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The Adobe Photoshop Elements Crafts Book

samzenpus posted more than 8 years ago | from the update-your-prom-pictures dept.

Book Reviews 51

Sdurham writes "Adobe Photoshop and its many siblings have long been a staple of artists, photographers, and programmers interested in doing serious image manipulation. Increasingly, Photoshop's younger sister Photoshop Elements comes prepackaged with digital cameras. Yet many of the users of these cameras lack the time or patience to tackle the steep learning curve of the Photoshop family and are left asking "How do I do ... ?". Elizabeth Bulger's The Adobe Photoshop Elements Crafts Book attempts to bridge the gap between Photoshop skill level and personal creativity by stepping the reader through 14 different craft projects. In doing so, Bulger tries to provide the basic Photoshop Elements skills necessary for readers to pursue their own projects after finishing the book." Read the rest of Sdurham's review.

Crafts is a small book, and will not appear overwhelming to casual computer users. At 156 pages, its 17 chapters range from six to 15 pages each. The book can be divided into two general sections. In the first section, comprising chapters one through three, Bulger introduces Photoshop Elements and progressively works through image manipulation from opening files to selecting and editing portions of images. These chapters can be skimmed or skipped by those users familiar with the majority of tools and commands in the many flavors of Photoshop. For the uninitiated, which will probably be most of Bulger's target audience, these chapters provide an important foundation to completing the projects later in the book. In the first of these, "Photoshop Elements Basics," the author starts by discussing the Toolbox and provides a nice full-page reference that clearly labels each tool. This comes in handy for beginners later on when Bulger instructs readers to use particular tools. However, she is careful to include the Toolbox icon along with each command she uses during the projects, so readers should be able to reference this page less and less as they move through the book. In addition to the different dialogue boxes discussed here (Palettes, Options bar, Photo Bin), Bulger also spends a little time explaining different image file formats and a summary of image resolution basics. It should be noted, however, that these are BASIC explanations. She attempts to give just enough information to get an inexperienced user moving.

In "Working with Layers" the reader is introduced to what can be a frustrating subject for Adobe beginners. Bulger does a nice job of working through the process of layer manipulation by using, you guessed it, a pizza as an example. Unfortunately, what would normally be an important introduction to the topic is marred by the fact that Bulger fails to adequately explain how to obtain the sample image (no disc is included with the book). Her only mention of it is "If you want to use this pizza image to learn how to work with layers," (and if I'm a beginner following the book, I do want the image, "you can download it from www.photoshopcrafts.com Web site." But for readers only vaguely familiar with using computers to do image work (i.e. some soccer moms or grandparents) this may be too little information to get the image. Even worse, those users who do visit the site and click on the pizza image thumbnail are presented with a JPEG file. No PSD file is available, and using the JPEG file prevents readers from following the chapter because no layers are available.

The final introductory chapter tackles another challenging subject for beginners, the many selection tools found in Photoshop Elements. This chapter feels like a good refresher for someone who is only moderately familiar with the differences between the different lasso selection tools. Again, however, Bulger may confuse her target audience by using terms without explanation. When showing readers the Inverse Selection function, she uses the term "ghosting." For experienced users this does not give pause for thought, but since these first three chapters are primarily for users with little experience, readers may be confused by the term. No glossary is included, but by using the Index the term "ghosting" can be found over seventy pages later. Oddly, it is this later entry where Bulger gives a good explanation of the term. While insignificant in itself, small errors like this do prevent inexperienced users from building confidence with the software prior to beginning the projects.

Of course, The Adobe Photoshop Elements Crafts Book is not primarily an introduction to Elements in general but instead is meant to allow users of varying levels to jump right in and start being creative. This is where the book becomes interesting. Creating Gingham giftboxes, garden journals, aprons, placemats, pillows, and Parisian tiles are some of the projects covered. In this review I have worked through creating the Travel Photo CD cover (because of personal need and lack of workspace to varnish or paint...), but every project chapter follows the same format. The introductory page of each project chapter has a picture whatever the reader will create and a summary of the skills that will be used to make it. A list of "Stuff You Will Need" is given next, and then each page of the chapter is divided into two columns, the left for photos of each step and the right for explanations on how to move along. The photos are crisp, and whenever they display a menu option a red circle surrounds where to click. This works well for those more inclined to see things done rather than read them.

