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France to Legalize File Sharing

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the viva-la-france? dept.

The Internet 446

quenting writes "In the debate around the anti-piracy bill, the French Parliament voted yesterday into law an amendment to the DADVSI bill that allows free sharing of music and movies over the internet, considering the downloaded files as a private copy. This decision goes against the French government and the music industry's recommendations, who argue the deputies only wanted to show their independence from the government. The initial bill's detractors who pushed for this amendment want a tax for author rights to be paid by everyone on the ISP fees." The French government has vowed to fight this decision (babelfish link).

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fp! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14316948)

hah. fp 4 me.

I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours! (3, Insightful)

PenguinBoyDave (806137) | more than 8 years ago | (#14316951)

About time that someone gives the recording industry the middle finger.

Re:I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours (1, Redundant)

jwambach (151360) | more than 8 years ago | (#14316975)

Re:I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317107)

Why doesn't Wired ever provide a date stamp for their news on the page itself? Why must I search for it?

Re:I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours (4, Interesting)

mmalove (919245) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317135)

"About time someone gives the recording industry the middle finger" ..... Ok, while I agree with the statement, a 5 - Insightful?!?! ..... There seems to be a growing trend that you can do anything legally as long as you live in the right country at the time : abortion, file sharing, pot smoking, drinking under 21, euthanasia - all legal but in differing countries. Oh, and none of them in the self proclaimed land of the free.

Re:I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours (3, Informative)

R2.0 (532027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317169)

Abortion isn't legal in the US? I thought that the big hairy deal here was that abortion IS legal.

But hey, whatever one needs to say to make one's point...

Re:I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours (1)

Filip22012005 (852281) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317183)

Why do people always complain about the way stuff is moderated? You seem to think that hundreds of people voted this guy insightful, while in reality, only 3 people did. Of the thousands of people visiting /., 3 thought this was insightful. Sure, many didn't bother to mod him down again, but 1) why spend you modpoints negatively, and 2) this article is not that old yet, stuff may happen.

Re:I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours (1)

burnstone (769550) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317222)

"drinking under 21"

In Soviet Russia... err... sorry, in Switzerland, you're allowed to drink beer and other drinks with low alcoholic content from your 16th birthday on. Drinks with more alcohol (schnapps and the like) from the 18th birthday on.

But this rules don't get very much attention... a twelve year old boy can go into a shop and buy wine as much as he likes... (well, not all shops. But most.)

--
Sorry for my english-skills. I hope they'll improve in the future :)

Re:I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours (1)

kokojie (915449) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317287)

In capitalist China, you are allowed to drink from ANY age, some parents feed their 1 year olds alcoholic beverages, I'm from China btw.

Re:I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours (1)

CodeHog (666724) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317233)

You forgot group sex in Canada.

Re:I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours (5, Funny)

Darkman, Walkin Dude (707389) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317185)

I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours!

Good man yourself... are you sure your government will let you do that? I mean they spent a lot of cash on brainwashing you to dislike France because they wouldn't join your half cocked crusade, they might be upset at the waste of their money!

Re:I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours (0, Troll)

IAmTheDave (746256) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317284)

I mean they spent a lot of cash on brainwashing you to dislike France because they wouldn't join your half cocked crusade

<francebashing>The US doesn't spend any money on making us dislike France. France has got making us dislike them pretty much covered. Wanna know why France really legalized file sharing? Because the US didn't.</francebashing>

Re:I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours (1)

ragefan (267937) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317297)

Good man yourself... are you sure your government will let you do that? I mean they spent a lot of cash on brainwashing you to dislike France because they wouldn't join your half cocked crusade, they might be upset at the waste of their money!

When has the government *ever* been concerned with the waste of money? Apparently you forgot the first rule of government spending: "Why build one when you can have two at twice the price?"

Re:I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours (4, Interesting)

ndtechnologies (814381) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317188)

Yeah, I've been trying to give them the finger for over 3 years now, but I guess it hasn't done any good! The funny thing is, File-Sharing can be a great tool for the distribution of music. It's just a matter of utilizing it in a way that will allow both the artist and the listener to benefit from it.

With our online music store, we are going to be utilizing BitTorrent technology for the distribution of some of our music.

