Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Australian Media 'Crooks' to Come in from the Cold

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the waiting-for-the-other-shoe-to-drop dept.

Media 273

pagefault writes "News.com is reporting that millions of Australians who tape TV shows and copy CDs will soon get the right to do it with a clear conscience. From the article: 'The Federal Government will next year legalize the video recording of television shows for personal use, and the transfer of songs from CDs to MP3 players, in a bid to overturn a ban which has made criminals of much of the population."

cancel ×

273 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Everyone's a criminal! (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349539)

If everyone does it, then maybe its not so illegal.

Re:Everyone's a criminal! (2, Funny)

Tezkah (771144) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349559)

You're forgetting that Australia is a nation that was founded by criminals. They are truly a nation where everyone was once a criminal.

Brings a tear to my eye. Makes me want to sing!

Oh say can you see, by the boot's glistening blue light, what so proudly we booted, the establishment of Fair Use

Re:Everyone's a criminal! (2, Informative)

Ruff_ilb (769396) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349624)

They were a penal colony founded on crimials, but their nation was definitely NOT founded on a basis of criminality, regardless of what the british thought at the time.

CUNT NIGGER FUCK SHIT ANUS ARAB KORAN PEDOPHILE!!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349639)

"Makes me want to sing!" HEY NIGGER, HOW ABOUT YOU SING MY COCK UNTIL YOU GARGLE MY CUM!

# Please try to keep posts on topic.
# Try to reply to other people's comments instead of starting new threads.
# Read other people's messages before posting your own to avoid simply duplicating what has already been said.
# Use a clear subject that describes what your message is about.
# Offtopic, Inflammatory, Inappropriate, Illegal, or Offensive comments might be moderated. (You can read everything, even moder# Please try to keep posts on topic.
# Try to reply to other people's comments instead of starting new threads.
# Read other people's messages before posting your own to avoid simply duplicating what has already been said.
# Use a clear subject that describes what your message is about.
# Offtopic, Inflammatory, Inappropriate, Illegal, or Offensive comments might be moderated. (You can read everything, even moder

Re:Everyone's a criminal! (4, Informative)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349644)

You're forgetting that Australia is a nation that was founded by criminals. They are truly a nation where everyone was once a criminal.

And more to the point, many of the people originally shipped to Australia were convicted of offences which would be considered barely criminal today, like stealing a loaf of bread (or copying a CD?).

I wonder if any of the convicts on the First Fleet were sent over for stealing music? Sneaking into a concert hall for example?

Re:Everyone's a criminal! (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349842)

"many of the people originally shipped to Australia were convicted of offences which would be considered barely criminal today"

This is not actually correct, but is a persistent myth. If you examine the records of who was on the ships for the first decade or so of transportation, almost universally they were people convicted of serious offences - murder, manslaughter, rape, serious theft and fraud. About the only ones who were probably innocent of any serious ill-doing were the quite substantial numbers of Irish and Scots transported for unspecified acts of treason and sedition.

Re: Stealing a loaf of bread... (2, Insightful)

Jim_Callahan (831353) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349880)

... is still considered quite criminal by US law. Even by the slashdot crowd agrees that it's criminal (golly gee, it's physical property of which the victim is actually deprived!). I doubt that it's any different in Britain.
 
Just because we don't send people to Australia for it doesn't make it not a crime. We don't send people to Australia for a lot of things these days.

Re: Stealing a loaf of bread... (1)

NitsujTPU (19263) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349954)

Does that mean that if I steal a loaf of bread, that I get free airfare to Australia?

Of course... (1)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349955)

Of course many of them were sent there for being debtors. Now in the US, we just file bankrupcy. Although, maybe if we had debtors prisons, fewer people would plan to go into bankrupcy.

Re:Of course... (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349990)

Although, maybe if we had debtors prisons, fewer people would plan to go into bankrupcy.

Not for long...
To learn more about debtors prisons, see: American Revolution, Causes of...

Re:Everyone's a criminal! (2, Interesting)

dysprosia (661648) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349668)

They are truly a nation where everyone was once a criminal.