Working through the Travel CD cover project, a few problems cropped up. First, the book is targeted at Elements 4.0, and for users of older versions (I have 2.0) the placement of commands and general variation is different enough to cause confusion. In addition, many of the steps do not clearly articulate what should be occurring on screen. This is where the nice images really come in handy. The greatest complaint, however, is that each step does a fair enough job of telling the reader what to do, but lacks any real explanation of why to do it. A beginner will have trouble transferring the specific steps in one project to their own creations (speaking to Photoshop commands here, not generalities like creating a tile).

Ultimately, The Adobe Photoshop Elements Crafts Book is a slick, well designed book with interesting projects. It is weakened from a lack of clarity and minimal explanations of why? that would greatly increase its utility in transferring the lessons to other ventures. It is a book well-suited to someone who already has a basic understanding of the Photoshop family, but perhaps one that may be a little unclear for real beginners. It will definitely appeal to readers with an independent spirit for creating or personalizing their surroundings."




You can purchase The Adobe Photoshop Elements Crafts Book from bn.com. Slashdot welcomes readers' book reviews -- to see your own review here, read the book review guidelines, then visit the submission page.

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Photoshop (0, Offtopic)

Dragoonkain (704719) | more than 8 years ago | (#14541602)

is in the same boat as SCO

um... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14546296)

This post was actually pretty insightful.

First Gimp Post (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14541684)

http://gimp.org/ [gimp.org]
The only Shop you'll ever need. And it's free too.

Re:First Gimp Post (0)

muszek (882567) | more than 8 years ago | (#14541837)

http://gimp.org/
The only Shop you'll ever need. And it's free too.
I'm neither a graphics pro, nor a fan of proprietary soft, but according to my good friend who's deep in this field, Gimp, even though it's been alive for 10 years, still lacks many important features. Stuff like styles applied to layers and other things, which I can't remember or simply can't repeat because that's just not my area of expertise.

Re:First Gimp Post (2, Interesting)

Strixy (753449) | more than 8 years ago | (#14541988)

I agree. I do a lot of graphic work and have to say that the GIMP is capable of everything that Photoshop is. Sometimes it may take longer, sometimes it is shorter. They're very different creatures. I used Photoshop for two years. I've been using GIMP for two years.

I really hope I don't ever have to go back to Photoshop.

Re:First Gimp Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14542034)

> I agree. I do a lot of graphic work and have to say that the GIMP is capable of everything that Photoshop is.

Heh. Lying doesn't work very well when you're around people who know better. Now get your hand off it and go back help mommy wash up.

Re:First Gimp Post (2, Interesting)

rocketpig (933454) | more than 8 years ago | (#14542328)

I'm a professional graphic designer and have been for 6 years now, with over 10 years experience in Photoshop. GIMP cannot compare at the professional level. It lacks the extensive layer manipulation tools, channels, filters, etc. found in Photoshop. GIMP is a wonderful open source program that will work for 95% of the population, and work well doing what they need. But to mistake it with the professional calibre of Photoshop is folly.

Re:First Gimp Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14542532)

So Photoshop wasn't a professional tool 10 years ago? It didn't have all the features it has today did it? And seeing that there are professional graphic designers using GIMP (like jimmac)...

Re:First Gimp Post (1)

rocketpig (933454) | more than 8 years ago | (#14544732)

I personally know at least 20 "professional" designers. As in people who make the entirety of their living from designing.

How many of these people do not have a copy of Photoshop on their work computer? Zero. How many of them even have GIMP installed on their computers? Two or three, I think.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not bashing GIMP. It's a good program that works wonderfully, especially considering it's OSS. But how can a program be considered professional when it won't even work in CMYK? Just try sending a job off to a printer sometime with it packed full of RGB images and watch how quickly that file is rejected and shot right back at you.

Re:First Gimp Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14544972)

But how can a program be considered professional when it won't even work in CMYK?
Duh, if a professional is using it is a professional program--in this case just think of all the professionals who don't need CMYK.

Re:First Gimp Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14542894)

You do of course realise many professionals use gimp already to do their graphic work, and use it well to create images that keep them employed, or interested in graphics, or just give them something to do.

These people, hard working people who are creative professionals making a living while using gimp must really stick in your craw then. If you think gimp isn't professional, you must also think these people are unprofessional. Are you calling them idiots? Are you saying they just don't know what they're on about, when they're clearly making progress through life while using the gimp?