About 2 years ago, there was a Music Industry meeting here in Nashville, and the President of Sony Music Nashville was quoted as saying "our biggest mistake was shutting down Napster", now take that for what it's worth, but it does say something.

Re:I hereby suspend my France-Bashing for 24 hours (3, Insightful)

Mulletproof (513805) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317251)

"About time that someone gives the recording industry the middle finger."

"...The initial bill's detractors who pushed for this amendment want a tax for author rights to be paid by everyone on the ISP fees."

Frankly, this is dealing with the devil to pay Paul before curiosity killed the cat ...Ok, nevermind that, but this ammendment assumes everybody is guilty of usurping copyrighted material. In fact, you will be taxed no matter what the content of your file tranfers, even if you have never used P2P software in your life.

Look, I'm all for "sticking it to the man", but this is a fine, fine example of playing off a hot issue to make easy money. I feel sorry for anybody who actually supports this legislative spam in France, thinking it's a good deal or they're "sticking it to the man" when they're in reality sticking it to themselves and their friends.

Time to Move (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14316960)

Didnt RTFA, head line says all.. we all know its time to emigrate to France

oh and first post!?!..

France are weird (-1, Redundant)

Idimmu Xul (204345) | more than 8 years ago | (#14316963)

French Government Lobbied to Ban Free Software [fsffrance.org] and
France about to get worst copyright law in Europe? but then this! I just don't know whether to hug or punch them!

Re:France are weird (1, Troll)

jonnythan (79727) | more than 8 years ago | (#14316986)

Hug them?

Why would you hug them?

This is a terrible thing. Sure those crazy French citizens would be able to download music to their heart's content for free, but, uh...... do you simply not believe in copyright?

Regardless of law, is it perfectly OK to buy a CD then proceed to redistribute it ad infinitum?

Re:France are weird (1, Insightful)

anonicon (215837) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317058)

Regardless of law, is it perfectly OK to buy a CD then proceed to redistribute it ad infinitum?

Yes. ;-)

Re:France are weird (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317059)

yes

Am I allowed to do so with every other product? (1, Insightful)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317061)

If I buy sugar am I allowed to then offer people sugar in their tea to my hearts content? If I buy a car can I offer rides to hitchhikers as much as I want?

Then why should music be different?

The current system was introduced only at the beginning of the last centurie. We survived millenia without it. Do not think that just because currently the law has made for an industry were none of the normal rules apply that this has to remain the same for eternity.

Re:Am I allowed to do so with every other product? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317152)

That is an incredibly moronic argument. Are you serious or trolling, I can't really tell.

You cannot buy the sugar once and magically give the same amount you bought to everyone who wants it. And as for the car, are you creating copies of the car and giving them for free to the hitchhikers?

Re:Am I allowed to do so with every other product? (0)

Tango42 (662363) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317156)

When you give someone sugar, you no longer have that sugar. When you give someone a COPY of your music CD, you both have it. There's a very big difference between giving someone what you bought and giving them a copy of what you bought.

Re:Am I allowed to do so with every other product? (2, Interesting)

Skye16 (685048) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317216)

First, I don't disagree with anything you said. However, I have a hypothetical situation.

Let's say we somehow manage to produce replicators, a la Star Trek. Now we suddnely CAN create duplicates of sugar or duplicates of cars.

Should we be stopped from doing that? Should it be illegal?

I'm just curious. The probability of ever being able to replicate something like that is probably right around the probability of me becoming Emperor of the Universe. But, if it were possible, what are the legal ramifications? Would Ford be right in saying "you can't put the [quantum representation schematics] (or whatever they'd be) into your replication device"? Or would you say "you know what? fuck you. i bought the car, it's mine, and i'm doing with it as i wish."

Re:Am I allowed to do so with every other product? (1)

idobi (820896) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317323)

Copyrights exist in relation our current economic model. In a world of replicators, the economic engine that drives the world would drastically change, so the foundation of your question is meaningless.

Re:Am I allowed to do so with every other product? (2, Insightful)

ozydingo (922211) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317193)

I support filesharing as a means of distribution and hate the RIAA, but that was a terrible argument.

By offerring people sugar from that which you purchased, you are giving up your own use of that sugar. The company from which you purchased it does not need to take your word for it, there's no way you can still have the sugar if you gave it to someone else.

