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Sound Waves Kill Skin and Prostate Cancer Cells

samzenpus posted more than 8 years ago | from the sing-the-cancer-away dept.

Biotech 107

Anonymous Coward writes "A recent Study in the British Journal of Cancer shows that the use of Quercitin and 20KHz ultrasound for 60 seconds killed skin and prostate cancer cells. 90% of the abnormal cells were dead within 48hrs. Since low frequency ultrasound was previously shown to enhance the skin penetration of topical substances up to 1000 times, it would seem that a topical Quercetin cream with a low frequency ultrasound wand might be just the ticket for those annoying little skin cancers that tend to occur in older geeks who have spent a bit of time in the sun."

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107 comments

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Killing cancer? (5, Funny)

ZaBu911 (520503) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622164)

Sounds great!

Re:Killing cancer? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622233)

:) Nice pun. Sorry that I don't have any mod points. Sadly, you can expect those with no sense of humor to mod you as "offtopic".

Re:Killing cancer? (1)

Bradee-oh! (459922) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622433)

14 comments in and no funny mod?

Bravo.

What else kills cancer... (1)

benjamindees (441808) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622467)

I love how slashdot goes from Bill Gates' taxes, to Chuck Norris [chucknorrisfacts.com] , to cures for cancer.

Re:Killing cancer? (1)

nonuttin (851992) | more than 8 years ago | (#14624573)

killed skin and prostate cancer cells

What I want to know is how did they get that cream on a prostate?

Re:Killing cancer? (1)

ntshma (864614) | more than 8 years ago | (#14625043)

Let me guess, to use the wand to kill prostate cancer you have to get the wand near the prostate? Does this cream have lubricant properties?

I shouldn't be able to hear ultrasonic (1)

iamlucky13 (795185) | more than 8 years ago | (#14630246)

Depending on the source you refer to, the human audible range is quoted as being as large as 16-22,000 Hz, meaning this falls short of ultrasonic.

What the article ultimately seems to say, is that listening to Mariah Carey can improve the effectiveness of topical cancer treatments. I say it's not worth it.

fr1st ps0t (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622167)

fr1st ps0t from the donald dcuk 0rg4sm troll

Wow (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622175)

geeks who have spent a bit of time in the sun

They exist?

Re:Wow (4, Funny)

(negative video) (792072) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622252)

geeks who have spent a bit of time in the sun
They exist?
What is this "sun" of which you speak?

Re:Wow (1)

brilinux (255400) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622399)

Have you ever read or seen some science fiction? So, they talk about traveling to distant planets and stars and such, but it turns out that there is actually some truth in this; we are all actually on a planet called "Earth", orbiting a star called, "the Sun". It is quite intriguing, actually.

Re:Wow (1)

dcapel (913969) | more than 8 years ago | (#14623451)

oh, you mean Sol! Oh, if your inferring we are actually in /Terra/, then of course I know what you primitives call the sun.

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14632697)

Sun: AKA, The Dreaded Day Star. 1) That which arises as the typical geek is trying to get to sleep. 2) That which heats the seats of the 1969 Vista Cruiser to a skin peeling temperature. 3) That which could kill us in a mere 7 minutes should it choose to belch (or fart for that matter). 4) That which is responsible for knocking out satellite and radio transmission, and causing blackouts when a sufficient number of vestal virgins have not been sacrificed to in witness of it's almighty power! 5) That which makes the sky glow in the northern territories, in an "aurora" of trippy colors and patterns (or maybe it was the windowpane, but everyone said it was the sun...). 6) That which causes you to blink when emerging from the cooconish basement of your parent's humble abode...

Re:Wow (3, Funny)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622280)

They exist?

Depends... do they mean "in the Sun(TM) [sun.com] "?

Re:Wow (1)

Almost-Retired (637760) | more than 8 years ago | (#14623438)

Well, not ALL of us are die-hard geeks about sitting in front of a computer in the weak light of man-made lights ALL the time.

I've had to have 3 spots removed from my face by freezing, and one on my back by a little deeper cutting, it came back negative though.

In addition to the computer work over the last 25+ years, I've also logged a few hundred thousand on a motorcycle, made the form and poured the blocks and laid up a retaining wall about 44" high & 100 feet long over the last 3 summers, in addition to the usual yard work & an occasional fishing trip. By the end of summer this 71 year old white boy looks pretty dark allthough its not as even as it was 60 years ago, darnit...

So yes, you could generally say that I don't need a vitamin D suplement in the summertime. :-)

I find this to be an interesting story in view of the fact that I'm now at that age where prostate problems can be worrysome but aren't just yet.

I get the feeling that with all the medical things we've discovered, and the rate of discovery, will if intelligently applied, are such that the first person to outlive Methusaleh has already been born. He will of course be independently wealthy because it will be charged for by the sharks^H^H^H^H^Hmedical profession who see such as a way to collect even more money. It won't be me by any means since I've developed insulin resistance and have to watch my sugar intake pretty closely, and failure to do that will eventually lead to all sorts of circulation problems that lead to a fatal heart attack. But, at 71, despite the aches and pains, I still feel pretty good most of the time, so I have hope for a few more years yet. I need to lose another 30 lbs to match the 30 I've taken off since being told to read my sugar a year ago, but that seems to have hit a cold weather standstill & will wait till I get back out and work it off come warm weather again.

