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Korea Plans to Choose Linux City, University

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the one-to-grow-on dept.

207

thefirelane wrote to mention an ambitious plan in the works by the South Korean government. Work is underway to choose a city, which will become a place where open-source software will become the mainstream operating system. From the article: "The selected government and university will be required to install open-source software as a main operating infrastructure, for which the MIC will support with funds and technologies. In the long run, they will have to migrate most of their desktop and notebook computers away from the Windows program of Microsoft, the world's biggest maker of software. 'The test beds will prompt other cities and universities to follow suit through the showcasing of Linux as the major operating system without any technical glitches and security issues,' Lee said. "

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207 comments

In Corea... (-1, Troll)

Uber Banker (655221) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741509)

...only old people use Windows.

Re:In Corea... (1)

70Bang (805280) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741549)



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Re:In Corea... (0, Offtopic)

Uber Banker (655221) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741941)

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Re:In Corea... (1, Offtopic)

trailerparkcassanova (469342) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741566)

only old people can spell 'Korea'.

Re:In Corea... (1)

myskim (867161) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741659)

Actually, a lot of countries outside of the US spell 'Korea' with a C.

Re:In Corea... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741792)

good that means even less people taking up .net jobs.

Re:In Corea... (2, Interesting)

Daengbo (523424) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741901)

Actually, in Korea, everybody uses Windows. The article claims that the desktop penetration is 1%, as opposed to the 3% globally. I, myself, have never met anyone who uses it besides myself, and people whom I mention it to give me confused looks. Hangul Office puts out a version of Linux (I think they just merged with Asianux), but it's given away for free in computer stores and still gathers dust.

Great timing for the article: I'll start looking for a new job here the end of next month, and will certainly put in a resume at the university chosen by ROK.

Re:In Corea... (2, Insightful)

Ekarderif (941116) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742149)

That's because everybody is also play Starcraft.

Food, supplies (1)

70Bang (805280) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741511)



Maybe now, the North Koreans will have a byte [sic] to eat.

ROFL (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741558)

Hahahahahahhahhhaahahahah, starvation is hilarious, good job :D

Re:ROFL (1)

mwvdlee (775178) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741737)

Hm, using sarcasm to demonstrate a point.
Where have I seen this before?
Ah, yes; the original post!

Re:ROFL (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741915)

Go look up sacrasm, brainiac. (hint: calling you brainiac is sarcasm)

The original post was just using a stupid pun.

I want to go to LCU (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741512)

Will they have a football team? If so where will they get the cheerleaders?

Universities and schools (5, Insightful)

pubjames (468013) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741524)

Personally I don't understand why universities and schools all over the world aren't switching all their desktops to Linux. How many billions of taxpayers money is being spent on Microsoft software that could be better spent elsewhere?

Re:Universities and schools (-1, Offtopic)

joe 155 (937621) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741548)

...about $7.2 billion
*Source: random-figures-I-pulled-out-of-my-head.com

Re:Universities and schools (1)

Arimus (198136) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741562)

But as most PC's are only supplied bundled with Windows and MS's VLK schemes for universities etc aren't as expensive as some make out then I'd imagine not alot.

Now if you can get rid of the MS Tax on new PC's then the balance would be restored.

Re:Universities and schools (0)

ELProphet (909179) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741585)

Billions of dollars that would become trillions if you switch to Linux. Why? Training. People "Know" (at least they think they do) how to use Windows, because they learned computers with Windows. All the money (~$100, educators license) for XP would be offset by probably 10-20 hours training and plenty of time wasted "Learning" this new OS, as opposed to just working (albeit at every user's own level) on whatever project is at hand.

Microsoft's monopoly with Windows comes from the fact that the general populace believes whether true or not, that it is the easier operating system, and don't want to take the time or the effort to learn or deal with somehting else. Suddenly, that $100 educator's license isn't looking like so much.

Re:Universities and schools (3, Insightful)

Bert64 (520050) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741645)

But training is the purpose of a university...
Surely you want people at university to be trained and to learn new skills, it worked fine a few years ago when university systems were all unix or dos based. I know lots of people who read their mail using pine at university, it may not have looked very pretty but it worked very well and was problem free.

Re:Universities and schools (1, Offtopic)

fl!ptop (902193) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741729)

i sent my first email in 1990 at college using pine, and i still use it to this day. imho, pine is the best email client available.

Re:Universities and schools (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741878)

Yes, training costs are clearly linear.

I'd just love to see the math where you show that the cost of training people to use a different Operating System is "trillions". I bet you a bajillion zillion[1] dollars you're wrong.

[1]: Numbers may be made up. Just like yours.

