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Installing Windows with Recent Updates?

Cliff posted more than 8 years ago | from the a-tailor-for-mine-emperor dept.

Windows 223

MoJo asks: "As a computer technician, I have to re-install Windows often. It takes three attempts to complete Windows Update (get latest update software, validate Windows, download updates). It seems like all this clicking could be scripted somehow, but I can find no-one who has found a way of reducing the whole painful affair to just one or two clicks." Is there a way to build a Windows installation CD that includes the most recent set of updates?

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FP (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591240)

FP

YOU SUCCEED IT!! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591648)

slashdot is gay

Terminal Server? (-1, Flamebait)

matth (22742) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591244)

Screw windows... install a Linux Terminal Server.. if a machine blows up.. you simply stick another cheap machine on the network and it's up in 30 seconds...

Install Cross-Over Office or WINE if you need to and your Windows applications work..

No more issues.

Flamebait? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591454)

Okay, maybe off topic, but come on! If the parent had been asking for advice regarding updating Linux and a Microsoft advocate had told him to switch to Windows instead, would that have been regarded as flamebait? A troll without a doubt, but not flamebait.

Yeesh. What an intolerant place ./ is these days!

Re:Terminal Server? (2, Insightful)

dotgain (630123) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592420)

Install Cross-Over Office or WINE if you need to and your Windows applications work..
No more issues.
Yeah, sure looks like you've tried it...

Slipstreaming (3, Informative)

ckswift (700993) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591247)

Ever here of slipstreaming? [google.com]

Re:Slipstreaming (2, Informative)

Stevyn (691306) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591312)

I've slipstreamed service pack 2 onto the windows xp cd, but you still have to go through the process the poster is talking about. I don't know if you can slipstream individual patches, however, even if you could, you'd still have to do it a few times a month. I think the poster is asking about a general script that would do this without human intervention, whereas slipstreaming still takes time.

mnb Re:Slipstreaming (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591508)

Why would you need to slipstream a few times a month?
Microsoft only releases patches the second Tuesday of the month.

Re:mnb Re:Slipstreaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14592451)

No, they don't. They release whenever they want to. It just so happens that they will often release a bunch on the second Tuesday of the month. But this is by no means certainly the case. Take for instance this month. Updates have been coming out one day, the next day, a couple days later, a week after that. So, no.

It is a drag that MS doesn't make this easier for their customers. I just did an install at work earlier tonight and at least three restarts and a bunch of clicking (at various times) to do the Windows Updates. And don't get me started about Microsoft Update not showing the SP2 Update for Office (the Office Update website does show it). Kind of negates the point of it, doncha think?

Re:Slipstreaming (4, Informative)

cowbutt (21077) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592355)

Combine some selective slipstreaming with the unattended build facility, e.g. using http://unattended.sourceforge.net/>unattended. My colleagues slipstream service packs and critcial hotfixes (i.e. those that can result in ones machine being 0wn3d during the install) into the installation image, then have a manually-updated .CMD script that runs on the first boot to bring in the others.

Re:Slipstreaming (1)

passthecrackpipe (598773) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592600)

Thanks for the tip - Unattended looks like a great toolset - I have been wanting to get my team off Ghost for a while now, and I'll get them to look into this.

Not just for servicepacks I might add (5, Informative)

toadlife (301863) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591321)

Most of the pages you will get when you google "slipstreaming" will talk about slipstreaming service packs, but you can also slipstream individual hotfixes into windows installations. Also not that Microsoft makes avaiable for download [microsoft.com] ISO Images containing every windows critical and security update. If you really want to make a slimpstreamed install of Windows with every single hotfix possible, this will save you time searching and download the iduvidual updates.

Re:Not just for servicepacks I might add (1)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591367)

Thanks for the link. Are the ISO images a recent thing, or have they been doing it for a while? I ask because it looks like the one available on the linked page only includes the updates released in January. You still need to get all the other updates released in the year+ between SP2 and January.

Re:Not just for servicepacks I might add (1)

toadlife (301863) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591385)

They just started doing the ISO thing. Long overdue I say.

Re:Not just for servicepacks I might add (-1, Offtopic)

ericdano (113424) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591863)

Funny, Apple has been doing that for a LONG TIME...........Since, um, OS X came out? Actually, before that, with System 9 updates.....

The ISO files don't help you at all. (4, Insightful)

Futurepower(R) (558542) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591703)

My understanding is that the ISO files don't help you at all. They are huge because they include all languages. Each ISO file includes only the critical updates for ONE month. I know of no way to integrate them into a single CD image containing Windows XP SP2 and all the critical updates.

It is possible to download all the separate critical updates, and run them from a batch file. But that's a hassle; Microsoft does not make that easy. This is another way that Microsoft is adversarial towards customers; they waste the time of some of the best-educated people in the world.

Re:The ISO files don't help you at all. (1)

toadlife (301863) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591786)

Oh I didn't know that they were only for the current month. I guess that makes sense, since ALL of the updates would certainly take more than one CD.