OTOH TPTB who control this, would look at my passing as a plus for SS's financial future, hence I don't expect to see real efforts made to implement much of this on the population as a whole due to the price to be charged for these "unusual" services. It is not in societies best interest that I draw SS based on the 55 years I worked and contributed to SS, for another 40 years. With the effects of inflation, my withdrawal rate (ignoreing the interest income I could have made had that money been invested in a compound bearing account all these years, but thats another beef entirely) I will have used up my contributions in another year or so.

The key phrase is TANSTAAFL, whether TPTB spell it out in understandable terms or not, which generally speaking, will not be done in words that Joe Sixpack will grok. That could^H^H^H^H^Hwould lead to serious social problems for TPTB at the end of the day.

American SS would be in seriously deep excrement if everyone lived for 5 years past their retirement party, and I haven't quite done that yet myself as I worked till I was 67. Many don't even make it to the party and thats all part of the equation that makes it almost work as the best ponzi scheme ever perpetrated on the american public, by the government no less. :-)

Extending the lifespan, without also extending the productive working years in roughly the same proportion, as was done by the last modifications to the SS act, simply is not good fiscal responsibility. Either that, or a much larger fraction of the working income is paid in taxes to support the benefits paid out for the longer lifespan. I believe some of that effect is seen in tax rates paid by the working class in the more socialist Scandinavian countries.

And thats my $0.02, adjust for inflation since 1934, then discount as required.

--
Cheers, Gene

Spelling Mistake (1)

woolio (927141) | more than 8 years ago | (#14623759)

Sun??? Sun???

Nah, they just mis-spelled "CRT Monitor"

Re:Wow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14623891)

Nudists are just another type of geek. They probably get enough sun to make up for the rest of us.

yep, scientist geeks. (1)

oneiros27 (46144) | more than 8 years ago | (#14624777)

There's lots of scientist geeks out there who interact with the sun. (and by 'interact with', I mean, sit in basements and look at pictures of it)

But I've actually seen some of them go into the big blue room while the glowy thing is still out.

Time in the Sun (1)

namespan (225296) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622189)

"might be just the ticket for those annoying little skin cancers that tend to occur in older geeks who have spent a bit of time in the sun."

Interesting. Is this some kind of career benefit one accrues with experience or time spent at the company?

Re:Time in the Sun (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622777)

It's all the unprotected CRTs. They're hell on your DNA.

Re:Time in the Sun (1)

turrican (55223) | more than 8 years ago | (#14623806)

Interesting. Is this some kind of career benefit one accrues with experience or time spent at the company?

Neither. The exposure usually occurs near the beginning, when you're the FNG (f'ing new geek) and are the one sent out on a 7-11 run.

Of course, not having to do this is yet ANOTHER benefit of having snackies on-site.

C'mon (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622191)

.. feel the noise, girls rock your... FIRST POST!

Text of Article for those who can't get BJC (0, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622192)

