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386 comments

That Tauntaun thing... (5, Informative)

cnelzie (451984) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610441)

...wasn't how they survived the entire evening. It was just to keep Luke warm while Han built the shelter... Geeze.

    (Yeah, I am a Star Wars Geek.)

Uh...Guh...^H^H^H^H... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14610487)

Not as cool as our interview, but pretty neat.


That Tauntaun thing...wasn't how they survived the entire evening. It was just to keep Luke warm while Han built the shelter... Geeze.


Nerdlinger Quotient overload...system failing...blessed oblivion alluringly beckons...

Re:That Tauntaun thing... (3, Informative)

Mayhem178 (920970) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610533)

Right on. And Luke falling from the AT-AT, well, if you read the novelized version (written by Lucas), it explains that Luke didn't walk away from that unscathed, even though he tried using the Force to slow his fall.

Star Wars geeks unite!

Re:That Tauntaun thing... (1)

nbert (785663) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610548)

Exactly my thought. However, I'm wondering how they could imitate this kind of situation. Afterall there's no chance they'll kill some animal in some cold place and put one of their interns in it over night. That would be pretty cruel taking into account that it's just done "to be sure"...

Re:That Tauntaun thing... (5, Funny)

IAAP (937607) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610568)

Afterall there's no chance they'll kill some animal in some cold place and put one of their interns in it over night. That would be pretty cruel taking into account that it's just done "to be sure"...

You mean would be cruel to the animal. The intern, on the other hand, well, they're interns!

Re:That Tauntaun thing... (1)

nbert (785663) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610601)

I'm more concerned about the animal. We kill them for food, but usually we don't do it for entertainment. On the other hand I don't want to be the one sleeping in a bleeding corpse at all, but as you said, those are just interns ;)

Re:That Tauntaun thing... (3, Informative)

Fishstick (150821) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610751)

>those are just interns

They've elevated the others on the show this season. They used to be referred to as "the build team" or "Myth-terns", but they get billing as "MythBusters" the same as Adam and Jamie this season.

I don't think you're going to get Kari to crawl inside an animal carcas (she's a veggie). She could hardly stand it when they brought back a pig neck/spine with meat still on it to use inside a ballistics gel model.

The other thing is they seem to do is go out of their way to get animals that have died on the farm of "natural causes" as opposed to going to a slaughterhouse and carting away a freshly-killed carcass. I kind of doubt they are going to go get a horse or cow and kill it for a myth like this.

Re:That Tauntaun thing... (2, Insightful)

TekPolitik (147802) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610985)

We kill them for food, but usually we don't do it for entertainment.

They do in Spain

Re:That Tauntaun thing... (1)

dfn5 (524972) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610614)

Afterall there's no chance they'll kill some animal in some cold place and put one of their interns in it over night.

Why Not? They killed a whole bunch of bees all in the name of science.

Re:That Tauntaun thing... (1)

nbert (785663) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610810)

...because it was assumed that there was some practical use to it. But if you do the same because you are interested if some Star Wars plot is "realistic" you are just doing it for entertainment, because there's no real life use to it (not taking the 0.00001% probability into account, that you get lost in some arctic region and manage to kill a deer right before you are close to freezing).

Personally I don't care much about bees, but they are cold blooded anyways and they are way too small to fit anything inside it after all...

Re:That Tauntaun thing... (5, Informative)

ArsonSmith (13997) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610777)

As someone who grew up hunting and skinned many a deer and elk I can say that the insides will stay rather warm for quite some time. While bow hunting you often have to track an animal the next morning because a bow wont kill it right away. While I think Hoth was suppose to be something like -60 or more I know that an Elk will hold heat for well over 12 hours in 0-10degree weather.

Sounds like a social occasion (1)

sczimme (603413) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610554)


...wasn't how they survived the entire evening.

"Oh yes, we spent the evening in a most delightful tauntaun... The neighborhood was just beastly, though - I don't know how we survived."

I suppose the viability of the tauntaun-as-pita approach (smell not withstanding) would depend in large part on the [overall] specific heat of tauntaun innards. (I'm assuming here that the insulatory qualities of the fur would be pretty good.) The light sabre would be necessary to cauterize the incision, lest [even more] unpleasant leakage occur.

To sum up: eewww.