Likewise, offerring rides to hitchhikers is in no way comparable to copying and distributing a CD. If you instead compared it to letting a friend listen to a CD while you do, then it might have been an appropriate comparison to make. But last time I checked, noone ever got in any trouble for that, at least on the scale that could be comparable to providing individuals with rides in your car. Playing the CD at a public event is another issue, but that's not what's being debated here.

If people who made arguments like yours, clearly not having any grasp of he situation, would just shut up, we might stand a chance at giving a unified, logical, sensible argument that could stand to be heard by those in power to make a difference. But perhaps I'm just too optimistic.

Re:France are weird (4, Funny)

dangitman (862676) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317008)

France about to get worst copyright law in Europe? but then this! I just don't know whether to hug or punch them!

I hear they are into BDSM over there, so they probably would be quite excited if you did both.

Re:France are weird (3, Funny)

rizole (666389) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317125)

Isn't that some kind of operating system?

Re:France are weird (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317210)

Isn't that some kind of operating system?

Yes, it's an ultra-secure system - meaning you must never forget the safe-word or there are grave consequences. Administrator privileges take on a whole new meaning.

Re:France are weird (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317014)

I just don't know whether to hug or punch them!

That sort of sums up France for several centuries.

Re:France are weird (0, Flamebait)

honeypotslash (927312) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317082)

I lean towards punch them. How long will this last before they raise the white flag again?
--
Get your Free MacMini here [freepay.com]

Serves them right for pushing their luck. (5, Insightful)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 8 years ago | (#14316965)

The French Parliment over-reacted here, but it's good to see that the kind of ridiculous measures requested by record companies and their ilk are resulting in equally ridiculous responses from those who disagree. Given the way politics seems to work these days (argue for a few years then go for a 50/50 compromise) then France might wind up with sensible legislation taken from the middle-ground.

Re:Serves them right for pushing their luck. (5, Insightful)

EzInKy (115248) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317045)


The French Parliment over-reacted here, but it's good to see that the kind of ridiculous measures requested by record companies and their ilk are resulting in equally ridiculous responses from those who disagree.


I like to think of it more as glimpse of the future the music and movie industries will face if they keep treating all thier customers as potential theives. Eventually they'll piss off so many people that no amount of money will protect them.

Who would have guessed it? (2, Funny)

CodeHog (666724) | more than 8 years ago | (#14316967)

France didn't actually surrender to something (not yet at least)!

Re:Who would have guessed it? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317007)

Wow. You're so funny and original. You must be from U.S.A.

Re:Who would have guessed it? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317223)

Wow. You're so funny and original. You must be from U.S.A.

I'm not convinced that the post is from an American. True, the grammar is poor, but the post contains no spelling mistakes, references to "nukes", or brain-dead cowboy-isms such as references to being "fur us or agin us". If indeed an American, the poster a member of the very small minority of relative sophisticates that inhabit a land that it seems is populated, in the majority, by frothing lunatic throwbacks who are too addle-brained to realize or care that fascism is descending upon their once great land.

Re:Who would have guessed it? (2, Insightful)

R2.0 (532027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317231)

"You must be from U.S.A."

Or Britain.

Or Germany.

Or Canada (Well, the non-Quebec parts, anyway).

Or Russia.

Or for that matter, any other country. You seem to forget that NO ONE likes France except the French (And maybe the folks in that suburb next door, what's it's name...Belgium!). Just because the US has recently eclipsed France as the Most Hated Country in the world shouldn't obscure France's long tenure at #1, and it's current solid position at #2 (there's a bad pun in there, somewhere)

Re:Who would have guessed it? (2, Insightful)

ThaFooz (900535) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317050)

France didn't actually surrender to something (not yet at least)!

Yes, but a couple weeks ago we learned that all it takes to capture Paris [wikipedia.org] these days is sticks and rocks. One sufficently angry record exec with a 2'x4' with a nail through it should be enough to reverse the legislation.

Re:Who would have guessed it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317166)

well if we're going OT, when's your next victorious withdrawal from a newly-freed country ?

great! (-1, Offtopic)

xabi (620010) | more than 8 years ago | (#14316973)

wget --quiet --mirror http://all.internet/ [all.internet]

Wording?? (3, Informative)

cyberbob2010 (312049) | more than 8 years ago | (#14316978)

I think they probably could have worded this a little better. They are making it sound like these "deputies" are not a part of the government as the "government" is going to fight them. It is not as if these are some rebels in the foot hills making their own laws.