No, on several counts. Do you consider the British prison guards, governors, and other administrative personnel criminals? They were not. Many "free people" also immigrated from Britain much later after transportation of criminals from Britain ceased, they were not criminals either. Many people also immigrated from elsewhere (such as neighbouring Asian countries) into Australia under multiculturalism, these were not criminals either.

Yes (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349701)

Yes, I would - "Do you consider the British prison guards, governors, and other administrative personnel criminals?" Hired or appointed mercenary functionaries of an extremely exploitative and imperialistic "royal" based autocracy are criminals by default, the most commonly used slang term would be "fascist pigs". The entire concept of "lords" and "commoners" is criminal.

Reminds me of a good joke (-1, Troll)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349980)

I was going through Customs in Australia and they asked me if I had a criminal record.

I shot back at them: I didn't know you still needed one to get into the country.

/zing

Re:Everyone's a criminal! (2, Funny)

FusionDragon2099 (799857) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349685)

Makes me want to sing! Considering the how the RIAA acts, you probably shouldn't.

Re:Everyone's a criminal! (4, Funny)

nathanh (1214) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349764)

You're forgetting that Australia is a nation that was founded by criminals. They are truly a nation where everyone was once a criminal.

And America was founded by puritans. Australians are forever grateful that we got the better deal.

Back to reality, Australia was neither founded by criminals nor was everyone once a criminal. Australia was founded by the British as a penal colony. God bless America for doing a bang up job on your education.

Re:Everyone's a criminal! (4, Informative)

CRC'99 (96526) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349798)

It's interesting that nearly EVERY comment is about Australia being founded by criminals. Do they teach nothing more than that in other places around the world?

What about the fact that it's the country (a government department no less!) that invented 802.11g?

What about the fact that a hell of a lot of healthcare stuff is started in Australia?

I remember reading something a while ago about the bionic ear was an Australian invention, and probably a ton of other stuff...

Re:Everyone's a criminal! (3, Insightful)

KingSkippus (799657) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349936)

Well, in America, we also know that you all love wrestling crocodiles and drinking Foster's beer. ;-)

Seriouly, Australia looks like a really cool place, and most Australian folks I know are super nice people. I'm thinking of moving there someday. The "Australia founded by criminals" is just an interesting story that gets propagated because of its novelty, I don't think that people mean it as an insult. At least, I can assure you that my own opinion of Australia isn't tainted by the story.

After all, let's not forget that the United States was founded by a bunch of insurgents. Funny how our own opinions of insurgencies have changed...

Well, its funnier.. (1)

msimm (580077) | more than 8 years ago | (#14350014)

And explains why Americans and Australians are so similar (of course we got all those giddy religous people with our criminals). Meh.

Re:Everyone's a criminal! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349878)

Australia was not founded by criminals. Australia was founded by the British Empire, and about 30% of the INITIAL POPULATION was deported criminals, the rest were free settlers. I assume you're an American, so you're forgiven for your misunderstanding about something outside of your borders, as it's to be expected.

Re:Everyone's a criminal! (1)

AtrN (87501) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349902)

Australia is a nation that was founded by criminals

Not really. The British, after losing the North American colonies they used to ship criminals to, used some parts of Australia for the same purpose. Some cities, such as Melbourne and Adelaide, were not penal colonies. I've also read that more people were deported to the North American colonies than to the Australian ones (googling for stats is left as an exercise for the reader). Our only "mistake" was not to revolt against the British.

Well that's a relief! (1)

jsweval (693114) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349545)

I can finally come out of my bunker!

Mass civil disobedience wins? (5, Interesting)

cloricus (691063) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349678)

I'm an Australian and I know of four police officers who are absolutely aware of my mp3(/ogg) collection. My collection is ripped from cd's that I legitimately own using sound-juicer and put onto my ipod using gtkpod. The police officers that have knowledge of this have part-taken in usage of my ipod to play these 'illegal' tracks and in three cases the officers themselves have children (or personally) who have mp3's both legal and illegal.

So I ask; how can the police enforce a law/requirement that they themselves do not respect? Further more I welcome this ruling from our great overlords (who I voted against) as it will stop most of the population being made criminals for using some thing (fairly) that they paid for. Kudos.

PS. Please don't arrest me and use this post* in court as an admittance of breaking the law!

*In the event that this post is used in the above fashion it is a complete fabrication! *Hides in his Bunker!

