×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Blog Services Outgrow Their Data Centers

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the it's-fun-to-write-things dept.

The Internet 153

miller60 writes "The growth of the blogosphere is straining the infrastructure at popular service providers. TypePad is having serious problems again today, the latest in a series of outages and malfunctions as it switches to a larger facility. Bloglines is also apologizing for performance problems, and says it too will move to a larger data center to accommodate growth. There's been no sign of a mass migration from either service. Are bloggers and blog readers willing to accept rocky performance from popular services?"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

153 comments

Problems accessing... (4, Funny)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276501)

Damn! I can't access my blog! I have to blog about this... uh... damn.

Re:Problems accessing... (4, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276678)

> Damn! I can't access my blog! I have to blog about this... uh... damn.

4:16PM up 4 days, 6:24, 2740 users, load averages: 8.44, 7.42, 3.38

Mood: Slashdotted.

Re:Problems accessing... (2, Insightful)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276813)

Lucky for me, I can post on CmdrTaco's Blog and laugh at your misfortune.

Re:Problems accessing... (2, Insightful)

afidel (530433) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277183)

Damn, this kind of deserves an insightful mod. If you had been around since the beginning you would realize that slashdot kind of started out with Rob posting one of the origional blogs =)

Re:Problems accessing... (1)

lynzh (820948) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276853)

Bloggers are willing to stand by the unstable service, because their friends are using it too. Take win32 for an example. That has been rocky and unstable for many years, yet here we are..

Aboslutely Not (5, Insightful)

Drakonian (518722) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276505)

Are bloggers and blog readers willing to accept rocky performance from popular services?

Absolutely not. They will all stop blogging en masse and the blogosphere will cease to exist. What a brilliant question.

Oh please God. (1, Insightful)

Changa_MC (827317) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276565)

They will all stop blogging en masse and the blogosphere will cease to exist

I'm not saying the blogosphere is the most useless thing on the net, because I really favor slashdot.

I will say that at least we slashdotters don't think we're "journalists."

Re:Oh please God. (3, Interesting)

dada21 (163177) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276710)

I will say that at least we slashdotters don't think we're "journalists."

Yet the word journalist is more apropos for a blogger than a media careerist. Going back to the dawn of the printing press, you see much more emotion and variety until fairly recent times.

The media now seems locked in with one another. It is all Reuters and UPI regurgitation.

Bloggers that focus on consistency float to the top. My favorite 5 bloggers offer 80% of the news I read -- some of them are ex-media writers. I also read some blogs just to get a sens of alternate opinions.

My 5 blogs (2 public, 3 private) replace my e-mail newsletter (2 years running) that replaced my print newsletter (3 years before the e-news). My readership is down 95% as I attempt to transition, but I'm getting a much better view on who is reading and who isn't.

I'm committed to writing 7 days a week. I already spend 2-3 hours reading links mailed to me, why not set those links up for others with similar ideas? Is my attached opinion wanted by the readers? Only time will tell.

Re:Oh please God. (1)

wootest (694923) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277108)

I will say that at least we slashdotters don't think we're "journalists."

The people who have any ambition to call their own writing journalism probably have a streamlined posting system. This doesn't mean that everyone that has a streamlined posting system - call it a news page or a weblog or a journal or a column - thinks that they're journalists. If I had to make such an extremely sweeping generalization, I'd much rather assign them the label "casual writers". But I think that in reality, very few people consider themselves either just because they're able to write on a web site, and I believe it's a label that's forced upon them by people somehow upset with a precious few.

Aboslutely Not-A successful retreat. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14276594)

Agreed. It's a silly question. It's like asking; will bloggers accept the problems that come with growth? Do they have a choice?

Re:Aboslutely Not (2)

Lord_Dweomer (648696) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277138)

While I know you meant your post tongue in cheek...what will most likely happen is that the services that CAN provide good performance that does away with these problems will most likely see a large influx of transfers from bloggers...now if only there was an easy way to transfer your blog between services...

Actually, thats a pretty good question...DOES anybody know of a good way to transfer your blog between services? Especially if you want to retain your previous posts and comments?

