Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

RFID Injection Required for Datacenter Access

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the one-way-to-make-sure-we're-working dept.

551

user24 writes "Security focus reports that RFID injections are now required for access to the datacenter of a Cincinnati company. From the article 'In the past, employees accessed the room with an RFID tag which hung from their keychains, however under the new regulations an implantable, glass encapsulated RFID tag from VeriChip must be injected into the bicep to gain access ... although the company does not require the microchips be implanted to maintain employment.'"

cancel ×

551 comments

Comrades... (5, Insightful)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697782)

...and the Comrades marched rank and file into their working facility, while the Big Brother telescreen carefully scanned each implanted chip...

Re:Comrades... (1)

CDMA_Demo (841347) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697984)



...and they continued to work on the The Manchurian Candidate Project...

A milestone (4, Interesting)

suso (153703) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697783)

Is this the first time civilians have been required to do thing type of thing? I guess its no longer science fiction.

Re:A milestone (3, Insightful)

servognome (738846) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697852)

Is this the first time civilians have been required to do thing type of thing?

Lots of stuff has been done to monitor civilian employees: Drug testing, email snooping, time card punching, video monitoring, background/credit checks, etc.

RFIDs (1)

suso (153703) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697959)

No, I meant with RFIDs.

Re:A milestone (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697880)

A milestone?

Well, it's more mill than mile.

Re:A milestone (4, Insightful)

Jafafa Hots (580169) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697892)

Well, there were those number tattoos in the Nazi slave labor camps...

Re:A milestone (0, Troll)

strider44 (650833) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697908)

My god! A serious case of Godwin's Law takes hold after only 20 mins! I wonder what the record for Slashdot is?

Re:A milestone (5, Insightful)

JabberWokky (19442) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697985)

Godwin's Law does not apply when there is a legitimate historical reference to Nazis. I'd say this one actually is a proper and on-topic reference, as there aren't many other cases of forced permanent identification or serialization. I can think of plenty of "mode of dress" and uniform enforcements, but no other examples of permanent body modifications that mark specific individuals.

--
Evan

Re:A milestone (1)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697965)

Somewhat ironic I think.

Re:A milestone (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697974)

"Arbeit Macht Frei" [spectacle.org] - Words on the gate of the Auschwitz.

From TFA (1, Informative)

daverabbitz (468967) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697784)

ompany requires RFID injection
Published: 2006-02-10

Click here for Core Impact!
Two employees have been injected with RFID chips this week as part of a new requirement to access their company's datacenter.

Cincinnati based surveillance company CityWatcher.com created the policy with the hopes of increasing security in the datacenter where video surveillance tapes are stored. In the past, employees accessed the room with an RFID tag which hung from their keychains, however under the new regulations an implantable, glass encapsulated RFID tag from VeriChip must be injected into the bicep to gain access, a release from spychips.com said on Thursday.

Although the company does not require the microchips be implanted to maintain employment, anyone without one will not be able to access the datacenter, according to a Register article.

Ironically, the extra security sought may be offset by a recent discovery of Jonathan Westhues, where the security researcher showed the VeriChip can be skimmed and cloned, duplicating an implant's authentication. When contacted, those at CityWatcher were unaware of the chip's security issue, according to the spychips.com release.

Posted by: Peter Laborge

BTW fp.

Re:From TFA (4, Insightful)

Esion Modnar (632431) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697899)

Although the company does not require the microchips be implanted to maintain employment, anyone without one will not be able to access the datacenter

And anyone who requires access to the datacenter to do their job, such as operators and sysadmins, cannot DO their job unless they get the implant. And if they cannot do the job, how are they expected to maintain employment?

I suppose the official reason for termination would be "uncooperative attitude." Certainly not "he refused to get chipped." Or maybe the company will concentrate on ways to make the employee so miserable, he just quits. Problem solved.

Re:From TFA (1)

puddingpimp (953823) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697919)

Seems fair enough to me, I for one welcome our new RFID-implant wielding overlords.

Re:From TFA (4, Funny)

slashname3 (739398) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697916)

showed the VeriChip can be skimmed and cloned, duplicating an implant's authentication.