Re:Mass civil disobedience wins? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349718)

'm an Australian and I know of four police officers who are absolutely aware of my mp3(/ogg) collection.

I'm an Australian and I know of a crap load of police officers who share music (burned CD's, mp3's, software) amongst each other, even doing it AT WORK.

Using the law to crack down on music file sharers in Australia is NOT about stopping the sharing. It is about extracting money from people or entities which have deep pockets. The fact that they go after ISP's and companies, instead of the file sharing users, is evidence of this.

A top Australian Lawyer or Barrister makes more in a day, than the typical 15 year old has in the worth of the entirety of his assets. The ISP those teens use on the other hand, have millions.

Re:Mass civil disobedience wins? (1)

cloricus (691063) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349733)

Seriously man... I was trying to avoid saying that a good percentage of them were hardcore pirates (which is a reasonably accurate thing to say) as we all know the popular image of Australia...

Guess it's time for all the convict jokes then ey?

Re:Well that's a relief! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349716)

Yeah you always could.

WHo gives a fuck anyway.

Ohh so you've changed havent you kangaroos? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349549)

Australia legalizes P2P and suddenly they aren't a nation of criminals?

Sure! Tell that to the British!

Artists lose??? (1)

datafr0g (831498) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349552)

But yet to be decided is whether a levy will be slapped on the store price of blank CDs and MP3 players, such as iPods, to compensate artists for the revenue they stand to lose under the new laws.

But didn't this law change come about because it was a law that just about everybody was breaking anyway? So nothing changes. So what do the artists lose under the new laws??

Re:Artists lose??? (1)

Ruff_ilb (769396) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349608)

There's always a price to pay for a change, even if it's only in legal status.

Re:Artists lose??? (3, Insightful)

MBCook (132727) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349805)

Technically they are currently losing money, but your point is valid.

The truth is, this is RIAA math (not the RIAA, but same kind). Remember that 4 blank CDs may cost $2 or whatever, but their value is the $150 that a 4 disc box set might cost (because that is what you could pirate with it). Logic, as usual for these kind of groups, does not apply.

Pathetic (0)

beaver1024 (645317) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349554)

Another pathetic attempt by the media companies to gouge the consumers for as much as they can. The new proposed legislation, whilst giving consumers a "clear" conscience, will punish them via a Canada like tax on blanks and iPods. Surely a blatant attempt by the media companies to get back at Apple for refusing to allowing to gouge the consumer even more by the 99c/song price.

Re:Pathetic (2, Informative)

fabs64 (657132) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349603)

rtfa :
n Canada, where similar laws have been introduced, a fee was levied on blank CD and iPod unit sales to compensate copyright owners with up to an extra $32 being placed on the store price of individual machines. Mr Ruddock's spokeswoman said a similar system had been discussed for Australia, but was unlikely to be introduced.

Tax? What tax? (3, Informative)

brunes69 (86786) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349609)

I mean, I live in Canadam, and I can buy a spindle of 50 blank CDRs for 8.99 CDN or so on sale, 50 DVDs for 9.99. Thats 18 measly cents a disc for CDRs or 20 cents a disc for DVDs... its even less for DVDs if you figure it per GB. The levy is pretty much irrelevant.

Re:Tax? What tax? (3, Insightful)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349645)

"The levy is pretty much irrelevant."

Immorality knows no dollar signs. If you multiply those 18 or 20 cents by millions of blank CDs and DVDs, you'll see that millions of dollars are being stolen from your fellow citizens and funneled to private interests under the assumption that each and every one of you are criminals. That's money that can be put to better use among the *productive* members of the economy. Moreover, those levies are going to an organization that represents only a small minority of the overall pool of musical talent in the country.

Go back to school (1)

brunes69 (86786) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349836)

If you multiply those 18 or 20 cents by millions of blank CDs and DVDs, you'll see that millions of dollars are being stolen...

I don't know what elementary school you went to, but here in Canada $1,000,000 * $0.01 = $10,000, hadly anything of importance to the multi-national record labels that do tens of billions on revenue a year.

I don't know what kind of pot you'd have to be smoking to think that millions of pennies would mean anything to any decent sized corperation.

