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Going Deep Inside Vista's Kernel Architecture

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the from-the-horse's-mouth dept.

Windows 478

bariswheel wrote to mention an episode of 'Going Deep' on Channel 9 which takes a hard look at the architecture of Windows Vista. From the post: "Rob Short is the corporate vice president in charge of the team that architects the foundation of Windows Vista. This is a fascinating conversation with the kernel architecture team. It's our Christmas present to all of the Niners out there who've stuck with us day after day. This is a very candid interview." Topics discussed include the history of the Windows Registry, and the security/reliability of Microsoft's upcoming operating system.

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First post :P (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388209)

First post :P

For those of us without speakers... (2, Insightful)

the unbeliever (201915) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388210)

Can someone post a transcript please?

For those of us without monitors... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388364)

Can someone post a ... oh, wait.

Re:For those of us without speakers... (5, Funny)

jtorkbob (885054) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388375)

Sure! Here is my transcription of the entire link:
Error: 503 Service Unavailable

Server returned file not found
Kind of sums it up nicely, if you ask me.

Re:For those of us without speakers... (2, Funny)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388386)

Wow, talking web servers. Microsoft is innovating!

Re:For those of us without speakers... (1)

AuMatar (183847) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388511)

Not found, eh? Must be the security section.

MMS stream hails from microsoft.com!?! (1, Informative)

mosel-saar-ruwer (732341) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388505)


Not to diss the underlying interview [I'm always willing to hear about kernel stuff], but it's kinda odd that the MMS stream originates at a M$FT server:
[Slashcode tends to put hard breakline characters and other weird white space into web addresses, so you will probably have to paste that address into a word processor and clean it up].

Re:MMS stream hails from microsoft.com!?! (4, Insightful)

Covener (32114) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388536)

Not to diss the underlying interview [I'm always willing to hear about kernel stuff], but it's kinda odd that the MMS stream originates at a M$FT server:


It's almost as if this MSDN interview of an MS executive on future MS technology is somehow MS related.

Re:MMS stream hails from microsoft.com!?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388563)

You're kidding, right? I thought that everyone knew that the MSDN was the Microsoft Developer Network...

Oh. I thought it was television. (1)

mosel-saar-ruwer (732341) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388583)


I assumed that "Channel 9" was something like the Discovery Channel.

My bad.

Hmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388212)

Is this a "back-door" porno?

I love the questions they ask. (5, Funny)

IntelliAdmin (941633) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388214)

My favorite is: "do you ever wish the registry had never been developed?"

Re:I love the questions they ask. (5, Informative)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388430)

I personally think the Windows Registry is the software implementation of the saying "putting all eggs in one basket".

But of course, backups are automatically made on successful bootups to minimize the damage done if you'd suffer from a file corruption in that specific file. But I've never figured out when it does that. It clearly doesn't seem like on every successful boot, as I've seen messages like "Windows has restored a registry backup" and after that wondered where all settings the past few months went, and why some programs don't even run anymore. Gah... Thankfully last time it happened were a number of years ago. *knocks wood*

Interestingly, Microsoft has started opting more for .config XML files stored in the application directory (sort of like their old .ini files) in their new wave of .NET applications, and that seems to be more like the recommended way of storing application settings. I don't know how user-specific settings are dealt with if doing it that way though, and if it's only suitable for settings for the local machine.

Re:I love the questions they ask. (1)

c0dedude (587568) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388459)

What was his answer -- the site is down for me. If anyone here knows the history of the registry, please post it, as it seems like a tranewreck to most.

Re:I love the questions they ask. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388499)

I think the registry was an april fools joke that a PHB thought was a real idea.

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388215)

mod me troollll!! :D

fp (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388216)

wind0ze sux0rs !!!
vista is teh sh1te

So... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388219)

How many minutes in the microwave? Usually it seems to be 3 for most no-name popcorn, but I don't know about this.

Is that a word? (1, Insightful)

slavemowgli (585321) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388220)

[...] the corporate vice president in charge of the team that architects the foundation of Windows Vista.

"architects"? Is that even a word?

Re:Is that a word? (2, Informative)

DyslexicLegume (875291) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388244)

Only when used as a plural noun.

Re:Is that a word? (0, Redundant)

WallaceAndGromit (910755) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388246)

Yes.