Re:Wording?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317005)

The deputies are not part of the government.

Re:Wording?? (1)

cyberbob2010 (312049) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317044)

"The national government of France is divided into an executive, a legislative and a judicial branch. The President has a degree of direct executive power, but most executive power resides in his appointee, the Prime Minister. The President's choice for Prime Minister must have the confidence of the National Assembly, the lower house of Parliament; also the Prime Minister is always from the majority party in that house." Sounds to me like they are

Re:Wording?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317162)

1. The word 'deputies' doesn't appear in your quote.
2. The deputies form the National Assembly (paraphrased from same fountain of knowledge - see 'France') which elects the Government.

To be fair though, the phrase 'government' is a bit vague, but you can be sure that when the French go on a bitchfest about their government it's not the National Assembly they're after.

Re:Wording?? (3, Informative)

SpaceAdmiral (869318) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317159)

In many countries around the world, "Government" refers to the "Executive" branch. That's what they are doing here and the wording is perfectly fine.

I can understand why that would be confusing for Americans, though. Hope that helps.

Re:Wording?? (1)

PeDRoRist (639207) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317235)

The national assembly and the deputies (legislative authority) are not part of the government (executive authority).

They are elected and work separately, and although they both represent the people, they don't always cooperate (mostly depends on whatever wing is in power) and can occasionally fight each other:
the assembly can censor the government (quite rare), the government can forcibly promulgate a bill of law without the deputies' consent (which happened twice since the latest presidential and legislative elections in 2002) and the president can dissolve the assembly (which last happened in 1995 IIRC - a disaster for the RPR (right wing) majority at that time)

Bad idea... (3, Interesting)

GreyWolf3000 (468618) | more than 8 years ago | (#14316981)

This could set precedent to undermine copyright as a whole. In which case, I predict we'll start seeing things like proprietary derivatives of GPL software emerge and not get challenged.

Unless a new paradigm for duplication and distribution of digital works is created, we need copyright to be enforced in all cases in order to protect free software.

Re:Bad idea... (4, Insightful)

Aim Here (765712) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317031)

"In which case, I predict we'll start seeing things like proprietary derivatives of GPL software emerge and not get challenged. "

In the absence of copyright law, what does 'proprietary' mean?

I thought the GPL was a legalistic hack to protect the ethical right to share information. If the government goes and legalises that, then the GPL becomes almost, but not quite, entirely redundant.

Re:Bad idea... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317123)

I thought the GPL was a legalistic hack to protect the ethical right to share information. If the government goes and legalises that, then the GPL becomes almost, but not quite, entirely redundant.

Remember that RMS's philosophy is not only that you should have the right to share information you want to share, but that you should have a responsibility to share information others want you to share.

There's a reason why the GPL concentrates on the inclusion of source code. In a world without copyright, there would be nothing to stop you taking GPL software, modifying it, and giving copies away - for free - without source code. And RMS would not want you doing that.

Re:Bad idea... (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317307)

There's a reason why the GPL concentrates on the inclusion of source code. In a world without copyright, there would be nothing to stop you taking GPL software, modifying it, and giving copies away - for free - without source code.

True. Then again, without copyright what value does the source have? Any binary you create can be distributed everywhere at no cost, so the value is almost $0. You might possibly earn a few bucks writing improvements on demand, but 99% of the COTS market would vanish in an instant.

Re:Bad idea... (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317236)

How is the GPL going to force me to open up the sourcecode when the law backing it no longer exists? The GPL does exist as a means to 'protect the ethical right to share information' (not that I agree that sourcecode is information) but not jsut the binaries but the sourcecode as well. Under the OP scenario, copyright no longer exists as a force to make me open my sourcecode up under the terms of the GPL.

Re:Bad idea... (2, Informative)

SerpentMage (13390) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317076)

Is this an undermining of copyright? I think not. In the article the following paragraph says it all.

"Legal music downloading sites such as Apple Computer Inc.'s iTunes have French-language sites, as do major music companies such as Vivendi Universal SA. Last night's amendment would allow someone having bought a song from one of those sites to share it with family or friends."