Re:Universities and schools (5, Funny)

ajs318 (655362) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741943)

That's right, training will be enormously expensive. GNU/Linux PCs have a totally different keyboard layout to Windows ones. When you want the cursor on a GNU/Linux PC to move up, you have to move the mouse sideways. In OpenOffice Writer, when you want to make text bold you have to select "underline" and if you want to underline text, you have to select "right align". In OpenOffice Calc, you can't use the numeric keypad; you have to spell out all your numbers in words, like "seven hundred and sixty four thousand, one hundred and fourteen".

Oh, wait a minute, that's bollocks. The keys are in the same place, the mouse moves in the same directions, the options all have similar names and things generally work fairly similar. Anyone who learns like an adult and sees the abstract concepts behind actions, rather than learning like a child and blindly parrotting actions, will have little trouble adjusting.

The one big thing that catches people out is that rebooting a GNU/Linux PC almost never cures it of a fault, because GNU/Linux applications don't very often go unstable for no reason; so if anything is wrong, it is likely to be deliberate {as far as the computer is concerned} and if you didn't actually change any settings, the problem will still be there next time around. That's what we call "repeatable behaviour".

Re:Universities and schools (4, Insightful)

flacco (324089) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741613)

Personally I don't understand why universities and schools all over the world aren't switching all their desktops to Linux.


because they get enormous discounts to keep them on windows. at our university, microsoft charges us about 10% of list price. a year or two ago, every employee at our university was given free upgrade to the latest version of windows (i believe that was not only for their university systems but their home systems as well).


microsoft knows that universities with a computer science or engineering school could go linux if they wanted to, so they accept huge cuts to make the cost of software a non-argument.

Re:Universities and schools (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741924)

The get enormous discounts, plus development support for their IT dept's, CS and Engineering programs. The vendor gets exclusivity against competing platforms.

At my college, they signed a deal with Apple. As a result, PC's became contraband - either you had to apply for and get an exception (very hard and not often given) or just not tell anybody you were using one.

Re:Universities and schools (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741627)

A state should make discounts for computers being sold to schools that include Linux.

Re:Universities and schools (5, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741656)

I don't understand why universities and schools all over the world aren't switching all their desktops to Linux

I used to work IT in research center at a major university here in the U.S. and I can tell you many reasons why *I* stuck with Windows. First and foremost is the practical matter of professors coming to you saying "I need this particular piece of software installed on my computer." Telling them "Sorry, there is no Linux version of that available" simply was NOT an option, and would likely have gotten me pink-slipped pretty damn fast.

Hell, we used to upgrade professors to new computers just to run a *single* piece of software they wanted (often software that wasn't even related to their work). They weren't particularly interested in the why-and-why-nots of why they couldn't get something that they wanted, only that they couldn't get it. Many of the profs I worked with had the emotional mentality of 3-year-olds wanting a piece of candy.

-Eric

Re:Universities and schools (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741937)

Now I know why U.S. citizens consider Denmark the capitol of Sweden.

Re:Universities and schools (1)

spitek (942062) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742242)

Indeed. This is not uncommon at all. I am aware of a huge Linux cluster installed at a research center at a major univeristy, NASA funded at times, spent about $1 Mil on hardware. In the end, one professor used it, and not all that often. It was sitting ideal with maybe 2% CPU unitilization for months and months while others where begging for time. The one professor, again, like a 3 year old with candy. What a terrible waste of resourses. Great motivator huh!

Re:Universities and schools (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741725)

The purpose of a univeristy is to prepare the student for the arms of the real-world. If you can *honestly* say that a majority of real-world applications will have a student plopped behind a Linux terminal, than by all means make the switch. Now then, with that said, what better way to drive MS out of the corporate world, but by having the universities switch to the OpenSource world? It all boils down to one thing in the end: MONEY.

Re:Universities and schools (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741733)

Well... maybe it's because nobody uses Linux, and when I send my kids to college I don't want them wasting time with an operating system that only a few geeks even know about.

Re:Universities and schools (1, Insightful)

stunt_penguin (906223) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741750)

Because out in the *real* world of work and the office, microsoft unfortunately rules the roost. You can't just create a little linux based utopian world inside schools and release people into the big bad world of M$ software. I can't imagine employers taking somone very seriously if they'd never used Microsoft Office plus outlook, never used windows explorer, set up a windows network, used a windows based printer driver, never used Sage- and those are basic office functions without any specialisation, such as Autocad & Archicad for architecture and manufacturing, plus Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Illustrator, Premiere, Director and Flash for multimedia production....

Linux is ok for openoffice, internet, mail and programming, but if you actually want to *do* something with the computer that isn't programming there's no wealth of professional grade software out there for professionals who are reliant on computer technology.

