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U.S. Army Testing Personal Cooling Suits

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the things-that-really-are-cool dept.

Science 398

DJ BenBen writes to tell us that they Army is currently testing some 500 liquid cooled vests with Humvee crews in Iraq. From the article: "The Humvees with add-on armor were fitted with air conditioners after TARDEC engineers in Warren, Mich., were given the requirement to figure out how Soldiers in armored vehicles could be kept cool under the desert sun. Some of the same engineers had designed the add-on armor kits for the M-998 and M-1025 Humvees in theater. But with the extra armor and doors closed, temperatures inside the vehicles could reportedly reach more than 130 degrees. 'It's like putting somebody in a toaster oven on low heat,' said Charlie Bussee, an engineer at TARDEC."

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Sounds cool but... (5, Funny)

rubberbando (784342) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304827)

Is it such a good idea to 'Slashdot' a MILITARY website?

Lets hope they don't hit back....

Re:Sounds cool but... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14304851)

At least our military friends now will not get hot under the collar...

Re:Sounds cool but... (2, Interesting)

Yartrebo (690383) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304913)

The army wants all the publicity they can get. It's a public server and its job is to disseminate propaganda that helps them meet their recruitment targets.

Re:Sounds cool but... (3, Funny)

cliveholloway (132299) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304916)

That's OK, it's only "Friendly fire" :)

Re:Sounds cool but... (2, Funny)

JambisJubilee (784493) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305086)

I hope the guys in the server room are wearing suits!

Re:Sounds cool but... (5, Funny)

Tackhead (54550) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305129)

> Is it such a good idea to 'Slashdot' a MILITARY website?
>
> Lets hope they don't hit back....

Especially if their sysadmin's wearing one of these watercooling vests. If you thought the Bastard Operator From Hell was bad-ass, you should see him when he's overclocked.

Re:Sounds cool but... (2, Funny)

ScaryFroMan (901163) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305151)

Hmm. A DoS from the DoD.

Re:Sounds cool but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305195)

I don't understand what this topic is getting at. Is this cooling system good or is it whack?

Re:Sounds cool but... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305309)

Oh noes! State sanctioned murderers aren't comfy-womfy!!!

Whatever shall they do? Perhaps they can suck each other off in the barracks!

Holy Pork Fatman! (5, Funny)

Marxist Hacker 42 (638312) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304835)

And exactly why would you ask scientists and engineers in MICHIGAN to test the effect of a DESERT environment? Utah I could understand. Or Nevada. Or Arizona. Or New Mexico. But Michigan?

Besides... (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304918)

Besides, it's a waste of money. Just put a forty gallon beer keg in the back of the Humvee, and believe me the desert heat won't be a problem at all.

Re:Besides... (4, Insightful)

iggymanz (596061) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305043)

that's a great idea, but of course we then still need this system to keep the beer cold.

Re:Holy Pork Fatman! (1)

squiggleslash (241428) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304926)

At a guess, it's because Michigan is home to most of the US automotive industry and therefore where most of the expertise in mobile air conditioning is likely to be located.

Believe it or not, sometimes the hubs of research of development are on the supply end rather than the consumer end.

Re:Holy Pork Fatman! (2, Interesting)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305010)

There's not much expertise required in aftermarket automotive air conditioning systems. They're really quite simple systems. You have a grand total of about six or seven significant devices: evaporator, condenser, compressor, dryer, metering/restriction device, pressure and/or temperature sensor, and a clutch on the compressor. You do a little bit of math to find out how big each of these things needs to be and bingo, you've got an AC system. These systems are currently made all over the country and you can do it yourself by mixing and matching parts, using convenient parts you can buy at the local parts house (pep boys, kragen, whatever.)

Re:Holy Pork Fatman! (3, Informative)

Scutter (18425) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304952)

And exactly why would you ask scientists and engineers in MICHIGAN to test the effect of a DESERT environment?

Err...because that's where the automotive engineers are? You do know that the Big Three are based in Detroit, right? And don't forget, Warren used to be home of the 900,000 sq. ft. Warren Tank Plant. General Dynamics Land Systems Division, as well as many other military contractors, are still based there, too.