I still think that general peer to peer networks a'la Kaaza would be in hot water. What I think the law is trying to get at is the stopping of the draconian DRM law that takes away fair use. Many of the online music shops have music that only certain computers can run. This law addon says, "Hey you bought, you can share it like you would a CD among family and friends".

Re:Bad idea... (1)

Anne Honime (828246) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317138)

This could set precedent to undermine copyright as a whole.

France never had, doesn't have, and surely won't have a notion of 'copyright' in the law ; that's completely alien to us. We *do* have intellectual property, but it's absolutely not the same thing as your copyright. Main difference : an author, in France has some perpetual rights on his work that he just can't sell to anyone (producer et al.), and that he only can use anytime after the release of his work, even after selling distributions' rights. Those are called 'moral rights'.

Re:Bad idea... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317238)

an author, in France has some perpetual rights on his work that he just can't sell to anyone (producer et al.), and that he only can use anytime after the release of his work, even after selling distributions' rights.

That sounds like a good idea. What happens to the rights when the author dies? Does it go into what we in the US call the "public domain?" Or do the rights go to the heirs?

Re:Bad idea... (1)

Anne Honime (828246) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317265)

Or do the rights go to the heirs?

They go to the heirs for plus/minus 70 years, then, public domain (the variation takes into account the length of wars, so a book published in 1936 gets a protection bonus of 5 years).

Re:Bad idea... (1)

ThreeE (786934) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317271)

So what you are saying is that France surrenders all intellectual property rights to the author?

Re:Bad idea... (1)

Anne Honime (828246) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317345)

So what you are saying is that France surrenders all intellectual property rights to the author?

It's much more complicated than that, and I lack english skills to explain it properly, but I'll try : in France, IP rights are either money-worth or moral. In the 1st category belong the rights to copy, distribute, display, etc. Among the 2nd are the rights to withdraw the work, forbid its representation, defend its integrity. Basically, the author can't give away the rights of the 2nd category, therefore anytime in the future, he can forbid any exploitation of his work without justification, provided he pays back the holders of other kinds of money-worth rights for the damage they face after that decision. But the main idea is that an author can always get back all the rights on his work, even if somebody else paid for the job.

Re:Bad idea... (1)

Curien (267780) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317172)

Protect it from what?

If some frenchman starts selling a slightly-modified version of some piece of Free software, how does that impinge on my ability to use the original version?

Re:Bad idea... (2, Insightful)

parodyca (890419) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317190)

I predict we'll start seeing things like proprietary derivatives of GPL software emerge and not get challenged.

Maybe, but it will all be free software. You wont be able to exploit it commercially without following the terms of the GPL. Just as you wont be able to exploit (sell) commercial software or music or whatever, without following those terms.

This seems reasonable to me. So what if the GPL loses some of its wind. If copyright laws are less powerful, the GPL does not need to blow so hard.

It will not pass. (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14316985)

I am French, I know how the government works there, and I can tell it will not pass. There is going to be a second reading of the law, and the amendments voted for the "legal license" to download stuff will be removed. Some guys from the ruling party have voted for the amendments, and the government is going to sanction them for that; hence at the next session they will simply be removed.

And if by chance the amendments are still present when the law is voted at the parliament, it is going to be cancelled by the Senate.

Welcome to democracy folks. This is just an advertizing "coup" from the opposition party. In the end, we'll get DMCA too (possibly a worse version of it). I know. I'm from there.

Re:It will not pass. (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317057)

I know. I'm from there.

Shouldn't that be "here," or are you living outside France?

Oh, tell them about the EU constitution (5, Insightful)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317139)

'Goverment' also wanted to push that through. The voter didn't go for it. Not in france, not in holland (where I am from).

There is a backlash going on with the voter not taking it anymore. I am not that familiar with france (language barrier) but I do get the impression that it has much the same problems as holland. With a cultural elite (media and politics) having put themselves in ivory towers where they can keep telling each other everything is alright while the real world is going to hell.

Holland had Pim Fortyun and Theo van Gogh and their murderers who upset this carefully constructed fantasy world. France had the recent riots and the continuing rise of extreme right.

