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EU to Develop Search Engine

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the searching-for-answers dept.

The Internet 460

William Robinson writes "Digital Media is reporting that French President Jacques Chirac is making plans for a European search engine called "Quaero" to rival US internet companies such as Yahoo and Google. From the article: 'Those involved in the Quaero project, including Thomson, France Telecom and Deutsche Telekom, have said that it will be much more than a typical search engine. It will provide an array of multimedia tools for identifying and indexing images, sound and text. Quaero will also reportedly include a powerful translating tool which will be able to 'understand' audio as well as text. The developers plan to make Quaero available on all platforms, including PCs, mobile devices and digital TVs.'"

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460 comments

Whee! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484009)

Whee!

Re:Whee! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484030)

Yuo fail it?

For Great Justice!

Anything you can do I can do better... (4, Funny)

jo7hs2 (884069) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484018)

Welcome to the great technological pissing war.

Re:Anything you can do I can do better... (-1, Troll)

NewbieProgrammerMan (558327) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484279)

Well, at least they're building search engines and space exploration vehicles instead of nuclear weapons. (It's supposed to be ~50% funny, laugh)

Re:Anything you can do I can do better... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484358)

Except France is not able do anything that the US can't.

Uhhh (1)

VanillaBabies (829417) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484024)

So they're reinventing Google, but in denial about it? GG France.

I think it's called "independence". (1)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484139)

Why depend on American companies if you can do it with European ones?

Re:I think it's called "independence". (5, Insightful)

bvwj (473084) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484193)

Q:Why re-invent the wheel?
A:Ego

Also, it's not European companies, it's a European govenrment subsidising European companies.

Re:I think it's called "independence". (2, Insightful)

undeadly (941339) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484302)

Also, it's not European companies, it's a European govenrment subsidising European companies.

This aptly describes US defence and areospace industry.

Re:I think it's called "independence". (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484202)

France has become so second-rate that the summit of its ambitions is doing what the Americans have done, late, and not as well. Galileo is GPS, twenty years late. This bogus proposal is Alta Vista, twenty years late. When was the last time a French product innovated? ian

Re:I think it's called "independence". (2, Interesting)

massivefoot (922746) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484366)

Well Galileo is important for two key reasons. Firstly, it's far more accuarte then GPS (on the order of 1m rather than 4-5m). Secondly, GPS is controlled by the Pentagon, they can switch it off (or, more likely, encrypt the signals so they can only be recieved by military personel) whenever they like. Galileo will be under civilian control. There was also talk of it including a relay system for distress signals.

Anyway, back on-topic, "Quaero" is intended to be able to search images and sound. I assume that doesn't just mean search text associated with them, as Google does. Searching an actual image or sound is a very complex procedure to do on the scale of the internet. If you want to see where this technology is at the moment try http://shape.cs.princeton.edu/search.html [princeton.edu]. It's fun to play with, and maybe even practical for searching, say, an engineering database, but it's a quite primative technology. So no, they aren't second rate, nor doing what "the Americans have done".

Re:Uhhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484324)

Good god. How stupid are you people? Look around - we're constantly re-inventing the wheel. In this instance, AltaVista, Yahoo, A9, Microsoft, Google, and how many others.

January 16, 2011 (4, Funny)

XorNand (517466) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484031)


MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. - January 16, 2011 - Google Inc. (Nasdaq: GOOG) today announced it acquired France, a country located in Western Europe, mostly associated with fine cheeses, wine, berets, and the 5-yr old search engine "Quaero".

Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Re:January 16, 2011 (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484180)

More likely:

"26th of April 2006, Google declares war on France

  27th of April 2006, France surrenders and hands over presidency to Larry Page"

Re:January 16, 2011 (2)

Galston (895804) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484220)

I think that the rest of the EU would gladly sell France to anyone at any price.

Re:January 16, 2011 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484393)

Any country that relies on CAP to keep going can piss off right out of Europe.

amazing.. (1)

tont0r (868535) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484034)

while there was always a quiet search engine war, ever since google blew up, search engines appear to be the new hotness/dotcom bubble.

Why Is This in Politics??!! (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484037)

According the the FAQ, [slashdot.org]the politics sections is meant for US Government politics.

