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Study: Waking Up Like Being Drunk

samzenpus posted more than 8 years ago | from the take-off-the-sleep-goggles dept.

Science 417

Ant writes "CNN reports that "sleep inertia" leaves some people so groggy, after they wake up, they might as well be drunk, researchers said on Tuesday. "For a short period, at least, the effects of sleep inertia may be as bad as or worse than being legally drunk," said researcher Kenneth Wright of the University of Colorado at Boulder."

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417 comments

Oh great (1, Interesting)

DrMrLordX (559371) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452772)

So am I going to get a DUI for sleeping through the alarm and rushing to work while groggy? Can't wait for that.

At least it won't show up on a breathilizer.

Re:Oh great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14452815)

At least it won't show up on a breathilizer.

It will. Your breath will have a distinct lack of caffeine...

Re:Oh great (1)

mrscorpio (265337) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452890)

Let me tell you from experience, your wife/girlfriend/significant other, should you have one, would disagree.

And here I thought... (0)

Patchw0rk F0g (663145) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452775)

...that all of my co-workers were just wasted. I think I liked it better when they were supposedly bonged out. "Sleep inertia" is just boring.

Remember Folks... (5, Funny)

Burning1 (204959) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452777)

So remember folks: If you fall asleep while driving it's very important that you don't attempt to wake up.

I so have this problem (1)

jdwilso2 (90224) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452781)

I end up babbling like an idiot to my wife every morning when I wake up. She thinks I'm just lazy in the mornings, but now I've got an excuse to hide behind :-)

Its just like... (4, Insightful)

Saggi (462624) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452782)

Its just like sitting and waiting for a new post on slashdot, and then quickly trying to write something usefull, witch actually ends up rather stupid.

According to this research we should not allow post for at least 3 min after a new entry on slashdot.

I think this entry proves my point.

Re:Its just like... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14453020)

or you should suscribe and thus get an extra 30 mins to come up with witty stuff to karma whore with.. :P

I'm sure I read this yesterday on the BBC site (-1, Flamebait)

silasthehobbit (626391) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452787)

Oh wait, http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4598714.stm [bbc.co.uk] I did.

And someone gets a referral link for that "news" item?

Jeez

--
silas
hobbit
london

Re:I'm sure I read this yesterday on the BBC site (1)

silasthehobbit (626391) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452826)

Sorry to reply to my own post, but how is that flamebait?

This was on the BBC's website yesterday. I've given the link and complained about the fact this isn't what I consider news.

I fail to see how this can be considered as flamebait.

--
silas
hobbit
london

Re:I'm sure I read this yesterday on the BBC site (1, Informative)

peterpi (585134) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452886)

Yeah, I read it too.

Did you submit it to slashdot?

No, neither did I.

Just one of the reasons... (2, Interesting)

Mortimer82 (746766) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452792)

Just one of the reasons why I choose to shower in the morning rather than in the evening.

Re:Just one of the reasons... (3, Funny)

trandism (835011) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453015)

You mean you shower? :o :o Every morning? :o ooops this place has changed radically lately :|

Legally drunk? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14452793)

Can a US-american please explain what "legally drunk" means?

Coming from a country where you can legally drink starting with 16 and buy alcohol with any age as long as "it is for your parents" I have to wonder what the difference between "legally" drunk and "illegally" drunk is.

Thank you.

Re:Legally drunk? (1, Informative)

silasthehobbit (626391) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452806)

I think "legally drunk" would refer to being under the blood alcohol limit for driving a car. I'd imagine that "drunk" would refer to any amount over that limit.

Although I'm prepared to be wrong about this.

--
silas
hobbit
london

Re:Legally drunk? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14452831)

I think "legally drunk" would refer to being under the blood alcohol limit for driving a car. I'd imagine that "drunk" would refer to any amount over that limit.

And "legally blind" means your vision is just barely good enough to drive a car?

Re:Legally drunk? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14452848)

I see, thank you.