To say nothing of employee's arms being taken and used to gain access. Just need to have a large plastic bags to put the body part in to keep it from leaking all over the hacker. Gives a whole new meaning to the term hacker.

I wonder if these are the same implants they use on dogs. If they are it's no wonder they are insecure. And I don't see how this improves security much if any. It would be better to have a two man rule enforced by the access system, using two factor authentication, and have cameras monitoring the access into the cages. Securing a data center is not that difficult. It can be costly.

One last thought, what does the company do if those implanted leave or are fired? Pay out the insurance premium for dismemberment when they remove the arm of the employee? I guess you know you are being fired when the security guard shows up at your desk with a box for your stuff and a hacksaw to revoke your access.

Re:From TFA (2, Insightful)

TykeClone (668449) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697966)

One last thought, what does the company do if those implanted leave or are fired?

Maybe revoke the authorization for that particular RFID device?

I'm sure.. (0, Redundant)

techefnet (634210) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697789)

I'm sure.. if this was in Norway, it would have been against the law. This doesnt sound good. Shouldn't be legal to require this, and I hope it is not in the US either.

Did you read the story? (2, Informative)

Saeed al-Sahaf (665390) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697831)

Shouldn't be legal to require this...

The story reads that it's not required to maintain employment. But, then again, most jobs in the US are "at will" anyway...

Didn't you just post this? (0, Redundant)

ThoreauHD (213527) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697793)

You guys needa start looking at yoru own stories, because I swear I read this yesterday.

The solution... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697794)

Go to http://www.monster.com/ [monster.com]

Re:The solution... (1, Insightful)

spectre_240sx (720999) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697854)

Ugh. I hate that site. Besides the fact that the IT section is full of spam telling me how I can work from home and make 3 million dollars a year, the site seems like it's always having troubles. I get runtime errors constantly while working on my resume. To hell with monster.com. Craigslist rules.

Re:The solution... (1)

unitron (5733) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697896)

"Ugh. I hate that site."

Me too. Those cables are way overpriced. :-)

Bright side of working from home (1)

davidwr (791652) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697939)

If you are your own boss YOU get to decide if you need to be RFID'd in the bicep before entering your datacenter/living-room/home-office.

TAKE THAT pointy-haired-bosses!

Yeah that was ironical. (4, Funny)

mfh (56) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697795)

Rumour has it that a certain data center will be sued shortly for creating a hostile work environment. There's a few ways to slice this one:
  • employees will strongly dislike geeks from Slashdot following them around with RFID readers
  • employees will strongly dislike nosy reporters trying to get stupid interviews about what it felt like to have an RFID tag implanted (ie: "So what did it feel like when the cold steel of that needle intersected your unwilling arm, ma'am?"
  • employees will detest their weekly security update shots, along with subsequent track marks


And then there is the whole magic marker circumvention method that is soon to be discovered (possibly within this thread).

Oh wait...

FTA: Ironically, the extra security sought may be offset by a recent discovery of Jonathan Westhues, where the security researcher showed the VeriChip can be skimmed and cloned, duplicating an implant's authentication.

Yeah... I can't wait for the Diebold spin on this story.

Typo (4, Funny)

BiggerIsBetter (682164) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697968)

That was supposed to read, FTA: Ironically, the extra security sought may be offset by a recent discovery of Captain Obvious, where the security researcher showed the VeriChip can be skimmed and cloned, duplicating an implant's authentication.

Seriously, which genius thought putting a remotely readable barcode in an employees arm was ever going to be secure? Must the IT world really repeat the mistakes of the 80's garage door opener industry??

Hey, doesn't anyone remember... (2, Insightful)

martinultima (832468) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697796)

Back in the good old days, we used to just use duct tape and superglue to keep people from messing with our machines! (And I guess OpenBSD [openbsd.org] doesn't hurt either... ;-)

I think I'll prestate the sentiments of Slashdot. (4, Funny)

captnitro (160231) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697798)

Aw, hell no.

What about the transhumanists? (1)

Cybert14 (952427) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697828)

Kevin Warwick used an implantable RFID chip as an example of early transhumanist technology. I'm sure a lot of Slashdot eagerly awaits transhumanism.