Side note: We used to have to use bicycles to get around that place. It was HUGE!

Re:Holy Pork Fatman! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14304982)

It's just more military logic. When I was in the Marine Corps, I spent a month in Wisconsin for cold weather training, only to be sent to Saudi Arabia a month later for Gulf War Senior.
It makes perfect sense to me!!!

Re:Holy Pork Fatman! (1)

VegeBrain (135543) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305127)

I guess you've never lived in Michigan with the temperature in the 90s and the humidity in the 90% range. I grew up in Michigan well remember how stuffy it gets with hot humid air blowing off of Lake Michigan.

Whatever it takes (-1)

b0r1s (170449) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304843)

Whatever it takes to get our military men and women home safely. Good luck. Merry christmas [vobbo.com] . Stay safe.

Re:Whatever it takes (1)

cliveholloway (132299) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304885)

Oh please. A crass advert wrapped up in sentimental twallop. What the hell has this got to do with "bringing our troops home"?

Re:Whatever it takes (5, Insightful)

gid13 (620803) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305013)

What it takes to get them home safely: stop declaring war on people. :P

Re:Whatever it takes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305087)

What it takes to get them home safely: stop declaring war on people.

But then there'd be no justification for billions of dollars in defense spending.

Re:Whatever it takes (4, Insightful)

commodoresloat (172735) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305124)

Actually, we don't usually declare wars; we just wage them.

Re:Whatever it takes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305310)

We're home feeling safe because we have brave men and women serving their country for us. Waging war and freeing oppressed people is what makes the USA so strong and successful. Never in history has there been such a benevolent superpower like the United States of America.

That's why we want them home, but wish for their best when they are fighting for us.

Freedom isn't free.

Re:Whatever it takes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305155)

Ah, but we haven't declared war on anyone since June 5th, 1942. See this wikipedia page for a reference. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Declaration_of_war_by _the_United_States [wikipedia.org]

Re:Whatever it takes (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305172)

Good idea! And that way they can be here to help pick bodies out of the rubble the next time we get attacked!

Re:Whatever it takes (1)

Phanatic1a (413374) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305258)

"Suppose they gave a war, and nobody came? Why then, the war would come to you!" - Bertolt Brecht

Re:Whatever it takes (1)

Alaska Jack (679307) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305305)

I can think of 3,000 or so people who might disagree with this, if they could.

    - AJ

Merry christmas? (1)

mobby_6kl (668092) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305278)

I think you meant to say happy holiday!

Nah, just kidding. I don't actually give a shit what it's called.
Happy holiday! ;)

Just hope they don't use red coolant. (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14304846)

That could be a scare for some troops.

Re:Just hope they don't use red coolant. (2, Funny)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305178)

S'okay, they've got plenty of coolaid in reserve.

The real reason behind them (-1, Troll)

HeLLFiRe1151 (743468) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304847)

Keeps the dead bodies from stinking. OK, flame me I deserve it.

MOD THE TROLL DOWN!!! (1)

GET THE FACTS! (850779) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305125)

MOD THE TROLL DOWN!!!

dumbasses (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14304853)

they have an existing AIR-CONDITIONING system in the humvee which doesnt do its job so they added a new AIR-CONDITIONING system to each of the troops???? wtf??
how bout designing an ac system that actually WORKS instead ?

Hot and cold? (3, Interesting)

Poromenos1 (830658) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304861)

I'm not a doctor, but is it good for soldiers' health to be hot and cold simultaneously? I have heard that having air conditioning and heating on is not healthy, so what about this?

Re:Hot and cold? (5, Insightful)

Jeremi (14640) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304877)

I'm not a doctor, but is it good for soldiers' health to be hot and cold simultaneously?


Possibly, but it's got to be better than dying of heatstroke.


Personally, I'd say being in Iraq is bad for American soldiers' health... but that's just me.

Re:Hot and cold? (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305028)

That doesn't make any sense. Also, it's not what's going on here. But, regardless, when you turn on defrost in your vehicle, if you have AC, it turns on. (Some vehicles, like the Mazda Miata, don't turn it on unless the AC button is depressed, but they have a weird control scheme in which AC is not a position, but an option.) The AC is used as a condenser-dryer in order to remove moisture from the defrost air, so the air on the inside of the windshield evaporates quicker.