You could allways just install WSUS on a machine and have it download all of the updates for whatever OS you want.

Re:Not just for servicepacks I might add (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591865)

There is a section of the Windows Update site called 'Windows Update Catalog' (http://v4.windowsupdate.microsoft.com/catalog/en/ default.asp [microsoft.com] ). It provides an easy way to download all the hotfixes for a selected Windows version and language. Very nice :).

Use IE for this site (1)

mnmn (145599) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592081)

Site fails with Opera.

Re:Not just for servicepacks I might add (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14592004)

Ahhh, nonsense! Don't you understand, Microsoft doesn't want it to be easy to install the latest version of Windows (+updates) for any user! This also makes it dificult to re-install Windows when (as it inevitably does) break!

Let's look:
1. initial XP Windows install + all updates (remember SP2 itself is 272M!) is >> 1 CD
2. How would they get a chance to run their "Windows Genuine (dis)Advantage" check?
3. How would they get a chance to force IE down your throat? For instance, another post at this same level reports:
There is a section of the Windows Update site called 'Windows Update Catalog' (http://v4.windowsupdate.microsoft.com/catalog/en/ [microsoft.com] default.asp [microsoft.com]). It provides an easy way to download all the hotfixes for a selected Windows version and language. Very nice :).
Trying it in Mozilla gives:
Thank you for your interest in obtaining updates from our site.
To use this site, you must be running Microsoft Internet Explorer 5 or later.
To upgrade to the latest version of the browser, go to the Internet Explorer Downloads website.


Whenever it comes to customer convenience or Microsoft dominance, who wins?

Re:Slipstreaming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591428)

Ever here of English?

Re:Slipstreaming (2, Informative)

ajayrockrock (110281) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591495)

Slipstreaming is great. The windows guy at work does it for a bunch of our servers and he also rolls in his own device drivers into the system as well so there's no searching for floppy disks to install the RAID/SCSI drivers. He got the idea from this Maximum PC article:

http://www.maximumpc.com/2005/01/how_to_slipstre.h tml [maximumpc.com]

--Ajay

Google is your friend (4, Insightful)

MeanMF (631837) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591251)

Re:Google is your friend (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14592186)

Goddammit ask /. pisses me off. Half the question asked are answered with a three second google search. This is ask /., not ask-a-really-slow-and-troll-infested-version-of-go ogle.

Re:Google is your friend (1)

The NPS (899303) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592359)

You can't search for slipstreaming if you've never heard of it. Things are only easy to find when you're a little familiar with them in the first place.

Re:Google is your friend (3, Insightful)

Achromatic1978 (916097) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592406)

You did notice that the search terms he fed into Google didn't include 'slipstreaming', but only a couple of keywords the questioner asked in the article?

It's called Slipstreaming (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591256)

A lot of people just use it to update with SPs, but you can use it for regular updates and drivers, too. If you need help, you can use a utility like AutoPatcher [neowin.net] or nLite [nliteos.com] to get you started.

Re:It's called Slipstreaming (1)

students (763488) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591451)

I've used autopatcher with great success many times.

Re:It's called Slipstreaming (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14592495)

You might want to try the current version of AutoPatcher: AutoPatcher XP January 2006 [neowin.net]

It would be nice if Microsoft would make it easy to script the install onto one CD (or DVD). It is a sort of a drag to have to rely on a third-party for what Microsoft could do easily if they didn't want to sell MSCE and other worthless degrees by making sure Windows is (or seems) much more complicated than it can (or should) be. Case in point: here's [microsoft.com] how Microsoft expects you to "integrate software updates into your Windows installation source files" (please, read the document before you comment on how nice they were to make it easy for us).

Yep (1)

mikepaktinat (609872) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591258)

Two ways to make it easy I would think. One, use microfot's WSUS. Two, download the updates to a disc and read the documentation, you can create your own "slipped streamed" instalation media for reinstalling. I prefer the first option, use ghost to throw an image on a PC, let it sit for a day on the network, and if the GPO are configured properly, you can come in the moring to a completely updated computer.

Re:Yep (1)

matth (22742) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591269)

Well that's great, but Windows 2000 needs service back 3+ before it will work with WSUS... so you have to install something.

Re:Yep (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591319)

not if you have an image of 2000 with SP3 installed
Or you slipstream SP3 into your install media

Re:Yep (1)

forsetti (158019) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591288)

"Let it sit for a day on the network". Heh -- I wish! Depending on the phase of the moon, we (large public University network) have seen TTC (time to compromise) as small as 15 minutes for an unpatched system. Those patches have to go on immediately!

Re:Yep (1)

mikepaktinat (609872) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591340)

We have a downstream WSUS server from our main WSUS server. It sits in a private network. The only thing on this network is Ghostcast, WSUS and new clients.