Therapeutic selectivity plays a crucial role in determining the success of chemotherapy. Some of the current targeted therapies attempt to localise drugs to cancer cells based on overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) (Mendelsohn and Baselga, 2000) or angiogenesis (Carter, 2001). Antibodies, inhibitors, antisense therapy and gene therapy are also among a few strategies that have gained momentum (Guillemard and Saragovi, 2004). Many of these strategies have now reached clinical trials; however, these methods are still limited by issues including low potency, delivery complications, multi-drug resistance, side effects, collateral damage (Tattersall and Clarke, 2003) or incomplete success (Lynch et al, 2004). In an attempt to develop a targeted chemotherapeutic strategy, we propose the use of bioflavonoids, which are common dietary supplements, in conjunction with low-frequency ultrasound. Quercetin, a major bioflavonoid in human diet, has been identified as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer (Singhal et al, 1995; Choi et al, 2001), colon cancer (Salucci et al, 2002), ovarian cancer (Chan et al, 2003) and prostate cancer (Knowles et al, 2000; Nakanoma et al, 2001; Kobayashi et al, 2002). Antiproliferative action of quercetin is hypothesised to be mediated by attenuating phosphorylation of activated hsp transcription factor (hsf), shortly after its trimerisation (Nagai et al, 1995; Lee et al, 1998), thereby resulting in increased susceptibility of hsf to proteolytic degradation and as a consequence inhibiting all downstream events, including hsp expression (Li et al, 1999). Since hsps are constitutively overexpressed in many tumours (Jaattela, 1999), inhibition of hsps is an attractive chemotherapeutic strategy. hsps form a complex with mutant p53 protein (mp53), thereby prolonging the half-life of malignant mp53 and allowing tumour cells to bypass the normal mechanism of cell cycle arrest (Selkirk et al, 1996). In spite of its therapeutic benefits, utilisation of quercetin in clinical applications has been limited by low potency and poor specificity. Additionally, it is difficult to sustain therapeutic quercetin concentrations in blood by oral ingestion (Lamson and Bringall, 2000). Here, through in vitro studies, we demonstrate for the first time, using two pairs of normal and cancer cells (human skin fibroblast and human prostate epithelial cells), that ultrasound selectively sensitises cancer cells against quercetin. LC50 of quercetin for skin cancer cells is selectively decreased by almost 80-fold by a short pretreatment with ultrasound. MATERIALS AND METHODS Cell culture Normal and cancer cells derived from prostrate and skin tissues were investigated in this study. DU145 prostate cancer cells were provided by Dr L Wilson at UC Santa Barbara, CA, USA. Nonmalignant prostrate normal cells (Catalog No. CRL-11609), nonmalignant skin cells (Catalog No. CRL-7761) and skin cancer cells (Catalog No. CRL-7762) were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC, Rockville, MD, USA). All cells were grown as monolayers and were kept in a 5% CO2 environment at 371C. Cell cultures were maintained in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) with glucose (1 g l1), NaHCO3 (3.7 g l1), L-glutamine (2mM), nonessential amino acids (0.0815 g l1) and 10% FBS. Antibiotic-antimycotic cocktail (Catalog No. 15240-062, Gibco, Invitrogen Corporation, Carlsbad, CA, USA), at a final concentration of 100Uml1 of penicillin, 100 mgml1 of streptomycin and 0.25 mgml1 of amphotericin B, was added to all cultures. Cells were harvested at a concentration of about 3105 cells ml1, by washing with versene (NaCl - 8 g l1, KCl - 0.2 g l1, NaH2PO4 - 1.15 g l1, K2HPO4 - 0.2 g l1, Na2- EDTA - 0.2 g l1 in distilled water with pH adjusted to 7.2) followed by 2-3-min digestion with trypsin/EDTA (0.25%/0.02%). Revised 1 November 2004; accepted 18 November 2004; published online 1 February 2005 *Correspondence: Dr S Mitragotri; E-mail: samir@engineering.ucsb.edu Ultrasound application and quercetin treatment Aliquots of 2ml cell suspension (3105 cells ml1) were plated in 12-well plates. Ultrasound was applied to cells prior to quercetin exposure. Other sequences of ultrasound and quercetin application were not studied and may yield different results. Ultrasound was applied at a frequency of 20 kHz and an intensity of 2Wcm2 (Sonics and Materials, Danbury, CT, model VCX 400). Ultrasound intensity was determined using a hydrophone (Tezel et al, 2002). Ultrasound was applied at room temperature for 60 s by directly immersing the transducer half-way down the meniscus in the well. The temperature of the cell suspension was recorded to ensure that no significant elevation of temperature (o51C) was observed. 20 ml of quercetin solution prepared in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) was immediately added after each sonication to the wells to achieve a final quercetin concentration of 0-50 mM. Cells were analysed for viability at the end of 48 h. In experiments involving multiple exposures of ultrasound, the adhering monolayer of cells in the wells was washed with the procedure described above. The washed cell suspension from each well was made up to 2ml by adding DMEM and subsequently sonicated by plating it in a new 12-well plate. Additional exposures were performed in some experiments at the end of 48 and 72 h and cell viability assessed at the end of 96 h. Cell viability prior and during experimentation was determined using Trypan blue exclusion under a light microscope. Gel electrophoresis and Western blots Malignant and nonmalignant skin cells were treated with ultrasound and quercetin (50 mM) and their hsp content was assessed using Western blots after 48 h. Specifically, the culture medium was removed after the treatment and the wells were washed three times with PBS to remove the serum and dead cells. The removed culture medium was mixed with PBS and centrifuged for 10 min to recover the dead cell pellet. 200 ml of lysis buffer containing 20mM Tris (pH¼7.4, Sigma), 150mM NaCl (Sigma, St Louis, MO, USA), 1% Triton X-100 nonionic detergent buffer (ICN Biomedicals, Aurora, OH, USA) with 1mM pepstatin, leupeptin and PMSF (Sigma Chemicals, St Louis, MO, USA) was added to the well and the dead cell pellet separately to obtain respective cell lysates. The cell lysates were then centrifuged for 10 min and the supernatant protein extracts were used for electrophoresis measurements. Electrophoresis samples were prepared on a cell number basis by mixing the two protein extracts and using the previously obtained cell density data, such that all the samples contained proteins from an equal number of starting cell population (roughly 6105 cells per well). Heat shock protein 72 (hsp72) mouse monoclonal IgG antibody (Catalog No: SPA-810, Stressgen, Victoria, BC, Canada) was used to measure the induction of inducible form of heat shock protein 70 family (hsp70), viz., hsp72. Anti-mouse IgG horseradish peroxidaseconjugated antibody (Amersham Pharmacia, UK) was used as the secondary antibody. Dilutions of 1 : 1000 for the primary antibody and 1 : 5000 for the secondary antibody were typically used. Images were captured using X-ray films by the ECL Western blotting detection kit (Amersham Pharmacia, UK) and quantified by densitometry by using the software ImageQuantt TL (Amersham Biosciences, UK). RESULTS Cytotoxic effects of quercetin and ultrasound were assessed using two pairs of normal and cancer cell lines (human skin fibroblast and human prostate epithelial cells). The pair of skin cells was obtained from the same donor and differed from each other only in terms of malignancy. Cells were incubated with quercetin (0- 50 mM) with or without prior exposure to ultrasound (20 kHz, 2Wcm2, 60 s). A strong concentration-dependent cytoxicity was observed in skin cancer cells for the combined ultrasound and quercetin treatment (Figure 1A, closed squares), but not in nonmalignant skin cells (Figure 1A, open squares, Po0.001 for quercetin¼50 mM). About 90% of viable population of skin cancer cells was lost in 48 h after ultrasound and quercetin (50 mM) treatment (Figure 1A, closed squares). In the absence of ultrasound, quercetin showed no significant effect on either malignant or nonmalignant skin cells after 48 h incubation (Figure 1A, closed circles and open circles, respectively; P40.90 for 50 mM quercetin concentration). Similar results were obtained for prostate cancer and normal cells (data not shown, Po0.05 for ultrasound, followed by quercetin (50 mM) treatment). Enhancement in quercetin cytotoxicity towards skin cancer cells due to ultrasound exposure (defined as the fraction of cells killed with ultrasound exposure divided by the fraction of cells killed