Re:Aboslutely Not (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14277490)

Absolutely not. They will all stop blogging en masse and the blogosphere will cease to exist.

We should all be so lucky.

Rocky Performance, here I come! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14276506)

"Are bloggers and blog readers willing to accept rocky performance from popular services?"

Yes.

Please reference: the Microsoft product line

Re:Rocky Performance, here I come! (2, Funny)

kesuki (321456) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277177)

Please reference: the Microsoft product line

I think you meant Reference: Slashdot.org error 503 service not available

more relevant to the current discussion ;)

Re:Rocky Performance, here I come! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14277262)

Somebody please mod this guy funny. It's funny when we laugh at others, but laughing at ourselves can be a lot funnier (and being a slashdot reader I regard myself as "part" of slashdot sometimes).

What are the other choices? (4, Interesting)

Hulkster (722642) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276524)

The submitter asks "Are bloggers and blog readers willing to accept rocky performance from popular services?" so I would answer that with what are the other choices available for the common public?

Yea, there is Google Blogspot ... but even the big "G" has had performance issues in the past. An option for /. readers is to host a blog on your own site ... but that's not realistic for the average Joe. This stuff is all free, so I think most people are willing to grin and bear and suffer through some outages. Plus I don't think the world is going to end if we are unable to blog for a short while ... ;-)

P.S. Per my /. username, I did get a chuckle out of this quote from Bloglines - "Bloglines has been busting at the seams like the Incredible Hulk" and yea, getting angry and transforming into a Big Green Monster [komar.org] can really wreck your clothing budget.

Re:What are the other choices? (1)

m85476585 (884822) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276831)

"An option for /. readers is to host a blog on your own site ..." But if you use a blog service you still rely on them some of the time to generate the pages to send to your server. It isn't as much load as hosting pages, but it is probably still significant. The ideal option would to use a blog tool that is hosted and runs off your server. My Yahoo website includes MoveableType (http://www.sixapart.com/movabletype/pricing [sixapart.com]). I haven't used it yet, but it seems OK. For non-Yahoo users it is fairly expensive.

Re:What are the other choices? (3, Interesting)

timeOday (582209) | more than 7 years ago | (#14277359)

Do people have a way to migrate their blogs to a new site, even if they wanted to? Do they even provide a way for bloggers to back up their literary masterpieces on their own media?

Re:What are the other choices? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14277505)

Of course. You can get an entire dump of your TypePad database with one click. Mine was nearly 60 megabytes of raw text when I migrated to my own server earlier this month.

Re:What are the other choices? (2, Informative)

lachlan76 (770870) | more than 7 years ago | (#14277609)

IIRC, they allow you to send it to an FTP server so that you can host it yourself.

Re:What are the other choices? (1)

Seumas (6865) | more than 7 years ago | (#14277610)

Well, one option would be for them to just run their own "blog". Not every "blog" has to be hosted on some corporate cookie-cutter cut-and-paste site. There was a time on the internets way back when that you would actually make your own sites and not just pump some lame content into text area fields on someone else's site to create your own.

submitter, you suck (5, Informative)

PavementPizza (907876) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276534)

Your summary implies that the latest Typepad outage has something to do with their datacenter move of October. It does not. They had a hard drive problem that they noticed during routine maintenance. [sixapart.com]

Re:submitter, you suck (1)

tsmoke (455045) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276969)

That's even worse! My faith in their engineering was shaken a bit by the fact that they couldn't migrate their systems reliably. It's even worse that they roll back data two days.

And I'm not a script kiddie that hasn't worked with large systems. Shit happens, I know that. But this is some nasty shit that typically is avoided.

Re:submitter, you suck (4, Funny)

multipartmixed (163409) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277047)

You know, I've noticed that hard drives fail quite often, and take a lot of data with them.

Somebody really should invent some method of making a single disk failure a non-issue; perhaps, by using a redundant array of independant drives...