Re:Yep (1)

toadlife (301863) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592310)

Clients need not have the firewall turned off to update themselves via a WSUS server, as the client intiates the connection. Slipstream an XPSP2 in your WindowsXP CD and the firewall will be on by default. In your default domain policy (or if you want to keep that clean, a seperate policy at the root of your domain), set the appropriate WSUS settings that will point the client to the WSUS server. When you join the PC to the domain it will get it's policy, and automagically update itself via WSUS - reboots and all. You might also need to set deadlines for all of the approved updates in WSUS so the computer updates itself right away.

If the computer is fairly new it should be able to update itself with all of the post-XPSP2 updates via WSUS in around 15-30 minutes with no interaction required.

Are the systems identical? (5, Informative)

eta526 (833281) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591265)

If all the hardware is the same, use Norton Ghost to create an image of the hard drive. Store this on an external drive or a network share and use this image on every computer. I did this for UMR (University of Missouri - Rolla) for the computer labs (over 900 computers), and it's really easy to pull down the old image, apply the new updates, and create a new "clean" image that can then be distributed to all the other systems.

We used BartPE or a bootable DOS disk (if the DOS network drivers were available) to boot the computer onto something besides the hard drive in order to create or restore an image.

If the hardware's different, you have to use Sysprep, but I haven't messed with that.

Re:Are the systems identical? (0)

ShyGuy91284 (701108) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591371)

That doesn't sound very legal. Even if you do have a license for each computer, as far as I know, there's no way to change the registration number of a Windows install once it's been installed and a ghost image has been made. Not to mention you then legally need a legit copy of Norton Ghost and everything else you might decide to include with it for every computer you install the image to. Although I have done zero research on the subject (Except that You'd need many licenses for Ghost), so this is all just assumption here.

Re:Are the systems identical? (3, Insightful)

gEvil (beta) (945888) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591396)

Welcome to the world of site licenses and concurrent use licenses.

Re:Are the systems identical? (1)

Ash-Fox (726320) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591420)

Actually there is no law stating that you can't use the same license key on every computer. Just that every computer has valid software licenses.

Re:Are the systems identical? (1)

eta526 (833281) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591432)

It is legal. Windows was volume licensed, meaning only one key for all the PCs on campus, and the software was either site licensed or only installed in the labs for which we had licenses. Ghost isn't installed everywhere, only on the bootable CDs, so the number of machines isn't an issue.

The procurement guy kept track of all the licenses (and actually read the EULAs as far as I can tell.) I'd have to go to him if I wasn't sure if we had enough licenses to satisfy a request, or if I thought there was a chance that what a professor or TA was requesting wasn't legal.

Re:Are the systems identical? (1)

ShyGuy91284 (701108) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591726)

Ah, I see. Sorry for doubting you. I wasn't sure if MS did site licenses using a single key. But it is illegal to use Ghost to apply an image to multiple computers, even if it does only exist on the main computer (Not that they could tell anyways since ghost doesn't leave a "This partition was created by ghost" that i know of). I checked the EULA because I was curious, and 10.v states "You may not use the Software commercially or non-commercially for the purpose of creating multiple computers or hard drives, except for multiple hard drives installed in or attached directly to the original computer." But my bad on the MS software.

Re:Are the systems identical? (1)

eta526 (833281) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591756)

Actually, we're clean on Ghost too, AFAIK. They're using 8 and 9 IIRC, so the license you read doesn't necessarily apply. I haven't read the license, but like I mentioned, the Procurement guy does so far as I can tell. I'm sure they'd have bought a site license if that was necessary. I don't know the exact terms, but as careful as they are about everything else, I sincerely doubt that something on that order could have slipped through the cracks.

Re:Are the systems identical? (1)

BlueStrat (756137) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592208)

Actually, we're clean on Ghost too, AFAIK. They're using 8 and 9 IIRC, so the license you read doesn't necessarily apply. I haven't read the license, but like I mentioned, the Procurement guy does so far as I can tell. I'm sure they'd have bought a site license if that was necessary. I don't know the exact terms, but as careful as they are about everything else, I sincerely doubt that something on that order could have slipped through the cracks.

You might check out Ghost for Linux (G4L). http://sourceforge.net/projects/g4l [sourceforge.net]

Assuming it will do what's needed, if your shop hasn't yet taken advantage of any OSS software, this might be a good candidate to get the camels' nose under the tent.

Strat

Re:Are the systems identical? (4, Insightful)

toadlife (301863) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591484)

"Even if you do have a license for each computer, as far as I know, there's no way to change the registration number of a Windows install once it's been installed and a ghost image has been made."

Got sysprep [microsoft.com] ?

Re:Are the systems identical? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591563)

Doesn't volume licensing solve this problem, atleast as far as Windows licensing is concerned? I would imagine that Symantec or another company would also have some type of licensing that is geared towards businesses with that number of machines.

Re:Are the systems identical? (1)

eta526 (833281) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591598)

Sassafras Keyserver is a good way to have a program installed on more systems than it is licensed for but only allow the licensed number to be run concurrently. I don't know details, but they can probably be found on the http://www.sassafras.com/ [sassafras.com] website.

