly, this is the sort of thing someone should be rewarded for. Not everybody gets to claim "I found a cure for cancer".

However, I have to admit that I am a bit trouble by this being patented. It is naturally occuring, easy to create, etc. The only thing that could possibly complicate this is a greedy corporation who has the patent and wants to enforce it and make tons of money. So rather than use government and philanthropist and charity money to cure a LOT of cancer, this company will be making billions off of a potentially life saving natural drug.

Now of course none of this has happened yet...but I won't be too surprised if it does.

Re:Cancer (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206568)

> So rather than use government and philanthropist and charity money
> to cure a LOT of cancer, this company will be making billions off
> of a potentially life saving natural drug.

About the only way for them to make billions is to cure a LOT of cancer.

Re:Cancer (1)

Lord_Dweomer (648696) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206639)

No, they also can also increase demand artificially by restricting supply. Also, instead of just charging a little and curing LOTS of cancer, they could just charge an insane amount and not cure as much.

Justification for monopoly on natural cancer cure? (1)

D4C5CE (578304) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206450)

This safe, naturally occurring, unmodified virus [...] an important discovery in the treatment of 2/3 of all human cancers [...] is patented [...]
Seems there's something very wrong about this...

http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/mpep/document s/appxl_35_U_S_C_101.htm [uspto.gov]

http://www.european-patent-office.org/legal/epc/e/ ar52.html [european-p...office.org]
http://www.european-patent-office.org/legal/epc/e/ ar53.html [european-p...office.org]

Dam... They patented the process not the virus (1)

technoextreme (885694) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206490)

Seems there's something very wrong about this...
Nope. The links spell it out clearly(well at least the uspto one). They patented a process not a virus. Do some freaking research.

Re:Dam... They patented the process not the virus (1)

D4C5CE (578304) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206622)

This safe, naturally occurring, unmodified virus [...] an important discovery in the treatment of 2/3 of all human cancers [...] is patented [...]
Seems there's something very wrong about this...
Nope. The links spell it out clearly(well at least the uspto one). They patented a process not a virus.
Then TFA (as quoted above) is wrong.
Do some freaking research.
Then please do follow your own advice and compare the provisions: One is wide and vague so strange things happen [uspto.gov] , the other one says (e.g. in article 52 subsection 4):
Methods for treatment of the human or animal body by surgery or therapy and diagnostic methods practised on the human or animal body shall not be regarded as inventions which are susceptible of industrial application [...]
while the full provisions of this as well as the subsequent article make an interesting read (and yet strange things happen there, too [ffii.org] ).

On behalf of the old people of the world: (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206457)

Thank you for your comments, US government. Now keep your nose the fuck out of other countries' business.

Seriously. Whenever another country dares to suggest that the US government has done something wrong, we get page after page of whining about how nobody has any right to tell the USA what to do. But does the US respect other countries' sovereignty? Grief, no. That's different.

Re:On behalf of the old people of the world: (1)

penguinoid (724646) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206547)

Whenever another country dares to suggest that the US government has done something wrong, we get page after page of whining

I suggest whining about it on slashdot.

Re:On behalf of the old people of the world: (1)

Mistshadow2k4 (748958) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206570)

I was born in the US, am 25 years old and have never been outside the borders of the US. And I agree with you. Sad, isn't it? I watched the SK vs. MS development as an interested bystander; I never presumed I had the right to tell the South Koreans now to run their nation. Nor do I think my government does.

Re:On behalf of the old people of the world: (1)

ScrewMaster (602015) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206608)

{sigh} rather makes you wonder if the word "megalomania" has some application to our current Administration.

Re:On behalf of the old people of the world: (1)

tsotha (720379) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206653)

Get a grip. That's the way it's been every administration since the late 1800s. Ever heard of the "Monroe Doctrine"?

non-competing competition (1)

penguinoid (724646) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206479)

Sound antitrust policy should protect competition, not competitors, and must avoid chilling innovation and competition even by "dominant" companies.'"

OK, I suppose they are arguing against helping specific competitors vs encumbering the company such that it cannot provent competition (without chilling their ability to compete?). That almost makes sense, but we have to keep in mind that specific competitors were harmed. And since when is microsoft a "dominant" company, with the quotes?