Yet, this story has nothing to do with the US or politics really. What the EU does shouldn't be in this section.

I know the editors are trying to instigate another US vs. EU flamewar, why are they allowed to troll like this?

Re:Why Is This in Politics??!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484222)

why are they allowed to troll like this?

because it is their site and they basically get to post whatever they want until people stop visiting it.

they could post abusive things about how stupid their users are if they want.

Re:Why Is This in Politics??!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484254)

Start your own site, kthxbye.

This is politics. (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484258)

If Europe wanted a better search engine, they should look to see if they have any kids as bright as Larry Page or Sergey Brin or David Filo and Jerry Yang.

Instead they've got a consortium of bloated bureaucracies - both corporate and political ones. This approach has absolutely ZERO chance of a technological success; so it 100% belongs in the politics camp.

And I'm serious. French declarations and large telecoms are no place to create the next Google any more than SBC or TimeWarner is. A couple college kids will blow them away simply becasue the college kids don't have to put up with the bureaucracy.

Re:Why Is This in Politics??!! (3, Insightful)

undeadly (941339) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484278)

Yet, this story has nothing to do with the US or politics really. What the EU does shouldn't be in this section.

In this you are very wrong. This is all about politics: get control of vital resources. EU views USA with Bush II in power with deep scepticism, and tries to wrestle as much control as they can since USA has become sort of unreliable. Quite simply, enemies of USA is scared more than ever and close allies are apprehensive. Those that thinks this is good are fools (not that I suggest that you thinks so).

That's great but (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484046)

what does it have to do with Apple?

Real reason (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484047)

The real reason is to filter out certain results on the query "French Military History".

Re:Real reason (3, Funny)

Compuser (14899) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484272)

In that case, why involve Deutsche Telekom? Or rather, why did
Deutsche Telekom get involved?

Re:Real reason (2, Informative)

arethuza (737069) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484280)

So what about the Battle of Tours [wikipedia.org]?

I would have thought it would have met with approval by our friends over the pond.

I am Scots - so naturally biased because of the Auld Alliance (not mention Val D'Isere [valdisere.com]).

Re:Real reason (1)

atrizzah (532135) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484353)

Of course, Martel was Frankish, not French. Some might say that most of his military aptitude passed to his German decendants :)

Quaero.com taken (2, Insightful)

digitaldc (879047) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484049)

Q: How exactly does Quaero translate: "Google is the best internet search engine ever made."
Inquiring minds want to know.

Check out http://www.quaero.com/ [quaero.com] - its a marketing company from Charlotte, North Carolina.

Re:Quaero.com taken (4, Funny)

Xemu (50595) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484151)

Check out http://www.quaero.com/ [quaero.com] [quaero.com] - its a marketing company from Charlotte, North Carolina.

And they're pretty damn good at viral marketing if they even get the President of France to advertise for them.

Re:Quaero.com taken (1)

brassmoknets (933133) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484248)

and quaero.fr, and a pending registration on quaero.eu Looks like someone didn't do their research before announcing the great rollout.

Re:Quaero.com taken (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484410)

Funny, but they would most likely use the new domain, named .eu

Quaero.eu (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484187)

In Europe, ".com" is not ubiquitous. Instead, the common format is to use the .xx country-based TLD. Or, if you are going to be EU-wide, as suggested in the article, then you would be Quaero.eu and not some silly .com

Additionally, who knows what kind of alternative algorithm tweak they might give results. For example, boosting .xx results slightly over .com results. Or perhaps boosting links which get .xx links TO them instead of *all* links (translation: what is more important to Europeans, as valued by links, ranks higher than generic-global links). Or perhaps they'll give greater wait to .eu based clicks as votes.

There are any number of ways to adjust the complex search result forumlas. Google is *not* the only game in town, even if they have been the best at it so far.

Don't playa-hate, Googlefanbois! See what Quaero comes up with, first. Hell, even dare to TRY it! :o

Vive le concurrence!

Re:Quaero.eu (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484361)

Oops, wait=weight.

(Relax, I was just typing too fast.)

Why? (2, Informative)

fishybell (516991) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484050)

If there's a true need for it, won't the market fulfil the need [google.com]?

