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Stardust@Home Lets Public Search Grains of Dust

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the bad-excuses-to-get-out-of-a-date dept.

Space 87

An anonymous reader writes "In a new project called Stardust@home, UC Berkeley researchers are inviting Internet users to help them search for a few dozen submicroscopic grains of interstellar dust captured by NASA's Stardust spacecraft. Rather than relying on the user's spare PC cycles, though, the system depends on their eyes." From the article: "Though Stardust's main mission was to capture dust from the tail of comet Wild 2 - dust dating from the origins of the solar system some 4.5 billion years ago - it also captured a sprinkling of dust from distant stars, perhaps created in supernova explosions less than 10 million years ago."

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Pick, pick :-) (-1, Offtopic)

archeopterix (594938) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444488)

Next they'll be asking us to pick lentils from the ashes :-)

Hither, hither, through the sky,
Bearded geeks and fat nerds, fly!
Whether bi or straight or gay,
Hither, hither, haste away!
One and all come help me, quick!
Haste ye, haste ye! - pick, pick, pick!

Time is money (3, Interesting)

PrinceAshitaka (562972) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444496)

My computer cycles I could care less about but my time is valuable to me. Are there really that many people out there that A. want to to this AND B. have the time to do this. I am sure there are many people in catagory A and in catagory B. How many people are in both catagories?

Re:Time is money (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14444500)

You'd be surprised..

Re:Time is money (2, Insightful)

germ!nation (764234) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444542)

amihotornot, ratemypoo et al. People have *plenty* of time to burn. Welcome to the internet.

Re:Time is money (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14444591)

How many people are in both catagories?

At least 100000. See http://clickworkers.arc.nasa.gov/ [nasa.gov]

Re:Time is money (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14444597)

The irony of posting this to slashdot...

Re:Time is money (2, Insightful)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445669)

Mod parent up (way underrated)

I agree, most people out here have time on their hands, just for reading and commetning in Slashdot for example.

Also, i'm in both A and B categories, willing to do this and unemployed. Whether I do that, whether I watch porn, basically..

Re:Time is money (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14446134)

Am I the only one that automatically mods parents down when seeing requests like these? (I also often mod down those posts demanding that their parents be modded up.)

Re:Time is money (1)

devonbowen (231626) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444772)

AND B. have the time to do this

I doubt there are many people that don't fit in your Category B. Most people consider me crazy-busy and I signed up for it. People I hear claim they have no time usually spend huge chunks of it in front of the tube watching other people do interesting things with theirs.

Devon

Re:Time is money (1)

hotdiggitydawg (881316) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444952)

This has been done before, and people get "paid" for it too: Amazon's Mechanical Turk [mturk.com]

Re:Time is money (1)

cli_man (681444) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445177)

Is there going to be any kind of reward for finding the Star dust? Also was there any mention as to how rare it would be to find dust in an image, like would there be dust in 1 out of 100 or 1 out of 100,000? If I had a decent chance of finding a piece of dust and then being able to track it as the analyze it to find out the origin I would be more likely to do it, kind of like finding and adopting your own experiment.

Re:Time is money (2, Informative)

gkhan1 (886823) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445180)

Yiu're forgetting the all important category C) is able to do it. This is not something everyone can do, you have to be tested first to see if you can be part of the project.

Re:Time is money (1)

fastgood (714723) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445469)

My computer cycles I could care less about but my time is valuable to me.

You gotta turn it into a contest for the smallest, or most distant, or largest [slashdot.org] .
And the computer-based program should encompass both fame and fortune [eff.org] .

Incorporate it into a screensaver, that a coworker will inevitably hack to be like the 1999
subliminal web page that suddenly pops up an alien after staring intently at a static screen.