without the use of ultrasound at the same quercetin concentration) increased with increasing quercetin concentrations (Figure 1B, closed circles; Po0.02 for 50 mM quercetin concentration). Ultrasound had no effect on quercetin toxicity towards nonmalignant skin cells (Figure 1B, open circles). Tumour selectivity (defined as the number of dead cancer cells divided by number of total dead cells; for equal number of normal and cancer cells treated) as high as 82% was observed. Ultrasound alone had no effect on cell viability of either type of skin cells (viability of 9675% for both types of skin cells). The effect of ultrasound on quercetin-induced cytotoxicity is clearly due to the synergistic activity between the two and not due to the direct effect of ultrasound on cell viability. The LC50 (quercetin concentration necessary to reduce cell viability by 50%) for skin cancer cells was also significantly reduced by ultrasound pre-exposure (Figure 2A: filled bar - skin cancer cells, open bar - nonmalignant skin cells). In the absence of ultrasound, LC50 of skin cancer cells was 98 mM. However, a single exposure to ultrasound for 60 s reduced LC50 to about 9 mM and two further applications of ultrasound 24 h apart reduced LC50 by 80-fold to about 1.2 mM. LC50 of nonmalignant skin cells was not significantly altered (450 mM in all cases). To assess the specificity of synergy between quercetin and ultrasound, similar experiments were performed using another drug geldanamycin (a drug known to interfere with hsp90 cycle) and ultrasound. Geldanamycin alone exhibited cytotoxicity consistent with prior reports (Gan et al, 1998); however, no synergistic effect with ultrasound was found. Selective effect of quercetin and ultrasound on skin cancer cells was accompanied by an effect on the inducible form of hsp70 (hsp72), which has long been known to confer protection to cells under severe stress (Kiang and Tsokos, 1998) and has been identified as a target of quercetin (Hansen et al, 1997). Skin cancer cells exhibited higher concentrations of hsp72 (1.8-fold, Po0.05) compared to corresponding nonmalignant cells (Figure 2B, lane 4 vs lane 1). This observation is consistent with the generally accepted notion that cancer cells overexpress heat shock proteins (Jaattela, 1999; Jolly and Morimoto, 2000; Nylandsted et al, 2000). Ultrasound alone or ultrasoundquercetin had minimal effect on cellular hsp72 in nonmalignant skin fibroblasts (Figure 2B, 12% decrease for ultrasound alone, P40.90, and 22% decrease for ultrasound50 mM quercetin, P40.76). A combination of ultrasound and quercetin (50 mM) induced a significant decrease in hsp72 concentration in skin cancer cells (72% decrease, Po0.01, Figure 2B). In the same cells, quercetin alone decreased hsp72 concentration by 31.4% (Figure 2B, lane 7) and ultrasound alone decreased hsp72 concentration by 31.7% (Figure 2B, lane 5). DISCUSSION The effects reported in Figures 1 and 2 are unlikely to originate from enhanced transport of quercetin by ultrasound. Quercetin is a small and slightly lipophilic molecule (molecular weight¼302 Da, octanol-water partition coefficient, Ko/wB1.270.13 (Brown et al, 1998)) Selective chemotherapy using ultrasound and quercetin S Paliwal et al 500 British Journal of Cancer (2005) 92(3), 499 - 502 & 2005 Cancer Research UK Translational Therapeutics and is expected to diffuse across cell membranes at a high rate. Intracellular quercetin concentrations are expected to be in equilibrium with extracellular concentration even without ultrasound. Moreover, under the conditions used for the experiments in this study, a moderate degree of cavitation was observed (data not shown) and was not strong enough to induce significant membrane permeabilisation (as judged by lack of intracellular uptake of calcein under identical conditions), and hence incapable of pushing quercetin into cells. It is not clear at this stage as to how ultrasound selectively sensitises cancer cells against quercetin. It is possible that the selectivity originates from the effect of quercetin as well as 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0 10 20 30 40 50 Enhancement in cytotoxicity Quercetin concentration (M) 0 A B 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 0 10 20 30 40 50 Fraction of viable cell population Quercetin concentration (M) Figure 1 (A) Fractional loss of viable skin cancer cells (closed squares) and skin normal cells (open squares) when exposed to various concentrations of quercetin after a short exposure to ultrasound (20 kHz, 2Wcm2, 60 s). Po0.25 for 5 mM quercetin concentration; and Po0.001 for 25 and 50 mM quercetin concentration. The figure also shows fractional loss of viable skin cancer cells (closed circles) and skin normal cells (open circles) when exposed to various concentrations of quercetin without ultrasound exposure. P40.35 for 5 mM quercetin concentration, and P40.90 for 25 and 50 mM quercetin concentration. Error bars indicate standard deviation. For skin cancer cells exposed to quercetin alone, error bars are shown only on one side for visual clarity. (B) Enhancement of cytotoxicity due to ultrasound application in skin cancer (closed circles) and skin normal cells (open circles) after incubation with quercetin at various concentrations. Po0.30 for 5 and 25 mM quercetin concentrations; Po0.02 for 50 mM quercetin concentration. Each point represents the average of three to five points. Error bars indicate standard deviation. Unpaired t-test for unequal variance was used to calculate probability values. 1 10 100 LC50 (mol l-1) Quercetin alone Ultrasound one dose + Quercetin Ultrasound three doses + Quercetin 1 2 3 C A B US US+Q C US US+Q Q 4 5 6 7 Normal Cancer Figure 2 (A) Reduction of LC50 for skin cancer cells (filled bar) and skin normal cells (open bars) due to application of ultrasound and quercetin. Quercetin alone has an LC50 of about 98 mM for skin cancer as well as skin normal cells. A single application of ultrasound (20 kHz, 2Wcm2, 60s) prior to incubation with quercetin substantially decreased LC50 for skin cancer cells to 9 mM, but only moderately affected LC50 for skin normal cells (86 mM). Application of three ultrasound pulses (prior to quercetin application, at 48 h and 72 h after the first application) further reduced LC50 for skin cancer cells to 1.2 mM. Application of two pulses had no significant effect on LC50 for skin normal cells. (B) Cellular concentrations of hsp72 in nonmalignant skin cells (first three lanes) and skin cancer cells (last four lanes). The first lane shows hsp72 concentration in nonmalignant skin cells prior to exposure to ultrasound or quercetin (control). The second lane shows hsp72 concentration in nonmalignant cells exposed to ultrasound alone. The third lane shows hsp72 concentration in nonmalignant skin cells exposed to ultrasound, followed by 50 mM quercetin for 48 h. The fourth lane shows control samples for skin cancer cells. hsp72 concentration in skin cancer cells is higher than that in skin normal cells. The fifth lane represents skin cancer cells exposed to ultrasound alone (20 kHz, 2Wcm2, 60 s). The sixth lane shows hsp72 concentration in skin cancer cells exposed to ultrasound and subsequently to 50 mM quercetin for 48 h. The seventh lane represents cells exposed to 50 mM quercetin alone for 48 h. Selective chemotherapy using ultrasound and quercetin S Paliwal et al 501 British Journal of Cancer (2005) 92(3), 499 - 502 & 2005 Cancer Research UK Translational Therapeutics ultrasound on stress response. Quercetin has been shown to interfere with the stress response and inhibit hsp72 both at protein and mRNA levels in certain cells (Hosokawa et al, 1990; Elia and Santoro, 1994; Jakubowicz-Gil et al, 2002). Ultrasound, being a mild stress, may also induce a stress response in mammalian cells. It is possible that the interplay between the effect of ultrasound and quercetin on hsp cycle leads to selective sensitisation of cancer cells against ultrasound. Whether or not other mild stresses, for example, hypoxia, yield similar results remains to be seen. Since elevated levels of hsps are broadly associated with survival of cancer cells (Burdon, 1987; Lasunskaia et al, 1997), chemotherapeutic strategies that target hsps are attractive. With further studies focused on in vivo testing and mechanistic understanding, this technique may provide a potential treatment for the treatment of cancer, especially skin cancer. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank Professor Stuart Feinstein and Professor Leslie Wilson for their discussion on the subject. We also acknowledge Ashwini Ashok Kumar, Tawni Koutchesfahani and Cecilio Moreno for their support and experimental help. Selective chemotherapy using ultrasound and quercetin S Paliwal et al 502

