Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Leap Second At The End of 2005

CmdrTaco posted more than 8 years ago | from the correct-your-watches-immediately dept.

Technology 269

Ruff_ilb writes "Because of the discrepency between an ephemeris second (the fraction 1/31,556,925.9747 of the tropical year for 1900 January 0 at 12 hours ephemeris time) and the second of atomic time (the duration of 9,192,631,770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the cesium 133 atom), we're left with more than leap years. In order to ensure that the the atomic time and civil stay coordinated, "Civil time is occasionally adjusted by one second increments to ensure that the difference between a uniform time scale defined by atomic clocks does not differ from the Earth's rotational time by more than 0.9 seconds."" And Happy New Years everyone ;)

cancel ×

269 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

niggers (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374336)

niggersniggersniggersniggers

seriously though, if niggers posted like this, they'd not be so white

Re:niggers (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374354)

Don't reply to trolls!

Re:niggers (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374365)

don't reply to people who reply to trolls!

Re:niggers (-1, Troll)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374465)

Don't reply to people who reply to people who reply to trolls.

Re:niggers (-1, Troll)

heinousjay (683506) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374484)

Ok

How did you use yours? (4, Funny)

Chemisor (97276) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374340)

And, of course, I already used it to read Slashdot. Oh, darn...

Re:How did you use yours? (5, Interesting)

Extrudedaluminiu (903390) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374349)

Do any NTP servers keep track of these seconds?

Re:How did you use yours? (4, Insightful)

lousyd (459028) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374403)

Do any NTP servers keep track of these seconds?

Yes, that's the point of serving the Network Time Protocol...

Re:How did you use yours? (1)

xYoni69x (652510) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374634)

Oh, you're right.

happy new year (-1, Offtopic)

yincrash (854885) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374341)

happy new year, slashdot. let's wish for 365 more days of everything.

Re:happy new year (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374381)

let's wish for 365 more days of everything.

If you had everything, where would you keep it? -Stephen Wright

Actually, that's an easy one:

Everywhere.

KFG

Re:happy new year (4, Funny)

SpinJaunt (847897) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374382)

More along the lines of 730 days if you include the dupes..

Re:happy new year (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374523)

happy new year, slashdot. let's wish for 365 more days of everything.

Twice

Re:happy new year (0, Redundant)

FlopEJoe (784551) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374650)

happy new year, slashdot. let's wish for 365 more days of everything.

w00t!! First dupe of 2006!!!

A cool thing to do (5, Funny)

rolypolyman (933130) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374346)

If you watch carefully for that leap second, you can do a freeze-frame flying kick like in The Matrix.

Re:A cool thing to do (1)

thc69 (98798) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374495)

No, that'd be a freeze-frame LEAPing kick like in The Matrix...

Re:A cool thing to do (3, Funny)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374632)

I didn't see anything as cool as that during the leap second, but a cat did walk by twice.

wow (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374350)

wow thats amazing

The hard way (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374355)

Adjusting the clock is of course the easy way to solve the mismatch between our ideal time and earth's rotation.

Real engineering solution would involve changing earth's rotation speed to match the clock. Any takers?

Re:The hard way (5, Funny)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374410)

Adjusting the clock is of course the easy way to solve the mismatch between our ideal time and earth's rotation

Oh yeah? It took me about ten minutes to adjust all the clocks in my house due to the damn leap second. Multiply this by the 100 million households in the nation, and we have a very serious issue here.

I demand that George Bush pull us out of whatever God forsaken U.N. treaty that got us into this mess.

Re:The hard way (1, Funny)

kfg (145172) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374419)

Real engineering solution would involve changing earth's rotation speed to match the clock. Any takers?

Yeeeeeeeeeeeah Baby! Which way to dee nuclear wessels?

KFG

Re:The hard way (2, Funny)

jacksonj04 (800021) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374471)

My clock is set by radio and has no manual adjust, you insensitive clod!

Re:The hard way (1)

GrungyLotG (890944) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374530)

Indeed, my watch does the same thing. Only problem is that I spend most of my time indoors, and between buildings that are built like Faraday Cages and all the interferance, it rarely recieves a signal.