Air Conditioned Bras (2, Funny)

tenchiken (22661) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304872)

I have a lot of friends in Iraq right now and they tell me that the Iraqi's are 100% convienced that the US already has air conditioned boxers, briefs, panties and bras... how else can they move around in that heat!

Reminds me of old Popular Science article (4, Informative)

StefanJ (88986) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304897)

I was a little nipper when the Space Race was in full swing.

In the early '70s, Popular Science ran an article by a stuff writer who tried out one of the water-cooled undergarments worn by astronauts during "EVA."

The garment was resembled full-length underwear, laced with yards and yards of plastic tubing. The cooling source was a bag of ice worn on the hip. Kind of like a fanny pack.

The writer put on the suit, dressed normally, and went for a walk around Manhattan on a stinking hot day. One of the few details I remember: A picture of him loading up the ice bag at a bar.

Re:Reminds me of old Popular Science article (1)

Brigadier (12956) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305054)



not a bad Idea, cool balls feel pretty good. I ride a motorcycle and I always look forward to filling up the tank on a hot day. Because on a fresh tank of gas the tank get real cold, then my balls go from hot and sweaty to cool and comfortable. hheheheh

Below ambient? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14304899)

Watercooling doesn't cool below ambient unless you have something like a peltier on the radiator...

Re:Below ambient? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305116)

RTFA much? The suits plug into the Humvee's AC system. Y'know, with a compressor and a heat exchanger and all that.

Of course, is there any real chance.... (2, Insightful)

Shining Celebi (853093) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304911)

of them being deployed? Even if all the tests go as planned, what are the chances the government is going buy one for every member of the military in Iraq?

Re:Of course, is there any real chance.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305112)

With the new lean mean fighting machine that is the army - they would only need to order 20,000!

Rapid Release System (2, Insightful)

Kuxman (876286) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304912)

"A rapid-release system allows Soldiers to quickly disconnect the hoses so they can jump out of the vehicle and keep the vests on."

Let's just hope that the water circulating through the vest is sucked out by the release system, or else that once-was-cold water is going to turn very hot and very heavy, RSN.

Re:Rapid Release System (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14304950)

Why suck the water out? Just let it run over them so the evaporation keeps them cool a little longer.

Re:Rapid Release System (1)

Baddas (243852) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304972)

Depends on the volume in the vests. With the right kind of microtubules and a high flow rate, you could keep the cooling down to a pound or two of water, which really isn't terribly much when considered next to a 12lb rifle and 20lb armor.

Re:Rapid Release System (0)

notbob (73229) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305074)

hopefully anyone with half a clue building this system would make it so they can access the water like a camel suit and actually drink the water thus replacing the cantine they were already carrying.

dual use items like this would make great sense

Re:Rapid Release System (1)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305224)

they say they are putting fungicide in the water.

i wonder if that would make it unsafe to drink?

Deja Vu (1)

imstanny (722685) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304931)

I definately read this on fark back in august. Old news.

Not to mention, Helicopter pilots have had this system for a while. Plus it's not that cool; it's not portable.

Re:Deja Vu (2, Interesting)

twiddlingbits (707452) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305003)

What's old is new again! NASA had it in the 60's. NASCAR drivers had it in the 70's and 80's. It was called the Cool Suit. It ran water in hoses via a small pump thru a cooler full of ice and then thru a vest like garment worn by the driver. Later on they added a fan which blew cool air into the helmet to keep the head cool. Worked great but the extra weight of the ice/water was not very nice. And some of the earlier systems did need ice added if it was really really hot. Temps inside a race car can run 135 and up and for 3-4 hours during a race.

Don't Let Blank89 know (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14304953)

He doesn't want the military to have any help, even potentially life saving armor.

Blank89 recently made the dumbest post of the year here: http://science.slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=171489 &threshold=-1&commentsort=0&tid=126&tid=14&mode=th read&cid=14283321 [slashdot.org]

In it, he says that he hopes potentially life saving nano-armor would not be used by the military. Later, after a backlash of comments, he tried to spin his one sentence comment, saying that he really meant that police should get it first, then the military. He tried to b.s. some crap about thinking of it as an investment. Really Blank89? I didn't see that from your original post!