Re:What about the transhumanists? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697934)

Kevin Warwick is a cunt. If I put a TV in the oven, am I a Transovenist?

Re:What about the transhumanists? (1)

Saeger (456549) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697982)

Transhumanism, no; Post-human Singularity, yes.

Mandatory tracking chips are double-plus ungood as long as we've still got our evolutionary baggage working against us. It'll be a few decades before we can necessarily remove the evil primate bits out of our old bio-brains, and have enough intelligence to understand the (un)intended consequences to what we think of this improved "humanity".

Re:I think I'll prestate the sentiments of Slashdo (3, Funny)

minus_273 (174041) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697872)

" must be injected into the bicep"

I think most slashdotters will have a problem there.

I especially like... (4, Insightful)

Statecraftsman (718862) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697801)

the part about the VeriChip being sucsceptible to scanning and cloning.

At least, it doesn't need to be cut out to be used by a sufficiently motivated attacker.

Re:I especially like... (1)

netwiz (33291) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697834)

Well, the same could be said about most ID badges that have some form of electronic identifier in them. Motorola makes the kit we use at the office. Pretty standard tech, and both systems can be defeated with directional antennas and patience. The only thing the implantation buys you is a slightly greater chance of getting hacked, as the employee will always have the badge on them, leaving them open to scanning just about any time.

Re:I especially like... (3, Interesting)

Martin Blank (154261) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697886)

This is why I keep pressing my employer to not adopt RFID badges, and keep either the magnetic swipes or move to 2D barcodes. I have an inherent distrust of anything wireless, which is why I still have cables running from my mouse and keyboard, refuse to use Bluetooth, and use wireless only when I have to and even then almost exclusively in Linux (though with WPA/WPA2 and a nice, long, random shared key, it's not so bad). My current record in a lab for cracking 128-bit WEP is about 14 minutes, start to finish.

Paranoid? Yeah, a bit. But then I've never had to worry much about someone intercepting my phone calls or passwords over the air.

On the main topic, if no one is going to be fired for refusing, but part of their job is working on equipment in the datacenter, what happens?

Re:I especially like... (5, Funny)

broller (74249) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697978)

So are you entering passwords or making phone calls with your mouse? I wasn't clear on that point.

this is interesting... (1)

the_humeister (922869) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697805)

Ironically, the extra security sought may be offset by a recent discovery of Jonathan Westhues, where the security researcher showed the VeriChip can be skimmed and cloned, duplicating an implant's authentication. When contacted, those at CityWatcher were unaware of the chip's security issue, according to the spychips.com release.

hahaha! Now implanting RFID tags is somewhat scary. How do you get it out without taking out a chunk of your biceps?

Re:this is interesting... (1)

netwiz (33291) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697847)

And will the company cover the costs of extraction if you're separated from them in any way (fired, RIF, you quit, etc.) I can just imagine some poor dead schmuck's widow getting a bill for a $300 implantable RFID...

Re:chunk of bicep (1)

teknickle (812501) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697856)

uh, dude.
This is slashdot. Average bicep here is only 6" in circumference.
I am assuming minimal bicep could be removed to get to the bone, let alone RFID chip.

As a side effect, leave the RFID implant as a cosmetic augmentation.
Hey, can they implant these in 'other' regions?

Re:chunk of bicep (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697938)

You'll probably find that the average bicep here has an 18 inch circumference and very little muscle. Slashdotters also have man breasts, which they sometimes attempt to titty fuck. Back injuries usually result.

Re:this is interesting... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697867)

I'm approaching two dozen RFID chips in my biceps, and let me tell you -- the chicks dig it!

Re:this is interesting... (1)

njh (24312) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697904)

Perhaps it is possible to destroy the chip whilst it is in your arm, using something like a blast of suitable frequency microwaves.

In any case, this sounds like fake-security. What reason would having an RFID tag attached to a person would make this more secure than just carrying a card. It's probably more an attempt to watch where employees go or something.