Re:Sounds like a social occasion (1)

hazem (472289) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610656)

My guess is that it would have been much better to leave the tauntaun alive and just snuggle up against it. While it's alive, it will continue to metabolize its fats and produce heat. A dead tauntaun is just a wet gooey blanket.

At best, maybe Han should have shaved off part of the hair so that Luke could get closer to the tauntaun's skin...

Re:Sounds like a social occasion (1)

miller701 (525024) | more than 8 years ago | (#14611053)

As someone else mentioned, the tauntaun had already keeled over.

Han may be a space pirate (who shoots first!) but he wouldn't kill a tauntaun just to save Luke, just ride the tauntaun back.

Re:That Tauntaun thing... (2, Funny)

zephc (225327) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610619)

"We'll cut it open to keep you alive, Luke"
"Uhh, Han, we're on Tatooine, and that's a Gungan"
"Exactly!"

Re:That Tauntaun thing... (2, Informative)

mordors9 (665662) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610674)

Didn't I read that the pygmies used to do that with elephants. Although how cold could it get in da jungle....

Re:That Tauntaun thing... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14610902)

Oh and for the record, the Tuantaun spit at Han first.

Re:That Tauntaun thing... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14610924)

Is that where the term "Luke Warm" comes from?

Starwars and the crew (1)

HeliumHigh (773838) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610457)

Wow, I would _not_ want to see what Jamie and Adam would do if they had lightsabers. Just imagine the practical jokes!

Re:Starwars and the crew (5, Funny)

dr_dank (472072) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610540)

Practical jokes? I'm thinking the SW angle is an excuse to get Kari into a slave Leia outfit.

The Real Myth (5, Funny)

Shadow Wrought (586631) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610490)

Does talking backward smarter make you sound? Hmmmmm?

Re:The Real Myth (1)

StalinsNotDead (764374) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610516)

Not smarter. Wiser.

Everyone knows Intelligence and Wisdom are different.

Re:The Real Myth (1)

Kesch (943326) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610543)

I agree with parent.

See right here on my character sheet. Here's the spot for Wisdom, and here's the spot for Intelligence. (I'm a Level 1 Monkey Coder FYI, but I plan to class into Killer Ninja at some point as well. Cookies for those who get the reference.)

Re:The Real Myth (1)

XenoRyet (824514) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610682)

I belive killer ninja is a prestige class for coder monkeys, so you won't have to cross-class. Just make sure you meet the requirements...

Re:The Real Myth (5, Interesting)

haluness (219661) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610773)

Just an interesting point, Yoda's form of speech actually belongs to a class of languages termed OSV (Object Subject Verb) whereas English is VSO (Verb Subject Object).

In fact there are real human languages that have OSV order.

More info at ahref=http://www.akerbeltz.org/beagangaidhlig/gram ar/grammar_VSO.htmrel=url2html-20202 [slashdot.org]http://www.ake rbeltz.org/beagangaidhlig/gramar/grammar_VSO.htm> and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_order [wikipedia.org]

Re:The Real Myth (5, Informative)

MutantHamster (816782) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610841)

"English is VSO (Verb Subject Object)."

No, is not English VSO. Is English SVO [wikipedia.org]. Sound VSO languages retarded.

Re:The Real Myth (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14610946)

Check out Derzu Uzala if you want to know more about Yoda :)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071411/ [imdb.com]

No wonder George Lucas was (again) inspired by Akira Kurosawa. Btw, Derzu Uzala was released in 1975 and won an Oscar (best Foreign Language Film), and Staw Wars: Episode V was released 5 years later in 198).

Deathstar (5, Funny)

damonlab (931917) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610531)

Does the Deathstar run Linux?

Re:Deathstar (1)

crumshot (746676) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610553)

I take it you didn't see Episode 6. You know that huge ball that went up in flames? Yeah, that was this Star of Death you mention. So to answer your question, no it doesn't run Linux... anymore.

Re:Deathstar (5, Funny)

Frequency Domain (601421) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610595)

Does the Deathstar run Linux?
No, but if the rebels had only had an Apple laptop they could have uploaded a virus and bypassed that whole shoot down the cooling vent thing.