Re:Text of Article for those who can't get BJC (3, Funny)

Krach42 (227798) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622231)

Serious dude... paragraphs, are awesome.

Re:Text of Article for those who can't get BJC (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14628073)

"Serious dude... paragraphs, are awesome."

So is proper puncutation. You should try it sometime.

Re:Text of Article for those who can't get BJC (1)

Krach42 (227798) | more than 8 years ago | (#14629106)

So is proper puncutation. You should try it sometime.

You complain about my punctuation, because it does not comply with your educated standards.

My choice of punctuation was chosen specifically to indicate the pauses in speech that I wanted expressed, and which would have been expressed had I been speaking the words myself.

Namely, I *wanted* a pause in speech after paragraphs. To break it appart and indicate the use of topicative speech in English, as best as it exists. This would be similar to the usage: "Beans, I like them."

Just because my puncuation use varies from your strict and narrow confines of perceived authority, does not make it wrong.

Full-text of article: (2, Funny)

mendaliv (898932) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622193)

Induction of cancer-specific cytotoxicity towards human prostate and skin cells using quercetin and ultrasound (god that's a mouthful)

FP (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622195)

FP

iDoctor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622218)

I just downloaded that to my iPod and I'm using it to remove my tattoos.

Now bend over as I... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622248)

insert this speaker...

Oh where is John Katz when you need him?

Slight problem eh? (3, Funny)

product byproduct (628318) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622250)

Too bad the 20 Kelvin*Hertz waves kill skin.

Re:Slight problem eh? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622419)

well they do use liquid nitrogen to freeze off skin tumors but Nitrogen condenses at a balmy 77 K.
And since when is 20 kHz 'low frequency'

Re:Slight problem eh? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622473)

"And since when is 20 kHz 'low frequency'"

Sorry, there wasn't enough room to put Low Frequency Ultrasound
in the title. 20KHz is considered the low end of ultrasound.
Happy?

Re:Slight problem eh? (2, Informative)

qbwiz (87077) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622584)

KHz is Kelvin-Hertz. kHz is kilohertz. Notice the capitalization. It's the same thing as kB versus kb.

Re:Slight problem eh? (1)

Wilson_6500 (896824) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622752)

Someone messed up in the summary. The Pubmed abstract (first link) says 20 kHz meaning kilohertz.