Doing a WHOIS on his domain name, I found Blank89's personal info:
Charles & Eric Wimberley
blank89@mail.com
1417 Crestview Drive
Blacksburg, VA 24060 US
+1.5409518540

Congratualations you stupid fucks! You won Slashdot's Dumbest Post of the Year!
I hope some serial killer gets this addresses and brutally kills you and your family!

Scorpius (3, Funny)

numbski (515011) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304954)

By chance is it made of black snakeskin, cover your head, and keep you cool despite looking really, well hot?

These Cooling Suits are GREAT!!! (1)

ferrellcat (691126) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304969)

...of course having to carry around that 4 foot tall bong is a real bitch!

Toasty (2, Funny)

Phae (920315) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304973)

It's like putting somebody in a toaster oven on low heat

Boy, but you should see them complain when it's on high!

Re:Toasty (2, Funny)

iggymanz (596061) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304993)

we did that test, but after 15 minutes on HIGH none of them were complaining. They just smelled like baked ham.

Here's a problem (4, Insightful)

pummer (637413) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304996)

Sure, these vests might work great while in-vehicle. But they're worn under-armor; what happens when a soldier has to exit the vehicle quickly? Sure, the hoses are quick-release, but now he's got yet another layer of clothing on in the desert heat, a layer that probably doesn't help his maneuverability. Perhaps there's a better solution.

Re:Here's a problem (1)

Ztream (584474) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305171)

Stillsuits?

Re:Here's a problem (4, Funny)

CaymanIslandCarpedie (868408) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305269)

Sure, the hoses are quick-release, but now he's got yet another layer of clothing on in the desert heat, a layer that probably doesn't help his maneuverability. Perhaps there's a better solution.

Ya know, I've been reading Popular Mechanics and I think in the next hundred years we'll see cooling systems mounted directly inside of the vehicles. These systems will cool the air and then blow it onto the vehicle's occupants. Now I don't suggest these are ready for common use yet, but one day it could be very useful for for are troops in such environments.

The War On Anything Not Earthly (1)

Neko-kun (750955) | more than 8 years ago | (#14304997)

When you think about it, these kinds of thing may very well be the early precursors to the Space Infantry Suits... Soon the US will be declaring war on anything that isn't from earth..

Re:The War On Anything Not Earthly (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305208)

> Soon the US will be declaring war on anything that isn't from earth.. If they come here to threaten our way of life I suppose you are right. I would be honored to have the US lead the way where others have failed, or simply ignored.

--

The Best Damn IRC Search Engine [ircdig.com]

Whoop de doo (4, Interesting)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305057)

This system has been used even in amateur racing for literally decades. It's called a "coolsuit" and they are neither particularly novel nor expensive. However, I would assume that this system costs a hojillion-billion dollars, because it was "developed" for the military.

Civilian racing versions usually feature a small pump inside of a water reservoir in an ice cooler. The pump runs off the car's 12VDC system. The rest of the cooler is filled with ice, to keep the water cold.

You can get one right here [eagleracingonline.com] for $320 (for a limited time.) Perhaps the military should just buy them from those guys, if they can come up with 40,000 of them or so :)

Re:Whoop de doo (1)

Dun Malg (230075) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305154)

I would assume that this system costs a hojillion-billion dollars, because it was "developed" for the military. Civilian racing versions usually feature a small pump inside of a water reservoir in an ice cooler. The pump runs off the car's 12VDC system. The rest of the cooler is filled with ice, to keep the water cold. You can get one right here for $320 (for a limited time.) Perhaps the military should just buy them from those guys, if they can come up with 40,000 of them or so :)

I'm fairly certain the military version will be more sophisticated and not require a cooler full of ice. Ice is generally a difficult thing to find in a combat zone, even one as metropolitan as Iraq.