OSS will /never/ work. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14445532)

You do sound kind of like the ppl that used to crow about how vaulable their time was and ppl wouldn't code for free. There are probably a lot more enthusiats that aren't capable of coding out there that would dedicate their time to ....wikipedia, or other altruistic pursuits. It's not so difficult to imagine anymore.
Astronomy is not easy, but it captures the imagination of anybody who has ever gazed up at the stars and wondered what's out there - that's billion of potential enthusiasts that otherwise cannot participate. Sure, why not - I guess it could work. Some volunteers might even get compensated grandly at their day job and still find time after hours to contribute to /anything/ aside from the routine.

Yet here you are posting on Slashdot... (1)

FatSean (18753) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445794)

Your time must not be worth very much money!

I would, but why not have a computer do it? (1)

iamlucky13 (795185) | more than 8 years ago | (#14448945)

I think I'm game to scan through a few images out of curiousity, at least, which is probably what they're banking on. I admit I've got a pretty good chance of forgetting about it though, because the probe hasn't even landed yet, and after it does, it will take months I'm sure before they have the pictures online.

Reading the article, it sounds like they're expecting the interstellar dust to be distinguishable from the comet dust because of its speed. The comet dust is supposed to hit the aerogel and stop fairly quickly. Since the interstellar dust is moving much faster, it is expected to travel nearly to the back of the aerogel target before being stopped. Despite the fact that the particles are ridiculously tiny, they shouldn't be overly hard to spot because they leave a microscopic damage trail in the aerogel. In that case, wouldn't a computer program be equally as adept as human eyes in determining which trails extend further than expected?

I found it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14449443)

Already found dust with my computer. It was sucked into the cpu heatsink!

Stardust@Home Lets Public Search Grains of Dust? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14444501)

O RLY?

Re: Stardust@Home Lets Public Search Grains of Dus (1)

Poorcku (831174) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445604)

YA RLY!

Is it just me... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14444521)

...or is distributed computing itself being overdistributed? If they keep it up, everyone will be running a completely unique @home program by themselves, defeating the entire purpose. :P

Re:Is it just me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14444745)

so true. if you have enough of something you tend to waste it.

Interesting (0)

DarkSnake (942987) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444527)

Hopefully we can get some sort of useful information out of it.

Re:Interesting (-1, Flamebait)

Omniscientist (806841) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444681)

The insightfulness of the parent's post astounds me. Bravo moderator!

Fingers crossed (1)

LiquidCoooled (634315) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444537)

Hopefully this landing won't be another cockup like the Genesis failure [bbc.co.uk] or we will be detecting grains of sand from the desert.

Re:Fingers crossed (1)

FalconZero (607567) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444948)

Which reminds me of a closely related project Sawdust@home where users spend hours looking through pictures of sawdust for signs of life.

Re:Fingers crossed (1)

m.h.2 (617891) | more than 8 years ago | (#14446265)

Or that other project "ReligiousIcons@home" where people find the likeness of religious figures in everyday objects like toast, squashed insects, pies, foot fungus, and excrement.

Re:Fingers crossed (1)

LanMan04 (790429) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445279)

I disagree. Project Genesis [wikipedia.org] was a smashing success!

Many eyes (4, Interesting)

spge (783687) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444545)

If people are prepared to spot themselves on Google Earth [theregister.co.uk] , as well as other things [theregister.co.uk] , there's no reason why they won't look for specks of stardust.

Re:Many eyes (1)

slowbad (714725) | more than 8 years ago | (#14446881)

How about having eyeballs quickly scanning 33 random rows of videos [google.com]
to find the 0.05% of porn in the Google video library?

NASA have already used internet users' eyeballs (5, Informative)

Trisha-Beth (9231) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444560)

Admittedly the search was for larger objects on Mars [nasa.gov] than the tiny flecks of space stuff from this mission.

Site link (4, Informative)

gkhan1 (886823) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444601)

for those of you to lazy to read the entire thing, here is a link to the website http://stardustathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/ [berkeley.edu]

User Error? (2, Funny)

Voltageaav (798022) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444612)

Useing the mass public for something like this seems risky. For instance, right now I'm so tired I'm seeing stars and this thing isn't even on my computer.