I think anyone using kelvin-hertz as a unit--for whatever unholy reason--would at least have the decency to write Hz-K or K-Hz to remove ambiguity.

Re:Slight problem eh? (1)

schon (31600) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622779)

It's the same thing as kB versus kb.

Actually, I think that the "k" stands for "kilo" (or "kibi", if you're retarded) in both of those. :o)

Re:Slight problem eh? (1)

DaemanUhr (829300) | more than 8 years ago | (#14624628)

It's the same thing as kB versus kb.

Actually, I think that the "k" stands for "kilo" (or "kibi", if you're retarded) in both of those. :o)

Actually, I think the point was, kB and kb are not the same thing: the capital B in the former means bytes, while the lowercase b in the latter means bits. 800 kB does not equal 800 kb. Don't f*ck up the capitalization is the lesson here. KHz and kHz are two very different things.

Re:Slight problem eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622839)

I can't seem to find anything goolging (or is it Googling) for "Kelvin Hertz" that
indicates it is ever used as a term of measurement. Therefore the
capitalization seems to be a moot point to me. 20kHz ultrasound device designers
shouldn't be confused.

please type the word in this image: violator

Re:Bad Googler! BAD!! (1)

25thCenturyQuaker (739040) | more than 8 years ago | (#14623413)

You must not be too handy at Googling.

kelvin-hertz relationship (physics.nist.gov) [nist.gov]

Maybe you'd prefer a Pittsburgh (PA)-based acid jazz DJ Kelvin Hertz [download.com]

Re:Bad Googler! BAD!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14623761)

I saw that.

The link you reference shows the relationship between the two and NOT
that the term "Kelvin Hertz" is used as a unit. Since kelvin
is a temperature unit, presumably the relationship has
something to do with molecular vibration -- but it is not
possible to tell from the provided link.

Would that be (1)

RaNdOm OuTpUt (928053) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622269)

Is that "skin cancer" and "prostate cancer" cells or "skin" and "prostate cancer" cells? (fp?)

Re:Would that be (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622564)

There was not enough room in the title for redundant words to
please all the grammar Nazis. I sense you lack focus youngling.

Cancer treatment. No side effects. Cheap.

Slashdot (1)

noz (253073) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622290)

"... those annoying little skin cancers that tend to occur in older geeks who have spent a bit of time in the sun."
So noone on Slashdot then?

Re:Slashdot (1)

Caspian (99221) | more than 8 years ago | (#14624658)

He's on Slashdot now?

Dude, I MUST find this Noone guy, I've been hearing his name EVERYWHERE.

Frenzy, Rumble, Laserbeak... (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622295)

Operation...
Human Emasculation...
Eject, eject, eject!

Sun ? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622301)

Sun? Only serious geeks program those... This is one of the few times I'm glad I program a Windows box.

Groovy baby (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622356)

Maybe protiens and waves have something in common.

Just perfect... (2, Funny)

nemik (909434) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622359)

Now I have to choose between keeping my skin or avoiding prostate cancer....

Now I have an excuse... (1)

gmf (810466) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622385)

I didn't fart, that was my prostate cancer prophylaxis!

Misleading headline (5, Insightful)

TeknoHog (164938) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622390)

I didn't even RTFA, but it seems from the summary that the sound itself doesn't kill the cancer cells -- it helps the drug penetrate into the tissue.

Re:Misleading headline (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622428)

It sensitizes the cells as well as acting as a penetrant for
the Quercetin. BTW calling Quercetin a drug is a misnomer. It
is a nutrient (bioflavanoid to be specific).

Re:Misleading headline (2, Funny)

c_fel (927677) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622449)

You're right. It helps the drug penetrate the body. And I tried it. I smoked my pot while listening a low frequency ultrasound and I felt 90% stoner !

Picky, picky. (4, Informative)

twitter (104583) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622691)

There's not much to read besides abstracts and that's too bad. One of the abstracts said it well:

Pretreatment of cells with ultrasound (20 kHz, 2 W cm(-2), 60 s) selectively induced cytotoxicity in skin and prostate cancer cells, while having minimal effect on corresponding normal cell lines.

Selective toxicity is what cancer treatment is all about, so while the sound man not "kill" cancer, it's a promising treatment.

It would be nice to see the actual studies. I'd like to see the statistics, and see if any other methods were tried and the researcher's reasoning. It may be that dysplastic cells are susceptible to sonic damage and this might work with other therapy methods, such as xray or heat. I'd also like to know how they treated prostate cancer, which is the number two cancer killer of men in the US.

Re:Picky, picky. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622974)

hi - we were wondering if you were going to address the concerns raised related to this [slashdot.org] post.

Thanks.

Re:Picky, picky. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14623046)

Selective use of heat has been applied to a variety of human tumors, in vivo, predominantly by oncologists in the Netherlands. (Google "hyperthermia cancer" for more info.) Cryotherapy, likewise, is a fairly common treatment for recurrent prostate cancer, as well. Both work by inserting little probes into the tissue in question and heating (or cooling), using tempreature measurements as a guideline to direct therapy. (This is a very basic description.)

The standard of care for treatment of prostate cancer remains surgery or radiation therapy.

The study quoted is interesting, but VERY preliminary. It was done in vitro, using cells in a Petrie dish. This does not even remotely approximately a real-life situation. I am unclear, for instance, how one would get the activating agent into the prostate. If something like this pans out, I predict it will be at least 10 years away.

Re:Picky, picky. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14623416)

"The standard of care for treatment of prostate cancer remains surgery or radiation therapy."