Re:Go back to school (1)

Rude Turnip (49495) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349987)

Two things to consider: there are more than just 1 million blank discs being sold and you are paying the tax. The dollar amount the record labels receive may be small relative to their overall revenues, but it's still a good amount of money that could be put to better use.

Re:Go back to school (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14350008)

whoa, talk about an utter failure in math. cut down "18 or 20" cents to 1 cent. cut down millions to 1 million. I guess we do know who is smoking..

Re:Tax? What tax? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349780)

"Canadam", eh?

And I thought USian speling was bad.

Re:Pathetic (2, Informative)

Phroggy (441) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349613)

Surely a blatant attempt by the media companies to get back at Apple for refusing to allowing to gouge the consumer even more by the 99c/song price.

Perhaps you meant AU$1.69?

Hang on mate... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349555)

...wasn't most of the population criminals to begin with?

Is that still a requirement? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349557)

"in a bid to overturn a ban which has made criminals of much of the population."

But without most of the population being criminals it just wouldn't be Australia!

Any Enforcement? (2, Interesting)

CWRUisTakingMyMoney (939585) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349563)

Wow, I didn't know about these laws. Were they enforced often, or just placed on the books so that they could say they did, and then largely ignored? If they're as wide-reaching as they seem (I didn't RTFA), there's no way they could be enforced enough to modify people's behavior, right?

Re:Any Enforcement? (4, Informative)

OzJimbob (129746) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349619)

Nah, they were rarely enforced. Most people don't know they exist, and that's fair enough, because you assume if you buy a CD you have the right to make a copy of it for yourself. That makes sense. The laws against it don't. It's only with the rise of portable MP3 players that the media has picked up on the fact that, before the recent opening of the Australian iTunes store, there was almost no legal use for an iPod in Australia, yet they were selling in their thousands.

Re:Any Enforcement? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349948)

This is a sensible move by the government, given that a significant portion of the population is made up of scofflaws without the change, and if you and everyone you know has gotten away with disregarding one law...

Re:Any Enforcement? (3, Interesting)

Chuck Chunder (21021) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349646)

"These laws" are just Australia's standard copyright legislation. Our "fair use" rights don't include time shifting. It's just the way it's always been but has been routinely ignored (or unknown) by the general public and no-one is really going to sue you for it because (I believe) it would be a civil case where all they could gain are "damages" which would be so minimal as to not be worth the effort (As it's just single use in the home the inflationary costing that peer to peer copying allows them to claim isn't there).

While this is being suggested as a "win" for the people I'd expect there is strong motivation from business to sort this out too. It doesn't suit them for copyright law to be seen as flexible and routinely ignored now that distribution is so easy for people to do.

Re:Any Enforcement? (1)

mikek3332002 (912228) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349686)

Thankfully the RIAA doesn't run the Australian Music Industry cause they certainly would have tried.

Re:Any Enforcement? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349799)

Wow, I didn't know about these laws. Were they enforced often, or just placed on the books so that they could say they did, and then largely ignored?

This is not so much about laws which explicitely forbid personal copying. This has more to do with the fact that since we did not previously have explicit laws allowing "fair use" type provisions, the copyright laws could be applied to the absurd. So these new laws, open holes to allow the reasonable use of copying.

Like in firewalls with a default deny policy. We had no specific allow rule.

Was anyone ever even brought up against copyright laws due to what reasonable people would consider "fair use" in Australia? I know of none and it certainly was not common if it did ever happen. This is why judges exist in the first place. They are there to interpret what is right and wrong with respect to law and adherence to it.

Re:Any Enforcement? (4, Funny)

AtrN (87501) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349858)

Were they enforced often

True story...

At the last federal election I rock up to the polling place, a school not too far from my house. I just walked up, got the iPod going so I don't have to listen to the local "party members" trying to hand me how to vote forms. As I walk in this guy, talking to someone on his left, bumps into me. I turn around, he turns around. It's fucking John Howard (prime minister of Oz if you don't know) - his office is just up the road from the school and he'd wandered down for a meet-and-greet. I just kept going.

He did nothing! There I was, fragantly defying the law of the land and our fearless leader, otherwise known as "the rodent", did nothing. He had his security guys there. He could of tackled me himself. Grabbed me and made a citizen's arrest or something. But he did nothing. Weak on law he is. Weak!