Re:The hard way (3, Funny)

MyLongNickName (822545) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374630)

Only problem is that I spend most of my time indoors,

This is Slashdot. Quit spamming us with stuff we already know.

Re:The hard way (0, Flamebait)

Hymer (856453) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374516)

If we look at your proposal more seriously : Greenpeace (and other environmental organizations) would protest against it until a investigation of the consequences was successfully completed. The conclusion of the investigation would state that the consequnces can't be predicted with 100% accuracy but there is a 30 % chance of earth colliding into the sun, 30 % chance of erth going out in deep space and 30 % chance of success... the last 10 % were eaten by the lab rats.

Re:The hard way (1)

Hymer (856453) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374672)

...my sense of humor is obviously not compatible with /.

Re:The hard way (1)

Cyberax (705495) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374533)

Well, we just need to reduce Earth's momentum of inertia. According to the law of conservation of angular momentum it will make Earth rotate faster.

You can try this on yourself: sit on a swivel chair and start spinning with your hands held apart, then quickly pull your hands close to your body - you should start rotate faster.

I think if we level all mountain ranges and melt both ice caps it should be enough to make Earth spin faster enough to compensate for this leap second.

Re:The hard way (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374594)

I think tsunami can change the speed of rotation. We would propably get one if we drop California to the ocean. Any takers?

Re:The hard way (1)

mordejai (702496) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374654)

Too easy...

I'd rather modify the cesium 133 atom to reflect the ephemeris second.

Yeah, *I KNOW* that requires changing all the universe rules...
C'mon, haven't you ever changed the database design one week before the release??

countdown (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374359)

10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0,-1

-Sj53

And those with computers... (1, Insightful)

jZnat (793348) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374363)

Those with updated (don't know from when) libc or equivalent automatically encountered the leap second at midnight. Even if you didn't, you'll still sync back up with an NTP server eventually (I'd hope).

Re:And those with computers... (1)

FluffyWithTeeth (890188) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374409)

You insensitive clod!

I don't have a computer!

Re:And those with computers... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374489)

He wasn't talking to you, as indicated by the "And those with computers...".

p.s. That wasn't funny.

Re:And those with computers... (2, Informative)

anothy (83176) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374584)

hopefully you don't mean that literally, or it's a bug (although an admittedly minor one); the change didn't happen at midnight for most of the world. for example, it was 19:00:60 in EST.

Re:And those with computers... (1)

drunkennewfiemidget (712572) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374601)

It did it at 23:59:60 UTC, regardless of your timezone.

oh great (1, Funny)

BushCheney08 (917605) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374364)

Great! Now I hafta go around the house and adjust all the clocks again...

Damn! (3, Funny)

Black Parrot (19622) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374368)

Now my clock is 121 seconds off, instead of just 120.

Thank goodness I didn't bother setting the VCR clock after the last thunderstorm.

Re:Damn! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374531)

Actually, no. Your clock is now 119 seconds off. If you think about it, time "stood still" for 1 second, giving your still running clock 1 second to catch up, bringing it closer to the actual time.

Re:Damn! (1)

xYoni69x (652510) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374648)

Not necessarily. Maybe it was off in the other direction?

Happy New Year (-1, Offtopic)

sfontain (842406) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374375)

It's, "Happy New Year." Why does nobody understand that it's only one new year? It's not "New Years" or "New Year's" but "New Year."

Re:Happy New Year (3, Informative)

Shimmer (3036) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374397)

"Happy New Year's" is short for "Happy New Year's Day".

Re:Happy New Year (0, Redundant)

dawhippersnapper (861941) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374398)

Day is left out. Happy New Year's Day! ......

Re:Happy New Year (1)

Paradise Pete (33184) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374412)

I think it comes from a mix of happy new year and new year's day. Kinda like people saying "realator" from mis-seperating the sounds in "real estate" to "reala-state."

Re:Happy New Year (1)

Paradise Pete (33184) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374426)

and of course when I say seperate, I mean separate ;-)

Re:Happy New Year (1)

fimbulvetr (598306) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374539)

If you look at the etymology of the word, you can get a good idea as to why it's spelled with an a instead of an e. The mere knowledge of where the word comes from will serve as an excellent mnemonic device for spelling it correctly when the times come. I myself suffered from the same condition up until about 2 years ago.