With the EU constition it became painfully clear that the politicians were totally removed from the real world. They just could not get that the voters were not going to vote it through just because they told them to.

I think this "protest" vote is a sign that even certain circles of goverment are beginning to realize that something is wrong.

To dismiss this as simply a publicity stunt is cheap. It is like calling the EU constition rejection a cheap stunt by the voters, no this is a way to tell the direct leaders of a country to get their act together. The NEW rules proposed are bad for the public and this was one way to make it painfully clear that there is resistance. Sometimes you have to shoot people in the face to get their attention.

Of course the problem is that the media who are supposed to tell us about these kind of things are the people behind the whole DMCA and similar crap.

But still it is good to see some resistance. I think this battle is far from over. If your leaders got a brain they will not want to have another disaster like the referendum. Of course if they had a brain none of this would have happened in the first place.

Re:Oh, tell them about the EU constitution (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317256)

Right, but this time there is no referendum. People will not vote for or against this law. This matter is in the hands of the government and the parliament. By the time we arrive in 2007 (the next presidential election) the law will already be in place.

Re:It will not pass. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317184)

Welcome to democracy folks. This is just an advertizing "coup" from the opposition party. In the end, we'll get DMCA too (possibly a worse version of it)

The law in question is that DMCA equivalent. That's kind of the point - the deputies placed an amendment on the bill to completely change the spirit of it, as a protest against its restrictions.

At last! (-1, Offtopic)

dangitman (862676) | more than 8 years ago | (#14316993)

FREEDOM SHARING is here! This is going to be almost as good as freedom kissing.

Re:At last! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317199)

freedom kissing

I think you've got the wrong forum, dude. Maybe freedom fries would be more familiar to your audience.

Cottonsarnit. (1)

dangitman (862676) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317244)

But I would have gotten away with it if it wasn't for those meddling virgins.

Merde!! (3, Funny)

malia8888 (646496) | more than 8 years ago | (#14316998)

The French Parliament voted last night to allow free sharing of music and movies on the Internet, setting up a conflict with both the French government and with media companies.

I smell a really big merde storm brewing here!...:-P..

FYI (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14316999)

This was made yesterday (21 Dec), during Chrismas holidays. As a consequence, only 58 deputies (out of 577) were present, 30 of them were for a 'global licence', 28 were against...

I don't think it's really significative

What to call this law? (5, Insightful)

corvenus (931206) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317003)

Will the Americans rename the French music piracy to "Freedom music piracy"? Ironically, in this instance the use of the word Freedom would actually make sense.

Oh! Yea Right! (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317009)

This is the same France that Slashdot sensationalistically reported was going to outlaw free software?

France is going to outlaw free software but legalize piracy? Yea right! There's not much worse than frog loving pirates.

Heavyhanded lobbying (5, Funny)

draxredd (661953) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317010)

Not to mention iTune and Virgin prepaid cards being distributed to the parliament members in the Hall of l'Assemblée Nationale. France is not yet accustomed to such blatant lobbying, prefering more hypocritical means of pressure.
So far so good but the government is certainly going to pull a Cheney on this (as in "pulling cheney back to vote patrioct act prolongation).
If the text is finalized, i guess french ISP will see a major surge in overseas subscriptions.

Not yet fully voted (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317027)

This is only the half of the law being voted yesterday.

The government is now trying today to reverse this vote, or at least to ask every internet user to pay a tax (to download freely, but not to upload). If this seems familiar to the cd/dvd tax, you are not too far...

Let's not make any conclusion and wait till tomorrow to know the real decision (Probably not as catchy as this news' title)

Could've been said better? (2, Insightful)

Wylfing (144940) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317028)

the French Parliament voted yesterday into law...This decision goes against the French government

Eh, isn't Parliament part of government? Anyway, it's the National Assembly we're talking about here. And it wasn't "voted into law," it was simply passed by the Assembly. The chance of this becoming a real law is zero, this is just political gaming in French government.

Re:Could've been said better? (4, Informative)

Albanach (527650) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317063)

No Government refers to the Executive branch, parliament is the legislature. The givernment may be formed by members of the parliament, but that doesn't make the parliament the government - as an opposition members in the parliament would tell you!

Re:Could've been said better? (1)

stud9920 (236753) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317077)

Eh, isn't Parliament part of government?
Monsieur de Montesquieux would like some words with you.