Wow... (1)

endtwist (862499) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349564)

Now how long until the RIAA throws a hissy fit and starts throwing "legal insults"?

Re:Wow... (2, Informative)

richdun (672214) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349896)

Not that it would stop them, but remember that the Recording Industry Association of AMERICA has little sway in Australia...

Is there a real difference between RIAA and ARIA? (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349956)

remember that the Recording Industry Association of AMERICA has little sway in Australia

RIAA and ARIA policies are set by their members. If the four major labels are members of both organizations, and they set the same general policy in both organizations, then is there a real difference?

A change in legal status only. (2, Interesting)

Ruff_ilb (769396) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349566)

I don't think anyone's going to be breathing a sigh of relief because the law seemed both unenforced and unenforcable. If it really made criminals of most of the population, then the average citizen probably didn't worry about this law much, if at all.

OTOH, I like seeing Australia taking a more friendly stance on this. Although the change will mean very little for the citizens, it's a message that they're declaring this stance instead of leaving it de facto.

Re:A change in legal status only. (3, Insightful)

DrEldarion (114072) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349848)

Although the change will mean very little for the citizens, it's a message that they're declaring this stance instead of leaving it de facto.

Actually, it could mean a lot if it prevents things like the broadcast flag [wikipedia.org] .

weeeed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349568)

ok, so thats good, all the skumma pirates can copy there poxy britney spears and whatver other fag is tyring to take their cash, but as everone is doing it we'll make it legal, yea right, but i'm not alowed to walk around with 3 oz of weed 20 pills and a dash of nutmeg. but it's ok. everybody rip off the music industry and pretend your not criminals, thats ok.

Re:weeeed (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349596)

but i'm not alowed to walk around with 3 oz of weed 20 pills and a dash of nutmeg


I hear the Canadian government is set to legalize nutmeg. You should look into immigrating.

Oh I get it... (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349571)

But yet to be decided is whether a levy will be slapped on the store price of blank CDs and MP3 players, such as iPods, to compensate artists for the revenue they stand to lose under the new laws.

...which is easier than working for a living.

We had the levy for cassette tape decades ago. I think we can assume it will go on this time as well.

Re:Oh I get it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349826)

But John Howard believes in freedom, not in unions. So I for one am optimistic. Go on, mod me into oblivion.

Ethics != Law (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349585)

The summary states that those that record shows for personal use can now do so "with a clear conscience." Either they thought it was an ethical practice before, or the still dont now. The law, and what people belive is ethical have nothing to do with each other. The changing of a law is not going to change people's belief about what is right and wrong.

/pedantic

Moral vs Legal (4, Insightful)

Stan Vassilev (939229) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349602)

I seriously doubt someone had unclear conscience while trying to copy his own CD-s to his own mp3 player.
Again brainwashing in action to make what's moral and what's legal the same thing.

If they outlaw living should I have bad conscience for being alive?

Re:Moral vs Legal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349928)

made criminals of much of the population
When "much of the population" becomes criminal because of a law, the problem isn't with the population.

Re:Moral vs Legal (1)

jd (1658) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349965)

Dunno about living, but some town in Brazil recently outlawed dying. There's just gotta be some way of modding these sorts of things +sqrt(-1) for being nuts.

EYE WOOD LIEK TOO SEA YER BEWBS!! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349605)

plz stap the trolltalk crapfleud...

kthnxbye

Before the obvious tirades start.... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349631)

Yes, Australia started out as a group of penal colonies (mostly)...
Yes, There were a lot of penal settlements...
However, most of the people sentenced for transportation were sentenced for quite petty "crimes", say, stealing a loaf of bread or poaching a rabbit so their kids didn't die of starvation.... obviously a hanging offense. It was the 18th century equivalent of running a red light. They still managed to tame the harshest continent on earth and prosper, creating one of the greatest egalitarian societies the world has ever seen.

Secondly, that still only accounted for a very small minority of the population. I'm hazy on the exact figures but only about 4% of the Aus population have any convict descent at all, something like 40% of the current population wasn't even BORN here. Add to that the vast numbers of free settlers who immigrated here over the last 2 hundred years seeking a better life while creating the worlds only multicultural success story (apart from the occasional whacko who appears in every society, and some recent blown-out-of-proportion beach riots where the citizenry took back the beach from thug troublemakers of Middle-Eastern appearance).