Re: (2, Informative)

Mathiasdm (803983) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610637)

It obviously ran Windows! Wikipedia:

The first Death Star held 27,048 officers, 774,576 crew including troopers, pilots and crewers, 400,000 support workers and over 25,000 Imperial stormtroopers. It also carried assault shuttles, Skipray Blastboats, strike cruisers, drop ships, land vehicles, and support ships as well as 7,200 TIE fighters.

As one can see, it's heavily armed. Imagine a botnet of Death Star zombies!

For surface protection it sported 2,000 Turbolaser batteries, 2,500 ion cannons and at least 700 tractor beam projectors, plus, of course, the superlaser.

There we have it! Anti-spyware protection, anti-virus protection, anti-adware protection... The whole lot!

Clearly, we're talking about Windows.

Re: (4, Interesting)

LehiNephi (695428) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610980)

2000 Turbolasers and 2500 laser cannons isn't that much when you consider the size of the deathstar. A sphere with a diameter of 120km (according to Wikipedia) would have a surface area of over 45,000 sq.km. That leaves more than 10 sq. km. per weapon.

I guess that's why Darth Vader had to send out the TIE fighters...

Water cores (4, Insightful)

slavemowgli (585321) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610538)

Could you pilot a submarine through a planet's core?

"If it were possible to have a water core at the center of a planet, then perhaps, but the pressures would be significant," Imahara explains. "That would have to be some submarine."

"Would the inside of a planet be water?" Savage asks. "I don't think so."

Indeed, the pressure *would* be significant, and the water would either be in a solid or supercritical liquid phase - it'd be pretty unlikely that you'd find it possible to drive a submarine through it in either case, though, even if the submarine itself would be constructed to withstand the pressure and temperature at the core.

Of course, IANAP, though, so YMMV.

Re:Water cores (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14610591)


Could you pilot a submarine through a planet's core?

"If it were possible to have a water core at the center of a planet, then perhaps, but the pressures would be significant," Imahara explains. "That would have to be some submarine."


The canopy to the submarine was an energy force field.

When the sub lost power, the canopy force field would have shut down (along with everything else), drowning the occupants.

Re:Water cores (1)

XenoRyet (824514) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610707)

The canopy force feild was clearly on a redundant power system, for exactly such circumstances.

Man is my inner SW geek coming out in this topic...

Re:Water cores (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14610679)

Good thing we're not talking about Science Fiction .

Re:Water cores (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14610683)

If the planet wasn't as big as earth it would be easier. If the submarine didn't need to hold people in a gas environment it would be easier. Hell a submarine made out of lead should be able to get to the centre pretty easily, it's just getting back out that would be the hard part.

Re:Water cores (1)

benwb (96829) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610699)

You realize that when you apply pressure to ice it melts?

Water Phase Diagram (4, Informative)

everphilski (877346) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610743)

Water Phase Diagram [lsbu.ac.uk]

Note regions VIII-XI. With enough pressure yes, water will solidify. HOWEVER there is a temperature point at which the water will no longer solidify (not shown on this scale although you can see the "liquid dome" is increasing as temperature increases. Eventually if you go far enough to the right there is a point where only vapor exists, regardless of pressure.

So while GP is correct that pressure will solidify water there is also extreme temperature that will counteract the pressure. One must wonder why water cores don't exist in real life...

Re:Water Phase Diagram (2, Informative)

fjf33 (890896) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610923)

There is a temperature at which you don't have water anymore. In the presence of the right catalyst you may have a core that creates H2 and O2 if you get the pressure and temperatures right. You may not even need the catalyst.

Re:Water Phase Diagram (2, Funny)

Doctor Memory (6336) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610926)

With enough pressure yes, water will solidify.

Awesome! At my next party, I'm going to have forged ice cubes! And I'll put 'em in the grill and fry steaks with them!

One must wonder why water cores don't exist in real life...

Oh but they do [overclock.net]!

Re:Water Phase Diagram (2, Informative)

hesiod (111176) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610932)

> One must wonder why water cores don't exist in real life...

Well, perhaps the answer lies in how the planets formed to begin with. If it started off as mostly rocks and gaseous vapor (including water vapor) collecting together, the denser materials would collect towards the center of mass -- assuming the objects were collectively spinning with enough speed to create a force to draw the pieces together into a sphere/larger rock. Also, the water would remain a vapor until the solid rock nearby was cool enough for the water to condense. By that time, much material would have collected to form the core.