How does that make you feel, belittling professional people just trying to make a living. Feel good making them seem stupid when you say gimp is unprofessional? What kind of a person needs to put down others just to make themselves feel good like you're doing. I wish you'd think about what you say before saying it.

Maybe you should just go back to stealing photoshop and not comment about things unless you can say something decent about people.

Re:First Gimp Post (2, Interesting)

doxology (636469) | more than 8 years ago | (#14544154)

GIMP can't even work with CMYK. For anything that's printed, GIMP is pretty much useless for professionals. Its JPEG export function sucks too. Whenever I design something for the web in GIMP, I end up exporting it to its final form in Photoshop anyway.

Re:First Gimp Post (1)

budgenator (254554) | more than 8 years ago | (#14542978)

just not my area of expertise.
Sounds like you don't even now the difference between Photoshop and Photoshop Elements, Elements is a hugely stripped down, castrated version of PS designed to be baitware given away with hardware. Photoshop is better than Gimp for certain narrow professional areas, but the differences between Photoshop and Gimp are narrow, where the differences between Elements and either are huge.

Re:First Gimp Post (3, Insightful)

winkydink (650484) | more than 8 years ago | (#14541936)

I'm sorry, but only a person who has never truly used Photoshop can make that statement. Gimp is very good at many things, but it isn't Photoshop.

Re:First Gimp Post (3, Informative)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 8 years ago | (#14542097)

I wonder if GIMP care that it isn't photoshop. Photoshop is an expensive professional tool, that let's face it, is probably the best thing out there. GIMP on the other hand is a free application, with no corporate backing, and isn't really used in a professional environment. Still it fills the need for a nice photo editor for those who don't need tons of features, and don't want to pay for it. I think that for the most part, GIMP is comparable to most of the other consumer level editors, and should get the recognition it deserves.

Re:First Gimp Post (1)

legirons (809082) | more than 8 years ago | (#14543116)

"GIMP fills the need for a nice photo editor for those who don't need tons of features, and don't want to pay for it"

I'd be interested to find out all the features Photoshop has though. People keep saying it's better than GIMP, but I've never used it to see what the fuss is about. What features does it have that you find useful?

Personally, I do need "tons of features", which is why I use the GIMP for most things (using layers, paths, fuzzy-edged selections, transparency, etc.). I don't have any problem with paying for software, so long as it's Free Software (as in, no stupid licensing restrictions), and available for all my computers (Windows, Mac, and Linux). What features can the Photoshop users suggest which would make my graphics editing easier?

Re:First Gimp Post (1)

arose (644256) | more than 8 years ago | (#14543242)

Scrapped together from similar /. stories:
  • CMYK
  • 16-bit channels
  • adjustment layers
  • macro recording
  • teh l33t

Re:First Gimp Post (1)

Fallingcow (213461) | more than 8 years ago | (#14543991)

Also, its out-of-the-box UI follows the conventions of every other program in the world, rather than making up its own thing.

I just had to do a bunch of work with The GIMP last week, and it dredged up all my bad feelings about it. I'm glad it's there, but man that UI blows. Better than it was a couple versions ago, but still bad. The only time it's OK is when all you're doing is editing images (not switching to other apps), and even then it's just as good as more standard UI, not better. For everything else, it's worse, worse being defined as, "taking more clicks than any sane app to do the same thing".

No, I don't want a separate application window for each image. No, I don't want to screw with manually grouping the windows every time I use the program. Yes, the idea sounds great on paper, but neither Gnome nor WinXP handle programs the way that The GIMP expects them to for an ideal user experience, because The GIMP is the only program that does things that way.

Sorry, a bit of a rant. I just really don't understand why they gave one of the best programs in the OSS world such a crap UI.

Re:First Gimp Post (1)

arose (644256) | more than 8 years ago | (#14544173)

Also, its out-of-the-box UI follows the conventions of every other program in the world, rather than making up its own thing.
Photoshop on SGI [shawcomputing.net] , Photoshop on OS X [mycom.co.jp] . The world is a big place isn't it?

Re:First Gimp Post (1)

Fallingcow (213461) | more than 8 years ago | (#14545143)

Yeah, but OSX is actually designed to do that. It's fine that it does that on there. Photoshop (last time I checked) doesn't do that on, say, Windows, since Windows isn't designed to do that.