Well, I definitely couldn't drive a car right after getting up... ;)

Re:Legally drunk? (3, Informative)

masklinn (823351) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453042)

Legally drunk would probably be closer to "drunk according to the local laws/regulations", I think. I Am Not A Native English Speaker though.

Re:Legally drunk? (2, Insightful)

Flendon (857337) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452852)

Well it varies greatly depending on the situation and what state you live in. If you are drunk and creating a big scene in a public place you can be arrested for 'Drunk in Public', which is a sort of catch all which can also be used to get bums off the street and such. Then if your driving it is based off of a specific blood alcohol level, which varies by state. Also if a minor is caught drunk it has to be proven with a blood alcohol test, but the levels are very low. So really "legally drunk" is just a catch all phrase without a set scientific answer.

Re:Legally drunk? (4, Insightful)

Fruny (194844) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452864)

It's not "legally" vs. "illegally", but, say, "legally" vs. "medically".

Re:Legally drunk? (1)

greg1104 (461138) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452873)

In most states here, you are "legally drunk" when your BAC reaches 0.08% (this lowers the bar, it used to be 0.10% in some). Since many people start to feel drunk at closer to 0.05%, legally drunk implies a level of alcohol in your bloodstream considerably above just regular old drunk.

drunk according to statute (4, Informative)

Quadraginta (902985) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452874)

If your blood alcohol concentration is above certain limits set by law, typically 0.08% these days, then you are defined by law to be drunk, whatever your state of reflexes, ability to concentrate, et cetera. Otherwise, whether you are drunk or not is a matter of judgment -- not yours, of course, but typically that of the policeman who stops you and the judge who hears the case.

However, the limit used to be 0.10%, and that is actually fairly sloshed. You would be pretty happy, typically, although people vary. The point is that it used to be the case that you could be definitely drunk, and know it, but still be under the limit at which you would be defined to be drunk by the law. Naive people would imagine, therefore, that you could be drunk but not legally drunk (because you were under the 0.10% limit). This was never the case, of course, since even under the 0.10% limit you could still be determined to be drunk by a policeman and a judge. But it was a popular fiction.

From this beginning I think nowadays "legally drunk" has morphed into a colloquial expression meaning mostly just "pretty definitely drunk" versus just feelin' good -- you know, at that point where friends argue happily with each other -- hey, I'm not drunk, man, just...relaxed...g'wan, ask me anything...look! I can balance a beer bottle on my nose (crash)!

It has nothing to do with the legal drinking age.

Re:Legally drunk? (2, Informative)

kfg (145172) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452919)

Legally drunk simply means you are drunk as defined by law.

This may or may not imply that you are illegally drunk, since being drunk in and of itself may not be illegal, say, if you are home in bed. Being legally drunk in public where such is against the law would make you illegally drunk and subject to arrest simply for being drunk, illegally.

If you are driving a car while you are legally drunk it is the act of driving the car that is illegal, not the being drunk, per se and the charge would be Driving While Intoxicated. Driving illegally, not illegally drunk.

Ain't legal semantics fun?

KFG

Felt like this all my life (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14452795)

wow! it's amazing to finally see in a study what I've known all my life. Like you're walking through a dense fog whilest dragging a couple of Yugo's roped to my brain. Sometimes in important situations I pass right through it into a more "complete" consciousness- if there is such a thing- but in general, its just a real pain. Caused me problems all my 35 years.

Wha....? (4, Funny)

lheal (86013) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452796)

Shorry, I dinnt unnerstan that. Where's my damn coffee?

I have this stupid little dog that keeps waking up at night and yipping with this ear-piercing yelp. Something about taking a piss. I hate that little dog. Damn activists would have me in jail if I shot her, though.

So where's that coffee? Oh, here it is. Ahh.

Wow, what a stupid post. Better not press Submi...

So if you drink a lot... (3, Funny)

Zakabog (603757) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452797)

So if you drink a lot before you go to sleep, and you wake up drunk, the two effects cancel each other out. So drink heavily every night and you'll be fine!