Military Development (5, Informative)

clark625 (308380) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305293)

Okay, yes, a coolsuit isn't news for some. What I take issue with is that you seem to have taken the same, unfortunate belief that so many smart people fall into. Military development isn't cheap, and because all the exact details are rarely given out to the public, it's assumed to be mostly waste. While this may be true in some cases, it's not the norm. Believe it or not, the Army does have a limited budget and actually cares about researching many areas simultaneously; thus they do care about waste.

Anyway, there's always a difference between a commercial technology and a military one. Take this suit for example. How many times do you think racecar drivers get shot at while in their cars? If a bullet penetrates through, what will the results be? If there is fluid leakage, will it harm internal tissue or poison the blood stream, or is it so cold that muscles will tense up? If there are wires (and there are), could those short out and cause electrical damage to the wearer? If the system becomes non-functioning, what could happen that would prevent the wearer from continuing the mission? Lastly, what do the soldiers that will be issued this device think about it? You know, the guys that have been there, and will be going back? Yep, the Army gets everyone's input (even privates), and that's a huge benefit mostly unique to our military.

As someone that's in the Army, I can tell you that we don't get issued ANYTHING unless the leadership is confident that it will benefit our mission. That's not a bad thing.

Re:Whoop de doo (1)

briancnorton (586947) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305304)

I thought the same thing at first, but then I realized that milspec isn't just another word for overpriced. When the military does stuff like this, it has a lot of considerations that you don't think of.

1) Where would you get ice or dry ice in Iraq?
2) The one you refer to lasts 2 hours on dry ice for 1 person. Now think 4 people for 10 hours and no dry ice.
3) Is it light enough that you can get out of it in a firefight and still be mobile enough to survive.
4) Does it go on top of or below fatigues/armor/etc
5) Does it affect the ability to drive or navigate or shoot? (condensation?)

SHIpT (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305076)

are 4 7ew good [goat.cx]

Fahrenheit, feh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305096)

At least have the decency to say that 130 degrees fahrenheit is 54 degrees celsius, ScuttleMonkey...

São Paulo summer (4, Interesting)

Mark_in_Brazil (537925) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305099)

I live in São Paulo. In the summer, when it isn't raining (and sometimes even when it is raining) it gets frickin' hot. When I didn't have a car (and for the short time when I had a car without air conditioning) and had to visit customers wearing at least "business casual-plus" clothes and sometimes a suit and tie during the summer, my mind naturally turned to ways to keep myself cool so I wouldn't arrive all sweaty and wrinkled at the customer sites.
I had the idea of a personal cooling unit, with a box (maybe carried in a briefcase) that would cool some liquid (water maybe) and pump it through tubes that I would be wearing to cool strategic regions of my body (major arteries and possibly veins near the skin seemed like good places to have the tubes passing). I had this amazing mental image of me walking down the Avenida Paulista (a famous major avenue in the city) in the blazing sun on the hottest day of the year, wearing a black wool suit and looking cool and comfortable while people around me in shorts, sleeveless shirts and sandals were panting and bathed in sweat.
The technical issues seemed tough to master, especially the question of how I would cool the water (or other liquid). Then it occurred to me that I could just have a reservoir filled with as much ice as it could hold, and then cold water filling the remaining space. A simple battery-operated pump would pump the water through aquarium tubing to the aforementioned strategic points and then back to the reservoir for heat exchange with the ice and cooler water. This version would be able to provide cooling for a much shorter time than the one with a portable refrigeration unit, but one could always refill the reservoir with ice and water, and it would be a lot easier to build and maintain. I would be able to build it from readily available (and inexpensive) components. Not to mention that I wouldn't have the problem of powering a portable refrigeration unit. This one seemed doable, but I ended up buying a car with air conditioning before I got around to making my personal cooling unit, and my interest in actually completing the project waned.

Re:São Paulo summer (1)

asternick (532121) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305283)

One would think that in a country that straddles the equator businesses would lighten up on the dress code!

militray spending (4, Funny)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305126)

military spending is such a waste. I can't remember the last time i used something developed by the military. I think the net would be a better place without this kind of research.

Re:militray spending (2, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305209)

man, thats funny. I wonder how many mods will get it?