Also, just because the government says that it should "understand" spoken audio, I'm pretty sure that no existing technology could even come close (<sarcasm>just look at the wonderful translation tools</sarcasm>).

Re:Why? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484087)

The market does not solve every problem. The market has failed to provide affordable health care for every American and those who call themselves Christians have failed to pick up where the market has left off. I left my church because the governing council was more interested in how to decorate the church for Easter than in how to feed the hungry two blocks away.

Re:Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484100)

Hm, you might want to check out what kind of technology your secret service is playing around with..

Re:Why? (4, Interesting)

NewbieProgrammerMan (558327) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484377)

Also, just because the government says that it should "understand" spoken audio, I'm pretty sure that no existing technology could even come close...
Isn't the lack of existing technology usually the reason one funds research?

Nothing to see (5, Informative)

Snamh Da Ean (916391) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484051)

Really little content in the article, a representative sample of which is "The ambitious project will probably not be available anytime in the near future. Quaero is still in the earliest stages of development, so early that none of the major players have yet ventured a guess as to how much the project might cost. When Quaero does launch, it will have a great deal of catching up to do."

So basically, a bunch of European telecoms companies are discussing how to compete with Google. And this is news why? Nothing to see here.

French search results? (3, Funny)

HugePedlar (900427) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484053)

Query: "King Richard the Lionheart"

Results: 1. "I fart in your general direction".

Seriously, though - I definitely think there's a market for an effective multimedia search engine: imagine being able to whistle a song into your mic, for example and being told what it was called.

Re:French search results? (1)

VanillaBabies (829417) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484107)

Except most people can't carry a tune to save their lives. It would be like searching for mickey mouse when you really want donald duck. One of the results MIGHT be helpful, but i wouldn't be money on it.

Re:French search results? (1)

HugePedlar (900427) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484195)

True, but most people can't spell for shit either yet search engines have learnt to adapt - not that I'm saying the issues have at all similar solutions, but it would be interesting to find out.

Re:French search results? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484394)

There's a premium mobile phone number in the UK that does something similar, but you have to use the real piece of music instead of whistling. Haven't tried it, maybe it works...

The name? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484055)

Using a name perhaps not associated with homosexuality in the UK would help perhaps :-)?

Hmmmm.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484337)

Using a name perhaps not associated with homosexuality in the UK would help perhaps :-)?

In Europe anything connected with the UK is automatically associated with three things: awful cuisine, lively and spirited women and an almost uniformly homosexual aristocracy.

Not going to work well (2, Insightful)

ZachPruckowski (918562) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484066)

If it is something run by the EU, it's going to face a lot of political hurdles. I recognize that gov'ts are sometimes better at providing these services than companies, but the EU has a whole lot more red tape to get through than most other gov't organizations. And the French President supporting it is no promise it'll happen. He lost the vote to ratify the EU constitution in his country.

I'm not saying it won't happen, just that it'll face lots of problems in a new governmental organization that is still trying to get its feet under it.

jsut waiting for the storm (0, Flamebait)

scenestar (828656) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484069)

of tinfoil hatters and "liberals" coming up bitching about why governments shouldnt run search engines for privacy and "who's paying for it" reasons.

ugh. bye bye karma i'll miss you

jsut [sic] waiting for the storm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484252)

of "conservatives" coming up bitching about why governments shouldn't run search engines because governments should be smaller and such things should be left to private companies.

ugh. if only i weren't an AC i could get all that delicious karma

Re:jsut waiting for the storm (1)

2nd Post! (213333) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484261)

Why should governments run search engines?

Why should the users trust that the government will provide fair search results free of bias?

Why should a government run search engine be better than a private run search engine?

Doomed to failure? (3, Insightful)

Z0mb1eman (629653) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484073)

As much as I'd like to see something like this happen - it's a huge project, led by SEVERAL governments and telecom companies, neither of which are exactly known for efficiency or technical brilliance. And it doesn't seem like there's much profit incentive, which makes it even less likely to be finished efficiently...

It's great that the EU is trying to assert itself in this area - having the US control 90% of the internet's technology is exactly the type of monoculture that is decried on the desktop - but is there any way this project won't end up crushed under the weight of its own bureaucracy?

Missing Feature (4, Insightful)

Jerf (17166) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484088)

It will also include a multi-lingual pony.