Add in the worlds best beaches, coral reefs, rainforests, snow country and general quality of life and all-in-all we feel sorry for anyone who DOESN'T live here. Accuse me of parochialism as much as you want, the fact remains it's God's Own Country with pretty much all of the advantages found elsewhere without most of the disadvantages. Sure we don't get it right all the time but hey, it's pretty damn close.

Now contrast that with a country (no names) who was founded by extremist religious whack-jobs fleeing incarceration once Europe finally took out the trash, who eagerly embraced slavery, who eliminated pretty much all of the native population, who's Founding Fathers were mainly sozzled drunks beating their manservants and who now comprises 5% of the worlds population but accounts for over 50% of the worlds drug usage and who gun each other down by the tens of thousands in the streets each year.
A nation of peaceful, easy to live with honest people or a nation of murdering drug addicts ?..

wow, tough choice....

Oh, and British people are generally ugly and have major personal hygeine problems, so we can forget about them too !

Re:Before the obvious tirades start.... (0, Troll)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349770)

Now contrast that with a country (no names) who was founded by extremist religious whack-jobs fleeing incarceration once Europe finally took out the trash, who eagerly embraced slavery, who eliminated pretty much all of the native population, who's Founding Fathers were mainly sozzled drunks beating their manservants and who now comprises 5% of the worlds population but accounts for over 50% of the worlds drug usage and who gun each other down by the tens of thousands in the streets each year.
A nation of peaceful, easy to live with honest people or a nation of murdering drug addicts ?..

wow, tough choice....


blow me

Re:Before the obvious tirades start.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349773)

Yeah ... but you guys have HUGE FUCKING INSECTS and LIZARDS that could EAT A MAN in his SLEEP!

Re:Before the obvious tirades start.... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349776)

Now contrast that with a country (no names) who was founded by extremist religious whack-jobs fleeing incarceration once Europe finally took out the trash, who eagerly embraced slavery, who eliminated pretty much all of the native population, who's Founding Fathers were mainly sozzled drunks beating their manservants and who now comprises 5% of the worlds population but accounts for over 50% of the worlds drug usage and who gun each other down by the tens of thousands in the streets each year.

Yeah, those Canadians are real bastards.

Re:Before the obvious tirades start.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349779)

Hehe, you said penal.

Re:Before the obvious tirades start.... (0, Offtopic)

cheesee (97693) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349806)

Now, about that drug usage. Australia has the worlds highest per capita usage of Marijuana and the second highest per capita usage of amphetamines (including methamphetamine and exstacy). There's probably a large weight moving throuh in America, but here a greater percentage of us use them.

Not disagreeing with the rest of it though.

Re:Before the obvious tirades start.... (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349828)

Said loudly and proudly:

usa usa usa usa

(Lower case used to bypass the lameness filter)

Re:Before the obvious tirades start.... (-1, Offtopic)

MidnightBrewer (97195) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349861)

Now the question is, why is it Australia has one of the world's highest counts of clinical depression? Because they're so damn good?

Re:Before the obvious tirades start.... (3, Funny)

Greg@UF (97388) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349960)

Because the poor bastard live right next door to wonderful, glorious New Zealand.. So near to paradise, and yet so far !

*grin*

Re:Before the obvious tirades start.... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349865)

Is this the same egalitarian community that wouldn't consider even people from Southern Europe for citizenship (until the late 70s), because they weren't "white enough"? The same one that has a huge Southeast-Asian worker underclass and rampant discrimination against non-Christians and non-whites? The same one that has recently been found to be FATTER on average than the United States (taking the coveted fattest nation in the world title)? The same country that took the land of their own Aboriginal natives, not unlike the Americans did to the natives there?

Re:i don't think the Aborigines concur (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349869)

"...greatest egalitarian societies the world has ever seen."

really? i wonder what the the REAL natives of Australia actually have to say about your "egalitarian" comment.

maybe if you opened a history book once in a while, and give your brain a chance to get into gear before running your fucking mouth, you might not be labeled a fucking tool of a troll.