Re:Is that a word? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388308)

"You can't be anal retentive if you don't have an anus"

You can retain someone else's. I have several on a string around my neck. They look like calamari.

Re:Is that a word? (1)

JonN (895435) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388255)

Quick check over to dictionary.com reveals:

1. One who designs and supervises the construction of buildings or other large structures.
2. One that plans or devises: a country considered to be the chief architect of war in the Middle East.

Re:Is that a word? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388265)

There is no word in the English language that can't be verbed.

Re:Is that a word? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388367)

There is no word in the English language that can't be verbed.

I think you'd have trouble verbing "the".

Re:Is that a word? (1)

heinousjay (683506) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388407)

Past tense of the is thud. Like the sound this joke made.

Re:Is that a word? (5, Funny)

andyh1978 (173377) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388289)

"architects"? Is that even a word?
Apparently so, nowadays. First you architect solutions, then you're leveraging synergies, and it's a downhill slope from there into corporate marketspeak.

In the words of Calvin, verbing weirds language. [everything2.com]

Re:Is that a word? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388607)

my bet is that the writer is from a latin based language. In portuguese [the translation for] "architect" exists both as a noun and a verb, so while reading that I didn't sound weird at all. I didn't know it didn't exist in english as a verb until now (not that this means anything, as my english is not anything to brag about).

FIRST POST (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388221)

HA!

Wonder if Dave is involved (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388226)

Wonder if Dave Cutler is involved, and if so, to what extent

Re:Wonder if Dave is involved (1)

aCapitalist (552761) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388602)

Have you read ShowStopper? [amazon.com]

first deep inside goatse post! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388231)

aftenposten!

How deep did they go? (3, Funny)

Spazntwich (208070) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388233)

Because I'm only interested if it was BALLS DEEP.

You name it, they've probably been there. (2, Interesting)

CarpetShark (865376) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388371)

Microsoft has been releasing a lot of Vista video "interviews" and tech intros lately. If you believed what they're trying to sell you, you would easily think that the Microsoft Vista teams are developing ground-breaking new technology for the benefit of us all.

However, any remotely circumspect look at them will reveal that they're carefully choreographed attempts to show microsoft as a powerhouse with new ideas behind every corner... i.e., "Ohh look, here's Joe, the guy responsible for all this, right behind the camera...". What's more, they're basically doing what they've always done, stealing other peoples' technology and claiming is as their own, in the process. One of these videos, for instance, is all about microsoft's new printing architecture, which is basically just a rip-off of postscript. Microsoft is finally catching up, and yet they tell their customers that they're doing new stuff.

It must be nice to have mainstream consumers for your main customers, rather than IT pros. You can sell 'em anything, and they'll never know it's crap, because they don't keep up with the industry.

Re:You name it, they've probably been there. (4, Insightful)

delong (125205) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388405)

It must be nice to have mainstream consumers for your main customers, rather than IT pros. You can sell 'em anything, and they'll never know it's crap, because they don't keep up with the industry

That's why I always skip all these "new Windows release" articles - they're pap. Usually just alot of mouth breathing over widgets and rather pedestrian implementations of mundane technology. Boring, and not very informative. Keeps alot of boring writers in jobs, though. Microsoft is like a 5 year jobs program for "IT Professional" writers that otherwise don't know their ass from their hat.

Re:You name it, they've probably been there. (5, Insightful)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388596)

Well, it was precisely this sort of hype that kept Windows 3.1 at the forefront while an actual 32-bit operating system that would run existing Windows applications (better than Windows itself) actually existed. Microsoft, through various "computer" magazines (which were nothing more than MS shills), painted a beautiful picture of Chicago, through artists renderings and feature lists for features that didn't even exist. Of course, when Windows 95 finally arrived, it was a bug-ridden piece of crap, but the marketing onslaught and MS's corrupt ways of dealing with PC manufacturers destroyed OS/2. People actually willingly went for one of the most unstable operating systems that MS ever produced.

Re:You name it, they've probably been there. (1)

Urusai (865560) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388618)

Hey, OS/2 was also developed by Microsoft. Damned if you do, damned if you do it again.

Re:How deep did they go? (2, Insightful)

schnikies79 (788746) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388378)

HAHAHAHAHA. I rarely laugh at posts but this one had me rolling for some reason.. Bravo!