Re:submitter, you suck (2, Funny)

nsasch (827844) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277210)

Sounds like a good idea, but the name? RAID (according to your initials) would never catch on, it's like the bug spray.
Maybe there should be different types, or versions optimized for speed, reliability, redundancy, hot swapping, etc.

Expression (3, Interesting)

Da3vid (926771) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276554)

It just seems that more and more people are finding a new way to express themselves. This started off just as a trend but has grown like wildfire. This has replaced the use of the diary, and for many people, it also replaces idle chit-chat of catching up on, "So what did you do today?" This leaves a lot of conversation on more focused conversation. As well, it also lets people keep in touch with each other easier than before. I mean, is anyone surprised that these things continue to grow with popularity? It doesn't seem like an unnatural progression to me.

Are we really surprised? How many people use the Internet on atleast a quasi-regular basis? I'm willing to bet that currently a large percentage either writes or reads a blog (likely both), and that those numbers are going to continue to increase.

-Da3vid-

Re:Expression (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14277203)

The first time someone responds to the question "So what did you do today?" with "read my blog", I'm no longer talking to that person.

As longtime readers of Slashdot know... (5, Funny)

shawnmchorse (442605) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276564)

Our willingness to accept rocky performance from popular services is the only reason we're still reading Slashdot today...:-)

Hmm... (3, Funny)

deathbyzen (897333) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276567)

I think the blogging community, in general, is more tech savy than the average citizen. Hence, they understand that the difficulties are only temporary and, in the end, will be beneficial for the community.

I'm sure xXxDragonTearsQTxXx, however, is quite pissed.

Re:Hmm... (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276940)

I think you're being sarcastic, but you got modded informative instead of funny...

Anyways, the vast vast majority of blog/journal nonsense is hosted by a very limited number of sites (compared to the vastness which is the internet)

From my experience, once you take away the sites with stupid simple interfaces, you have a very limited number of people with technical knowledge, and their friends.

Yes. (1)

shobadobs (264600) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276569)

Are bloggers and blog readers willing to accept rocky performance from popular services?"

if they believe the rocky performance is temporary
then Yes
else No

Re:Yes. (2, Funny)

game kid (805301) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276822)

I always thought bloggers were pre-programmed robots that spilled out random text. This source code proves it, I tell ya! ;)

Re:Yes. (1)

Red Flayer (890720) | more than 7 years ago | (#14277425)

"if they believe the rocky performance is temporary
then Yes
else No"


I'd say thatmost bloggers will be pretty resistant to changing providers. Like changing email addresses, or telephone numbers, it's a pain -- especially if you have an established blog.

Bloggers identify with their blog, and moving to a different site, with a different mechanism and layout, just doesn't feel 'right.' So they will choose to believe it's temporary... only prolonged crappy service will make them move.

who cares about the bloggers? (4, Insightful)

Stevyn (691306) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276576)

It's the advertisers who should be angry. They're the ones paying for these services. They rely on the readers to view the web pages and buy their products.

Re:who cares about the bloggers? (1)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276828)

no, typepad costs money the bloggers are paying for it.

ad supported services have better incentive to keep performance up because when the system is annoyingly slow people visit fewer pages and see fewer ads before they leave to do something else

Re:who cares about the bloggers? (1)

slavemowgli (585321) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277105)

I don't know. Livejournal, at least, has paid accounts, too - and what's more, there is absolutely no advertising on the site (other than what some users might post, of course), so it's not as if anyone else is paying for the service through ads, either. Those with paid accounts at least *are* paying for the site on LJ.

But of course, LJ is only used by pseudo-emo and -goth teenagers who post about how dark and tortured they are, right? I kinda anticipate responses of this kind, so let me just say that it ain't so - LJ is a blogging service like any other. And in fact, there are some very high-profile people on LJ, too (Dave Jones of Linux kernel fame comes to mind, for example. Look him up; his username on there is "kernelslacker").

Will Bloggers Accept This? (2, Interesting)

Eli Gottlieb (917758) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276578)

Of course not. They'll give money to the guy who can host their blog with better performance and reliability, perhaps by soliciting donations from readers (like every webpage does). A few new businesses could even open and employ people just to host blogs, at least until the fad dies down. Everybody who invests with intelligence wins.