Re:Before the obvious tirades start.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349898)

It was the 18th century equivalent of running a red light

Morons who run red lights deserve harsh punishment. Innocent people get killed because of it.

Fair Use (2, Interesting)

Freaky Spook (811861) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349666)

Australia never had Fair Use laws in copyright, it was always just assumed it was ok, now I guess its good there is legislation to protect the consumer.

Australias has to adopt DMCA under the Australian/American Free Trade agreement so I guess its a little late for this now though.

Australia does have Fair Use (2, Informative)

Chuck Chunder (21021) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349710)

Australia does have Fair Use (or "Fair Dealing") provisions in copyright, it's just that home recording/time shifting isn't one of those provisions.

Australian Fair Dealing provisions allow for:
- research or study
- criticism or review
- reporting of news
- professional advice given by a legal practitioner or patent attorney

Advertising (2, Interesting)

Ribbo.com (885396) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349677)

The bigger worry is for the TV channels who stand to lose the most from advertising revenues. More and more people record shows off television simply so they can watch it later to skip through the adverts. If advertisers stop paying premium rates for prime time television, then there is a big risk the quality of the shows will go down due to large inshow advertising "hi joey, i see your enjoying a thirst quenching sprite!" because it's the only way to get the adverts to be watched (assuming people actually watch Joey).

Re:Advertising (2, Insightful)

CaptainDefragged (939505) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349702)

"then there is a big risk the quality of the shows will go down "
Is it really possible for the quality of commercial prime time TV in Australia to sink lower?

Oh come on (1)

Chuck Chunder (21021) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349720)

We get the best television America can produce!

Re:Oh come on (1)

CaptainDefragged (939505) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349757)

That is so true. The best that America produced a couple seasons ago. It is also why the I seem to be watching more and more of SBS and ABC 1 and 2. At least 80% of what I capture for later viewing is off these channels. There's just a couple of fishing shows on Saturday that get recorded off the commercial channels and I do cut these adverts out as they are annoying and repetitive. As also posted by others, no one watches Joey.

Re:Advertising (1)

cloricus (691063) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349722)

This is already happening. Take for example a Bond movie (sure not a TV show but this is going into tv shows already) only five years ago a Bond movie wouldn't have any ads at all, now every thing in Die Another Day is product placement. Or for further example the first fourteen minutes of I, Robot. I put to you that the ad reps needed a way around ad skipping and ad placement was a great idea so they have integrated it reasonably well. Now they are fighting to try and keep both revenue streams open for as long as possible which in Australia will be awhile.

Unlike America (I assume?) we don't have a culture of wanting to skip ads as TV stations on the whole tend to space them well and limit how repetitive they are while adding verity (eg not drug ads 24/7). Personally my family has a DVR device that can easily skip ads but we don't bother...The want and effort required just isn't there and this is reflected by every DVR owner that I know.

Also, no one watches Joey.

Re:Advertising (1)

TekPolitik (147802) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349756)

More and more people record shows off television simply so they can watch it later to skip through the adverts. If advertisers stop paying premium rates for prime time television, then there is a big risk the quality of the shows will go down

The quality shows all end up on cable anyway, where they get much better treatment than they get at the free-to-air networks. As with so many things, "you get what you pay for".

Re:Advertising (1)

nincehelser (935936) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349981)

The bigger worry is for the TV channels who stand to lose the most from advertising revenues. More and more people record shows off television simply so they can watch it later to skip through the adverts

On the other hand, the advertisers have managed to get a copy of their add in a persistant form to their target demographic. Instead of trying to create 10-second commercials that evaporate into thin air, they can create more elaborate ones that have meaningful and interesting information. Make longer commericals that people want to watch. Slip them in so they create their own storyline over the course of the actual show. Give people some incentive to watch commericals for clues to a puzzle that will get them a treat.

A lot of the above has been tried before, but how people are watching their entertainment is changing....they might have more impact now.

Do you know what this means? (0, Redundant)

Caithness (934705) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349687)

The continent of Australia really is entirely populated by criminals! Vizinni was right.

Well I never... (1)

js92647 (917218) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349706)

I doubt the ones (outside of Australia, preferably.. AMERICA) that do this illegaly do infact somehow have an unclear conscience. Since, you know, they totally can't stop dragging icons of mp3 files back and forth. "OMFG I can't stop doing it!! AAH! 5 seconds left!"