Re:Happy New Year (2, Informative)

xenotrout (680453) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374498)

REALTOR® is actually a registered trademark, which seems much like "realator" as you say. Although it does sound like it could be an "official" contraction, it's made up.
If you care to know, someone decided, it would seem, to make up a word in order to create "de facto regulation" of an industry--that is, anyone can call themselves real estate agents, but only those who get trademark license (possibly by passing a test on how well they understand real estate agency or REALTY) can legally call themselves REALTORs. And people are "supposed" to prefer a REALTOR over a real estate agent (at least that's the hope of the company owning the name REALTOR--I don't know whether it works or not).

Re:Happy New Year (1)

Paradise Pete (33184) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374593)

REALTOR® is actually a registered trademark

Realtor has been a plain ol' word for many years. Do you have a reference?

Re:Happy New Year (1)

User 956 (568564) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374414)

It's, "Happy New Year." Why does nobody understand that it's only one new year? It's not "New Years" or "New Year's" but "New Year."

I think it's a contraction of "Happy New Year's Day" with incorrect punctuation. This being Slashdot, incorrect punctuation shouldn't surprise you.

Either that, or it's a conflation of "New Year's Eve" and "Happy New Year." Or, Taco's drunk, dictating articles, and he's slurring his speech. There's a veritable menagerie of possibilities; a smorgasbord of likely explanations, if you will.


Re:Happy New Year (1)

gilroy (155262) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374421)

Blockquoth the poster:

Why does nobody understand that it's only one new year?

What, after 2006 the calendar just ends? Of course there'll be many more New Years, and the original poster just wanted to pro-actively wish that all of them are Happy.

:)

Re:Happy New Year (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374423)

Wow dude, you used your extra second to be a grammar naz-OMG SHUTUP THE BALLS DROPPING HAPPY NEW YEARS'ESE"S!!!!!!11!!

Re:Happy New Year (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374517)

"New Year's" is a contraction. It is short for "New Year's Grammatical Rant"

Highlights problem with ntp... (4, Informative)

Dr. Zowie (109983) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374379)

The NTP [slashdot.org] protocol that all of us cool kids use to synchronize our computers' clocks has a fundamental flaw -- the NTP time is tied to UTC [wikipedia.org] , but contains no leap seconds at all, more like TAI [wikipedia.org] , the atomic time standard. When there's a leap second, the system's solution is to ignore it.

So, as of today, any time stamp you have made using NTP, ever, has been retroactively displaced by one second. Intervals that included midnight (UTC) last night are all too short by one second.

This may not be a problem for handling your calendar appointments, but it can muck up all kinds of scientific applications that require high precision.

Re:Highlights problem with ntp... (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374433)

The NTP [slashdot.org] protocol that all of us cool kids use


Aha! I was wondering why i couldn't use it.

mnb Re:Highlights problem with ntp... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374447)

That is why real men use GPS for time.

Re:Highlights problem with ntp... (5, Insightful)

thehickcoder (620326) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374448)

Actually, if you where doing high precision scientific applications, it seems this type of behavior would be preferred. Because of the leap second there was not 2 seconds between 11:59:59 and 12:00:01 last night. So, using the NTP behavior if I want a timestamp that was exactly 10000000 seconds ago, I get one that represents 10000000 actually elapsed seconds.

Just because everybody agrees to change their clocks doesn't mean time actually slows down or speeds up.

Re:Highlights problem with ntp... (1)

Antony-Kyre (807195) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374621)

There's alternative scientific research which hints that the speed of light is variable. Maybe the earth isn't slowing down. Maybe our atomic clocks are just getting faster.