Keep in mind .... (1)

shri (17709) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276590)

That most blogs are inactive and only used by blog spamming scripts. Also keep in mind that people this is a slow time. Most people have other stuff to do (don't know what bloggers are doing.... do bloggers have families?) and if there is such a thing like a good time to redo stuff, it is in the next two weeks.

Finally, I'm sure Bush or someone will cockup and give the bloggers something more substantial to complain about other than the speed and performance of typepad.

Yes they will (5, Interesting)

kramthegram (918152) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276607)

Because you're looking at it all wrong, it's not just a service, it's a community. For the Same reasons people won't just let New Orleans go they won't leave these communities at the first sign of trouble. Sociology is a science that needs to be applied to the web more and more...

Re:Yes they will (2, Insightful)

Kelson (129150) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276726)

Exactly. When LiveJournal has technical problems for a few days, people don't leave LiveJournal en masse -- they wait it out. Because the whole point of being on LiveJournal is the community. Their friends, readers, etc. are all on the same service, and moving to a new one is going to involve dragging them along. On the other hand, if you and a bunch of friends do decide to leave, you'll probably end up migrating together.

Ever tried using a LiveJournal account to comment on a Myspace blog? Not gonna work. (Ironically, the people behind LiveJournal are the ones who set up OpenID [openid.net], which may make this possible some day.)

This is, of course, a generalization. You can find blogs on LiveJournal, TypePad, Blogger, etc. that are aimed at a general audience and have simply chosen a hosting provider. But in most cases, you'll find that the active readers -- the ones who hold conversations in the comment threads -- are all on the same blogging service.

Re:Yes they will (2, Interesting)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277024)

While it may be a community, I think the main thing that prevents most bloggers/journalists from leaving is the fact that they already have a lot invested in their current site.

I don't know if this has been done already or not, but I imagine that one of the big providers could steal a lot of dissatisfied users from the competition if they made a stupid simple transitioning tool.

E.G. Type in your username and password, select your old blog/journal and hit enter. Ideally, it'd backdate old entries so it looks like you've been at the new site all along.

I know that a large part of it is the community, but I don't imagine it would be hard for groups of friends to defect.

Good for them! (2, Insightful)

redelm (54142) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276622)

The only reason they're outgrowing their servers and links is that more and more people are finding them popular. Whether I agree or not with their viewpoint, I'm always happy to see people finding what makes them happy. Even moreso, because the growth is likely to be from moderates -- the real fringies were already there.

Now, if only... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14276632)

Zonk's blog-related posts would suffer similarly...

All things may be equal. (2, Insightful)

daviddennis (10926) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276649)

I remember that when ISPs first started, they were all flaky, but we loved what we could do on the net. We tolerated outages because we knew that all ISPs had roughly the same failure rate and so switching wouldn't improve much.

The current situation with blogs looks about the same.

Blog services are sticky when they form a community of sorts. If you like the people you know through those services, you stick around. And if your web address is based on their site (i.e. xxx.blogspot.com), well, moving will cause you to lose all your readers, too.

So I would say the answer is yes, that people will stick to the services they enjoy, because they know that if they move, they'll get about the same level of service.

D

Re:All things may be equal. (1)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276842)

i have used both myspace and xanga, i have never had xanga behave weird or run slowly, while myspace is slow or messed up several times a week. there certainly is a wide variety of performance and quality.

Re:All things may be equal. (1)

daviddennis (10926) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277317)

Most people are on myspace because their friends are all on myspace, and they value that very time-consuming to set up network.

They also know that's where the hot girls [namb.la] and buff guys are.

So it remains popular even though its software engineering is truly abysmal.

D

Re:All things may be equal. (1)

radiotyler (819474) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277188)

We tolerated outages because we knew that all ISPs had roughly the same failure rate and so switching wouldn't improve much.

Dude. They're called domains [dappergeek.com]. That example there: I pay about $100 a year for the managed hosting and bandwidth. TANSTAAFL. You want something reliable, you pay for it.