IOW death. Either quickly by poisoning, or slowly from the other cancers the radiation induces.
Thanks, but no thanks.

"If something like this pans out, I predict it will be at least 10 years away"

I have no doubt that, in conventional circles, it will not. Neither quercetin nor
20kHz ultrasound wands require: a prescription, millions of dollars in drug development
money, or are patentable. The economic incentive for big Pharma is not there.

Since 20kHz increases the penetration of topical substances, it should be very easy to
run a trial on skin cancer patients. I doubt such a trial will ever occur. But that fact won't
stop a skin cancer patient from buying some quercetin, dissolving it in fat
(coconut oil woould work), applying it topically, and exposing the area to 20kHz.

Egads! Humans treating themselves for medical issues! The horror! Next they'll be riding
bicycles instead of driving cars! When will it end!

Re:Picky, picky. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14624651)

There was some research a while ago using much higher energy ultrasound to kill prostate cancer. The sound energy could be better focused so, unlike radiotherapy, not killing nearby very useful tissue like the bowel and bladder control system.

acoustic holography (1)

obtuse (79208) | more than 8 years ago | (#14627354)

Use a multi-beam or acoustic holography technique to deliver destructive ultrasound to specific tissues. That may provide sufficiently selective toxicity. Surgery causes its own tissue damage, and I've even heard the needle biopsy described as creating a stream of metastases along the path the needle is withdrawn.

This is why I was initially apprehensive about diagnostic ultrasound with my kids, but the diagnostic ultrasound process delivers orders of magnitude less energy.

Only 90%? (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622457)

I haven't read TFA, but if this process only kills 90% of the cancer cells, won't the regrowth eventually become resistant?

D

Re:Only 90%? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622530)

The other 10% survive because the ultrasound helps them metastasize and spread to the rest of the body.

Re:Only 90%? (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622673)

Incorrect. In any case, adding Curcurmin to the mix would solve that
problem -- http://www.tribuneindia.com/2001/20010221/cth3.htm [tribuneindia.com] .

http://www.thepowerhour.com/curcumin/Turmeric.pdf [thepowerhour.com] (warning pdf)

I love it.

Re:Only 90%? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14623423)

Regardless, if tumeric is effective in fighting cancer (I don't disbelieve the study BTW), it has many other disease fighting abilities. There's a number of articles on in it in some European Journals of Gastroenterology (the US based ones haven't 'discovered it yet' since it can't be patented ;) ).

If you have an upset stomach, a couple of tumeric pills should make you feel better. It works really well.

Re:Only 90%? (1)

Wilson_6500 (896824) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622767)

Combine this with standard treatments. I'm not a doctor, but I would guess you can irradiate these types of tumors.

Re:Only 90%? (1)

Mo6eB (832959) | more than 8 years ago | (#14624034)

This won't be a problem. For the cells to become resistant, they would have to mutate. When they mutate, their DNA won't match yours and your immune system will clean them up in no time.

The whole problem with cancer, is that its DNA matches your DNA, so your immune system doesn't reject those cells.

Wow, keep my skin or be rid of my prostrace cancer (1)

acercanto (930670) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622557)

Hard choice there. The title actually talks about killing skin cancer cells as well as prostrate cancer cells...

Where? (2, Interesting)

triso (67491) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622675)

"A recent Study in the British Journal of Cancer shows that the use of Quercitin and 20KHz ultrasound for 60 seconds killed skin and prostate cancer cells....
So, where do you rub the Quercitin cream and place the ultrasound probe to kill prostate cancer cells?

Re:Where? (2, Funny)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622843)

It rubs the cream upon it's skin. Or else it gets the probe again.

Re:Where? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14623070)

Since the pubic bone is rather thick, I'd guess you'd be
talking a quercetin enema. Might sound gross but for someone with
one of the most deadly and painful cancers -- I'd doubt there
would be much objection. The ultrasound should have no problems
penetrating the bone though. But...I think you could stand a
60 second ultrasonic quercetin enema if it meant it would save your
life. I'm sure the Hulk could have handled it.
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0084642/ [imdb.com]

Please type the word in this image: external

Geeks Don't Know From Fiery Orb in Sky (1)

gadlaw (562280) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622602)

What is that fiery orb in the sky? I'm pretty sure the incidence of skin cancer in geeks is way way below that of the rest of the population. Now if we're talking carpel tunnel syndrome then we're into geek territory. But the sun? Geeks live indoors.

sound (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622659)

What was that?

Woot (1)

JDWTopGuy (209256) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622728)

1. Make CD full of songs with proper frequencies
2. Kill cancer
3. ?????
4. PROFIT!!!

Re:Woot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622944)

That should be 3 question marks, not five.

Re:Woot (1)

bobzieruncle (812075) | more than 8 years ago | (#14626560)

1. Make CD full of songs with proper frequencies
2. Kill cancer
3. ???
4. PROFIT!!!

Step 1 has been done already. It just remains for someone to scour the delete bins for old *Nsync and Boyz II Men albums and repackage them as cures for cancer. ;-)

As bad as it is to joke around about cancer... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622781)

I mean, this is absolutely terrible to think about, but wouldn't it be hilarious to see some guy holding a speaker to his nuts blasting Barry White just to get rid of cancer?

Marketer's dream (2, Funny)

itwerx (165526) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622788)

just the ticket for those annoying little skin cancers that tend to occur in older geeks who have spent a bit of time in the sun.