From the site:
Regardless of the type of licenses you need to manage, when properly configured, K2 will always keep usage within legal limits. You can set it and forget it. K2 does the rest. You can predict future software demand and purchase only what your organization needs. You can even reclaim lost or abandoned software, and prevent the need to purchase replacement software.

Re:Are the systems identical? (4, Informative)

RESPAWN (153636) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591589)

That doesn't sound very legal. Even if you do have a license for each computer, as far as I know, there's no way to change the registration number of a Windows install once it's been installed and a ghost image has been made.

You've never heard of a volume license key (VLK) or of Microsoft's volume license program? The VLP version of XP (like the OEM versions) requires no online activation and uses different licence keys from the standard versions of XP. The CD-Key itself isn't your actual license to use Windows. It's merely one way of ensuring that the media was obtained legally. In the corporate world, you buy the VLP version of XP, and Microsoft emails you a CD key to use for all of your computers.

Also, changing the CD key is trivial. You just run Sysprep (found on the Windows CD) and in the course of running it, Sysprep will ask you for a CD key. This is the same software that you should be running on the PC before you make your Ghost image of it if you plan to join it to a domain.

Not to mention you then legally need a legit copy of Norton Ghost and everything else you might decide to include with it for every computer you install the image to. Although I have done zero research on the subject (Except that You'd need many licenses for Ghost), so this is all just assumption here.

I'm a little hazy on the legalities of this as well. The way it's always been explained to me is that you need a licnece of Ghost to create an image. Also, if you're running the full-on Windows client, you will of course need a license for that. However, I've always been told that when restoring an image to a PC, it is legally permitted to use the DOS version of Ghost without a licence for that PC. Now whether or not that's true, I'm not sure. I've never bothered to read the licence documentation, instead trusting the word of my higher ups.

Re:Are the systems identical? (2, Insightful)

rikkards (98006) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591724)

I'm a little hazy on the legalities of this as well. The way it's always been explained to me is that you need a licnece of Ghost to create an image. Also, if you're running the full-on Windows client, you will of course need a license for that. However, I've always been told that when restoring an image to a PC, it is legally permitted to use the DOS version of Ghost without a licence for that PC. Now whether or not that's true, I'm not sure. I've never bothered to read the licence documentation, instead trusting the word of my higher ups.

Nope you need to have a Ghost license for every single workstation that will have a Ghost image applied to it. I was involved in an update for a site of approx 17000 users and they mentioned that they would have to buy new licenses for all the machines if they decided to Ghost. They started investigating RIP from MS which comes free.

Sysprep is your friend you can get the machine to do practically everything including join to a domain (use an account that only has permissions to join a domain so that you don't divulge a key account) as well as creating generic images. I had an image that would work on over 8 different desktops and about 6 laptops.

Re:Are the systems identical? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14592271)

I just went through this on a smaller scale and discovered that the combination of RIP Linux (PXE booted of course) and the very excellent ntfsclone makes short work of it. The only thing that isn't handled automatically is creating a properly sized partition on the disk, if someone would put a little wrapper around ntfsclone (I know about partimage, but ntfsclone is way better than the limited ntfs support in partimage) to handle partitioning it would be very possible to make a completely scripted PXE based windows image deployer with free software. The ghost licensing demands are pretty sad considering how close a completely free solution is.

Re:Are the systems identical? (1)

GroundWire (671102) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592042)

I can respond to this authoritatively.

According to Symantec, you require a license for every computer DEPLOYED with Ghost, regardless of how it happens. (through the console, ghost/multicast, an image from a hard drive, or a drive-to-drive transfer)

I LOVE ghost, and I've been using it since v3.xx (when it was owned by a company named Binary Research) for doing harddrive upgrades. I really wish Symantec would pull their head out of their *** and sell me some sort of "technician license", where for $900 I can use it on as many computers as I want - because I can't afford to have a $25 license disappear everytime I use it on a client's machine in the shop!

Here are some sources you can read to confirm what I'm saying:

http://service1.symantec.com/SUPPORT/ghost.nsf/d87 bb6ce0bde286d88256d6a00452701/71b757789120db828025 701500716e86?OpenDocument&prod=Symantec%20Ghost%20 Solution%20Suite&ver=1.0&src=ent&pcode=sym_ghost_s uite&dtype=corp&svy=&prev=&miniver=sym_ghost_suite _1 [symantec.com]

http://service1.symantec.com/SUPPORT/ghost.nsf/doc id/2001031312251025?Open&src=ent&docid=20010322102 94225&nsf=ghost.nsf&view=d87bb6ce0bde286d88256d6a0 0452701&dtype=corp&prod=Symantec%20Ghost%20Solutio n%20Suite&ver=1.0&osv=&osv_lvl=&seg= [symantec.com]

(Note at the bottom of this particular page:)
Note: You are allowed to install the Ghost console numerous times, however, you must keep track of the total number of licenses used. This includes all clients managed by any console of a given version, plus all copies made with boot disks.

Re:Are the systems identical? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14592260)

Why not use dd for imaging?