Re:User Error? (1)

Voltageaav (798022) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444643)

Oh, sorry. Self, RTFA! If you can keep your eyes open much longer that is.

Dust... Obliguraty little britian quote (4, Funny)

rf0 (159958) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444635)

Marjorie Dawes: Dust. Anybody? No? High in fat, low in fat? Dust. Anybody? No? Dust. Anybody? No? Dust. Anybody? No? Dust. Anybody? No? Dust. Anybody? No? Dust. It's actually very low in fat. You can have as much dust as you like.

Re:Dust... Obliguraty little britian quote (2, Funny)

mysticwhiskey (569750) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444714)

Yeah, but no, but yeah, but no... I'm so totally not obligurated to answer that question, like?

Re:Dust... Obliguraty little britian quote (1)

shudde (915065) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444720)

Yeah, but no, but yeah, but no... I'm so totally not obligurated to answer that question, like?

Considering his email address, there's something I'm more shocked by in that subject line.

Re:Dust... Obliguraty little britian quote (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14444801)

Computer says: No

wrong, faggot (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14445833)

there is never, ever a time for an "obliguraty" quote from a stupid fucking show like little britain. simpsons, futurama, office space, hell even hackers...whatever, but not that damned show, you humourless jackanape.

Re:Dust... Obliguraty little britian quote (1)

MooUK (905450) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445859)

That quote is even better when said wandering around a quarry discussing the effects of dust.

At least, most of an EnvSci class of ~30 laughed.

Finding Dust? (1, Funny)

19061969 (939279) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444642)

As if I need my computer to find dust. All I have to do is take the back off and there's loads of it there already. Hey, Berkeley! I've found some, you crazy researchers!

What's that? Interstellar dust you say? Er, sorry...

Re:Finding Dust? (0, Offtopic)

19061969 (939279) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444878)

Man, somehow I knew that this post would be marked down by some humourless retard with more mod points than they need. Still, that's life on /.! And my karma is bad through this crap, so I don't give a fuck.

Re:Finding Dust? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14445651)

Your joke was not funny.
By association, you are not funny.
A not funny joke, by a not funny poster. The mystery of the downvoting is solved.

Re:Finding Dust? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14445257)

As if I need my computer to find dust. All I have to do is take the back off and there's loads of it there already.

Don't you need your computer in order to take the back off of it?

Fi8St (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14444665)

the above hi5 far

Image processing/pattern recognition? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14444667)

Why wouldn't they use image processing or pattern recognition techniques to do this? I couldn't find anything about this in the article, but i'm sure that if humans are able to detect specks of dust, they can also train a pattern recognizer to do the same, if not better.

Re:Image processing/pattern recognition? (2, Informative)

SSonnentag (203358) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445259)

I work with digital video images. People have been trying for years, if not decades, to write software that can mimic the capabilities of the human eye. Usually this software is needed for auto tracking and scoring objects in the field of view. Some limited success has been achieved, but even the best software needs a human to make the initial detection. The pattern recognition capabilities of the human eye are absolutely phenomenal. I doubt computer software will ever be able to replace us in this area.

Re:Image processing/pattern recognition? (1)

4D6963 (933028) | more than 8 years ago | (#14446047)

"The pattern recognition capabilities of the human eye are absolutely phenomenal." As a matter of a detail, it's not the capabilities of the human eye that are phenomenal, but the human's brain, in other words, the humans intelligence. Correlation and such techniques are limited to, in this case, locating, something quite precise. Such things as dusts or craters are too changing, and can look too different to detect them without any intelligence. However i really wonder what these dusts must look like so they can't be detected by signal processing techniques

Re:Image processing/pattern recognition? (1)

TopherC (412335) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445263)

I wondered this same thing. The story reminded me of the way particle physics was done in the 60's with bubble chambers and photographs.