And come on, no-one likes being a sub-domain [slashdot.org] anyway.

-Tyler

Just get hosting (4, Interesting)

drakethegreat (832715) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276668)

Seriously just spend the 3-5 bucks a month and get some basic hosting. Its worth the cost cause you don't even have to know how to build a site. You can just install the solutions given to you by the host or one you download. I think more people should consider this because I'm less interested in blogs from websites like blogger.com because it requires just blabbing once a day and nothing else so I tend to think the quality is slightly lower. This may just be in my head but I think this is a really good reason for people consider homebrew blogs.

Re:Just get hosting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14277600)

Most of those "3-5 bucks a month" hosting places have bigger uptime issues than the services mentioned here.

Cruel (4, Funny)

gibbo2 (58897) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276768)

Bloglines is apologising for performance problems, and you're going to Slashdot them on top of that? Guess that shows what people think of bloggers around here :)

A free soap box is good for most... (1)

xoip (920266) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276769)

It's important to keep in mind that the bulk of Bloggers have no interest in setting anything up from scratch and less interest in paying for it if they know it will be relatively reliable. Top tier Bloggers are already running their own sites and invest in connectivity and design and for the most part are untouched by service interuptions. So...the cynic in me wonders if these service interuptions are used as a catalyst to get some people to pay for a premium service. Just a thought.

*cough* (1)

Kawahee (901497) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276793)

I dunno how much foresight went into this question: "Are bloggers and blog readers willing to accept rocky performance from popular services?", but it obviously wasn't enough.

People who use these popular services probably aren't smart enough to set up their own blogs, like 'professional' bloggers do. 'Pro' bloggers host their own blogs, and consequently aren't going to max out their webhosts data center.

And let's not forget, it's only temporarily 'rocky'.

Re:*cough* (1)

Lehk228 (705449) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276862)

actually centralized services are better in many ways, they allow reasonable spam protection within comments and take care of all the hosting and upgrade concerns for you. rather than finding out too late that there was a security patch for jRandomBlogSoftware AFTER someone goes in and changes all your graphics to hello.jpg

Money Money Money (2, Insightful)

Rac3r5 (804639) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276795)

My big question is where on earth do these ppl get the money to run these services??

Sure they have ads and stuff.. but do ppl really click those ads? Very rarely do I ever click ads.

Re:Money Money Money (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14276927)

FWIW, I make a few hundred bucks a month from advertising on my weblog, and it's non focused and pretty crappy (but the readers seem to like it).

The Other Six-Apart Hosted Service Is OK (1)

rpk (9273) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276817)

Livejournal has its problems now and then, but it's been pretty reliable.

Of Course We Stay (2, Informative)

JenovaSynthesis (528503) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276821)

If the outage was every other day or something, I could see a mass migration but when you've built up a blog/livejournal/etc. you cannot just pack it up and move it most of the time so you just stay an deal. Plus there is the social networking factor involved as well.

Plus it is not like users are getting shafted. LiveJournal has had problems come up once in a while and they compensate thier users for it with things like an extra month of service free and stuff like that.

Outages happen and it are a fact of life on the Internet.

Re:Of Course We Stay (1)

PenGun (794213) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276888)

Well I post at 0 so I gues I'm just a brave AC.

  The reason "you cannot just pack it up and move" is 'cause you are an user idiot and you would drown without a floatation device.

  Users should be punished when useful and ignored the rest of the time. The ones that can type should be punished on a regular basis.

  Outrage is what makes it all worthwhile.

      PenGun
    Do What Now ??? ... Standards and Practices !

Blog Proffesionals (1)

PenGun (794213) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276841)

I dunno the failure of the borken services at least gives us a chance for humour. I get a kick out of the "IT Professional Solution" guys. There are quite a few out there who have learned to set up "Moveable Type" etc and now advertise themselves as "IT Professionals". Priceless, but they never get the joke.

    PenGun
  Do What Now ??? ... Standards and Practices !