Re:this is interesting... (1)

poopdeville (841677) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697954)

Because ID cards can be stolen without drawing much attention. Stealing someone's implanted RFID tag would result in a would-be intruder getting a lot of unwanted attention.

Re:this is interesting... (1)

pembo13 (770295) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697992)

All they have to do is steat the radio signals.

Re:this is interesting... (1)

name773 (696972) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697989)

you can definitely destroy it while it's in someone's arm. collateral (sp?) damage is the only problem.

does not require the microchips be implanted (4, Interesting)

still_sick (585332) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697806)

Mmmm-hmmm...

They won't require you to implant the chip to keep your job. But how long can you keep your job if you can't access the datacenter?

Re: does not require the microchips be implanted (2, Funny)

slashname3 (739398) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697935)

They won't require you to implant the chip to keep your job. But how long can you keep your job if you can't access the datacenter?

Depends on how good you are at hacking the datacenters firewall so you can get in to do your work.

uh, no. (1, Interesting)

netwiz (33291) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697809)

Isn't this illegal? I was under the impression that forced surgery as a requirement for employment was against OSHA. Maybe I'm wrong. Altho, if you're in a right-to-work state, I can't see why they can't force this on workers. If you agree to it in a contract, well, you had your opportunity to decide against it.

At the same time, where does this take us? More importantly, what new kinds of abuse will this bring about? I'm a bit spooked.

Re:uh, no. (0, Troll)

Saeed al-Sahaf (665390) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697849)

Isn't this illegal? I was under the impression that forced surgery as a requirement for employment...

Did you read the story? Obviously not. Because according to the story, it's not required to maintain employment. Of course Slashdot left that part out, knowing full well that 90% of the readers will be like you and jump to a conclusion, having not read the story...

Re:uh, no. (2, Insightful)

netwiz (33291) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697861)

Actually, they didn't leave it out, and I did read the article. My comment was a question of the logical extention of this policy. More to the point, if they're only going to allow access to RFID-enabled employees, doesn't it seem kinda necessary that either 1) you will be implanted if your responsibilities include accessing the video library, or 2) you're going to lose that responsibility. I can't see the latter being a positive career move.

Resistence is futile (1)

LemonFire (514342) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697907)

Resistence is futile, prepare to be assimilated...

What is next? Embedded computers that control and monitor where we go and what we do?
This may sound like paranoia but the problem with these type of changes is that they are so gradual that we don't realize what we have lost till its too late.

Spell Check? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697816)

Cincinnati.

Maybe they're right (5, Insightful)

HeavensBlade23 (946140) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697817)

Isn't this what the Christians have been saying was going to happen for the past 20 years now? Of course, it's not the governing that's forcing the chips on people, but it's only a matter of time.

"The Mark"... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697998)

won't be removable/destroyable.

It's probably another step towards the Mark, but that's going to happen in God's timing whether we cry "ahhhh this technology resembles what the Mark may be like" or not.

It's not the technology that's evil, people, it's that the Mark will show you are allied with God's enemy.

Well, it's Slashdot (5, Funny)

1310nm (687270) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697821)

It might actually double the victim's bicep circumference.

Re:Well, it's Slashdot (1)

Bananatree3 (872975) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697865)

It might actually double the victim's bicep circumference.

Damn, that's got to be some tiny implant!

Re:Well, it's Slashdot (1)

Roydd McWilson (730636) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697889)

Or it might just get lost in a sea of flab. How good of an insulator is fat?

Don't panic (1)

Have Blue (616) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697827)

This is just one private company making an internal policy change. If it was a government doing it there would be cause to worry.

Re:Don't panic (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697895)

If it was a government doing it there would be cause to
worry.
Are you kidding? Some federal chucklehead is going to read this and think "cool beans, I bet we can get a shitload of funding to implement this."

I mean seriously... If you work for the CIA, you're not allowed to tell anyone where you really work. You think they wouldn't implement something like this and then tell everyone to STFU about it?

Re:Don't panic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697964)

I hear what you're saying, but an overwhelming majority of agency officers are overt, and even many of the blackest of black in the clasdestine service can become overt upon resignation/retirement. The longer you're in the easier it becomes because you've likely been declared to a number of foreign services anyway. Cover is an offensive tool, not defensive mechanism.