These days, of course, it's all done with discreet detector components and complex tracking algorithms. Nobody wants to sift through billions of pictures and carefully measure the curvatures of dozens of tracks per picture. (Also modern tracking chambers don't perturb the particle as much and allow for other follow-up detectors such as calorimeters or Cerenkov emmision detectors.)

Tracking algorithms of some sort could easily be employed here, as well. As soon as you take a picture and scan it in you have digitized it in some way. Admitedly these impact patterns don't look exactly like "tracks", but there are also algorithms for finding "showers" in calorimeters, Cerenkov rings, etc. They just need to get a particle physicist on board with the project. Actually I thought astronomers were also good at writing pattern recognition software. And there are some nice new statistical techniques that should be able to do better than humans can at this kind of thing. Hmm.

Why not use people to train the machine? (1)

freejamesbrown (566022) | more than 8 years ago | (#14446001)

Perhaps user feedback helps the pattern matching algorithm learn?

Do we know?
m.

Re:Image processing/pattern recognition? (1)

Amiroi (945514) | more than 8 years ago | (#14459609)

The reason they don't use image recognition software is that it won't work in this case. In order to use this kind of software to work, they would need to "teach" it what particle track looks like, using existing particle tracks. But here's the problem: particles like this have never been collected, so nobody knows exactly what the tracks will look like! The sample images that they're using to train users are approximations, created by particle accellerators shooting particles into aerogel. This is close enough to teach humans, but not good enough to teach a machine. So right now distributed computing is the only known way to find these particles. You can read all about this at http://www.planetary.org/programs/projects/innovat ive_technologies/stardustathome/stardustathome_sto ry.html [planetary.org] .

International Stardust Registry (4, Funny)

aapold (753705) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444679)

The International Stardust Registry gift package is now available for a reasonable fee. It includes a beautiful 12" x 16" parchment certificate, available framed or unframed, with the name of your choice, dedication date, and coordinates of the particle of stardust. You'll also receive an informative booklet with details on the computer user who described your particle of stardust.

What better gift for a loved one or friend than a particle of stardust named in their honor? Note - we have been asked that no further particles be named "Ziggy".

Re:International Stardust Registry (1)

kf8vn (526580) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445284)

And... Your gift will be recorded at the US Copyright Office, in book form

Re:International Stardust Registry (1)

twilight30 (84644) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445628)

'Cause you know, 'Music sounds better with you', right?

Not for me (1, Funny)

cffrost (885375) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444695)


Is UCB going to distribute air filters to participants?

My machines process enough dust as it is. Dust-analysis in addition to dust-processing sounds to me like a high-risk task combination.

Re:Not for me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14444764)

First rule of the majority of Slashdot visitors: Never read the article.
Second rule of the majority of Slashdot visitors: Never read the article.
Third rule of the majority of Slashdot visitors: Never read the article.

Aerogel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14444700)

They seem to use aerogel [nasa.gov] for this. It's so cool material woot!

I'd buy it, even if it's mostly just air.

risk (1)

fireiceviperhotmail. (944265) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444711)

From the article:
"It's amazing that Stardust flew without anyone having a clue as to how to get particles out of the aerogel after it came back," Westphal said. "You have to give NASA credit for taking a risk."

I doubt this very much because it realy isnt like nasa to spend probly a few million dollars on something they could have tested before sending it up in space...

Julien http://free.hostdepartment.com/8/81fortune/ [hostdepartment.com]

The Missing Link (3, Informative)

squoozer (730327) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444718)

The Stardust@Home Project [berkeley.edu] where you can pre-register and find out more.

Using porn sites (2, Interesting)

Frans Faase (648933) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444756)

Maybe they could set up a porn-site where you have to 'pay' by judging an image. It seems that this technique is used a lot by cyber-criminals for surpassing the "human-only" test that are used during registration to prevent robots from registering. These test consist of text messages that are easy to read by humans but not by computers. It is a very smart idea to use humans (horny men, in this case) for performing a simple "computational" task.