(Note: i'm asking, I've never used it in making an image for a windows system!)

Re:Are the systems identical? (4, Informative)

RESPAWN (153636) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591542)

If the hardware's different, you have to use Sysprep, but I haven't messed with that.

Actually, it's always a good idea to sysprep on XP since if you don't you'll end up with multiple computers on the network with the same SID. That really becomes a problem with AD since that's how it uniquely identifies all of the computers in the domain.

Re:Are the systems identical? (1)

eta526 (833281) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591629)

I don't know the details, but the Desktop Infrastructure guys set up a nifty little perl script that would unjoin the computer from the domain, rename it based on a database entry (the same database the DNS servers use, I believe) and rejoin it to the domain. Like I said, I don't know details, but it worked great. I just ran the script before making the image and it would unjoin. The next time that computer or any created with its image booted up, it would remane itself and rejoin the domain. (It took 3 reboots to complete this, one after unjoining, one after renaming, and one after rejoining, but it still beats doing it manually on 7-55 computers at a time, depending on which lab.)

Re:Are the systems identical? (1)

RESPAWN (153636) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591660)

That is pretty nifty. Is there any way I could get a copy of that script and take a look at it? I've taken over the responsibility of creating drive images for my office, and possibly even our sister offices. I've been trying to research a way to make it more automated, but so far I have been unable to come up with the right combination of search terms on google to find what I'm looking for.

Re:Are the systems identical? (1)

rikkards (98006) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591732)

Sysprep is still better. You can do everything needed plus Sysprep resets all the hardware settings so that you can use the image on varying hardware platforms (different NICs, sound cards Video Cards, chipsets). Look up the OEMPNPDriverPath entry.
You can pretty much get it to the point that someone just puts in the workstation Name and that's it, everything else has been automated. You can even automate the naming to a certain degree.

Re:Are the systems identical? (1)

dotgain (630123) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592429)

Actually, it's always a good idea to sysprep on XP since if you don't you'll end up with multiple computers on the network with the same SID.

Wow, I never realised that. Obviously, neither did Microsoft. Not a week goes by you don't learn yet another staggering stupid thing that a Microsoft OS does.

Who'da thunk it? Organisations out there with two or more completely identical machines.

Re:Are the systems identical? (1)

hazem (472289) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592025)

You can use linux tools as well to accomplish this.

at a very raw level, using dd and gzip to make images of the harddisks.

Another pretty good tool is partimage. I use this myself. You can put images on another drive, or even over a network (I prefer to use NFS, but you can set up a partimage server elsewhere).

It can cause problems if the hardware in not identical. But, I think there is a windows tool called sysprep that helps the image know that it needs to re-search for hardware when it boots up again.

If your partition/disk sizes are different, then make hte partition as small as your smallest disk, and then use ntfsresize in linux to expand the partition back out to the full size of the disk.

This is so much better than re-installing everything every time because you can also install all your software and set things up "just so".

MSFN's Unattended Windows Install CD (4, Informative)

UnderScan (470605) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591285)

Its not that hard to use google. Do you realy want it that bad but are unwilling to search for it?
MSFN's Unattended Windows : Introduction [msfn.org]

Have you ever wanted a Windows CD that would install Windows by automatically putting in your name, product key, timezone and regional settings? And have it merged with the latest Service Pack to save time? Followed by silently installing all your favourite applications along with DirectX 9.0c, .Net Framework 1.1 and then all the required hotfixes, updated drivers, registry tweaks, and a readily patched UXTheme.dll without any user interaction whatsoever? Then this guide will show you how you can do just that! Through the course of this guide, you will create a CD that does all the installing for you. The CD will be fully updated with the latest hotfixes, and install all your programs for you.

Re:MSFN's Unattended Windows Install CD (0, Troll)

Gothmolly (148874) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591593)

Great... and then you're stuck with the .NET Framework^WDRM^Wspyware^Wkludgeware on your system.

Re:MSFN's Unattended Windows Install CD (2, Insightful)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591790)

"Its not that hard to use google. Do you realy want it that bad but are unwilling to search for it?"

It's perfectly reasonable to want to hear the opinions of others that have gone through it. No need to be an asshole.

Re:MSFN's Unattended Windows Install CD (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591919)

Good point. Besides, when I google for something, often I find my question followed by responses like "why don't you google for it?"

Norton Ghost (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591302)

Contrary to the slew of slipstreaming google links, application links (nlite for example), Norton Ghost is a wondeful application. But if you don't feel like spending money or scouring torrent sites, go with slipstreaming nlite.

Slipstream and SMS (2, Informative)

Centurix (249778) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591314)

If you manage a lot of desktops, Microsoft's System Management Server (SMS) is a good way to go. You get used to writing scripts for it after a while.

I'm pretty sure SMS is still an up to date product from Microsoft, unless they've developed something else in the last couple of years...

GIYF (2)

vonsneerderhooten (254776) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591326)

This [google.com] and this [microsoft.com] should get you started.