Attestation (0)

AndyCampbell (801057) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452801)

I can attest to this. When I wake up, my judgment is severely impaired, to the point that I'll hit my snooze alarm for 2 hours and end up late for work, while not really getting much more sleep. Even after I do wake up, it takes a long time before I'm really capable of doing much. It seems that even our supercomputer brains need time to spin up before we're ready for action.

Re:Attestation (1)

PhotoBoy (684898) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452910)

I can attest to this as well, I've always said that I can do my best work at midnight, not 9am.

Re:Attestation (1)

Freaky Spook (811861) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452912)

I used to do that, till i moved my alarm clock to the other side of my room so I actually have to get out of bed to turn it off. I haven't been late for work since I did that.

Getting out of bed is easy when you find something to really motivate you.

Re:Attestation (1)

cnettel (836611) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452973)

It's only a matter of time until you are able to do that in some kind of pseudo-sleep and still get back to bed. I know that I am able to do that.

Re:Attestation (1)

toleraen (831634) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453087)

Agreed. I did this for years growing up. Now it's more of a "fly out of bed to turn the alarm off and jump back into bed real quick" without even thinking of it. So I started setting two alarms, one to "wake" me up, and the other to actually motivate me to get out of bed. Of course being required to get up at 4am just seems so unethical to me...so that doesn't help!

theolein reports on Common Sense (3, Insightful)

theolein (316044) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452805)

It may come as a great shock to these scientists to realise that most people on the planet take awhile to get fully awake after waking up. Those same people would refer to that knowledge as common sense.

Re:theolein reports on Common Sense (4, Funny)

datafr0g (831498) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452898)

Yeah but do you have scientific evidence that common sense exists?

Re:theolein reports on Common Sense (3, Insightful)

kfg (145172) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453027)

. . .do you have scientific evidence that common sense exists?

Anecdotal evidence suggests that it does not. I shall apply for a grant to conduct a rigorous test of the hypothesis. If I get it. . .

Q.E.D.

KFG

Re:theolein reports on Common Sense (2, Funny)

kfg (145172) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453016)

Next up, a study that shows that if you put your head between your legs for a few minutes and then sit up really, really fast you get light headed.

Will the miracle discoveries of science never cease?

KFG

MIT natural alarm clock (4, Insightful)

moonbender (547943) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452807)

There was a story about some sleep researchers from MIT having developed an alarm clock that monitors your sleep and wakes you up at a time when you're most likely to be well rested (outside a REM phase or whatever). Of course that meant you couldn't enter the exact time to wake up, just an approximate. I still thought this sounded awesome, and they were going to commercialise it, but even if they did I guess it's really expensive and also, sleeping with sensors attached is bound to be annoying.

Re:MIT natural alarm clock (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14452881)

I wrote a paper about biological rythms, night work and the use of bright light to ease the transitions from day to night work and back. During that work I read about "alarm" clocks called simulated dawn, it's like a brigth light like the ones used to treat seasonal affective disorders, but it's connected to a clock. You can adjust when the light should light up, and then it will gradually increase the light. This light will be sensed through the eyelids, and when you reach the next light sleep phase you will wake up feeling refreshed (in theory, at last). No need to do complicated, uncomfortable measurements of REM or whatever.

I would love to have one of these but my girlfriend gets up later than me and she also wakes more easily, so she is less than thrilled about the idea.

No idea on pricing.

Sleeptracker (5, Informative)

Freaky Spook (811861) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452885)

The sleeptracker watch is what your talking about, it monitors your body signals to wake you up at the best moment, you set an alarm window & it will wake you up at the best time, they sell on Amazon for 139.95.

Re:Sleeptracker (3, Informative)

moonbender (547943) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452911)

Heh, Slashdot rules. I checked it out, and 1) it does seem to work, 2) it just monitors your movement, that's all. If you're moving, you're probably not in a state of deep sleep and are more easily woken up. Interesting, but still too expensive (if not quite as much as I'd have thought). Oh and 3) it's just a wrist watch, so not that annoying to wear, I guess.