I wonder if this idea can be extended. Using humans to perform computational tasks sounds to be a very interesting business model.

Re:Using porn sites (1)

cfx666 (887251) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445448)

I wonder if this idea can be extended. Using humans to perform computational tasks sounds to be a very interesting business model.
Well then...
1. Go To http://www.mturk.com/mturk/welcome [mturk.com]
2. Repeat step one a thousend times
3. Repeat step twho a thousend times
4. Finally *PROFIT*

Cfx

Couldnt a computer do this better ? (2, Interesting)

bxbaser (252102) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444767)

if a human can recognize the trails shouldnt a computer be able to ?
The article didnt mention any reason why a computer would not be able to do this.
does anyone know anything more about this.

makes me wonder is this is some sort of trial to test a distributed voulenteer workforce and they needed something interesting to get participants.

Re:Couldnt a computer do this better ? (1)

Goffee71 (628501) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444802)

So they want people who have been staring at screens filled with code/porn/FPS action for years to concentrate on detailed images and try and spot little trails. I hope everyone's had their eyes tested recently! Squint, squint

Re:Couldnt a computer do this better ? (1)

Vo0k (760020) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445034)

They look just like railgun blasts in the far end of the arena. We should be pretty good at spotting them.

Re:Couldnt a computer do this better ? (1)

joto (134244) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444834)

I thought of the same thing. But I guess we'll have to wait untill the first scanned images show up. Then you can try making a program to do it. If it works well, you should rank pretty well at stardust@home...

If I discover a particle... (2, Funny)

BHennessy (639799) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444780)

...will they name it after me?

Re:If I discover a particle... (1)

luder (923306) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445556)

Well, you and the other discoverers get to name it, so you might get a chance to "convince" them to name it after you.

from the article:
"If at least two of the four volunteers viewing each image report a track, that image will be fed to 100 more volunteers for verification. If at least 20 of these report a track, UC Berkeley undergraduates who are expert at spotting dust grain tracks will confirm the identification. Eventually, the grain will be extracted for analysis. Discoverers will get to name their dust grains."

ZFAILZORS? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14444811)

Wait! Maybe project's goal is gonna change... (1)

bibi-pov (819943) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444831)

From TFWS : 15 Jan 2006 : Stardust recovery

So the probe isn't recovered yet and if it crashes, all we're gonna search for is the probe in the dust, right ?

NASA graphical page for Stardust location (3, Informative)

psiXaos (702248) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444873)

sandgrains@home (1)

mixenmaxen (857917) | more than 8 years ago | (#14444945)

We will shortly be conducting a scientific experiment to locate particularly beautiful sandgrains on the beach of Copenhagen. A powerful automated microscope will comb the beach taking pictures, and anyone with a PC can join the effort to locate the most ornate and beautiful sandgrain. Participants that locate the most beautiful sandgrains will of course be eligible to name them.

My God, its full of stars (1)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445012)

Discoverers will get to name their dust grains.

Suggested names: Dusty, Sandy, Cindy, Sparky, Eartha, Ashley, Ashton, and Pierce

In a different exciting development... (3, Funny)

lxs (131946) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445068)

I'm launching "cleaning@home" where users get the thrilling opportunity to keep my house clean. Users only have to show up at my door where they can aquire the "bucket-n-mop" application which effectively harnesses their spare "work-cycles".

This morning I was quoted as saying "This is a great new field for distributed applications. - careful the floor is still wet!"

Re:In a different exciting development... (1)

kesuki (321456) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445688)

Old news, Tom sawyer patented distributed work over a century ago. His idea was slighly superior however in that people Paid him money to experience first hand the thrills of using their idle work-cycles.

So i'm afraid you owe old tom sawyer a good deal of royalties for infringing on his patented business models. Guess you shoulda charged people to show up at your door and clean your house for you.