You know, I thought marketing vaporware claims were bad, but political marketing vaporware, now that's whole new dimensions of vapor. It's bad enough when marketing has excessive influence on tech development, can you imagine what it'll be like when politicians are involved as a matter of "national prestige"? I have not the humor chops to properly satirize that.

SNL has fresher news (1)

Unknown_monkey (938642) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484093)

Ok, just saw this on SNL on sat nite. When SNL is beating slashdot to the tech news, it's time to retire.

I for one welcome Tina Fey as my new master. Oh Yea....

Three Cheers for an "Industrial Policy" (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484098)

Shades of the Nixon-Khrushchev "kitchen debate".

The Soviets turned their national scientific and research genius into making *one* perfect washing machine, as the foolish Americans splintered their effort among competing companies tearing each other to shreds in destructive competition over shape and color.

"Today, we are behind you. Soon we will be even with you, and we shall pass you, in glorious progress toward perfect socialism and communism!" (or something like that).

How can feeble, fractured American enterprises like Yahoo and Google survive competition with the might of central, coordinated European industrial policy???

Right.

Bet it finds Airbus before it finds Boeing (1)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484099)

There's just something slightly unseemly about this. Government-coordinated search just chafes, I guess - though much of Europe is presumably used to communicating over state-owned infrastructure anyway. But at least they'll have no trouble keeping pages about German WWII relics from being indexed, this way.

Can someone from the EU please explain..... (2, Insightful)

Chineseyes (691744) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484102)

Why everything american must be reinvented and/or redone? Mod me down if you must but I just dont get it. Seems like a huge waste of money to me but maybe I'm missing something.

Ahhhh... finally... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484108)

I can search for "anti americanism" and feel good about it...

That list of countries... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484116)

Did somebody forget to include poland?

Why not Gögel? (2, Funny)

Joseph_V (908814) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484125)

Jokes aside, Americans may laugh because google already indexes multimedia and a host of other information like scientific journals and nudey pics. But the Euros have a healthy dose of nationalism that will likely influence their homepage.

I don't think anyone can compete with google right now in a slug match on indexing, but other factors make special purpose internet hubs a winner. (a number already exist such as yahoo and /.)

Wow (4, Funny)

ScaryFroMan (901163) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484128)

I'm usually not one to say that Slashdot is slow, but geeze, SNL got it first.

Something like its a search engine that after you enter in a query, it rudely refuses.

More Headlines To Follow (0, Troll)

MudButt (853616) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484129)

French President Jacques Chirac is making plans for a European search engine

"Quaero quickly surrenders its data centers to Google"
"Quaero results limited to wine, cheese, and speedo pics of Jerard Depardieu"
"Quaero snubs American visitors... But still loves Levi's, Coke, and American Pop Culture"

Re:More Headlines To Follow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484299)

"Quaero helps out in the American Revolutionary War, so that people like the above are free to display their ignorance."

Really? (1)

jmerelo (216716) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484149)

Most europeans are quite happy with their californian-bred search engines. Plus, they don't have awkard names.

Re:Really? (1)

IANAAC (692242) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484306)

Most europeans are quite happy with their californian-bred search engines. Plus, they don't have awkard names.

Maybe so, but as an american (who translates for a living) I think this really could be a good thing. Eurodicautom (and the soon-to-be-released IATE) are invaluable for intergovernmental documentation within Europe.

I had also heard... (3, Funny)

Loco3KGT (141999) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484152)

that France was looking to invent a "circular transportation facilitation device." Could I get someone to confirm that?

Does this mean (1)

xdjyoshx (804247) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484153)

That we will get to see naked women present the search results? If so.. C'mon we all know Dan Rathers ass was too hairy!

Agreed (1)

hakan2000 (945918) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484169)

Say what you want about the French, but think I their vision is right on: (from the article...) 'Today the new geography of knowledge and cultures is being drawn. Tomorrow, that which is not available online runs the risk of being invisible to the world.' Already, a lot of 'news' and 'information' in the world are manipulated by huge media organizations. You hear, listen, believe what CNN, NBC and BBC tell you, because that's what is available to you. As I think you'll all agree, with the WWW growing to an enourmous size, search engines become a critical source of information and it is scary to me that one entity in the world can fully control the index to information.