Panic! (1)

mfh (56) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697918)

This is just one private company making an internal policy change. If it was a government doing it there would be cause to worry.

Yeah!! No government would ever dream of hurting us!

Re:Don't panic (1)

cunamara (937584) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697960)

Precedent is a dangerous thing, and this is precedent.

I'm sorry... (1)

QuietLagoon (813062) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697830)

... but, no.

Unless and until the pointy hair managers can guarantee that the RFID tag that they force me to implant in my body will never be used for purposes other than those which I agree to, I will refuse to succumb to their idioitic desires for control of my body.

Before you ask, any company those does this to its employees, is a company I would never even consider working for.

I always knew Management worked us like dogs... (3, Insightful)

scotty1024 (584849) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697835)

But now they want to chip us like dogs too?

What's next, kibble in the break room vending machines?

Re:I always knew Management worked us like dogs... (1)

slashname3 (739398) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697988)

But now they want to chip us like dogs too?

What's next, kibble in the break room vending machines?


You mean you get kibble in the break room? Were lucky if the VPs leave a few crumbs.....

Why? (5, Insightful)

cgenman (325138) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697837)

I'm not understanding the point here. If you inject the RFID chip, you can theoretically track your users wherever they go. But you can't ensure that access isn't being granted to someone who has an RFID chip in their wallet. You are making it slightly harder to steal the data, but you're not making it any harder to clone the chip.

What's the security benefit to injected RFID?

BTW, this [spychips.com] is the original article.

Re:Why? (1)

Maximalist (949682) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697869)

Great analysis. This is stupid half-thought-through security theater. I wonder what numbskull consultant gave them that idea, and how many thousands of dollars the company spent for it...

Re:Why? (4, Insightful)

netwiz (33291) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697920)

You're not even really improving the security at all. Most of these types of devices get a short burst of RF at the reader which serves two purposes, one to provide raw power for the device (a la crystal radios), and one to signal the device to request it's ID. The device gets just enough power from the input signal to do a lookup and squirt back it's code just before it dies. The trick is, so long as you're willing to wait for someone to use the door, a directional antenna will pick up the conversation nicely. Once you've got a sample of the door's signal (they broadcast continuously), you can use the same directional to trigger the victim's ID unit remotely. Since normal badged users won't have the badge on them at all times, you couldn't get the code by following them in public. The RFID guy on the other hand, well, he's a different story. you could snag codes from him all day by just hanging nearby as he goes in/out of stores, Wal-Mart, etc.

So in the end, the RFID makes things worse by imcreasing the level of access to the device itself.

Re:Why? (2, Insightful)

killjoe (766577) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697986)

"What's the security benefit to injected RFID?"

It probably gets the CIO a bonus. That's the way these things work in corporations. It has nothing to do with whether it's effective or not. It benefits the ruling class and you have no need to know why or how. Do it or hit the road.

Religious Objection (5, Insightful)

Shky (703024) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697838)

Could someone object on the basis of religious discrimination if they believe that RFID implants constitute the "Mark of the Beast"?

Re:Religious Objection (4, Interesting)

Bodysurf (645983) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697878)

"Could someone object on the basis of religious discrimination if they believe that RFID implants constitute the "Mark of the Beast"?"

I would imagine it would be just like the article stated: They can't/won't force you, but if you refuse, you don't get acccess to the datacenter. Just like the Mark of the Beast "... no one may buy or sell except one who has the mark or name of the beast, or the number of his name."

Re:Religious Objection (3, Informative)

WasteOfAmmo (526018) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697953)

Not that I'm typically very religious or anything but:

It seems to me that it would be a little hard to claim that this, or a good many of the other things that people have pointed too, constitutes the mark of the beast.

  1. It is in the bicep region, not the forehead or right hand;
  2. It is not a name nor the number 666
From the book of revelations:

13:16 He causes all, the small and the great, the rich and the poor, and the free and the slave, to be given marks on their right hands, or on their foreheads;

13:17 and that no one would be able to buy or to sell, unless he has that mark, the name of the beast or the number of his name.