The Upside (1)

KrackHouse (628313) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276912)

I grabbed some huge satellite photos from the tsunami devastated areas and had 300,000 visitors in a couple of weeks using blogspot. I used bittorrent to host the media files but that much traffic would have killed most other hosts regardless. I'm now on my own server using Wordpress because blogger.com did start to get frustratingly slow but if I got hit with another traffic spike I'd be toast.

Like World of Warcraft? (1)

All_Star25 (736597) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276919)

Are bloggers and blog readers willing to accept rocky performance from popular services?

Like the legions of users who cope with the sometimes-rocky performance World of Warcraft? If some of these users are one and the same, the answer is yes.

If self hosting, what to use? (2, Interesting)

ChicoLance (318143) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276959)

I see several comments here about paying the $5/month and hosting the site yourself. Makes since to me, and I've been doing that for quite a while now. I've recently starting using blogging software from blogger.com [blogger.com] for my personal site [orner.net] instead of writing my pages from scratch because it makes it really easy to put up new pictures of the kids. However, I'm not sure how I feel about committing to a particular site like Blogger, even if I do host the site myself, as the blogging community shifts and twists as it grows.

What software is out there that's easy to set up that's more of a homegrown solution? I know of Moveable Type, but is there something else that the Slashdot crowd uses?

BTW: Am I the only one who thinks the term "blog" grates on his nerves much like "information superhighway" does?

--Lance

Re:If self hosting, what to use? (1)

wootest (694923) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277162)

WordPress [wordpress.org] (PHP) is an amazing piece of software. I used to use Movable Type, and their respective pros and cons tend to cancel each other out, so it's really a matter of taste and priorities. There are tons of other solutions - TextPattern [textpattern.com] (PHP) and Typo [leetsoft.com] (Ruby on Rails) are also popular and widely supported, and if neither will do, check your favorite search engine's index.

And yes, the word "blog" is an amazing eyesore, and it's just a contraction for the hell of it. "Weblog" or even the accepted ancestral "log" means so much more that it's hard to believe why people would use the four letter alternative other than to feel special.

Re:If self hosting, what to use? (1)

rhandir (762788) | more than 7 years ago | (#14277573)

I'll second Wordpress.
1. It's free.
2. It's fast and simple to set up. (You don't have to spend all day tweaking it, unless you want to.)
2. The stuff under the hood is both simple and elegant for nerds like us. (If you know how to write for...while loops, you can customize the behavior of wordpress in excruciationg detail. Note that the html templates use php inline.)
3. The management interface is dead simple for total n00bz - anyone can make a blog out of it, and almost anyone can make it look pretty with different themes (skins).

Con:
It doesn't generate static pages.
But if you are using cheap shared hosting, the account is probably "virtual" anyway, and performance benefits from static-page caching and tweaking aren't an issue. If you are running your own server, there are some cacheing tweaks* you could probably use, but that's beyond the scope of my expertise.

*the most heinous tweak would be crawling your own site and constructing a mirror every time something changed. _That_ is one hell of a kludge.

Re:If self hosting, what to use? (1)

wootest (694923) | more than 7 years ago | (#14277644)

The very best way to serve up 'baked' pages using WordPress is Staticize Reloaded [photomatt.net], which also allows some parts of a page to stay 'fried' on load, with other pages 'baked' for you. This is a way better solution than building your own caches.

Re:If self hosting, what to use? (1)

Qbertino (265505) | more than 7 years ago | (#14277417)

I don't like WordPress like some others here do. I think there's to much of an unjustified hype about it. I consider both b2evolution [b2evolution.net] and Pivot [pivotlog.net] superiour in terms of quality, features and usability. Pivot is database free which can be a big performance plus if you're only powering a single blog. I'd actually suggest you check out Pivot. It's backend is approachable and extremly easy to use and the available templates are a wonderfull groundwork to get rolling with your own style.

Of course all these are GPLd blogtools. If you insist on spending money for a commercial blogtool licence I'd strongly recommend Expression Engine [pmachine.com] over Movable Type or others.

A third alternative are payed blog services. You might want to check out Squarespace [squarespace.com] which looks like solid functionality crossed with a designers wet dream.