The GIMP just does it on everything, and always has. WTF? I doubt that most of the users run The GIMP on OSX, and I doubt that most of the developers run on OSX, yet they designed the UI around a principle that, of the Big 3--OSX, Windows, and most (all?) Linux WMs and any other Unix variant (the BSDs) that uses ports of the same--only that one uses.

Is there a way around this? Every time this flamewar breaks out, the only solutions I've seen are "Use a modern OS!" (they mean OSX), and "Do some sort of funky grouping thing to the windows that you have to do manually every time you run it and which still leaves the windowing in a sub-par, braindead state". If there is a way to make it conform to the norms of 99% of the rest of the Windows and Linux (and BSD) programs, why isn't that the default, or at least an easy-to-find option?

Re:First Gimp Post (1)

arose (644256) | more than 8 years ago | (#14545216)

Is there a way around this?
Yes, at least on GNU/Linux (but I posted it as AC accidentally):
Also with the right settings GIMP is a joy to work with on GNOME (or anywhere with a sane window manager) in "Preferences/Window Management" set "Hint for the toolbox" and "Hint for other docks" to "Utility window".
Works very well for me, only image windows show up in the window list and the toolbars spring to top when you select an image. Sure it's not HIGed, but it fits in quite well IMHO. For Windows there is some plug-in that puts it all in a big window (and stop that 99% BS, Windows software uses all possible brain dead models of which the window-in-window is only one), I haven't tried it as I don't use Windows.

Re:First Gimp Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14544261)

Also with the right settings GIMP is a joy to work with on GNOME (or anywhere with a sane window manager) in "Preferences/Window Management" set "Hint for the toolbox" and "Hint for other docks" to "Utility window".

Re:First Gimp Post (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 8 years ago | (#14547712)

Yeah, when working with GIMP, I usually stick it on it's own desktop, that way it's 17 windows don't interfere with the other applications i'm running. I wish this was available on windows. I know you "can" have multiple desktops on windows, but because it's non-standartd, it ends up being slow, and kind of quirky. With all the eye-candy they are pumping into vista, I wonder if they had the smarts to copy something that's been around in X for many many years.

Re:First Gimp Post (2, Interesting)

Firewalker_Midnights (943814) | more than 8 years ago | (#14542289)

If you actually believe that The GIMP can compete with Photoshop, then you've never used either one it seems. GIMP lacks many of the powerful features that make Photoshop what it is. A list of what is in each app will immediately show vital tools missing from GIMP. In fact, with the exception of paths and a few scripting abilities, you can get the same results out of Photoshop Elements, which is the stripped down version of Photoshop. Great for linux users, and people who can't afford the $800+ Price tag of Adobe products, however for a real power-user in the gfx field, it's a tinker toy. ---- Now as far as the book above goes... They're really interesting things for beginners to do, but more advanced users would find the content a bit "below their skill range".

Re:First Gimp Post (2, Interesting)

Ira Sponsible (713467) | more than 8 years ago | (#14542822)

GIMP in its current incarnation doesn't compare to Photoshop. I'd say that GIMP 1.2 is roughly equivalent to Photoshop 3.0 (though a little bit better in many ways), but later versions of Photoshop have left GIMP far behind. Comparing the most current versions to each other, Photoshop absolutely slays GIMP in most areas - it was made as a professional tool for professional photographers, not as a generic image manipulation program (Yes I know the G stands for GNU). I actually use GIMP extensively - see my free binary porn wallpaper [volture.cx] as an example of things that can be done entirely within the GIMP using the tools it has available. And as insane as it may sound, I prefer GIMP's interface to Photoshop's.

But one more thing I do have to say in this GIMP vs. Photoshop debate is this: GIMP really is a powerful image manipulation program, probably the best one that is freely available. And for most of my imaging work GIMP is more than adequate. But if you need the big guns and professional power, you need Photoshop.

Re:First Gimp Post (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14542888)

What's with you people and your screwed up ideas of professionalism? Making a living = professional. Some people do that with GIMP.