Re:non-competing competition (1)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206664)

Keep in mind that the US DOJ also thinks penalties shouldn't actually penalize when applied to (campaign contributing) corporations.

I'm not paranoid... (1)

Otter (3800) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206484)

Numerous other third party studies show that the Reovirus should be an important discovery in the treatment of 2/3 of all human cancers.

I'm not one of the people always yelling about advertisements maquerading as stories. (Either it's interesting or it isn't.) But I would be astonished if this ludicrous overhyping of a moderately interesting Phase I result from a small-cap biotech isn't being submitted by someone with a financial interest in the stock.

Results like this are daily occurrences, and if this site is going to start flogging particular ones as being the cure for "2/3 of all human cancers" I should submitting my own. After buying the stock, of course.

Terminology... (2, Insightful)

stienman (51024) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206493)


RedHat follows Indian investment trend

Is that what people are calling outsourcing now?

-Adam

Re:Terminology... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206576)

I have hides for trade.

This is ManWhoThinksHard, he is our most prized warrior.

Re:Terminology... (1)

taustin (171655) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206597)

Only when it's done by white hat companies, which is to say, companies doing open source. Nothing an open source company does can possibly be evil, can it?

It's not just Red Hat too (2, Informative)

mrokkam (783202) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206498)

Even McDonalds is investing in India now.(100 million dollars approx)
Article [rediff.com]

So all you guys hoping that you can get a job at McDonalds asking "Do you want fries with that"... think again;);););).

My cat has cancer! (1)

Felius (56017) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206515)

You insensitive clods!

Seriously though, when my total mutt of a moggy has just had a skin graft and is about to undergo chemotherapy, I have to start to wonder - am I taking this too far? He's so cuddly though.

Sorry, I now return you to your regular trolling.

For USA citizens... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206555)

...who wonder why you have a reputation for being arrogant, this is a perfect example. Your government has "rejected" a decision by a Korean court about Korean law. An American company has said that the Korean court didn't "properly apply" Korean law. Perhaps it escaped your attention, but if South Korea want laws to work in a certain way, it's not your place to say whether that is okay or not. Other countries don't need your approval if they want to enforce their own laws in their own terroritory.

Re:For USA citizens... (1)

EzInKy (115248) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206855)

...who wonder why you have a reputation for being arrogant, this is a perfect example. Your government has "rejected" a decision by a Korean court about Korean law. An American company has said that the Korean court didn't "properly apply" Korean law. Perhaps it escaped your attention, but if South Korea want laws to work in a certain way, it's not your place to say whether that is okay or not. Other countries don't need your approval if they want to enforce their own laws in their own terroritory.


Though I do agree some of your post it must be noted that the article summary is trolling because the article it links to states that the "Bush administration on Wednesday protested", not "rejected", the decision. Protest is a form of free speech as in I approve your right to say what you say but that doesn't mean I approve of what you are saying. As for our laws affecting other countries I think the rest of the world should just totally boycott us. Don't sell us anything and don't buy anything from us.

Patenting virii (2, Insightful)

Locke2005 (849178) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206582)

This safe, naturally occurring, unmodified virus... is patented Can't God or Darwin or somebody claim prior art on this? Pardon me while I file a patent on EVERY existing genome... I'll own EVERYTHING!

Re:Patenting idiotic spelling (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14206638)

> virii

*facepalm*

Bruce McDonald: get back to work! (3, Funny)

ChaosDiscord (4913) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206617)

"Korea's remedy goes beyond what is necessary or appropriate to protect consumers, as it requires the removal of products that consumers may prefer," J. Bruce McDonald, deputy assistant attorney general at the Justice Department's antitrust division, said in a statement.

Ummm, Bruce, could I see you in my office for a minute? Great.

Bruce, I appreciate your enthusiam. I really do. It's really great. But, you know, there is a lot of work to do in the office. Stuff related to US antitrust law. It'd be really great if you could spend more time worrying about enforcing our laws and judgements, and less worrying about Korea. 'Cuz, umm, that's what the taxpayers are kinda paying ya for. We on the same page here? Great. Well, back to it then.