The essence of what you're looking for here is an unattended windows * install with hotfixes and updates streamlined. You can even go a bit further and build in additional drivers and software(JRE or AV, anyone?). In my experience as a tech, XP is the OS I find myself reload most often. One can also do unattended reloads of W98/ME/2k as well. All involve similar google searches.

Pretty much sums it up... (1)

the_flyswatter (720503) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591364)

This is pretty much what you asked for: http://www.vorck.com/hfslip.html/ [vorck.com]

From the site:
This process details how to create a CDROM of Windows XP or 2003 that slipstreams a Service Pack and the post-SP patches...

Re:Pretty much sums it up... (1)

TAiNiUM (66843) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591997)

HFSLIP is highly recommended. It is a windows batch file so everything it does is transparent and it can be considered an open solution. It supports 2k/XP/2003.

The batch file calls standard windows programs in order to integrate hotfixes, codecs, drivers, and lots of other neat stuff into a fresh ISO (automatically). Really quite easy, and the support is excellent.

The community is here: http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?s=828e7ef495f9 325af8454bbbb194f79f&showforum=129 [msfn.org]

And a full description is here: http://www.msfn.org/board/index.php?showtopic=5765 9 [msfn.org]

Ever hear of Terminal Server? (-1, Flamebait)

matth (22742) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591386)

TO THE MOD WHO MODDED THIS FLAIMBATE. THIS IS NOT A TROLL OR A FLAIM. IT IS THE TRUTH. IF YOU WANT TO RUN A NETWORK OF LOTS OF MACHINES USE TERMINAL SERVICES. A LINUX TERMINAL SERVER APPLICATION WORKS VERY WELL.

Screw windows... install a Linux Terminal Server.. if a machine blows up.. you simply stick another cheap machine on the network and it's up in 30 seconds...

Install Cross-Over Office or WINE if you need to and your Windows applications work..

No more issues.

Re:Ever hear of Terminal Server? (1)

Ash-Fox (726320) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591407)

You need to clean your shift key more.

Re:Ever hear of Terminal Server? (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591521)

If you're that upset by being negatively modded, then don't post on slashdot.

Re:Ever hear of Terminal Server? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591635)

FYI - not all applications work properly under wine or Crossover - here are just a few examples direct from the WINE application database: http://appdb.winehq.org/appview.php?versionId=2023 [winehq.org] http://appdb.winehq.org/appview.php?versionId=3688 [winehq.org] http://appdb.winehq.org/appview.php?versionId=757 [winehq.org] http://appdb.winehq.org/appview.php?versionId=3678 [winehq.org] http://appdb.winehq.org/appview.php?versionId=725 [winehq.org]

Re:Ever hear of Terminal Server? (2, Insightful)

mnmn (145599) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591723)

Doesnt work too well for all apps, and youre keeping all your eggs in one basket there. Performance becomes an issue fast. Not to mention upgrading or restoring from backups becomes impossible without disrupting everyone's desktops settings and other files.

Solutions like yours exist already. There are terminal client versions of XP and other companies including sun were selling real cheap graphic terminal thin clients a while ago. Not a smashing success.

And yelling and screaming on slashdot doesnt convince anyone at all.

Re:Ever hear of Terminal Server? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591793)

  • PARENT IS A TROLL
  • PARENT IS A FLAIM[SIC].
  • PARENT IS *NOT* THE TRUTH.
Linux is not the only way to do things. Windows performs just as well - and in fact much better then linux does when it comes to running windows apps.

funny enough Windows Server & desktop runs Windows Apps easier than trying to run them on linux (go figure)

. Get a life and learn to be less bigoted and learn a variety of platforms.

Use something like Acronis (1)

Pugslyyy (816429) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591400)

Even if you could get a clean (totally up to date) install of Windows, you still need to install all those other apps... I've found it so much easier to just image a base system I like with Acronis and then restore that image onto the new system. If I'm a little behind on Windows updates, it will catch up that first night when it runs update automatically at 3am.

Re:Use something like Acronis (2, Insightful)

slaker (53818) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591630)

So it doesn't bother you to have lots of PCs on your network with identical SIDs?

If you're taking the step of imaging, use Sysprep (google it) to make each install clean and unique, or at the very least find a copy of GHSTWALK.exe to run after the fact.

Re:Use something like Acronis (1)

direwolfwr (896541) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592458)

So it doesn't bother you to have lots of PCs on your network with identical SIDs?

If it's a domain based environment, having duplicate SID's shouldn't be a problem at all (since the domain-SID is used). Duplicate SID's are only a problem in a workgroup environment (where the local SID is used), in which case s/he could use Ghostwalker, PowerQuest SID changer, Altiris deployment solution or Sysinternal's newSID.

Nlite (5, Informative)

October (107948) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591440)

Nlite [nliteos.com] is a great tool designed exactly for this. I've used it for several installs, and have created a CD that will install XPSP2 with hotfixes and all my drivers, and none of the extra crap that gets installed by default. It starts up in my LCD's native res, includes all my critical apps (firefox, etc.) right on the CD, and is completely unattended.