Where is the news? (-1, Flamebait)

JonN (895435) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388236)

I come to /. to read the news, about what is going on in the tech world, and generally I am looking for recent news (oxy moron? Isn't all news recent?) Anyways, someone double check the article date, because to me it says Fri, Dec 23, 2005 6:16 PM. Well that is awhile back isn't it? And I'm going to go out on a limb and seem a bit whiny, but I promise that getting my stories posted is not my objective, however I know that between me and countless other /. users there has to have been more recent and just (if not more) as interesting news.

Alright my 15 minutes of fame is up, don't drink and drive, try the veal.

Re:Where is the news? (3, Funny)

0racle (667029) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388325)

Oh no, something from just over a week ago! Trash it people, its obviously of no use.

Normally I'm a fan of the Deep Inside Series. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388237)

But that was the worst porn video I've ever seen. There wasn't even any nudity, but considering how these people looked (think your local linux user group visits The Gap), that was probably for the best. My rating? Totally Limp.

Please, kill the registry... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388238)

...good old ini files are much more easy to use (i.e. copy around, fiddle and the like)

Re:Please, kill the registry... (5, Insightful)

dc29A (636871) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388305)

...good old ini files are much more easy to use (i.e. copy around, fiddle and the like)

That will also make applications easier to port. Something Microsoft doesn't want. Registry is a good lock-in tool for Microsoft.

Re:Please, kill the registry... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388368)

actually, this will make applications easier to copy to a new system after a reformat or general cleanup. Microsoft shouldn't give a tiny rat's ass for this, since that's the way (ok, one of the ways/reasons) their software ended up in everyone's computer...

Re:Please, kill the registry... (5, Informative)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388514)

Hmm... Well, assuming you have the source and are ready to start porting code, it's just about changing the behavior of a number of well documented [microsoft.com] API calls. You can make a library out of it with your own preferred behavior to make the code reusable. Actually, I'd be surprised if someone hadn't already done so and posted it somewhere on the web.

It's hardly a lock-in method when it's both documented methods and it's easy to find out what happens -- the Windows registry is hardly rocket science, but more like a tree of settings that can have a few different data types.

mnb Re:Please, kill the registry... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388614)

Shush!
Do you really think you can get modded insightful? Your well reasoned and well documented factual post has nothing on a simpleminded (and factually incorrect )Microsoft attack by someone who didn't even post about the article in question!

But honestly, this is a true test of the moderation system. Your point is based in fact and deserves a higher score than the GP post's tirade based on incorrect assumptions.

We'll see.

Re:Please, kill the registry... (4, Interesting)

displaced80 (660282) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388380)

(I'm a .NET developer .... hey, don't shoot me!)

I'm a huge fan of .conf files (or, on my home platform of choice -- OS X -- .plist) files. Although I appreciate .conf files' readability, sometimes I want to store prefs which are a little more complex. My preferred method is to create 'Prefs' classes in my apps. Depending on requirements, I'll make a UserPrefs class and optionally a SystemPrefs class (for prefs that apply to all users). These are just a bunch of properties to hold each setting. It's nice from a coding point of view because you can put sensible defaults into the prefs class(es)' constructor in case the prefs haven't been saved previously. I then just serialise and de-serialise these classes into and out of an XML file. These get saved into appropriate filesystem locations.

The resultant XML isn't as tidy as that which OS X's Cocoa frameworks produce, but it's still a gazillion times more manageable and flexible than registry entries. I'd like to put together a generic viewer/editor for these xml files (much like OS X's 'Property List Editor'), although they're still plain-text tweakable if you're paying attention.

The registry is an idea whose time has passed. I'd like to see a future MS operating system implement a standardised xml file layout for everything the registry holds, using as many individual files as are appropriate. Turn the legacy Registry API calls into wrappers for the file-based system.

That'd make things neater, if done right! :)

Re:Please, kill the registry... (2, Interesting)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388555)

Turn the legacy Registry API calls into wrappers for the file-based system.