Re:In a different exciting development... (1)

Da_Biz (267075) | more than 8 years ago | (#14446463)

I'm launching "cleaning@home"

Seriously, this '@home' moniker is starting to get lame and hackneyed.

That noted, I'm wondering if the iClean 06 suite comes with your service, including iBucket and iMop, as well as a bottle of iSol?

a friend has found ten asteroids (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445376)

I have a compsci friend who is a fairly dilligent amateur astronomer. He gets to name them.

@Home? (1)

njyoder (164804) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445431)

Why did they have to name it @Home? All the other projects refer to distributed computing at home. This refers to distributed human work, so it should get a different suffix. Something related to clickworkers, mechanical turk or whatever would do fine.

I should probably point out that the project doesn't actually start until March 1st. You can preregister now though. What's interesting is that this also has tests you need to pass to be able to participate. This is different from NASA's clickworkers project where anyone could just run the java applet without registration and fill things out at will. The overall accuracy for clickworkers was higher than that for trained professionals, but perhaps there's something different with Stardust@Home that requires people to pass a test.

NASA is mum about the sensors (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14445527)

I wrote NASA and JPL both asking what the chances were that the parachute sensors were installed backwards like they were in Stardust's sibling craft Genesis. JPL replied within 3 minutes of my initial inquiry with "Are you press?" When I answered "No." they clammed up and ignored my followup emails.

I can't help but feel that NASA is putting a brave face on the sensor problem and is pretending all is well when they actually expect Stardust to crash and there won't be any comet dust to look at.

Re:NASA is mum about the sensors (1)

Kiryat Malachi (177258) | more than 8 years ago | (#14446302)

NASA PAO, from personal experience having worked there, doesn't talk to non-press. And non PAO don't talk to anyone they don't know.

King of all Cosmos (1)

MooseTick (895855) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445540)

This wouldn't even be necessary if the King of all Cosmos didn't get drunk and make all the stars burn out. I don't see why we need to be burdened with finding all the stardust when he was the one who messed it up. At the least he could get his son the prince to take care of it.

Green speckles... (1)

thrill12 (711899) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445606)

I have signed up to participate, but I wonder what I will do when I see a green speckle forming on an image and slowly increasing in size !?
I hope they didn't name the project "Project Scoop [1000misspenthours.com] " internally...

Re:Green speckles... (1)

rah1420 (234198) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445777)

I wonder what I will do when I see a green speckle forming on an image

Start drinking Sterno. Rapidly. :)

unfortunately, dust isn't exciting (to most) (1)

potus98 (741836) | more than 8 years ago | (#14445739)

It's just not the same to say "WOW! I helped find a spec of dust!" instead of "WOW! I helped find an advanced civilation in another galaxy!"

Part of the attraction for some of the distributed computing projects is that those who donate their time get a sense that they are helping to solve a really big, important challenge. I'm not saying it's scientifically sound to make research decisions based on flair, but when it comes to getting folks to donate their resources (cycles, time, eyes, tax dollars) to a cause, it sure helps to have a little flair.

That old question from college... (2, Funny)

FenwayFrank (680269) | more than 8 years ago | (#14446536)

So if we hook this up with the SETI@home program [berkeley.edu] , could we look for intelligent life in the universe that's inside the speck of dust? "Beam me up, Scotty: there's no intelligent life down here."

I've seen this (1)

Talinom (243100) | more than 8 years ago | (#14448533)

This game is available at my local game shop. "Let's Count Sand," "Bean Farmer, Extreme" and "Let's Wait in Line" are but a few other equally engrossing titles at the place.

Personally I cannot wait for the upcoming game "Nada 3."

I know where it is... (1)

GoatMonkey2112 (875417) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453223)

the Stardust is in Vegas you morons!!

I'm glad I was watching NASA TV (1)

devehf (946024) | more than 8 years ago | (#14475085)

Duxbury was wearing a flightsuit on NASA TV after re-entry. Nice "Mission Accomplished" refernece.
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