Re:Sleeptracker (1)

Freaky Spook (811861) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452929)

Iv been thinking about getting one to see what its like, im more interested that it records your movments during the night & can map your sleep cycles.

A watch isn't that bad to wear to bed i don't think either, especially if its going to help you.

I think it will be one of those things i get when I get my tax return.

Then in the US (5, Funny)

woodengod (863603) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452817)

... waking up should be forbidden for persons younger than 21 years ;o)

Re:Then in the US (1)

Ambush (120586) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452899)

Then in the US waking up should be forbidden for persons younger than 21 years ;o)

... leaving the entire population sound asleep, of course.

Oh wait, that was the idea, right? ;-)

Where's that Snooze button? (3, Funny)

datafr0g (831498) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452818)

There is evidence that the cortical areas of the brain thought to be responsible for problem-solving, complex thought and emotions take longer to wake up than other parts of the brain, Wright wrote.

Problem Solving? COMPLEX THOUGHT?! EMOTIONS!?!?!?

Fuck that! I'm goin' back to bed!

Re:Where's that Snooze button? (1)

Andrzej Sawicki (921100) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452933)

Funny as it seems, I know I am much easier to anger shortly after waking up. (And I mean even when waking up on my own, without any devices or people to "help".)

This is news? (1, Funny)

Flendon (857337) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452820)

Did it really take a team of scientists to figure this out?

Scientist: Hey Bob I have an idea for a research proposal, but I'm going to need a big grant.
Boss: What's your idea?
Scientist: Well I want to study the effects of waking up.
Boss: Is this just an excuse for why you are always sleeping at your desk?
Scientist: *Looks guilty* N..No! I want to compare the effects to um.. Drunk Driving! Yeah I want to compare the effects of waking up to Drunk Driving thats it!

GREAT! Now I can get plastered during lunch (1)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452822)

Just claim I took a nap and I can finally survive those afternoon meetings legally.

As for this being true, my usuall waking up is from nice pleasant dreams to the stark reality that my life is half over and I am old and decrepit and nobody loves me and I am in a job I hate and it is cold and my body hurts.

The reason I appear drunk is not because I wake up drunk but because a small drink is the only way to survive waking up.

I don't drive so I am not putting anyone at risk by going to work with a small booster. Yeah sure sure I am ruining my health. Who gives a fuck. It is alcoholism or suicide.

Re:GREAT! Now I can get plastered during lunch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14452877)

And you chose alcoholism?

Ah... (1)

JohnnyBigodes (609498) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452834)

!!! Now that's what it was! I always wondered why the world was making SsSs shapes under my feet after dropping out of bed.

I was sleeping deeply (5, Funny)

smitty_one_each (243267) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452856)

...and dreamt of being at a Black Sabbath concert. They were grinding out "Iron Man", and I was in front, doing some mighty head-banging.
Things turned literal when my head met the window sill against which my bed lay.
I became semi-conscious, with blood streaming from my forhead, but couldn't move well because my right arm was still asleep.
Almost deathly so: my sleeping position had cut off circulation to the arm, apparently for a long time. The Sabbath dream had been my subconscious trying to 'rock' me into a different position. Later, when my arm functioned again and the bleeding stopped I thought, wow, that would have been pretty funny, if it hadn't happened to me...

My brain is slower in the morning (5, Interesting)

Max Romantschuk (132276) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452889)

I literally think more slowly after waking up. When I shower in the morning it takes me like 20 minutes to do the exact same procedure I can complete in 10 minutes if take a shower in the middle of the day.

I bicycle to work, and I've found the exercise really helps to jolt you awake. Fresh air and exercise in general wakes me up much better than getting on a bus to work does. Below freezing temperatures help too ;)

I think people tend to take their need of sleep too lightly these days. I would prefer to sleep about 9 hours a night, but practical issues and social pressure keeps me at between 6 and 8 hours per night. I don't feel that time spent sleeping is wasted, as a programmer I often that I've solved problems during sleep.