For those who don't know, this is actually exactly what Microsoft themselves did starting in Windows 4.0. They changed the implementation of a number of Registry API calls to work (read + write) against the registry rather than system .ini files. Time to change back to files again, maybe? ;-)

Re:Please, kill the registry... (1)

HiredMan (5546) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388592)

  • I'm a huge fan of .conf files (or, on my home platform of choice -- OS X -- .plist) files
  • The resultant XML isn't as tidy as that which OS X's Cocoa frameworks
  • I'd like to put together a generic viewer/editor ... much like OS X's 'Property List Editor'

So you're copying the way OS X does things within .Net to compensate for the way M$ does them. Sounds like you're ready for the Windows next-gen R&D team alright!

=tkk

Re:Please, kill the registry... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388615)

The resultant XML isn't as tidy as that which OS X's Cocoa frameworks produce
Actually, .plist files are managed by CoreFoundation - which sits underneath both Carbon and Cocoa.

Registry ain't all that bad (0)

Trinition (114758) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388464)

From a programmers point of view, a registry is just a one level higher abstraction above an INI file. The nice thing about an INI file is that its just text, so you can edit it with about any text editor. But a text editor editing an INI gives you no constraints on what goes in it. So you could but a non-numerical value for a line in an INI file where the system that uses it only supports a numerical value. So a programmer writing a program which uses such an INI file has to take extra precautions and use a bare bones text reading API, or find some existing library which handles it for him.

The registry provides constraints. When you have a DWORD value, you can't put letters into it (unless, of course, you're using the hex mode of the field your favorite registry editor). It's hierarchial in nature meaining you can infer a lot of context, too. And as a programmer, you have a very simple API to go against for 90% of what you need to do.

That said, there are some things I which the registry did better. For one, I wish it were "registries" instead of "the registry". Why not let each program store its data in its own sort of registry file. You could very surely know you've removed a program by not letting it write to the system or user registry, but only to its own globval or user-specific entrues -- and delete those files when you want. I also wish every key and value had a description with it. I also wish there were richer data types, such as "existing file path", "file path", etc. so you could build even better basic tools for working with them. And I wish the registry were an open format that worked on any platform. Then I could take the registry file for application X I configured on my Windows machine and copy it to my Linux machine (granted, there's other cross-platform issues when you start intrereting the data on disparate platforms, such as file paths).

"architects" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388241)

"Architect" is not a verb... any more than are "leverage" or "impact."

"Designs" works just fine.

Re:"architects" (1)

Shut the fuck up! (572058) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388254)

Neither is virii or boxen but pompous asses still love to use such words.

Re:"architects" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388303)

True, but virii and boxen at least have English-language rules behind them. They happen to be exceptions, but that's the reason "pompous asses" love them so much.

Re:"architects" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388387)

True, but virii and boxen at least have English-language rules behind them.

No they don't, you stupid cunt.

Re:"architects" (3, Informative)

colinrichardday (768814) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388415)

It would be "viri", not "virii", except that "virus" was a mass term in Latin. Also, aside from "ox"/"oxen", there are no other such plurals of nouns ending in "ox" (no "foxen").

but what about... (1)

circusboy (580130) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388576)

all those "Unice Boxen" I keep hearing about here?

Re:"architects" (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388577)

What about VAXen?

Source (1)

endemoniada (744727) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388247)

I hope the post pieces of the source for people to comment on :>

Windows becoming more like Unix (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388257)

MS said for years that Unix is so old. Now Windows is becoming more and more like Unix. What a bunch of idiots these guys are that took them so long to realize that their architecture is flawed and that Unix's architecure is superior.

Early Codename (1)

rfinnvik (16122) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388268)

Early Vista kernel codename: Heart of Darkness

Does Vista's Kernel support ESCAPES in WMF files? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388274)

As if it does a number of things will be going deep inside.... Fista Vista!

Fix whats there! (4, Interesting)

a_greer2005 (863926) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388279)

Not flame, genuine curiosity from a 20 year old IT major

OK, am I the only one who has grown weary of the "oh well, another month, another insain exploit" state of mind in which windows users and admins seem to be willing to accept? Why do people just accept this, I understand a few bugs, and maybe a SINGLE large scale outbreak in something as commonplace as Windows, but this crap is just outright crazy now-a-days.

Businesses would never accept this kind of qualty from, for example, partners, suppliers, and so on, so why do they "just take" this seeminly QC-lacking products from redmond with glee?