Legislative != Executive

Re:Could've been said better? (1)

Anne Honime (828246) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317195)

this is just political gaming in French government.

Maybe, but generaly speaking 'political gaming' doesn't take place in public at the parliament, more in the corridors and far away from cameras. This is a 1st in the french political life, and it shows a really deep division inside the current majority. Followups will be very interesting. For instance, a MP of the majority declared he was voting against the government because, being the father of teens, he didn't wanted to face prosecutions along with 8 million people. As far as it goes, it is a very strong point for his peers.

Not exactly (1)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317230)

Not sure about the exact arrangements in every country but most, holland, england, america and france got 2 houses or whatever the local version. One is the 'goverment' It is the one that gets the biggest headlines and from here the ministers are chosen. In america and holland the elections are also staggered. So you have elections every 2 years rotating. One for the president and his ministers. One for a second group who do not directly control goverment.

They are however the final step for any law that has to be passed. Now this changes immensly between countries BUT if directly elected this second house is still usually different from the main house. 2 years is a long time in politics and in america it used to be a case that a party would rarely control both at the same time. One of the reasons Bush is so powerfull is that currently the republicans own both houses.

There is also another difference. The up and comers and career makers are in the first house. This is were the attention is and this is where you can make it big. The second house tends be more like a retirement home. It has older people who don't feel they have to make a name for themselves anymore.

Strangely enough while it would make you suppose they are extremely conservative this is not always the case. They certainly can be far less corrupt. A person with no ambition is far harder to buy off. A person with grandchilderen will be more concerned with the enviroment then with getting a seat at the board of a big oil company.

The second house can act like a brake. Wich is why it is there in the first place. It is far from unusual for the second house to shoot down the more ambitious new laws. While sometimes this can be seen as bad when it comes to progress it also stops law like these from being passed.

It is not just political gaming when this happens, it is the system working. Not fast, not perfectly but as it was intended to.

The next time you wonder why you got so many different elections? It is because each election allows you to vote for a brake. I like a lot of brakes. Goverments should never move at more then a snails pace. Fast moving goverments tend to invade poland.

Re:Could've been said better? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317315)

Generally, in a Parliamentary system [wikipedia.org] , the "Government" refers to the ruling Party or Coalition, which gets to choose the Prime Minister and Cabinet which is the Head of Government.

But you are partly right - The Fifth Republic of France [wikipedia.org] is not exactly a Parliamentary Government. The National Assembly is in fact part of the parliament, but in addition to the Prime Minister, there is a popularly elected President which also has significant powers. Elle est très embrouillante, non?

Sacre Bleu! 519 members still have to vote? (1, Insightful)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317037)

"The amendment was approved 30 to 28, with 22 members of the UMP voting in favor. While there are 577 members of the lower house, few were present for last night's vote."

This title is misleading, if the measure was passed by only 2 votes and 90% of the members still have to vote, I would say the title should say that France may legalize file sharing? Or maybe I just don't know the French government very well.

Last night's amendment would allow someone having bought a song from one of those sites to share it with family or friends.

Who needs a law to do this?

Re:Sacre Bleu! 519 members still have to vote? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317201)

The ones that were absent don't get to vote anymore.

Re:Sacre Bleu! 519 members still have to vote? (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317232)

If you're not there for the vote, tough. That's why most places have party whips to round up politicians from the local bars and brothels, and that "bing-bong" sound to let everyone know that a vote is happening. That said, they'll find a way to bounce it back down from the upper house and re-vote when everyone is awake.

Opposition party sneaks one over in the middle of the night in order to embarrass the government and score points. Not because they do or don't care about the issue. Nothing to see.

Re:Sacre Bleu! 519 members still have to vote? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317334)

"Who needs a law to do this?"

Everyone, if the RIAA gets its way.

Contradicting News... (5, Interesting)

stupid_is (716292) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317064)

The Register [theregister.co.uk] is running a different story:

Individuals in France who ignore copyright by downloading illegal music files will also be subject to a harsher "graduated" enforcement procedure, according to Agence France Presse.

If uploaders keep ignoring warnings, they can be put on trial. A new anti piracy bill that is being examined by French MPs would also allow record companies to include technical measures to stop users from directly making copies.