Re:Highlights problem with ntp... (4, Interesting)

Dr. Zowie (109983) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374684)

Hmmm... Maybe I wasn't clear to start with. If (using my handy atomic clock) I made an NTP timestamp at precisely 11:00 pm UTC yesterday, and another NTP timestamp at precisely 11:00 pm UTC today, those two timestamps would differ by exactly 24 hours, although the two UTC times are 24 hours and one second apart. That is an error. T

he error is carried by the fact that NTP stays synchronized to UTC in the present, but the past is "free floating". If, today, I convert my previous NTP timestamp back to UTC I will find that it occurred at 11:00:01pm yesterday rather than 11:00:00, the time that I actually made it. That's because NTP counts offsets from the present moment, assuming that UTC behaves like TAI.

Re:Highlights problem with ntp... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374551)

Of course, an NTP client is built into Mac OS, Windows, and virtually all Linux distributions and Unix variants.

So it doesn't take much to be cool.

To fix the problem you state, don't communicate time as a 32-bit or 64-bit value. Instead, communicate time in standard ISO-8601 form.

When storing time values, make sure you know exactly what time you mean. Again, it might be a good idea to store time as a ISO-8601 value.

Re:Highlights problem with ntp... (2, Informative)

DrPepper (23664) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374646)

NTP does include support for leap seconds - there are bits that can be set by the primary time source to indicate that a leap second will occur soon. NTP isn't a time source itself - it's a protocol for transferring time. You can use whatever time source you want for NTP - it's up to the time source to set the bits if desired.

NTP is intended for synchronising computers together (useful for servers). It is not intended to provide a highly accurate time signal for scientific applications. If you need that kind of precision, then you use a direct time source such as a GPS signal - a common secondary use of the atomic clocks onboard the satellites. The only way to get better precision than that is to get your own atomic clock :-)

WOOHOO! (1)

spineboy (22918) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374388)

Yeah! - Mandatory overtime - I get time and a half! - Oh wait.......nevermind

time.gov (5, Informative)

srblackbird (569638) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374392)

I watched the time at Time.gov: 23:59:56 (UTC) =>23:59:57=>23:59:58=>23:59:59=>23:59:60!=>00:00:0 0
It was Amazing! This was the first time for me... *remebers where I was at that moment

Re:time.gov (1)

Krimszon (815968) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374415)

Do you have a replay?

Re:time.gov (1)

26242 (830254) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374578)

That would have been pretty cool to see. Awesome pawsum!

How did you spend the extra second? (2, Funny)

House of Usher (447177) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374404)

So during the correction of the clocks and the extra second being added, what did you do? Did you ponder world peace? The latest 0 day exploits for Windows? Where Microsoft is going with the .NET platform with version 2.0? Or were most of you transfixed on Times Square watching the ball drop getting close to someone you love?

Re:How did you spend the extra second? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374440)

Adjust my clock. Duh.

Re:How did you spend the extra second? (1)

jzeejunk (878194) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374474)

Yeah ! I watched the ball drop and I was close to my *coughs* *coughs again* laptop, reading slashdot - my one true love. You make me sick!!

Re:How did you spend the extra second? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374573)

I personally re-enacted every Italian military victory.

old news (5, Funny)

Viriatus (886319) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374411)

Old news, from last year.

oh, shit. (1, Funny)

CAIMLAS (41445) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374417)

Oh, shit. I've got to reset my goddamn clock again.

Re:oh, shit. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374548)

Interesting. A comment made *ten minutes earlier,* essentially said the same thing, "Great! Now I hafta go around the house and adjust all the clocks again..." was modded as 1 - Redundant. Yet this one was modded 3 - Funny.

Nice to see we don't have toadying, sycophantic Moderators on Slashdot.

Please feel free to mod this as -1 Troll or Flamebait. I expect no less.

a question (1)

yincrash (854885) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374432)

since it changed for UTC time, does that mean on the east coast, it was 7:00:60PM? CRAZY

Re:a question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374535)

Actually 6:59:60 PM EST, but yes, that's essentially correct.

Leaplog (0, Offtopic)

davydmadeley (267470) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374438)

Jan 1 07:59:59 oracle kernel: Clock: inserting leap second 23:59:60 UTC

Re:Leaplog (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374538)

Dec 31 00:59:29 j1.sjc..net xntpd[86356]: time reset 0.999834 s

BBC TV yesterday (1)

takev (214836) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374458)

Did they actually cheer a second to early.
Or did the BBC compensate for the Leap second.
How would you show a leap second on an analogue clock that they used.