A few points to the EU powermongers... (5, Insightful)

Aphrika (756248) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484172)

1. Try and come up with a domain name that isn't ambiguous in how it's said or spelt.

2. Start asking us EU citizens if we'd mind you spending our cash on something that isn't really required

3. get out of the mindset that the internet is somehow defined by geographical borders and edges - just what is an EU search engine? Does it just search the EU? What?

4. How about attacking the problem of low tech-esteem in Europe not by building a government-sponsered programme (which no doubt will require taxpayers money to be thrown at it year on year), but by fostering an environment where private tech companies can flourish (like in the US).

I hope they change the name (2, Insightful)

DrXym (126579) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484188)

No one is going to have the foggiest idea how to type quero, queero, quato, kumquat, kuato or whatever the hell it is into their addrees bar.

Re:I hope they change the name (1)

davidbrit2 (775091) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484370)

I can already envision hordes of EU users Googling the name to figure out how the hell to spell it. :)

Erm, vapourware anyone? (1)

brassmoknets (933133) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484196)

This just seems like a combination of "wouldn't it be nice" on the part of the telecoms, with "F--- you, we will not use your pig-dog search teqnologique" from the french. Combine those two sentiments with classic European beaurocracy and what do you get? 12 review boards, 17 redrafted amendments to 14 bills, $3 billion of wasted tax money and, erm, that's it.

Re:Erm, vapourware anyone? (2, Funny)

general_re (8883) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484287)

...and, erm, that's it.

Well, not exactly. If the EU is going to be shitting out money like a broken slot machine, it remains for you and I to figure out how we can get a piece of this. I'm certain that, given the proper funding, I can help them solve the technical obstacles before them However, for deeply complicated reasons (it's complicated) much of my research will need to be conducted in places like Bali and the Bahamas and so forth.

Re:Erm, vapourware anyone? (1)

Olix (812847) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484397)

Ah, thats the best thing about horribly overweight and bulky bureaucracy. Nothing changes! I rather like things as they are now, you see.

Wow it will do so much (1)

wmshub (25291) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484211)

So this search engine will run on all platforms, index everything in every type of media, etc. etc. etc.

While they're at it, why don't they just say it will cure cancer and bring an end to poverty and war?

In other words, this is all vaporware. We should all know by now that the claims of a project when it is started can be very different from the reality when (oops, make that "if") it is completed.

I'm Feeling Lucky (0, Troll)

GiggidyGiggidy (935020) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484224)

Perhaps the French are just pissed off that with Google one can type "French Military Victories" and hit I'm feeling lucky to see a fake google error message saying no web pages found. Better yet, perhaps socialist countries do not believe in page rankings. It's not fair to the lower ranked pages to be at the bottom, every page should have the same rank.

One week later (1)

superwiz (655733) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484232)

The European Union managed to roll out a search engine in just under a week of development time. Leaders of the nations of the EU self-congratulated for 2 hours while announcing to the world that America has lost its lead in technological superiority. Some of the technology used in the search engine was licensed from companies held by non-EU entities.

One week later. In a surpricing turn of events the European Union's search engine has stopped functioning after the American company Google has blocked the IPs of Quaero's servers.

Google's layout must be too rich (1)

tibbetts (7769) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484251)

The developers plan to make Quaero available on all platforms, including PCs, mobile devices and digital TVs.
"All platforms" must surely include the Minitel [minitel.fr], which, with its a text-only display, would choke on the rich graphics with which Google festoons its pages.

This will most likely fail (1, Insightful)

bwd (936324) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484255)

It will fail if it is backed by Germany and France. Both of those countries have laws which force companies to filter hate speech, or at the very least help track the people down. That overhead, which Google doesn't have to deal with, will weigh heavy on their ability to offer untainted search results. That's in addition to other government red tape. That's a huge burden that Google doesn't have.

"...making plans for..." (2, Interesting)

Weaselmancer (533834) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484256)

igital Media is reporting that French President Jacques Chirac is making plans for a European search engine called "Quaero" to rival US internet companies such as Yahoo and Google.