Re:My brain is slower in the morning (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14452994)

This is intresting.. to feel good I have to sleep 9 hours, if I dont I get realy tired during the day, I have headackes and yes I feel that I react and think slower then when Im totaly awake.. I would realy realy like to be able to sleep just 6-8 hours, it would do wounder with my friends and family, couse I often just dont have the time as I have to get home to sleep.. work, sleep, work, sleep.. No kidding, its a real problem.

I see you're problem (5, Funny)

lheal (86013) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453004)

When I shower in the morning it takes me like 20 minutes to do the exact same procedure I can complete in 10 minutes if take a shower in the middle of the day.

Perhaps you should find some other place to conduct that procedure. Most slashdotters do it in front of their PC at night, I think.

Re:My brain is slower in the morning (1)

dabigpaybackski (772131) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453068)

Try doing some light exercise before lights-out--stretching, chi gung, even some isometrics. I wake up fresher because of this routine.

some tribe in africa (1)

iogan (943605) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452901)

I wish I had a link or something (too early in the morning to look one up) but I read recently about a tribe in Africa somewhere whose warriors had the ability to go from sleep to full battle readiness in a matter of seconds. I wonder what their secret is.

Re:some tribe in africa (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14452966)

Possibly impending doom and the adrenaline release it triggers...

Re:some tribe in africa (1)

lixee (863589) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453008)

Supports the link between drinking and agressiveness ;-) More seriously, being surrounded by wild animals and enemy tribes maybe the reason they only half-sleep.

It's unpleasantly like being drunk. (1)

GSV Ethics Gradient (779784) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452906)

'What's so unpleasant about being drunk?'
'You ask a glass of water.'

Re:It's unpleasantly like being drunk. (2, Funny)

Smidgin (912451) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452950)

Was this experiment by any chance conducted by The Maximegallon Institute of Slowly and Painfully Working Out the Surprisingly Obvious? (Mostly Harmless, Chapter 6)

Sleepiness and Intoxication (1)

AnomalyConcept (656699) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452913)

I guess that explains a lot of these comments, like this one. (Posting at 06:33)

On the topic of being drunk and sleeping, I recall seeing an 'experiment' on TV that compared the effects of being drunk to that of sleepiness while driving. The conclusion was that being sleepy was worse, as the driver invariably fell asleep, and the car ran off the road.

IIRC, the testing was done with a driving simulator, and all that was tested was steering, which may not entirely be accurate, especially if the whole operation of the gas and brake is removed from the test.

Re:Sleepiness and Intoxication (1)

ladyKae (945309) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453006)

being sleepy was worse, as the driver invariably fell asleep, and the car ran off the road.
*um* as opposed to being drunk and not running your car off the road...?!?!?

Anyone else here... (4, Funny)

aug24 (38229) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452921)

...ever woken up still drunk? I remember doing so after my mate Frank's stag do. Got downstairs, drank some water, out of the house to Fulham High Road to a coffeeshop, bought coffee and a Sunday paper, sat down and realised that (a) I couldn't read and (b) I forgot shoes.

Justin.

Re:Anyone else here... (1)

davidrb84 (942894) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453001)

About half of my university lectures before noon in my first year were taken drunk, I actually found waking up drunk made me more likely to go, seems like a good idea when drunk to go out in the freezing cold and dark outside world. When sober you relise it's a bad plan and remember you can read the notes late. Or was that just me?

I just woke up, and i just wanted to say... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14452928)

(sobs) I love you, man. Every last one of you.

Scientists with lots of time on their hands (2, Funny)

oztiks (921504) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452931)

For a short period, at least, the effects of sleep inertia may be as bad as or worse than being legally drunk," said researcher Kenneth Wright of the University of Colorado.

Is this one of these scientific tests that involve lots of alcohol and plenty of sleeping?