Re:BBC TV yesterday (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374511)

On BBC 1, the clock was counting down and went 5-4-3-2-1-1-0. The people in the streets were just waiting for the bell of Big Ben to strike midnight -- there's no second hand.

I don't get it (1)

BlackTriangle (581416) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374475)

Wouldn't having variable-length seconds make more sense? And what's with daylight savings? Daylight savings is whack, yo. It fucks up my computer and that's the tip of the iceberg - god knows how much it must fuck with industry..

It's not the 'ephemeris second' that's the problem (5, Informative)

Jonathan McDowell (515872) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374478)

Original poster is slightly wrong - it's not the length of the 1900 ephemeris second,
it's the fact that the Earth, like all of us, is getting older and slowing down, so that
the 2005 "Earth rotation" second (i.e. 1/86400 of one spin of the Earth) is longer than
the 1900 equivalent and longer than the atomic time (SI) second. Instead of changing
the length of the second, it is currently deemed less painful to keep using the old
length and stick in an extra second every now and again.

Since this depends on the slop of the Earth's interior, it's not a fully regular and predictable thing - we might even have to remove a second one year.

Re:It's not the 'ephemeris second' that's the prob (1)

product byproduct (628318) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374582)

It is worth noting that those "leap seconds" amuse only some people. People who work on systems that can't afford a 1 second discontinuity (such as the GPS system) use a continuous counting of the SI second.

http://www.leapsecond.com/java/gpsclock.htm [leapsecond.com]

Re:It's not the 'ephemeris second' that's the prob (1)

at10u8 (179705) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374600)

This is very true.

To within about one part in 1.E12 the ephemeris second is identical to the SI second defined by the cesium resonance. In 1977 the length of the second of TAI was changed [ucolick.org] so as to conform better with the preferred definition of the SI second. Before 1977 TAI and UTC ticked faster than they do now. Astronomers did not object to the change in rate of TAI because it was within the uncertainty of the original definition of the ephemeris second.

Great (4, Funny)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374497)

Gotta love those long weekends!

Working (0, Redundant)

isorox (205688) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374534)

Hey, I was at work at midnight, I demand 1 second's overtime!

Chuck Norris (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374537)

The only reason we have a leap second isn't because of the malarkey that they presented. We have a leap second because Chuck Norris roundhouse kicked someone so hard in the face that it slowed the earth's rotation.

January 0 (1)

thomasdelbert (44463) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374544)

There was a January 0 in year 1900? Hmm found no mention of it here [wikipedia.org] .

- Thomas;

Re:January 0 (1)

at10u8 (179705) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374629)

Have a look at an old ephemeris and see the large numbers of tabulations of quantities with respect to date. For the sake of ease of typesetting it was commonplace to have tables with dates such as January 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35. That avoided the need to redundantly set more lead into the matrix for the name of the month o nevery single line of the tables. In the case of tables being interpreted by humans there was no expectation of raising some sort of input exception because in the full context the meaning was pretty obvious.

Expected Result (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374546)

Hmm...on my Windows box, the following code...

wscript.echo (cdate("1/1/2006 11:58:59") - cdate("12/31/2005 11:58:59")) * (24 * 60 * 60)

...yields the expected result of 86400 (Funny what I've come to expect, having used MS products.)

This noon-ish to noon-ish period should propery wrap whether or not MS conversions take into account your timezone (mine is MST,-0700) or not (at least in parts of the world, like the continental USA).

How did your systems behave?

11 hours late, 1 second short (1)

hostingreviews (941757) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374549)

Thanks Taco. We could have used that extra second when it happened - 11 hours ago. 3... 2... 1... 1...

The clock problems (3, Interesting)

Antony-Kyre (807195) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374557)

Did anyone notice the atomic clock problems that happened when the leap second occurred? Some atomic clocks were different than others. If I am not mistaken, and I don't believe I am, the leap second occurred at 23:59:60 UTC (yes, I typed that in correctly). I also flipped back and forth between like ABC and NBC, Pacific Time, and notice they were like 3 seconds or so different in their countdown clocks. What is up with that?