Re:militray spending (1)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305249)

judging from the replies, not too many

Re:militray spending (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305211)

Let's start with the fact that the military paid for ARPANET, which turned into the internet you're using right now...

Re:militray spending (1)

ZiakII (829432) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305227)

military spending is such a waste. I can't remember the last time i used something developed by the military.

um.... what about the Internet? since that came from the ARPAnet (Advanced Research Projects Agency) which was created by Department of Defense (DoD) spending.

Re:militray spending (1)

Gojira Shipi-Taro (465802) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305254)

He forgot to use the tag. Y'know, to clue you into the joke.

Re:militray spending (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305233)

Ever use a GPS? Or, for that matter, a road map? Freeways? Potato-chip bags?

There's others...I'm just too lazy to try to remember them.

Re:militray spending (1)

Gojira Shipi-Taro (465802) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305241)

Heh. I wonder how many moderators will take you seriously. (sorry to spoil the deadpan)

Re:militray spending (1)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305265)

you know, that would require actually knowing the history of the net. :-p

Re:militray spending (3, Funny)

Hamster Of Death (413544) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305276)

Yea, those slackers. I'm so glad Al Gore invented the internet, just so we can show those lazy military folks how to accomplish something!

i don't know (5, Informative)

xo0bob0ox (600085) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305133)

I don't know if this is such a good idea..when I was in Afghanistan we often were in humvees and they were already crammed as it is. I think anything like this would just add to the chaos that is inside the humvee. Although it is a step in the right direction It just dosn't seem smart. Its hard to get out of a humvee when you plan to, and I can't imagine how bad this might add to any reaction to contact or IED. The Ac in humvees right now is not too bad, its just the fact that it overheats the engine and you end up having to shut it off is what sucks. Then again, its always cool up top on the turret...

Re:i don't know (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305270)

Parent has it right. The real problem is the fact that the engine overheats with the AC on. I've had vehicles blow engines on a convoy on 130+ degree days, and it sucks. It's enough of a bitch to get a seatbelt over body armor, connecting headsets, other various electronics, (un)locking doors, etc every time you get in and out in combat situations. And it gets a lot hotter than 130 inside an uparmor on hot days - getting out into the 130 degree sun was always a relief.

Re:i don't know (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305315)

Is the compressor running directly off the engine? The only reason I can think of for not doing it is a lack of space.

I know busses have gigantic compressors that run directly off the crankshaft and put out enough BTUs to cool several houses (since Busses don't have insulation)

Not sure if that would help with overheating.

Well... (1)

Blue-Footed Boobie (799209) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305144)

This is interesting, but I will be really excited when we have our own Still-Suits ala Dune. I mean, I would think we have the technology to make still-suits a reality.

Re:Well... (2, Funny)

geekoid (135745) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305168)

Becasue drinking your own sweat is fun!

Re:Well... (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305237)

http://technovelgy.com/ct/content.asp?Bnum=42 [technovelgy.com]
It's basically a micro-sandwich; a high-efficiency filter and heat-exchange system. the skin-contact layer is porous. Perspiration passes through it, having cooled the body. Motions of the body, especially breathing, and some osmotic action provide the pumping force. With a Fremen suit in good working order, you won't lose more than a thimbleful of moisture a day - even if you're caught in the Great Erg.
I thought the entire mechanism behind perspiration was that it cooled you through evaporation. IE water ---> air

Then again, you aren't really supposed to be traveling around the desert during the daytime, so I imagine it would work just fine at night, since temperatures drop & the heat can radiate away.

That's the military for you... (1)

kponto (821962) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305166)

WTF is wrong with air conditioning?


Seems to me that if they're going to spend all this time adding a liquid cooling system to the vehicle, they could just add some AC device instead.



k

Re:That's the military for you... (1)

Kuxman (876286) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305214)

RTFA:
"But even with air conditioning, temperatures inside the armored vehicles could still reach 95 degrees in the sun, Bussee said. So something more was needed."

Re:That's the military for you... (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305300)

Apparently, the AC in current humvees causes the engine to overheat. (source [slashdot.org] )

Not that hot... (1)

evilviper (135110) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305180)

But even with air conditioning, temperatures inside the armored vehicles could still reach 95 degrees in the sun, Bussee said. So something more was needed.