Re:Nlite (2, Informative)

rhandir (762788) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591610)

I've used nlite. It is free as in beer, and worked well for me.

Three good things the previous poster didn't mention:
1. Nlite is menu driven. You can configure almost every aspect of the install, including which services are set to run manual or automatic. No funny stuff with regedit, no hexediting etc.

2. You can bypass the check for adequate memory/hd space to install xp on systems that shouldn't be able to run it.

3. If you are comfortable editing install exe's (or trust other people's edits) you can slipstream in applications. (Though you'll need to have the cd keys on hand when the system first starts up.)

Con:
Nlite uses .NET ver 2.

Re:Nlite (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591664)

I love nLite. I use it all the time to produce updated versions of my XP installation CD that I use for clients.

I do a lot of PC repair, and I keep copies of XP home & Pro with the latest hotfixes, etc. All I need to do is enter the customers cd-key when it asks for it, otherwise I sit back and relax. :-)

RyanVM's update pack (5, Informative)

Mitchell Mebane (594797) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591445)

As others have mentioned, it is fairly easy to slipstream SP2 into an XP CD. But if you want to integrate the more recent updates, there's really only one option. RyanVM's Windows XP Post-SP2 Update Pack [ryanvm.net] does exactly what you want and works like a charm. There are even third-party addon packs which let you add other interesting things to your XP install CD.

Re:RyanVM's update pack (1)

Aarondeep (90981) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592182)

mod parent up, this site is great and is updated with recent paks so you can keep up with all the hotfixes. I find slipstreaming acrobat reader and the .NET framwork paks saves alot of time

This Worked Very well (1)

MrShaggy (683273) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591488)

This Website [nu2.nu] was very well done. It explains how to make a bootcd, and how to get the ServicePack in as well. Very quick and easy. As long as you follow a few steps. This will work for Win2k.xp..prolly 2003 as well. Hope it helps. This also works for BIOS updates et al.

You don't (2, Informative)

55555 Manbabies! (861806) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591533)

You don't waste time installing the patches, you let WSUS do the work once you hook the computer on your domain.

You can also slipstream hotfixes and apps (3, Informative)

hillct (230132) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591536)

While slipstreaming service packs is a common practice, you can also slipstream hotfixes. Hack when I was in IT support we used this great script [wisc.edu] to automate the process. Some of the other links I still had bookmarked may be of value to people who not only want to slipstream service packs/hotfixes but also build an unattended installation CD. In our case we installed all the apps common to our PC images (except for office) from one CD. We threw the CD in, booted from it and came back 2 1/2 hours later to find a fully installed desktop with all our standard apps. This method is superior to using Ghost or other imaging software when you have a heterogenius enviroment where PC hardware varies drastically from depertment to department or desktop to desktop.

http://www.nu2.nu/bootablecd/ [nu2.nu]
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/ie/ie ak/default.mspx [microsoft.com]
http://unattended.msfn.org/unattended.xp/ [msfn.org]
http://www.appdeploy.com/packages/ [appdeploy.com]

This last link related to a commercial software distribution enviroment but but it includes an archive of the known switches accepted by various installers to make them silent. The technique we used was to use the unattended.txt file to add a RunOnce registry entry, to regedit (to marge a secondary gegistry file containing other RunOnce entries) to be executed on the second reboot to silently install our list of apps, where the installer commands used included the switches detailed on the appDeploy website (and many other palces across the web).

There are a relatively small number of installers out there that take a relitively well known set of switches to make the installation silent (accepting all the defaults). These methods saves us thousands of man-hours in PC deployment in the two years they was in use.

--CTH

NLite (3, Informative)

Timeburn (19302) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591544)

For those with never enough time to be as nitpicky as they'd like:

Nlite [nliteos.com] is a wizard which will prep custom XP or 2003 install discs for you. It will slipstream service packs and hotfixes in, add drivers (including storage or net drivers for the initial installer), remove drivers and services, allows you to setup unattended install, plus has tons of other tweaks and adjustments. You can then install directly from the modified install folder, or have Nlite prep an ISO and burn a bootable CD.

I recently used it to strip XP down to run in under 64MB RAM on an older laptop. Runs like a charm, and needed no updates when installed.

Also perfect for preparing an initial install image for use with RIS and sysprep.

Of course, you still have to find and download the hotfixes, but I think some of the other posts in this discussion have pretty well covered that part.

A little google... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14591561)

installing windows iso with critical updates [google.com] . Wow, that first link looks pretty useful.

A step down (0, Redundant)

Lacit (909742) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591588)

So when did Slashdot become tech support?

These types of questions can be answered using a quick search in Google...

unattendend.msfn.org (4, Informative)

duffbeer703 (177751) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591594)

This project describes how to do what you are talking about.

If you use ghost images, just setup a baseline PC that uses automatic updates or WSUS. Everytime updates are released, run sysprep and ghost the machine.