Re:The clock problems (2, Informative)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374659)

That may have been caused by different lenghts of time delay. not all networks use the same amount of time delay on their live feeds.

Re:The clock problems (1)

Antony-Kyre (807195) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374670)

And I thought atomic clock servers were suppose to be accurate. I guess I was wrong. I manually used a program to check my computer time against atomic clock servers. Some servers didn't recognize the leap second, and I really thought they were suppose to be accurate.

Earth's rotation isn't constant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374605)

Interesting bit of trivia for you... Earth's rotation is slowing down. When you think about it, the moon exerting a gravitational force against the earth leaves friction between the water and the earth's bottom. So very slowly, the earth's rotation will become that of the moon (where one side always faces the moon) so that there will be no more slowing. When this happens, a day will be around 300 hours. Of course, when that happens, we'll probably also be consumed by the expanding sun.

A link for the curious: http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/distance/strobel/gravappl/ gravapplb.htm [man.ac.uk]

And... (1)

manavendra (688020) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374609)

How many seconds were wasted talking and discussing that extra second? Domino effect, anyone?

That's So, Like, 2005, eh (1)

pipingguy (566974) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374616)


Rob, we all saw that coming a few days ago. But /now/ it's important to *you*. If you'd just stop with the babymaking attempts, playing with your new Legos and ignoring dupes you could start working on the reply for the 1,000,000 Slashdot account.

Not everywhere on earth 2005 was a second longer. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374652)

If you live "east" from England, 2006 actually is already a second longer than it wouuld have been if there was no leap second. The leap second happened after new year's eve, and so for us 2006 will have one second more. Americans of course get to have a longer 2005, and since Americans don't know there is something outside their country, I guess the title is fitting for a slashdot article.

Being born on a leap year might sound bad... (1)

RavenChild (854835) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374678)

Just imagine being born on a leap second.

Leap Second Lovers Are Traitors Says Bill O'Reilly (4, Funny)

Fishstick (150821) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374680)

"This year's leap second is an assault on the American public," says commentator Bill O'Reilly. "The reason the leap second is even being proposed is because of America Haters, because of Iraqi hate mongers, and let's be honest, Shiites. Why would you add a second to the year unless you're an anti-American hate monger?
I remember liberals at a party saying, 'let's add a second to the year' and I was the only one who spoke up against it. Why would they want to add a second to the year? Because it gives them a second longer to hate Bush.

"Look, look, look, look. A leap second is a denial of everything American, of everything good, of everything moral. They're saying we need this second because the earth rotates on its axis and revolves around the earth, well this is the no spin zone. So we don't need a leap second. Though I would rather have a leap second than some of these hate-mongers who go around hating even their own ideas! They need to hate their own ideas so much that you have many liberals proposing the leap second, which is an idea that they hate, yet, they propose.

"I am so so so so upset with these people, who actually believe their ideas, yet, I have no hate in my heart. I am a simple guy, who only has my own true beliefs and a few products that are my cornerstone to fight against the leap second poobah. Let me say it aloud: Leap Second, leap second, leap second. Doesn't it sound ugly?

"Please, don't let these Darwinian leap-seconders, who believe that the planets revolve around the sun, who believe that rocks are sedimentary, igneous and stalactites, who are innocent dim-wit believers in a faith bordering on hating everything religious like trees and fruitcake, yet, who don't believe in John 7:12:45:67:89, have their say.

"But you know what I love? Dialogue. Rational dialogue which allows me to say that aliens from a Iraqi loving planet want to abolish Christmas by adding a leap second to the Darwinian anti-God year. Dialogue is what keeps the American system God-loving and anti non-God. It also keeps the anti-God loving non-Iraqi loving insurgent deniers able to voice their hideous so-called opinions over the American loving tolerant airways. And now let's take some calls."

Steve Martin [huffingtonpost.com]

Missed it? (1)

david.emery (127135) | more than 8 years ago | (#14374691)

I was expecting the leap second to show up in the big Dick Clark Times Square dropping ball (5..4...3...2...1...1...Happy New Years) but I must have blinked and missed it...

          dave

nerdiest. explanation. ever. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14374694)

Super gay.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>