The only real-world usable alternative to the scourge of M$ might be OSX and its Apple-made successors. It's easy to use, has a large library of *real* software written for it and doesn't cost the earth.

Re:Universities and schools (2, Insightful)

nursegirl (914509) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741849)

I think Korea is looking at this as more significant than just a "we can save money on MS licenses" project. From TFA:
``In order to become a genuine software powerhouse, Korea has no choice but to secure source technologies. We cannot achieve the goal under the command of dominant closed-source programs,'' said Ko Hyun-jin, president at the state-backed agency.
They are hoping to get more people using, developing, perhaps even vending OSS programs. Exciting potential partnerships for OSS developers in the rest of the world.

Re:Universities and schools (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741954)

I can't imagine employers taking somone very seriously if they'd never used Microsoft Office plus outlook, never used windows explorer, set up a windows network, used a windows based printer driver, never used Sage- and those are basic office functions without any specialisation
... and which should take about a week to learn on the job, rather than three+ years of study at University.

Re:Universities and schools (2, Insightful)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742003)

Because out in the *real* world of work and the office, microsoft unfortunately rules the roost. You can't just create a little linux based utopian world inside schools

We're talking about universities, not evening schools. If you need to learn MS software, there are plenty of "For Dummies" books you can read over a weekend -- don't waste your probably one and only shot at higher education learning how to operate a black box that will be obsolete in two years.

Re:Universities and schools (1)

hal2814 (725639) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741761)

As others have pointed out, Microsoft seriously discounts their products to universities. At my Alma Mater (and workplace for a while), individual departments paid nothing for Windows licenses. The only restrictions they had were that you had to go to a training class provided by Microsoft before you were allowed to copy the media the University provided. If the University is paying a lump sum anyways, the departments have little reason to worry about it. It's not coming out of their departmental budget. We had a similar deal with Novell.

And for what it's worth, our Computer Science lab workstations were mostly Sun, a few Linux boxes, and a very few Windows boxes (MAYBE 10 out of 150 computers). And I'd say that at least 80% of the research computers were running Linux, Irix, or Solaris.

Also, the general purpose computer labs tended to be 60% Windows and 40% MAC. A lot of us got very used to using the MAC since you could usually walk up and get a MAC right away instead of waiting for a Windows box. I wonder if Linux boxes would be treated the same way as the MAC boxes.

Re:Universities and schools (1)

level_headed_midwest (888889) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741911)

My university (University of Missouri- Columbia) has over 1000 computers over 50 labs. I'd say that about 75-80% of those are Dells and Gateways running only XP Pro. Most of the rest are 15" "lampshade" iMac G4s, with about 50 Dells running XP and RHEL 3 in dual-boot and 20 Dells running only RHEL 3. There are a handful of PowerMac G5s and iMac G5s in the newer labs.

There are two labs that I use quite a bit on campus. One has about 40 computers in it, 30 are XP machines and the other 10 are the G4 iMacs. The XP boxes are usually all filled, and the people who come in look for one of those first. If the Dells are all being used, then one or two that come in will use a Mac. Most just swear under their breath and go to another lab. The other has 30 machines that dual-boot between RHEL 3 and XP. I have only seen one other person boot Linux on those machines, and that was to use a program (Sybyl) that only ran on UNIX. When I was using RHEL in that lab, some guy next to me whispered, "dude, you know you can get rid of that Linux crap by restarting and selecting 'Windows.'"

So I'd say that people stick with what is familiar to them, and that is overwhelmingly Windows.

Re:Universities and schools (2, Insightful)

level_headed_midwest (888889) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741824)

A lot don't spend much money on software licenses. The district I went to school in used (and is *still* using) Windows 98 on its machines. They paid for the license once and are using it until the AMD Duron 700 computers it runs on die. Most of those computers don't have MS Office or anything like that on them. Some have Word 6 on them, but most are just the W98 OS, a Web browser, and some specific apps (a reading-level test, library card-catalog search function, etc.) that the school really uses the computers for in the first place.

My university used W2K Pro until MS announced that it was moving into extended support phase (last year), upon which they moved to XP. I bet they stay with XP until 2011, when XP Pro gets its mainstream support dropped my MSFT. The Windows OSes have not changed that much since about W2K, so lots of businesses have CFOs that don't buy the Fisher-Price GUI as an improvement and thus hang onto older OSes until they no longer get patched.

Re:Universities and schools (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14742045)

The reason they don't switch is because Microsoft has a monopoly. They know what the students are going to go out into a world that is largely dominated my Microsoft, particularly MS Office. If you want to get a job as a secritary in an office, it's pretty immportant that you know how to use the different Office programs inside out. For some reason the schools have gotten it into their minds that it's their jobs to teach the kids this kind of thing.