Keep in mind that I don't know jack about astrophysics and could be completely wrong.

Re:Water Phase Diagram (1)

TekPolitik (147802) | more than 8 years ago | (#14611073)

>One must wonder why water cores don't exist in real life...
Well, perhaps the answer lies in how the planets formed to begin with.

At least one star system in the Star Wars universe (Corellia - Han Solo's home system) was constructed artificially in the long-forgotten past. While Corellia involved relocating planets from other star systems, it seems reasonable to assume planet construction may also have been an option, and given Naboo seems to be a tranquil paradise it may well have been constructed for wealthy beings in pre old-republic days.

On the other hand we don't know for sure that there are no water-core planets "in real life" - in fact all we know about is the limited planets around an insignificant yellow star in an unfashionable area of the galaxy, together with the existence of a few gas giants and even fewer rocky worlds around some nearby stars.

Re:Water cores (1)

7macaw (933316) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610722)

>Indeed, the pressure *would* be significant, and the water would either be in a solid or supercritical liquid phase - it'd be pretty unlikely that you'd find it possible to drive a submarine through it in either case, though, even if the submarine itself would be constructed to withstand the pressure and temperature at the core.

Well, you just need to construct the submarine with a huge drill at her nose. It may be useful when targeting surface ships as well.

Re:Water cores (2, Interesting)

StarvingSE (875139) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610748)

I am sure that they did not go through the planets core during that sequence of TPM. I was always assuming they were just traveling through some kind of deep water caves that cut through the land as a short cut to their destination.

Its like how some people might call the deep water trenches in the Pacific the "planet core" to emphasis how deep they are.

Re:Water cores (1)

XenoRyet (824514) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610824)

That's what I always assumed as well. Makes particular sense given that the statement came from the gungans, who aren't particularly scientificaly, or geologicaly savvy. To a gungan deep cave == planet core.

Re:Water cores (1)

ILikeRed (141848) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610806)

The general idea is stupid, but I would point out a problem with your reasoning. Water, unlike most chemicals, EXPANDS when frozen - which is why the bottoms of our oceans don't freeze. (i.e. the pressure at the bottom of the ocean prevents the water from freezing.) You can test this yourself, fill a bottle all the way up with water, put it in your freezer, and see if the bottle expands or contracts.

Re:Water cores (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610814)

But I thought that solid water (ice) was less dense then the liquid form. Therefore, if you compress water enough, it cannot turn into a solid.

Re:Water cores (5, Interesting)

pclminion (145572) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610993)

But I thought that solid water (ice) was less dense then the liquid form. Therefore, if you compress water enough, it cannot turn into a solid.

There are twelve known physical types of ice [lsbu.ac.uk]. Look at the phase diagram carefully. Even at 10,000 gigapascals there are forms of ice. Most of these types are denser than water. What we typically think of as "water ice" is specifically called Ice-1 (there are two subtypes, cubic and hexagonal). Ice-2 through Ice-10 are all denser than water, with Ice-10 being 2.5 times as dense. That's some heavy ice. Ice-11 is less dense than water, but Ice-12 is again denser.

Our observations of water here on earth are not really representative of all the forms of H2O in nature. On the contrary, a big part of the reason why life is able to exist on this planet is that we are almost exactly at the triple point of water. By the weak anthropic principle, we only observe those forms of water that are conducive to the existence of life.

Animal Guts (1, Insightful)

AviLazar (741826) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610542)

Yea they do stink, a lot (ever hit a deer, your car will stink for at least a year)....But, an animal of that size (essentially an animal that is big enough to act as a mount for a human) would probably retain enough warmth to keep a person (inside of it...yuck) at a decent temperature for 4-5 hours.

Re:Animal Guts (1, Funny)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610589)

(ever hit a deer, your car will stink for at least a year)

      Of course you could always try washing it...

Re:Animal Guts (2, Interesting)

AviLazar (741826) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610712)

Of course you could always try washing it...

The deer guts manages to find itself into various areas that is near impossible to wash without taking the car apart. In my case, because I had to drive my car home, enough of the deer stuff got in the ventilation system.

Re:Animal Guts (1)

butterwise (862336) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610851)

In my case, because I had to drive my car home, enough of the deer stuff got in the ventilation system.

That's why, whenver I hit a deer, I butcher it at that moment, on the spot.