I pity those serviced by this computer technician (0, Troll)

juventasone (517959) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591599)

Any "computer technician" who doesn't know about slipstreaming or any of Microsoft's other Windows deployment methods probably isn't any more qualified than a random computer enthusiast. As its been posted here, there are also several other third party alternatives found with a simply phrased google search. Additionally, if you know what you're doing, you shouldn't have to be re-installing Windows on a regular basis. The more knowledge and experience you have, the more you'll be able to fix the problem, rather than dicking around or giving up and re-installing.

Re:I pity those serviced by this computer technici (1)

gooman (709147) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591788)

Well, every technician starts somewhere, don't be such a curmudgeon. While I agree that slipstream is a valuable (and basic) skill for any tech nowadays, I'm surprised at how many I've met that have never done it or knew it could be done!
That said, I've picked up a couple of links in this thread that were new to me. I was satisfied with the MS tools and method (they did the job) but now I'm interested in trying out some new tools.

You learn by doing. You learn by asking. Just don't stop learning.

Google is your friend (0, Troll)

HardCase (14757) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591653)

Fingers broken? Why not Google the answer instead of subjecting yourself to ridicule on Slashdot?

Images (1)

gruhnj (195230) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591731)

As has been pointed out earlier in this story, the best you can do is http://unattended.msfn.org/ [msfn.org]

Having said that, if you are doing this often enough why do you not have an image? Imaging spares you this work and you also get all of your applications as well. Your more likey to mess something up the more manual rebuilds you do, especially if you have a non trivial configuration. Better yet, with a little work with sysprep you can add drivers for multiple models. Bâshrat the Sneaky's DriverPacks [driverpacks.net] works for most hardware and takes minimal effort. I currently use the same image for about 15 different models of laptops. Having one image for all of my on site hardware makes updates a snap.

SGT Gruhn
BCT1, 101 ABN DIV(AASLT)

Autopatcher (3, Informative)

Lord Kano (13027) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591792)

I'm sure that there is a more elegant solution, but I use Autopatcher [autopatcher.com] , when I need to bring a system up to date.

Slipstream SP2 into an install CD. When it's installed copy over and run Autopatcher.

If I had to do it more often, I'd probably look into a better way but the 4-5 times a year that I need to install XP doesn't make it worthwhile.

LK

Just ghost it if it's the same computer... (1)

rob1980 (941751) | more than 8 years ago | (#14591855)

The amount of time you spend tracking down and integrating every security fix will far exceed the amount of time it takes to run Windows Update 3 times. Not to mention the fact your super duper Windows disk will be out of date by the next month anyway.

unattended.sourceforge.net (3, Interesting)

matithyahu (560061) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592022)

For a completely different, Free Software suggestion,
try unattended at http://unattended.sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net] Haven't used this at work but uses a Linux or windows server, a boot disk and you write the Perl scripts. Seems like a neat project, installs programs and does all the rebooting for you.

The university I work at recieves them from Dell with images, apps included we just do the 3 or so non-critical fixes since the image was sent to Dell.

Use VMPlayer and a WinXP VM with all the updates (1)

frenchrh (560234) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592248)

Just do a virtual machine of windows XP which has the latest updates and other software installed, ( and follow the licensing issues) and then make a snapshot or a clone. This simple directory structure can be booted as a VM (virtual machine) on any Intel/AMD system, under either simple windoes or better yet, simple Linux install. this way also you can "reload" your users to the initial snapshot, and therefore a fresh but up todate Winxp install, without all the windows bureaucratic overhead. so it they keep their files on network stores for example, then they can reset the snapshot on a dialy basis and avoid Windows normal decay/corruption processes. And VMPlayer is free, as is a decent Linux, like Open SuSE.

hfnetchkpro (2, Informative)

Kris_J (10111) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592299)

Google for hfnetchk, hfnetchkpro, shavlick or shavlik. Sorry I'm not on a real PC to make looking that up for you easier.

A healthy solution (-1, Offtopic)

eyepeepackets (33477) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592327)

Use this:

http://www.slackware.com/ [slackware.com]

It will solve the root of your problem. Every other solution offered here is a bandaid which will fall off shortly, will surely get infected, will probably leave scars and will cost a lot of time and money for a temporary "cure."

Oh yes, I almost forgot, the fee for the fix: Gratis.

Cheers.

A solution for recovery CDs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14592535)

To add another question, how do you do this without installation CDs but with recovery CDs instead? Mine at least don't allow for slipstreaming

Disk images with Linux instead of Norton Ghost (1)

rduke15 (721841) | more than 8 years ago | (#14592561)

For identical hardware, the best solution is disk imaging. This will also get you all the software installs and configurations, which is much more work than the basic Windows install + updates.

If you don't have Norton Ghost and/or don't want to pay for it, you can use a Linux Live CD and ntfsclone. I use a script on a USB drive based on these disk imaging instructions [alma.ch] .

For different hardware, the slipstreamed install disks suggested in previous comments seem to be a good starting point.
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