Re:Contradicting News... (2, Informative)

yogikoudou (806237) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317144)

This was the ministers's proposition.
The two amendements voted last night go against this repressive measure. Mr Bloche, a socialist deputy (left-wing) bashed this all-repressive govt attitude and propositions for about an hour and a half. The repression has not been voted. The whole governement project, voted as "emergency" just before Christmas (when nobody's present) has failed, and lead to the legalization of file sharing, considered "personnal, private copy".

Thanks a lot to the socialists for this move !

Finally a copyright law I like (3, Insightful)

Yartrebo (690383) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317065)

I must say that this law actually looks good in all ways. If implemented, it will do everything from encouraging the spread of technology, increasing standards of living, saving natural and human resources, and even closing the trade deficit in France. Too bad I'm too cynical to actually think it'll stick.

New War (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317068)

I wonder if G.W.Bush will declare war on france? and who will the brits team-up with? will we see history a repeating?
please place your bets now..

Great News... (0)

DarthTator (937292) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317072)

now the proliferation of Jerry Lewis movies may continue unabated!

gn44 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317086)

accorDing tothis

... so now we have to learn French... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14317089)

Looks like p2p software is going to be written in French. Fortunately, there's a Windows Service [damnednice.com] and Linux Shell Ext [damnednice.com] that will automatically translate into English.

Political situation in France (5, Informative)

palad1 (571416) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317108)

The current french government is not really popular, not popular at all even.

The weird thing is that there is no traditional opposition to this government. The left wing is not in good shape at all (since the 2005 elections where Jospin lost to Le Pen (our very own racist nutjob)). Which leads me to my point, these amendments were voted not because they are a Good Thing (tm) (which they are!), but because the UDF (center-right) saw this as a way to strenghten its role as the 'Real Opposition' and gain voters in the 'internet generation' demographics, which is not favorably biased towards them.

But rest assured the current government is backed by very powerful industrials who cherish their fscking IP rights, so these amendments will be vetoed to death, or stealthly removed during the holidays season, just like previous bills have been passed last summer.

I'd like to give my props to the eucd.info/ [slashdot.org] guys for their actions though, but don't fool yourselves, even the 'good guys' that voted these bills are using us, voters for their very own agenda.

That's the sad truth... or maybe I should stop reading http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Culture [wikipedia.org] :)

Here's another theory... (1)

stubear (130454) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317118)

"...who argue the deputies only wanted to show their independence from the government..."


Or possibly this is an attack on the U.S. economy. If they made it legal to freely distribute intellectual property online then either the U.S. media companies would need to pull out of the french market altogether or take the hit in sales due to widespread distribution without compensation.

'Twas the (Night Before)x3 Christmas... (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317137)

And all through the lower house, not a creature was stirring, except a tenth of the 577 deputies, of which 30 voted in favour of this ammendment. Joyeux Noël, but I doubt it'll survive very long once everyone gets back from the holidays.

Ah well, it's the thought that counts.

At last! (4, Funny)

Billosaur (927319) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317150)

A country where I will be free to share my William Shatner and David Hasselhoff MP3s with others!

This just in . . . (2, Funny)

DrHogie (8093) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317163)

The domain name http://lepiratebay.fr/ [lepiratebay.fr] was just registered.

Would you like some Freedom Fries (2, Funny)

bignobody (933871) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317218)

to go with that download?

misleading title (surprised?) (1)

TheTilde (709489) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317247)

I don't think we can call it "legalizing" because there is a fee for everyone: some people say it can be 6 or 7 euros. 6 or 7 euros???? That's too much!!!!

Since when shall we pay for sharing files?
What about people who don't download copyrighted and restricted materials?

yeah I'm from France and I don't think these are good news.

This just in... (5, Funny)

tomcres (925786) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317273)

Metallica boycotts France.

Nobody cares.

Ce n'est pas une légalisation du P2P (5, Informative)

aaribaud (585182) | more than 8 years ago | (#14317290)

I've read the amendments and the law, and the minutes of the debates, and I'm even listening to the current debates right now (and yes, I'm French) and I am not sure at all that this legalizes file sharing. It might possibly make downloading licit, without doubt subject to the payment of a personal copy tax. However it does not legalize uploading at all.
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