Re:First Gimp Post (1)

Ira Sponsible (713467) | more than 8 years ago | (#14543528)

In the context of my statement, a professional photographer is one who makes a living exlusivly on photography. Make no mistake, anything that can be done in Photoshop can be accomplished in GIMP, but the vast array of tools Photoshop has that GIMP lacks means that one can get fantastic results much more quickly in Photoshop. The difference is significant enough that professional photographers routinely find the $800 price tag of of Photoshop to be a much better value than the $0 price tag of GIMP. When you have hundreds of photographs to work with per week, you don't have time to go through all the steps GIMP requires when Photoshop can let you do it in one. Time saved is money made.

That said, you can take my GIMP from my cold dead hands . I will actually fire up GIMP first if it's not a job that requires things that only Photoshop can do more easily. Doing things manually in GIMP has also helped me figure out how to duplicate effects Photoshop does automatically, which is really useful if I happen to be on a client's computer and the only graphics program available is MSPaint. A quick install of GIMP can let me get quality results on site that are more than adequate for their needs.

Bottom line is Photoshop and GIMP are made with two different users in mind, one for a pro who needs all the extra power to get things done quickly, and one for anyone at all who needs to just get it done.

Re:First Gimp Post (1)

sammy baby (14909) | more than 8 years ago | (#14543677)

Make no mistake, anything that can be done in Photoshop can be accomplished in GIMP...


Including working in CMYK end-to-end? Or with 16-bit RAW?

Re:First Gimp Post (1)

arose (644256) | more than 8 years ago | (#14544337)

If number of steps required to do something is the problem it may be worthwhile to pick up some Python--you will able to create your own tools.

Re:First Gimp Post (1)

Ira Sponsible (713467) | more than 8 years ago | (#14545568)

Sounds like a great plan to me. I'll just go right out and get me a book on python or check out whatever web resources are available, spend hours or days grokking the material so I can spend more hours or days coming up with a plugin or tool for GIMP that already exists in Photoshop. Meanwhile my clients are waiting for their projects to be finished, and I'm not out working new shoots, or worse, cancelling them so I can say I have my own homebrew gizmo.

Re:First Gimp Post (1)

arose (644256) | more than 8 years ago | (#14545704)

I was thinking more of tools that do not exist or take several steps in Photoshop--it may be a great product, but I doubt it does everything everyone needs with one click (some people seem to live by the limitations of their tools though...) Either way it's a better way to spend time then the above post.

Book division. (-1, Troll)

LightningBolt! (664763) | more than 8 years ago | (#14541770)

The book can be divided into two general sections.

This is best done with a machete.

Everything you need to know about Photoshop (3, Interesting)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14541817)

So ya wanna be a Photoshopper, eh?

Participating in a FARK Photoshop contest can be a unique and rewarding experience. It can also be a nightmare rivaled only in scope and severity by the sudden popularity of reality TV. The experience you have will depend on how much of this page you read.
http://www.fark.com/farq/photoshop.shtml [fark.com]

Nuff Said.

A commentary on Drew Curtis (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14541908)

Drew Curtis can eat my balls of all the collected schmegma [goatse.cx] because he is a moronic coward who deserves to die. If I were you, I would hate fark. But since I am not you, I would regret being you if I were indeed you, So, IN CONCLUSION...GOOD DAY, SIR!

Re:A commentary on Drew Curtis (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14542177)

Troll = Duke fan.

Re:Everything you need to know about Photoshop (2, Informative)

perseguidor (777194) | more than 8 years ago | (#14542294)

Or you could join Something Awful and participate in its Photoshop Phridays:

http://www.somethingawful.com/photoshop/ [somethingawful.com]

Re:Everything you need to know about Photoshop (1)

jaseparlo (819802) | more than 8 years ago | (#14544172)

Or you could go to B3ta anytime http://www.b3ta.com/ [b3ta.com] or worth1000 once you get good.

Re:Everything you need to know about Photoshop (1)

rubicelli (208603) | more than 8 years ago | (#14544797)

Or Worth1000 [worth1000.com] (Photoshopping: it's not just for Fridays anymore!).

Consumer Reports (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14546887)

Why was Photoshop Elements missing from Consumer Report's review of digital photo editing software? That seems like a bizarre oversight raising the question of how qualified CR is even do software reviews. Another option would be that the review pool was stacked to provide a specific outcome.

Save $2.64! (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14541941)

Save yourself $2.64 by buying the book here: he Adobe Photoshop Elements Crafts Book [amazon.com] . And if you use the "secret" A9.com discount [amazon.com] , you can save an extra 1.57%!