I'm not sure what edition the above is from but it is plain English and close enough for this discussion.

13:18 Here is wisdom. He who has understanding, let him calculate the number of the beast, for it is the number of a man. His number is six hundred sixty-six.

On a side note: always wondered about making a program to compute all the possible combinations of the Jewish alphabet that adds up to 666 (filtering out all the nonsense ones of course). Someone must have done this somewhere already.

Merlin.

Escalation (4, Funny)

Spazmania (174582) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697843)

So much for Evil Guy yanking out an eye or cutting off a hand so that he can fake access. Now he has to take the whole arm...

Seriously, if he wants in that bad I'd rather he just beat me up and take my keys.

That is FUCKED up! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697845)

I'm just surprised it's being used sooner for a data center, rather than a requirement to receive government tax refunds and social services, or own property.

I guess we'll just have to wait a few months...

Chipped by your boss ?= chipped for life (3, Interesting)

Statecraftsman (718862) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697850)

So when you decide to leave your emplyoyer do they take it out free of charge? I hope so.

If not, you're likely to be tracked not just by your employer but by anyone else with an RFID scanner. There really ought to be an activator button or device that needs to be pressed or broadcasting to make such a device safe for the implanted.

Re:Chipped by your boss ?= chipped for life (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697897)

How the hell could your employer track you away from the office? RFIDs have a VERY limited range. It's not like he's going to be able to use a satellite to track you as you go about your daily life. And as long as you're on the clock and on the premises, you bet your bippy he's got the right to know where you are and what you're doing.

But you won't come in Monday morning after a weekend of partying and have your boss say, "Hey Statecraftsman, we see you went to four gay bars this weekend! That's not good for our company's image, so you're fired! Take your lumbar roll and get out!"

Put down the paranoia and step away from the keyboard.

Re:Chipped by your boss ?= chipped for life (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697905)

Given that the RFID implant doesn't have an off button, I can just see it now.
Instead of tinfoil hats, people will be wearing tinfoil armbands.

Re:Chipped by your boss ?= chipped for life (1)

slashname3 (739398) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697963)

HA HA HA! And here you all thought the tin foil hats were just silly and non-functional! So next time you see someone with foil wrapped around their bodies you know where they work.

Fuck em, quit. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697859)

Working for such anal retentive boneheads has gotta suck anyways. Refuse to be owned by the man. Fuck em and quit.

This will only last about as long as (4, Insightful)

zappepcs (820751) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697863)

This will only last about as long as the Sony rootkit-like DRM lasted. It now has public attention, and when it is pointed out that the scheme has enough security holes in it to act as a noodle strainer, the number of people who will actually allow the implant will be zero, meaning there will be no one to do any maintenance in the datacenter, and thus the rules will have to be changed.

For less than they paid for the RFID system, they could have hired someone to log people in and out of the data center. Additionally, I question the validity of a system that restricts access to only those with an implant during disaster situations (fire, flood, and worse) where access rights and needs are rather different than in normal situations.

Good security costs a lot of money, and you cannot replace the human element in the security chain. The RFID schemes won't prevent anyone following an authorized person into the data center, unless there is physical restrictions that would make working in the data center dangerous during emergencies. In this case, the $10/hour guard is more flexible and cheaper than the high-tech answer, and more respectful of humans in general... or at least I think so

Re:This will only last about as long as (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697940)

i don't know; they had people using RFID tags around their necks before the injection; there's no fundamental change in technology and therefore security problems.

If people didn't have a problem wearing them round their necks, they shouldn't have a problem having them injected - at least from a security/technology viewpoint.

I'm probably going to get modded as a troll, but.. (3, Interesting)

damneinstien (939730) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697961)

It now has public attention

I don't think we can call this public attention. Seriously, if our attention actually mattered in changing any policy, don't you think Microsoft would have been extinct by now and that DRM and other things like [insert what Slashdot users think is evil here] would be under public scrutiny? The cliched Joe Sixpack will probably never hear of this; heck, I don't think Joe Sixpack knows what RFID is.