Re:Fix whats there! (3, Insightful)

a_greer2005 (863926) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388298)

Hate to reply to self but: heres the rest of my thought that I forgot:

If you already paid for WinXP, why the hell should you have to pay AGAIN for the "security" that was supposed to be there...and in 2k, NT4, yadda yadda yadda?

Re:Fix whats there! (2)

fleaboy (657517) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388358)

I did notice today that Windows Live customers should not be affected by the WMF exploit. Guess you didn't pay ENOUGH just purchasing XP.

Re:Fix whats there! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388309)

Like getting gang-raped in a Turkish prison : eventually you get used to it.

Re:Fix whats there! (1)

rpd10 (550879) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388350)

Oh but business does accept it; or I wouldn't be staring at an XP desktop now. BTW isn't "20 year old IT Manager" an oxymoron?

Re:Fix whats there! (4, Insightful)

jjohnson (62583) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388351)

Businesses would never accept this kind of qualty from, for example, partners, suppliers, and so on...

Businesses in all markets accept this kind of quality from their suppliers and partners all the time. They don't like it, they scream about it, they change relationships because of it, but don't think that problems of the same scale don't constantly occur in businesses generally. I say this as someone who spent five years in plastic housewares manufacturing. Technology is not unique at all in this respect.

Re:Fix whats there! (1)

Arandir (19206) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388467)

...they change relationships because of it

Yet the question being asked is why businesses DO NOT change relationships with Microsoft when it delivers crap. My company dumped a major supplier, and at great expense, over quality issues, but when a Windows virus infected a quarter billion dollars worth of product, no one even blinked.

Re:Fix whats there! (1)

kwalker (1383) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388355)

I believe the term is "conditioning" which replaced "brain washing". When you're used to getting something of a certain quality from a particular person or organization, you come to expect it. (That's the tech-savvy people who defend microsoft)

Either that or you have no idea what a WMF is (May even think it's an acronym for a body part) and don't understand how it can hurt you or why it's important. (That's everyone else)

Besides, usually with partners, suppliers, etc. you have a way of punishing them, perhaps a contract stipulation. With Windows, unless you're actually willing to roll-up your sleeves (Or buy a Mac), you're stuck. And for most people, they'd rather sit around, drink beer, watch NASCAR and complain about how slow their computer is getting and how they can't get rid of all those damn pop-up winders.

Re:Fix whats there! (1)

dc29A (636871) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388374)

OK, am I the only one who has grown weary of the "oh well, another month, another insain exploit" state of mind in which windows users and admins seem to be willing to accept?
- That's easy to say. Problem is much higher on the food chain. Managers and people with money, who pay for projects have no clue what's good and what's not. To make matters worse, Microsoft shoves under their noses "unbiased" studies that show Windows is superior to *Nix. So managers get brainwashed and think that the people below them (coders, admins, etc.) are a bunch of hippies and they are wrong about *nix being better. So they end up buying into MS propaganda and continue using MS products. Of course the programmer or admin who has a mortgage and bills to pay can't really slam the door and leave, finding another job is not easy. The "Screw you guys, I am going home" line doesn't work in the real world anymore. It worked in the Dot.com bubble for sure. Not anymore.

Re:Fix whats there! (1)

Arandir (19206) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388402)

It's a combination of ignorance and complacency. People just don't know any better, and it doesn't annoy the decision makers enough to demand a change. If all you've ever known is Windows, then it's all too easy to think that everything else must be just the same. If you're a decision maker you're never going to get your hands dirty with the issue anyway, so who cares? You've got grunts to take care of that.

Add to that the major hurdle of switching away from Windows, and you end up with the current business climate.

Re:Fix whats there! (-1, Troll)

Nethead (1563) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388443)

Not flame, genuine curiosity from a 45 year old veteren: OK, am I the only one who has grown weary of the "oh well, another month, another insane death toll" state of mind in which US Senators and Concgessmen seem to be willing to accept? Why do people just accept this, I understand a few deaths, and maybe a SINGLE large scale slaughter in something as commonplace as War, but this crap is just outright crazy now-a-days. Republicans would never accept this kind of slaughter from, for example, progessives, moderates, and so on, so why do they "just take" this seeminly half-assed planned war from neo-cons with glee?

Re:Fix whats there! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388490)

ummm they accept it every week from linux vendors, sun, IBM etc, why not MS? check out the vulnerability list just in the 2.6 kernel since release, it is appalling.