"Making plans for" is a long, long way from delivering anything. I'm betting that once they start to realize the scope of what they're suggesting, they will change their tune a bit. Or at least scale back the idea somewhat. A google that understands audio and video?

Good luck though, because after all it's saying "why not" that makes change happen - but I think they'll be surprised when they realize the magnitude of their undertaking. Underestimating Google is a classic internet blunder.

I get dibs! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484260)

QuaErotic.com would be a great name for a naughty website

Re:I get dibs! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484335)

Some lucky Icelander will get quaerot.ic though.

Hidden Features... Historical Revisionism! (1)

RexRhino (769423) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484277)

I am sure that this search engine will have all sorts of wonderful hidden features... for example, if someone searches for information about risky or unhealthy behavior, I am sure the search engine will at least give them a warning, if not omitting the information (after all, the government has an obligation to protect people). I am sure it will definitly ommit information about illegal activities. I am sure the system will profile people based on their search topics, so that potential terrorists, hate criminals, etc., can be tracked and dealt with by the government. And I have a hard time believing that a search engine operated by the government will give good results if we search for information critical of the government.

In the end, if not enough people use the search engine to justify spending the massive amount of money on it, the government will make other search engines illegal!

50 years from now, when someone suggests that maybe search engines shouldn't be run by the government, the standard historical revisionist arguements will be brought out: Before search engines were nationalized, search engines were so expensive that only the rich could afford to search for things on the internet! And that even those who could afford to pay to use a search engine entered a "wild west danger zone", where virtually any information could be found without being strictly licenced and controlled by the government. And everyone will tell themselves how much more democratic and progressive a government monopoly search engine is, and how terrible it was back in the day when nearly anyone could put information on the internet to be found by anyone else.

press releases (1)

revery (456516) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484292)

Those involved in the Quaero project, including Thomson, France Telecom and Deutsche Telekom, have said that it will be much more than a typical search engine

I'm waiting for a press release that say something like "Those involved in the Chameleon search engine project have stated that Chameleon will be a complete ripoff of existing search engines, with little to no innovation."

I'm long past getting excited about products that were just announced by groups that have no significant track record in the area they are proposing to enter.

France is no longer a superpower (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484305)

It's a bit pathetic how so many in France seem to be unable to resign themselves that France is not a superpower anymore, and has not been one for many years. As an European, I find it annoying that the French government wants to compensate for that by manipulating the European Union in a (doomed) attempt to be a superpower again - it is a well-known fact in Europe that France (and Germany, to a lesser extent) are happy with the European Union as long as they are the one calling the shots. Well, I guess that we'll have to wait until the generations from before the 50s are gone for good.

pi$$ings (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484321)

bla bla bla... lots of pi$$ing against the EU in this thread....
Did you notice that JAPAN is doing exactly the same?? Builing an own search engine... wheeew... Now please start with some inadequate polemic flameing. - great.

Anyways... the de factor google monopoly is not good.

Spite (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484323)

I'll definitely use it, if only to spite America..

Doomed to failure and obscurity (2, Insightful)

MetalliQaZ (539913) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484338)

Putting together a project like that simply because they don't want to use commercial offerings based in the United States is stupid. Without solid motivation, ingenuity and demand, it is doomed to fail.

-d

being european (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14484367)

i apologise for the name...

Let's make a bet (2, Insightful)

dada21 (163177) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484369)

Take people with the same energy as those who work for the DMV, and put them up against people with the same energy as those who work for your average car dealer.

Train both sets of people to become software developers.

Let's bet on the outcome. Public programmers are shams just like public workers in any public office. Cronying at best, lazy worthless animals at worst.

How Europeans continually think that they can compete by removing competition and giving it to government is beyond me.

How much will they have to block. (3, Interesting)

DAldredge (2353) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484376)

Since most of Europe has 'hate speech' laws, how much of the net will this search engine be forced to block?

Why not just buy a large interest in Google? (1)

Fiz Ocelot (642698) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484389)

They should just buy enough Google stock in order to put someone on the board to represent their interests. It would be much easier and probably cheaper than a big project like this.

The rest of the press release (1)

davidbrit2 (775091) | more than 8 years ago | (#14484399)

"...It will also engineer itself, be telepathic, cure all known diseases, absolve us of our sins, and come with a free pony."
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