Just a marketing gimmick (4, Insightful)

cyberjessy (444290) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697866)

To me this sounds more like a marketing ploy. So that they could go to potential clients and say, "Look we are so secure and futuristic that we need embedded chips in humans to access our critical datacenter!". Client is left stunned.

IANA American, but I hope that the goverment would do something if this was forced on the employees working in the datacenter. After all, what can this achieve which cannot be done with a retinal scan, RFID tag combo? If the criminal can pass the retinal scan, can't he also pluck the RFID from the employee and stick into his arm?

Huh..... I would hate it if someone said they are gonna put a chip inside my body. Wait till someone gets hurt and the company gets sued for a million dollars.

Heh. (4, Funny)

soupdevil (587476) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697871)

The joke's on them. Geeks don't HAVE biceps.

Wait, the bicep? (1)

LeddRokkenstud (945664) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697876)

Why the bicep? Wouldn't it be easier to put it elsewhere?

Re:Wait, the bicep? (1)

Jafafa Hots (580169) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697911)

I would be hard pressed to decide whether I was going to quit, or force them to put it in my asscheek.

Re:Wait, the bicep? (1)

wildblue7272 (943982) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697981)

"or force them to put it in my asscheek." Well, you would have more fun than the average employee trying to get the chip close enough to the reader to gain access.

What part don't they get... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697888)

Fsck you, your mother and your little dog too.

You should see... (0, Offtopic)

CyberSnyder (8122) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697893)

...the "injection" required to gain access while in prison.

How to get yourself targeted by hackers. (1)

Associate (317603) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697914)

Step 1: Do something that most people find offensive.
Step 2: Require Step 1.

Sounds expensive. (1)

deep44 (891922) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697921)

I'd be interested in seeing the business case for moving forward with something like this. Seems like there would be more cost-effective alternatives, expecially since this is essentially "unproven" technology when it comes to physical security.

I'm just speculating, but this sounds like a decision that was made at the executive level rather than a decision made by a security professional.

Re:Sounds expensive. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697980)

From the company's website:
We are a Microsoft solution provider and offer network security services ranging from a brief two hour security assessment to providing a comprehensive strategy to get secure and remain secure.
Well, we can rule out the "security professional"..

Paranoia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697923)

Did the clever management at CityWatcher.com think of the posibility that someone would kill one of their employees to get the RFID? If there's a will, there's a way.

Why not biometrics? (2, Interesting)

yorktown (947019) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697937)

I wonder why the company doesn't use a biometric entry system that uses fingerprints or retinal scans for security? People are less likely to object to thumbprint scan than minor surgery. And it's probably more secure, given that RFID can be cloned.

A coincidence ... I think not ! (1)

icepick72 (834363) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697969)

Soon the total comments on this Slashdot article will read "666 of Total#". Too conincidental. We have a problem!

In Soviet Russia, RFID chips employ YOU! (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14697972)

In Soviet Russia, RFID chips employ YOU!

The mark of the beast. (1)

macdaddy357 (582412) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697991)

Revelation Chapter 13

16 And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads:

17 And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.

18 Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six.

I'm not a religious nut, but injected RFID? That's scary!

The bicep?!! (1)

BumpyCarrot (775949) | more than 8 years ago | (#14697996)

But my hat only works on my head!

Curse you!

Sounds like a publicity ploy (4, Insightful)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 8 years ago | (#14698001)

We all know that this won't increase security, but now this surveillance company can use this in all their advertising and PR. "Sure, you can go with the other company but they arent half as serious as we are. We put bloody implants into our employess! That's serious!"

Its harmless except for Joe and Jane Datacenter who have to go in for some minor surgery on the weekend to keep their jobs. I hope this "Golden Casino" mentality stops right here after these people get exposed for the dumbasses that they are. Hell, even in the article they did not know the weaknesses of RFID authentication.

I woulndt doubt if this was 100% publicity stunt. I wonder how many people even have to access the datacenter. Depending on the company size it could just be one or two people. Of course all the executives, security, etc will have the old keycards that will work just fine.

First Tin Foil Hats... (1)

MioTheGreat (926975) | more than 8 years ago | (#14698005)

Now we'll all need tin-foil T-shirts.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...