What does this line of code mean? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388282)

if (defaultBrowser != MSIE || defaultMediaPlayer != WiMP || defaultMailClient != LookOut || defaultGUI != FisherPrice)
{
alert(Microsoft)
}

Heh, my "confirm you're not a script" is "issues." Not surprising.

Re:What does this line of code mean? (1)

heinousjay (683506) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388428)

It means your sense of humor is defective.

Cue ominous music (3, Funny)

CaptainCarrot (84625) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388291)

Why do I get the feeling this is the programmer's equivalent of that scene in the teen slasher movies where the girl is going into the dark basement, unarmed and with nothing but a flickering candle for light?

Re:Cue ominous music (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388491)

Help! Grue!

slashdotted (3, Funny)

Cmdr_earthsnake (939669) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388314)

Click on link + server not responding + hosted on a microsoft server +MS publicity = slashdotted

Re:slashdotted (1)

protohiro1 (590732) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388439)

Damn, good MS have come up with a scarier, uglier error page for asp.net? We are working on a new CMS in .net at my company. Those error pages seriously freak clients out. It looks like the world ended.

Re:slashdotted (1)

protohiro1 (590732) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388454)

I assume that the database server is overloaded, so the cms is throwing an error. Couldn't there be a more graceful way to do that?

Re:slashdotted (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388496)

Re:slashdotted (0, Offtopic)

smalgin (750257) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388585)

1. >Click on link + server not responding + hosted on a microsoft server +MS publicity = slashdotted
2. ???
3. Profit!

it's their christmas present (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388316)

darn. I wanted a dirt bike.

But thanks for the deep look at the windows kernel.

speed (1)

fsterman (519061) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388324)

Holy shit, I just averaged 1.1 megs a second download! They are going too be hurting after this.

That's It?? (5, Informative)

Spinlock_1977 (777598) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388391)

Now I'm only half way through the video, but holy minimizer Batman, is that all they're doing?

So they discovered software dependencies and configuration management, error handling in the kernel, and reversed one of their previous errors - putting device drivers inside the kernel.

I'm no OS guru (I'm just an applications guy), but shouldn't they have thrown the whole mess in the garbage and started over? They're referring to the Vista kernel as "NT"!! It's freakin NT!

NT's karma has waned (especially this week). God help us - we'll be stuck with MS security holes forever.

Re:That's It?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388541)

The NT kernel has always been a rock solid piece of well designed software. There may be a crap load of problems with windows but one of them isn't the kernel. don't confuse the mess that is the rest of windows as being some fault with the kernel architecture.

Re:That's It?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388613)

Modded informative?

The NT kernel is rock solid and it makes perfect sense for vista to be based on the server 2003 kernel.

Great but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388426)

in the last months there are more news about Microsoft Vista than about Linux. It's Linux stopping?

Re:Great but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388528)

No. Linux is just a mature product.

Merry Xmas! (1)

broody (171983) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388437)

After watching the video, I won't ever complain about my lump of coal for Xmas ever again.

"Going Deep Inside Vista's Kernel Architecture!" (-1, Redundant)

Caspian (99221) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388474)

This sounds like a spam subject line from a parallel universe in which most people are geeks.

It'd be a pr0n site, of course.

Re:"Going Deep Inside Vista's Kernel Architecture! (1)

nxcho (754392) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388616)

But it is this universe, and you have just been tricked by the evil spammers to visit their site (*wierd sounds from the twilightzone*) Get ready for som kernel pr0n (of course in this case it is low quality pr0n, with lots of p00).

Bad audio quality and bad accent (1)

oglueck (235089) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388475)

Why is the audio quality of the movie so bad? Like this their American accent makes it very hard to understand anything if you are not a native English speaker.

Vista and WMF Vulnerability (5, Informative)

blast3r (911514) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388532)

I haven't read this anywhere yet but I did some testing today and found that Windows Vista is vulnerable to the nasty WMF dealio. I am wondering what else Microsoft is importing into Windows Vista? hmmmm

slashdotted (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14388545)

"Runtime Error" or it never loads...

mirrordot mirror [mirrordot.org]

And in other news... (1)

Foofoobar (318279) | more than 8 years ago | (#14388620)

Slashdot editors provide free advertising for Microsoft spin doctors. Film at eleven!
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