Oh yeah, and we all know that's a billion-dollar market just waiting be tapped! :)

Sun washed geek (1)

imposterX (687193) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622812)

Hey guys, not all geeks adhere to the strict cathode ray glow suntan. I for one sport a genuine tan, although it's not hard to get in an Australian summer. This is sometimes the thing that irritates me about the nerd cliche. Although many people live the cliche, there are probably many more "nerds" out there that are playing sport and out in the sun all the time. my 2c

Re:Sun washed geek (1)

Jippy T Flounder (819544) | more than 8 years ago | (#14625325)

once again - the geek is the one with the suntan. the nerd is the one with the umbrella, 2 inches of sunscreen pasted on his face, and he's probably wearing his trenchcoat on the beach. of course - this is all in the unlikely event that he's ventured so far as to get to the sand.

Re:Sun washed geek (1)

vidarh (309115) | more than 8 years ago | (#14625501)

It's not that easy. The geek/nerd distinctions varies markedly by geography, from slight differences to having switched place completely. And in many places there isn't any distinction between the two terms at all.

Re:Sun washed geek (1)

Jippy T Flounder (819544) | more than 8 years ago | (#14633195)

then in the interests of public safety, perhaps it would be wise if we standardized. i believe that if we create a consortium, we can bring all interested parties under one umbrella, and get some decisions made.

Re:Sun washed geek (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14625719)

You're not from around here are you?

I see your 2c and raise you 2 more (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14628306)

You probably don't truly qualify as a geek. Somewhere you got this stupid idea that, these days, it is cool to be a geek, so you call yourself one. It never was cool and never will be cool. Yes, I use a computer, too. I'm not a geek because of it. Geeks don't call themselves geeks, other people brand them geeks.

oooh! (1)

La Fourmi Nihiliste (906448) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622817)

well this calls for a new iPod accessory: the 20KHz ultrasound stick. and it should come complete with topical Quercetin cream. but for the 60 secs of 20KHz Ultrasound, you will have to buy it 99cents on the iTMS. ant

Vibrating Butt Plug cures cancer? (1)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622822)

But you have to put the special cream on, too, eh?

Yes Comrade! (3, Funny)

Stonent1 (594886) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622928)

In Soviet Britain, you kill cancer!

Kills what, again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14622954)

At first, I thought the title was saying that the sound waves kill both prostate cancer cells and skin.

IN SOVIET RUSSIA... (1)

cralewyth (934970) | more than 8 years ago | (#14622991)

...Prostate kills YOU!

No, hang on...

...Prostate kills YOUR Sound waves!

Nope, that's not it either...

...Sound Waves kill YOUR Prostate!

Wait wait, that sounds nasty....

...Sound Waves kill YOUR Prostate CANCER!

Yeah, that's it.

Ouch! (2, Funny)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 8 years ago | (#14623975)

I for one... am not entirely sure I welcome our new sound/vibration emitting anal probe developing overlords. :-/

Finally.... (1)

HaydnH (877214) | more than 8 years ago | (#14624179)

...I knew there had to be a use for all those boy bands!

Soundwave kills cancer? (1)

wertarbyte (811674) | more than 8 years ago | (#14624317)

Wait untils he releases his Casetticons - More than meets the eye.

Re:Soundwave kills cancer? (1)

HTH NE1 (675604) | more than 8 years ago | (#14628321)

Laserbeak, eject. Operation: mastectomy.

Good news! (0, Offtopic)

Illserve (56215) | more than 8 years ago | (#14624613)

I knew decepticons were just misunderstood.

hmmmm.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14625175)

Vibrating wand...

Prostate...

Must ... not ... visualize ...

20kHz==ultrasound??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14626017)

I was under the impression that most humans could hear 20Hz to 20kHz, which would mean that 20kHz can't be ultrasound.

In other news... (1)

metamatic (202216) | more than 8 years ago | (#14626776)

In other news, 90 seconds of Britney Spears has been shown to kill brain cells.

And Bose will be adapting their acoustic waveguide technology to produce a suppository-based speaker that gives you booty-shaking bass while killing colon cancer.

Re:In other news... (1)

Dastardly (4204) | more than 8 years ago | (#14628836)

Too bad Bose speakers are incapable of reproducing 20Khz. But, not to worry that $150 home theater in a bok has no problem with 20kHz.

Royal Rife did this in the 1930's (1)

AKAJack (31058) | more than 8 years ago | (#14627061)

Well his story is a facisnating read anyways.

http://www.rife.org/ [rife.org]

I think the conspiracy theories surrounding Rife are as numerous as those on the Kennedy assassination and engines that run on water.

Rife's basic theory was everything had a frequency - including diseases. If you could find the frequency of the specific disease the person had and then bombard them with high energy RF you could disrupt the disease enough to wipe it out.

The implementations today range from quack devices to actual medical testing (outside of the U.S.) Lots to be learned still. Great to see people still talking about it and working on it.

older geeks who've spent a bit of time in the sun (1)

ralphclark (11346) | more than 8 years ago | (#14629097)

geeks...sun...geeks...sun

it does not compute

Just a general philosophical question (1)

Expert Determination (950523) | more than 8 years ago | (#14630783)

Why do people say 'sound waves' in contexts such as these? "Sound waves" and "sound" are interchangeable. If sound waves kill cancer cell, sound kills cancer cells. In ordinary conversation we say "sound". We don't say "the sound waves from my stereo are great". So why do we say "sound waves" in this context?

Go Science! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14633181)

*dances*
 
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