Ummm... This sounds pretty ridiculous to those of us who live in the desert. Around here, when it's 125F degrees in the shade, everyone still works outside, and many in direct sunlight. I *never* even turn on my car's air conditioner (though admitedly, most people do).

Can someone fill me in as to why Iraq is so different that people can't work in tempuratures even lower than people in So. California/Arizona/Nevada are used-to?

Re:Not that hot... (2, Insightful)

Hamster Of Death (413544) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305236)

Do you wear full body armour on top of coveralls and carry 50 pounds of equipment wherever you go on those days? I know I sure as hell wouldn't if I had the choice hehe.

Sure (4, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305239)

I am going on a limg here and say your not wearing T-shirt, long pants, long sleeves, helmet, flak jacket,canteen, side arm, automatic weaponn, ammo, etc . . .

All while looking for people trying to kill you.

" I *never* even turn on my car's air conditioner (though admitedly, most people do)."

yeah, well your a kook.

Re:Not that hot... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305259)

a) The big thing is that it is 95 degrees in the vehicle WITH THE A/C on! Think about what the temperature has to be outside to do that, and what the temperature in the vehicle would be without A/C.

b) Most of the people you see working outside near you eventually have access to A/C buildings at some point. I do not think soldiers in Iraq have the same luxury.

c) Most of the people you see working outside near you are not wearing several layers of long clothing, including unbreathing personal armor.

Re:Not that hot... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305279)

Can someone fill me in as to why Iraq is so different that people can't work in tempuratures even lower than people in So. California/Arizona/Nevada are used-to?

Not everyone who got sent to Iraq is from Nevada, you know. Sure, you can work all day when it's 125 degrees out, but come up north here and shovel my sidewalk sometime. I don't even need a coat; you'll be wishing the military was researching a special suit for you.

Re:Not that hot... (1)

keybordcowboy (740374) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305286)

Are you kidding?

Iraq is a very hot place. The average high in July in Baghdad is 110. Now include a hot ass uniform, helmet, direct sun, and driving around in a hot vechile that probably has very low air cirulation.

Typical America... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305189)

The U.S. Army spends thousands of dollars to develop Personal Cooling suits. The Russian Army wears T-Shirts.

Peltier Cooler? (1)

Caydel (851013) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305201)

It coud be done with just a racing 'coolsuit'. Plus. extra geek points if instead of a large cooler of ice, you get a small cooler with a Peltier device! http://www.hackaday.com/entry/1234000083048949/ [hackaday.com]

Sounds like a good way to spend tax dollars (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305226)

Send soldiers to Iraq and make sure even in Humvees they have a cooling suit. And also see to it they always have bottled water [newhousenews.com] to drink.

This reminds me of when Pratap Chatterjee was talking on C-Span booktv about his book "Iraq, Inc. : A Profitable Occupation" about all the wasteful spending and downright scams military contractors were running.

Why not install a/c? (1)

pidge (160537) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305253)

Of course, they could just buy a Bushmaster [adi-limited.com] .

Units (1)

jmv (93421) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305282)

...the vehicles could reportedly reach more than 130 degrees. 'It's like putting somebody in a toaster oven on low heat,...

OK, so I have the temperature on the Fahrenheit scale and on the "kitchen appliances" scale. Now, how about a SI unit like, say, degrees Celcius (or Kelvin, why not)?

Waste of money (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14305296)

Wouldnt it be easier to just bring them home ?

That's just piggybanking... (0, Troll)

Stan Vassilev (939229) | more than 8 years ago | (#14305302)

..your taxes. I mean ultra modern suits that don't work, ultra modern PC-s and equipment that just makes everything harder to operate with rather than easier.. it's just suspicious tech firms milking the military department.

Because this is what war is used for, you know when the war starts, it better last long, cuz that's the time lots of people make LOOTS of money selling overhyped and overpriced gadgets to those poor soldiers.

Oh, and reminds me of a popular old story about NASA spending millions to invent a pen that works in zero gravity environment. They finally nailed it, but at quite the cost.. The alternative solution by the Russians? Use pencil.
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