REMOVE Animal Guts (2, Informative)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610803)

I think the real goal would be to dump the animal's viscera and use the large rib cage and fat/hide as a sort of shelter or smelly windbreak. The damp gutsy stuff in an opened-up belly would very quickly be a big old heatsink in the sort of wind and temps portrayed in the movie.

If you really a fun portrayal of this sort of thing, watch the evade-the-British-captors scene in the 1995 version of Rob Roy [imdb.com], starring Liam Neeson. That's a great movie, even without light sabers. Ye Old Ferrous Cutlery does just fine for those Baroque combatants. Tim Roth does a particularly slimy job as the primary villain. Highly recommended.

The only good wars... (5, Funny)

truthsearch (249536) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610584)

"Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls. Contrary to what you've just seen, war is neither glamorous nor fun. There are no winners, only losers. There are no good wars, with the following exceptions: The American Revolution, World War II, and the Star Wars Trilogy. If you'd like to learn more about war, there's lots of books in your local library, many of them with cool, gory pictures." -- Bart Simpson

Re:The only good wars... (0, Offtopic)

fashionfirst (949194) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610623)

off topic anyone?....

Re:The only good wars... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14610718)

The article relates to Star Wars. The quote relates to Star Wars. It's an oblig. Simpsons quote. I can see by your ID you must be new here...

A 50 footer? (5, Informative)

Otter (3800) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610586)

Could you survive a 50-foot fall into a snow bank like Luke Skywalker did?

Huh? Jamie Pierre just broke the skiing cliff-drop record [localnews8.com] with a 245-footer in Grand Targhee. I haven't seen the video yet, but supposedly he didn't even land it cleanly. (The New Zealander who previously held the record hit a 225-footer into slush, landing on his back with a backpack full of foam.)

C'mon, a 50-footer won't even get you into a movie nowadays unless you throw at least a 720...

Re:A 50 footer? (1)

pclminion (145572) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610864)

C'mon, a 50-footer won't even get you into a movie nowadays unless you throw at least a 720...

Yeah. Anybody who's flipped through a volume of Accidents in North American Mountaineering could tell you that people have survived MUCH longer falls than 50 feet, and people have survived long falls (80+ feet) onto solid rock as well. It is highly dependent on your orientation when you land. You probably aren't going to get up and walk away from something like that, but survivable? Absolutely.

My favorite ... (2, Insightful)

WankersRevenge (452399) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610598)

Could you survive a 50-foot fall into a snow bank like Luke Skywalker did?

"It's plausible, depending on the exact conditions," Imahara explains. "You could survive, but you'd be pretty badly hurt. Let's just say you probably wouldn't be jumping up on a tauntaun and riding to the next outpost, if you know what I mean."

*cough*cough* ;) [boston.com]

Re:My favorite ... (2, Interesting)

maxume (22995) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610755)

A guy who lived across the hall from me in college, in the dorm, had a roof outside his second floor window. He conjured up a snow shovel, made a pile, went to the fourth floor, and jumped.

He did it again from the fifth floor. 3 stories is what, 40 feet? He was fine, physically anyway.

I must be weird (2, Interesting)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610615)


I must be weird. I just watch the movies and don't talk about them much if at all. Tech and stuff in Star Wars is just too much of a stretch, what I'd refer to as fantasy, rather than Sci-Fi. Trying to explain stuff from Fantasy, down that path madness lies.

so, y'see, if greedo shot first, han wudda been blinded anyway, so...

The lightsaber myth... (5, Interesting)

Vexler (127353) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610620)

Can a weapon like a lightsaber actually exist?

Even the most uninformed fan knows that it's not just the light, but it's plasma being shaped into a cylindrical shape approximately 1 meter in length (according to the Episode III novel) that gives the lightsaber its power. (Yes, and the Force, but let me just talk about the saber for the moment...)

One of the problem has to do with the state of the plasma, often called the fourth state of matter. It is by no means solid, and yet the fact that the lightsaber has a distinct shape when activated and the fact that two lightsabers can clash in a duel mean that there is a solid-like boundary to the blade that is inviolable. On the contrary, often we see the blade cutting through other objects and body parts with frightening ease. (Just ask Count Dooku.)