Is this like an inner ear infection? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14452932)

I really felt drunk that time, either that or on the high seas. Glad I didn't drive a car, I could barely walk to the doctor's office. Got a week off from work though, and gravol and fluids.

So.... (1)

MindPrison (864299) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452935)

Youre saying Im an full-time alcoholic? Shit - my new year resolution was to give up alcohol and now they tell me that Im drunk every day just by waking up, greeeeeat! ...better get sign up for one of those AA meetings.

Re:So.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14453046)

LOL, standing up in a circle (head bowed)....

"Hi I'm Fred and I have sleep inertia"

Aliens (1)

pipingguy (566974) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452942)


What happens when we sleep is fun. Have you ever woken up to find that the TV or radio is broadcasting exactly what you were dreaming about?

I'm no sleep researcher or psychologist, but it seems that the human brain is incredibly quick (while dreaming) to pick up on external, subconscious influences/input. It's quite amazing, actually.

Re:Aliens (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452972)

"I'm no sleep researcher or psychologist, but it seems that the human brain is incredibly quick (while dreaming) to pick up on external, subconscious influences/input. It's quite amazing, actually."

I disagree. I suspect that what you see when you wake up is being projected back into your memories of being asleep.

After all, you have no proof that you ever really 'dream', since you're not conscious at the time. All you have are some memories that may or may not bear any resemblance to reality (of course that's true of anything thats happened in the past when you were awake too).

where this scares me is wrt medical care (3, Interesting)

mrpeebles (853978) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452984)

Where all this scares me is with respect to medical care. My understanding is that while there are guidelines on how many hours, eg, medical residents can work, at least in many cases it is cheaper for hospitals to pay the fine than to hire more residents. I have heard of studies comparing sleep deprivation to being drunk for a long time. Hopefully they are starting to add up, and we'll stop having to wonder whether the doctor looking at us in the emergency room hasn't slept in the last 24 hours.

British army (5, Interesting)

19061969 (939279) | more than 8 years ago | (#14452999)

This problem of getting to full cognitive capacity after waking is a serious one in some professions. Think about doctors who are on night duty and are woken up to immediately deal with an emergency. In some cases it might be better to just stand around and do nothing for a few minutes unless it really is life threatening.

I had a doctor friend who, after coming in from a night out drinking, used to hook himself up to a drip. End result: waking up with no dehydration and much less of a hangover, but that's slightly OT.

I also heard that in the British Army, the first minute after waking up doesn't officially exist - that's because they're aware that people are still "out of sorts" and incapable for at least a minute. In theory, you can punch the Sgt-Major and get away with it.

Of course, he would make you pay one way or another...

Woke up this mornin' got myself a beer (1)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453037)

The future's uncertain and the end is always near.
Let it roll baby roll.


Jim Morrison did extensive research into this phenomenon, way back in 1970.

Pissing (1)

Reikk (534266) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453054)

I was so tired the other day I was standing there taking a piss and I fell back asleep and fell into the wall

Totally Inaccurate Report (1)

NardofDoom (821951) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453081)

Waking up is not at all like being drunk. When I wake up, I'm groggy and pissed off. When I'm drunk, I'm groggy and happy.

I literally just woke up (1)

MrNougat (927651) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453084)

It's 6:23 AM, I got up at about 6:15. I have come to know that I need to have about ten minutes of sitting down at the computer before I can function at all. For those ten minutes, it's like being in another world, and as I am typing this, I can feel the lucidity surging back into my head.

Being awakened and having to get up out of bed and do normal awake things definitely demonstrates this effect more drastically than waking up on your own and lounging on the bed while you become fully awake.

reported this yesterday (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14453089)

I reported this yesterday morning. I guess my AC post was not ignored (for various reasons, I have to post as AC).

And they did need research to find that out? (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 8 years ago | (#14453092)

Well, I guess researchers at Colorado are so busy that they never sleep :-)

In German, there even exists the word "schlaftrunken", which literally translated means "sleep drunk".
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