Re:Bruce McDonald: get back to work! (3, Insightful)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206704)

"But sir, Microsoft donated eleventy zillion dollars to your re-election campaing. And Bill and Melinda had you on their yacht."
"Really?"
"Yeah."
"Bruce, you're doin' a heckuva job!"

Mutant Cat (1)

CaptainCarrot (84625) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206618)

From the article: "...it is extraordinary that Australia has a mutated cat that can grow to the size of a leopard."

So it's a little big. Feh. I won't be impressed until we have mutant cats that can shoot lasers out of their eyes, or sprout wings, or that can freeze the water out of the air or something like that.

The... X-Cats!

Re:Mutant Cat (1)

Tuross (18533) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206666)

Gee, you see one oversized cat and suddenly it must be a mutant. Step outside the box for a minute here. I mean, come on, how else do you think we keep the Great White Shark under control?

"I'm gonna eat you little fishy!" -- The Cat, Red Dwarf

Cancer cured? Who cares, joke about the cat! (1, Offtopic)

BobTheWonderMonkey (144907) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206688)

C'mon, people, we have a posting about cancer nearly being cured, and the postings that get modded up are jokes about the cat. Typical Slashdot.

Grow up, people, and maybe everyone else will take us seriously as a demographic.

Saw giant cat in Florida (1)

uncadonna (85026) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206700)

For what it's worth, my wife and I were biking in a state park in central Florida about 5 years ago and encountered some sort of feline creature, tan colored, about the size of a large dog, almost waist high. We turned around and hastened in the opposite direction.

We inquired at the nature center. The ranger assured us that there was no such animal endemic to the region. We have no idea what it was we saw.

I'm curious about this. I wonder if anyone else has had a similar experience in Florida or elsewhere.

Re:Saw giant cat in Florida (2, Informative)

AJWM (19027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206832)

Um, google for "florida panther".

Now, maybe that ranger was clueless or maybe by "the region" he meant central Florida -- the Florida panther's range is more southwestern Florida -- but it's not like the critters couldn't walk from A to B if they had a mind to.

If that is what you saw, consider yourself lucky to have seen it. (There probably wasn't much risk to you -- if the behaviour is anything like the mountain lions around these parts (Colorado), it'd leave two adults on bikes alone. A kid or a dog on its own, on the other hand...)

Florida Panther, maybe (1)

KwKSilver (857599) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206865)

Florida panther? Google "Florida Panther" then click Images. I got 244,000 hits on the text and 2800 on the images. If so you saw a very rare beast. I've lived here about 15 years, spent a lot of time "in the woods" & never seen one.

Not news (1)

maggern (597586) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206720)

Seriously, that the US government supports a US company (Microsoft) in a despute in a foreign country, is as much a news story as my grandma getting her daily bath.

In other - just as important news - I woke up this morning and had breakfest.

Thats a massive CAT (1)

POds (241854) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206778)

That is truely big. Honestly, I dont think any one would believe they could get that big unless someone saw it for them selves.

This is basicly a ferral demostic cat big enough to eat a human!!!

Indian "Investment" (1)

EmagGeek (574360) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206818)

And of course the "investment" capital comes from "cashing in" "investments" in the US. That is, if by "cashing in" I really mean "Laying Off".... and for all intents and purposes, not hiring a US worker to hire one in India is essentially the same as laying one off, except that they were never hired in the first place to be laid off..

IBM vs. RedHat vs. India - $/job? (1)

tlambert (566799) | more than 8 years ago | (#14206825)

OK, RedHat is gettting 300 programmers for $20 million "over several years" or "in the next 2 to 3 years".

IBM is getting 3000 programmers for $1.7 billion "over 4 years".

So for 10 times as many programs for 2 times as many years, IBM is paying 85 times as much money (as opposed to 20 times).

Someone at IBM needs to figure out why it's costing them 4.25 times as much for the same thing RedHat is buying... IBM appears to be paying ~$142,000 per job per year, whicle RedHat is only paying ~33,500 per job per year (assuming that's only 2 years for RedHat).

-- Terry
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