Which brings me to another issue: The power required to confine the plasma in a blade-like configuration (be it magnetic or otherwise) may well exceed the power to generate the blade in the first place. It seems almost redundant for a weapon of this type to be built, as the builder can control and direct the flow of plasma with a device no more than 30 centimeters in length. As someone else said regarding construction of Dyson Spheres, "If you can build it, you don't need it."

Re:The lightsaber myth... (4, Funny)

radtea (464814) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610904)

the fact that two lightsabers can clash in a duel mean that there is a solid-like boundary to the blade that is inviolable

Clearly there is some kind of quantum coherence going on in the plasma that effectively makes each lightsaber a single giant fermion. Then the Pauli exclusion principle keeps any two lightsabers from occupying the same space. This is why the only thing (other than Chuck Norris) that a lightsaber can't cut through is another lightsaber.

Re:The lightsaber myth... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14611000)

Even the most uninformed fan knows that it's not just the light, but it's plasma being shaped into a cylindrical shape approximately 1 meter in length (according to the Episode III novel) that gives the lightsaber its power.


Hold on there, Poindexter - a lot of us are fans of the (original) movies and the action figures without researching the technicalities of the construction and operation of a lightsaber. My only examination of such things came when I was playing with my brother's plastic lightsaber. If you substitute "relatively uninformed massively over-interested or overly-critical Star Wars geek" for "uninformed fan", your statement would be much more accurate.

Re:The lightsaber myth... (1)

NickeB (763713) | more than 8 years ago | (#14611029)

On the contrary, often we see the blade cutting through other objects and body parts with frightening ease. (Just ask Count Dooku.)

Body parts? Obi-Wans mentor nearly succeeds in melting his way through a blast door, who cares about some fragile body parts?

Skip the article... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14610631)

No pictures of Keri.

Death Star? (3, Funny)

jollyroger1210 (933226) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610678)

Would it be possible to have something as big as a death star? How about Star Destroyers?

Imagine, a Beowulf Cluster of Death Stars.

Don't read if you love Star Wars (5, Interesting)

Microsift (223381) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610736)

I'm going to ruin it for you... In episode IV, the Storm Troopers set their blasters for stun and fill the room up with blaster energy (it was represented as concentric circles), and capture Princess Leia. Why on Earth wasn't this the default setting? Much is made in the movies about the Jedi's ability to block blaster fire with their light sabers, (and in Vader's case his hand). It seems like the obvious tactic against a Jedi is set for stun, knock the Jedi out, set for kill, kill the Jedi. No muss, no fuss. But they never do this...

Re:Don't read if you love Star Wars (1)

XenoRyet (824514) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610783)

That's easy. A Jedi would easily be able to resist the effects of the stun setting. There are numerous Jedi tricks (both Cannon and EU) that can be used to maintain conciousness under adverse conditions.

Re:Don't read if you love Star Wars (1)

kailoran (887304) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610892)

There could be a zillion possible reasons, including:
  - lightsabers might block stun blasts just as well
  - range, accuracy and effectiveness) of stun mode could be unusable in real combat
  - the jedi could be immune to the stun blasts (the force) (although I think it would take quite a jedi to withstand a lot of hits. they aren't all-powerful after all)
etc.

I think Stun was a new setting for blasters (1)

Jurrasic (940901) | more than 8 years ago | (#14610936)

Developed only after the Jedi were already exterminated, since there is no sign of this setting prior to episode IV. Neener!

Fifty foot fall (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14610860)

My dad was in the paratroopers (I was born at Ft Campbell). On one jump, one of his fellow paratrooper's chute didn't open, and neither did the reserve.

Dad says the fellow fell 2000 feet (divide by three for meters), landed in a muddy, plowed field, and didn't break a single bone! He was in the hospital for his bruises for only 2 days (this was in 1951).

OTOH my Grandfather worked for Purina, and went four floors down an elevator shaft onto a concrete bottom (roughly fifty feet) in 1959. He lived, but he would have beeen better off if he'd died; he was a complete cripple and severely brain damaged, but he lived. But he didn't land in snow or a plowed, muddy field.

So yes, it's completely plausable to not only fall fifty feet into a snowdrift, but to get up and ride that funny looking horse.

-mcgrew

Wasnt this already done? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14610964)

Seems like their was a show on the science channel about the science of star wars and star trek. Hardly a myth.
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