Blah Blah Blog! (1)

kilodelta (843627) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276984)

When you consider the amount of inane chatter on blogs this really doesn't come as a surprise. I'm contributing to the chatter by posting this.

It's strange... (1)

shaneh0 (624603) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276992)

...that MySpace is also having "database issues" today. There was (is?) a message up preventing me from logging on about an hour ago...

Shane

Re:It's strange... (1)

billy reuben (667186) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277237)

was the message you saw "This user's profile has been temporarily disabled for special maintenance. The profile will be available again shortly. Sorry for the inconvenience"?

Blogs.. (1)

stimey (819269) | more than 8 years ago | (#14276994)

Who cares about blogs, too many blogs. Everybody including the latest sony robot writes a blog.

What are they talking about?? (1)

marcushnk (90744) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277031)

I don't see any problem with my immensely popular Blog [modmeup.net] :-P 09:11:22 up 29 days, 1:04, 2 users, load average: 0.00, 0.01, 0.00

BLOG???? (1)

Hexxon (151978) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277034)

Ok... somebody please fill me in... What is a blog? Is it a forum? Is it an article? Is it something only the 14-18 year old crowd is into? What exactly is a "blog" because im just old and this terminology is beyond me. I have only recently (within the last year) seen all this shit about "Blogs". They even talk about this shit on the TV.

I ran a BBS back in the early '90s, does that make me a blog master?!?!?

Re:BLOG???? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14277228)

I ran a BBS back in the early '90s, does that make me a blog master?!?!?

No. You are an idiot who doesn't know how to use google.

Re:BLOG???? (1)

psykocrime (61037) | more than 7 years ago | (#14277477)

Is it something only the 14-18 year old crowd is into?

Definitely not. CEOs and high-ranking executives of some of the world's biggest companies blog. Blogging is very popular with software developers, who post all sorts of interesting observations, solutions to problems, etc. For example, I was recently struggling to work out how to share a Spring ApplicationContext across web applications in an app server. My first instinct was to store it in JNDI, but it turns out the class isn't Serializable, so you can't really store it in JNDI. I found the solution in some guy's blog, who spoke of the NonSerializableFactory class that JBoss provides. While I probably would have eventually stumbled into a similiar solution on my own, a blog saved me a lot of time, because someone chose to share their experience.

Blogosphere...more like Borosphere! (2, Funny)

cheesy9999 (750203) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277098)

I can handle certain word inventions like blog, blogger, AJAX, even Web 2.0 ... but for god's sake ... BLOGOSPHERE?

Why I like WordPress... (1)

martinultima (832468) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277239)

There's a very good reason I use WordPress myself... in fact, there's several, partially because I got fed up with Blogger and partially because it lets me run everything on my server, on my terms.

The one problem is that this server is a single 700MHz Duron system with 256MB of memory that my friend and I have running out of my house (it was at his originally, long story about why it moved). And it doesn't help that it's on my home Internet connection, and also running (along with my blog) the homepages of Ultima Linux [kicks-ass.org], several other, smaller projects, and not to mention the rest of my homepage.

Hmm, maybe if I had my own data center... ;-)

Networks. (1)

Mr. Spontaneous (784926) | more than 8 years ago | (#14277273)

A lot of bloggers put up with the outages and rockiness because they've got an established "community" on their servers. Blogs are becoming more and more itegrated with social networking. If you were already in one with many friends, would you migrate at the drop of a hat, or would you ride it out?

coc4 (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14277388)

Qthe BSD license, there are 3xemplified by

Gee... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#14277430)

How will I ever get on with my life, knowing some blog sites are down? Oh I just don't know how I can cope. Oh... ah... ah. Oh, there. I'm coping. Oh well.

Are bloggers and blog readers willing to accept... (1)

Ruff_ilb (769396) | more than 7 years ago | (#14277632)

Doesn't matter - They've got no choice. Very few of these bloggers are going to just say "Screw this" and get their own webhost/domain name. Most will just put up with "Gee, my lj has been laggy lately. Oh well."
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...