Nobody Cares (-1, Offtopic)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 8 years ago | (#14542056)

This was posted over half an hour ago, and still has only 10 comments. Obviously nobody cares.

Re:Nobody Cares (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14542618)

Last post!

Boo (0, Troll)

spammyd (714691) | more than 8 years ago | (#14542236)

Why not also post the amazon link to buy the book plus a place to put in my credit card, boo on you for posting something that is a blatant advertizement for photoshop and a book that a person must purchase photoshop to use

you insensitivE clod! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14542275)

BSD managed to make then Jordan Huubard And abroad for America. You, part of GNAA if continues to lose

Time and patience? (3, Insightful)

thaerin (937575) | more than 8 years ago | (#14542446)

Yet many of the users of these cameras lack the time or patience to tackle the steep learning curve of the Photoshop family and are left asking "How do I do ... ?

Considering the widescale use of digital cameras today, I can't help but think a lot of the lack of use of this software stems not from "How do I do ...?" but rather the "I didn't know you could do that!" catergory. Besides a batch or two of red eye, how often does the average consumer actually even care about the end product? Judging by my Inbox, apparently not much as most don't even take the time to figure out how to resize or compress a picture before sending it to the masses. Besides, who needs to spend $ on a book when they can just call the tech/geek in the family.

back in the day (1)

tod_miller (792541) | more than 8 years ago | (#14543205)

I was called out to a small document writing office, as one of their older PC's was running out of space, they had no clue why.

Nothing installed, just basics. They had about a 20-25GB (Hooooeoeooewg at the time) hard disk.

I found almost 20gb of BMP files that the users had been storing, basically, random screen grabs. in BMP. Some were composite and were 8-16 mb files.

They had filled 20gb in BMP's, not even run length encoded. Most of it was black and white text, saved in a 32 bpp un compressed file.

more than 3000 BMP images.

*shudder* Almost makes you want to start some kind of 'save the hard disk' foundation.

Every year BMP files destroy an area of hard disk the size of the united kingdom. Act now, boycott bmp files on the web, and visit jpeg2000 compliant porn websites.

I wonder if fractal compression is actually better on lesbian porn that hetro porn.

Think about it... thats right... think about it...

signed

Tod the Miller of the Vale BSC SSC /obscure? //wrong site! ///more than one fark reference on slashdot? ////O RLY?

please type the word in this image: signed
random letters - if you are visually impaired, please email us at pater@slashdot.org

Microsoft Paint (3, Funny)

saboola (655522) | more than 8 years ago | (#14542580)

I prefer the book Microsoft Paint : A guide to drawing naked stick figures on public computers

Other Books that would Rate Higher? (1)

ewanrg (446949) | more than 8 years ago | (#14543104)

Given that the reviewer only gave this book a 6 out of 10, I'm wondering if the reviewer or other readers could recommend a book on Photoshop Elements that might be closer to a 10. I've been spending more time with my new camera (Canon 2 IS), and am thinking an upgraded camera should be accompanied by an upgraded user :-)

Alternately, is there anything similar out there for the latest version of the GIMP?

Programmers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14543134)

What programmers use photoshop for image manipulation? Does photoshop even take data from stdin? Why not use imagemagick or gd?

Which tools do I even use in GIMP for... (1)

Zantetsuken (935350) | more than 8 years ago | (#14544743)

I took a class on Photoshop at my community college, now, I'm not claiming to be the best in the world here, but most of what we learned had to do with image surgery (say, making it look like your fat bitch assed Aunt that you hate to hell and back, completely disappear from the picture, with only a few hints something got photoshopped). So, one of the first things I look to Photoshop for is doing this kind of work. My question is, if GIMP doesnt have the tools (if its not on the tools pallet, for all practical purposes, they might as well not even be there) Photoshop has for this kind of work, how do I do it in GIMP? Which is one of the major reasons the current GIMP not only cant touch Photoshop, but Adobe has a 30 mile restraining order on GIMP.

BTW: On the other hand, GIMP did have an impressive array of included textures to choose from (that weird little bubbly orange lava thing, umm... interesting)...

Photoshop Element team is laid off (1)

geekBass (665923) | more than 8 years ago | (#14545494)

I know someone used to work at Adobe in the elements team. They got the axe due to the Macromedia merger.
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  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>