Good for Australia, now how about we push this sort of law towards the western hemisphere?

Most of the Australian Population Criminals? (0, Redundant)

philibob (132105) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349717)

Imagine that, considering it started off as a prison colony...

How is media levy divided up? (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349725)

The question I have never seen addressed is how levies on the sale of blank CD/DVD media is/may be divided up by such organisations such as the RIAA or ARIA (Australia) and given to artists. It may be all well and good to say that the money goes to artists, but in practice I very much doubt it, it is just going to go into the general coffers of the relevant recording industry association to use as they see fit.

So, does anyone know where there is a published policy of how such money does supposedly get allocated to artists?

Criminalizing Personal Content (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349738)

Those crazy Aussies might get away with it for now, but pay attention to the way this kind of story will spin into the future.

The entertainment conglomerates will use the media to reinforce their position that any free content is bad while they pay the Aussie gov't to allow them to maintain their dominance.

It was fun while it lasted.

Better Headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349752)

Australian Media 'Crooks' to Come in from the Prison Colony

Not as funny as 'In Soviet Russia...' jokes (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349754)

In Australia, Federal Government legalizes you!

USA Is not much better (3, Insightful)

IntelliAdmin (941633) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349765)

I see the day when we will have the same restrictions. Look at the MPAA, RIAA. They are constantly trying to close the "Analog Hole". They want to make it illegal to timeshift. How well do you think your TIVO will work when you can only get the signal via their box. They provide one you say? Guess what happens when there is no competition in any given field? The choices suck.

Just wait a year or two (5, Funny)

l33tlamer (916010) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349809)

[US President]: Hey, I hear that you are letting your minions copying CDs down there. You do remember the agreement we had right?
[AUS President]: huh?
[US President]: The FREE trade agreement?
[AUS President]: Oh yeah, I forgot. Don't worry, should be fixed in a jiffy. Btw, I got to get back to Australia in a week. The people seems to get a bit worried when their president is away for more than a few months.
[US President]: Ok, I guess I can replace you with an intern. Go ahead and get out from underneath my desk.

All hail to our Yanky overlords. I, as an Australian, welcome our inclusion into the United States of America as its newest state. I also welcome renaming our parliament to "Congress" and our Prime Minister to "President". One can only hope that the states will outsource its prison facilities over here.

Re:Just wait a year or two (2, Funny)

radiotyler (819474) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349940)

One can only hope that the states will outsource its prison facilities over here.

I thought the British Empire tried that once already?

*rimshot*

great.. (1)

agendi (684385) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349819)

but what's the catch? I have no evidence but my gut is telling me that this is diversion from something more insidious.

Re:great.. (1)

Sailor Coruscant (713289) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349923)

How about the rest of the DMCA which is being implemented as part of the australian / usa free trade agreement?

dumb (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14349862)

come in from WHAT COLD?

Australia is hot you retard.

Finally somebody blinked! (1)

Progman3K (515744) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349873)

Good for Australia.

Not criminals! (4, Insightful)

the packrat (721656) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349949)

Just to insert a little sanity here. In Australia, most copyright violations are prosecuted in the civil courts (exceptions include sale of couterfeit goos, called 'passing off'). It is only in corrupt countries where the media corporations can easily buy new laws that such things have fallen under criminal prosecution.

Let's not even begin to talk about the DCMA, the shiny new laws which make videotaping a movie in a theatre more heavily punished than several types of killing, or the perpetual copyright on Mickey Mouse or anything else that american corporations bother to pay supreme court justices for.

RIAA (1)

Alpha_Traveller (685367) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349968)

Oh hey RIAA do you want to tie your own noose or should we just let Australia do it for you?

cdr/ipod tax? (1)

stuuf (587464) | more than 8 years ago | (#14349993)

But yet to be decided is whether a levy will be slapped on the store price of blank CDs and MP3 players, such as iPods, to compensate artists for the revenue they stand to lose under the new laws.

They're kidding, right? What about the people who fill those CDs with linux installers, photos, and the countless gazillions of other things that aren't pirated music, or buy songs for their iPod from iTunes?

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>