I know at my school the main reason we still use windows is because the students need a "dynamic and relevant education". WTF? The job of a school is to teach children concepts and ways of thinking, not tools. The computer courses in our school are absolutely pitiful and useless if you want to me anything more than a mindless secritary. I've had arguements with several of the people at the school, but hey, what do I know, I'm only their sysadmin.

Re:Universities and schools (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14742164)

What do you know? How not to spell Secretary, obviously....

As for a dynamic and relevant education, you'll probably find that the hundreds of apps that your students use for learning are only written for the windows platform....

It's grim up North (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741526)

North Korea tried something similar, but people kept stealing the punchcards to make soup.

UNIX used to be the norm (5, Insightful)

TheRealDamion (209415) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741545)

It's only the past few years that Windows has started to take over UNIX use in universities, certainly from my experience in the UK. Linux was used by many during this when it arrived over a decade ago, along with many who stuck with all the other UNIX flavours, I can't believe people who are new to this (7years experience with Linux) don't spot the same trends. Actions like this are far too little too late, the war was won a long time and ago and what's needed is a cleverly crafted resistance movement not pretending Linux is new and starting to make inroads.

Solaris, WABI (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741575)

My last year in school, "the big change" for one of the departments
I worked with was to install SparcStation 5's on the
front office desks, running Microsoft Office using Sun WABI.

Don't ask me why.

Re:UNIX used to be the norm (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741667)

I've seen the same thing at my university over the last 8 years, and I have to say a lot of responsibility lies with the admins. The technical services group here is so resistant to change that our *nix boxes still look exactly the way they looked in 1997, while our Windows boxes are reasonably up-to-date and understandably popular with the students as a result. We have a standard setup that runs across Linux, Irix and Solaris, which means lowest common denominator. I feel like an idiot explaining to students that their Java windows keep appearing halfway off the screen because the window manager's older than Java, or that they can't view HTML emails in the mail client, or that the installed version of Mozilla won't display Yahoo Mail correctly because it's four years out of date. The impression they come away with is that Unix is archaic, cobbled-together and useless for getting real work done. So to be honest, if they see Linux as some cool new thing that's entirely unrelated to the Unix systems they're used to, it's probably no bad thing.

Re:UNIX used to be the norm (1)

Stormwatch (703920) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741825)

I feel like an idiot explaining to students [...] that they can't view HTML emails in the mail client
You can just tell them the truth: e-mails are MEANT TO BE pure text. Duh!

Re:UNIX used to be the norm (1, Troll)

squoozer (730327) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741684)

It's good to see Governments taking Linux seriously but it seems pretty clear to me why UNIX lost out in the first place: money. Windows was (and I would say still is) the better product and it's dirt cheap if you are installing thousands of copies and are an educational establishment. If open source / UNIX is to take back some of those installs it needs to become a lot simpler to use. I love my Debian box and wouldn't give it up for the world but I spend 10 times as long making it work than I do on my Windows install. In fact, I don't remember the last time I had to fix anything on my Windows install - it just works. I admit that if it (hardware mainly) doesn't work straight away under Windows it probably never will but the time I have spent trying to get poor supported hardware working under Linux... well lets just not go there.

Re:UNIX used to be the norm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741742)

Windows was (and I would say still is) the better product

Where do you get this "Windows" you talk about? I've heard about it before, but all I got is this piece of crap Microsoft Windows (95, NT4, 2000, XP).

Re:UNIX used to be the norm (2)

timeOday (582209) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741711)

I disagree; things have changed. Linux did exist 10 years ago, but what about the applications? It's OpenOffice and Firefox that matter, not the kernel.

the most damaging illness known to man'kind' (-1, Flamebait)

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MIC=Ministry of Information and Communication(n/t) (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741550)

n/t

Kudos to South Korea! (4, Insightful)

Rob T Firefly (844560) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741557)

That's quite a big step, and seeing it actually taken (by politicians of all people!) warms this old jaded heart. Assuming all goes well, this is going to serve as one hell of a shining example for the OSS community.

Now, cue the distro wars...

Is that the way to go about it? (3, Insightful)

mytec (686565) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741563)

The selected government and university will be required to install open-source software as a main operating infrastructure

Since when is forcing adoption the right thing to do? Is this forced switch really in the best interest of the students? What applications might they have to give up that don't have the equivelent in the open source world.

That is no better than MS forcing their software upon anyone they can. Not because it's necessarily better but because they can.

Re:Is that the way to go about it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741623)

I think you're missing the point. Whatever platform the students are presented with, that's the one they're being forced to use. This policy is not forcing FOSS on students.

Where the force is applied is on the IT and purchasing staff, where interests usually conflict, and the best decision for the people that count (students) is not always made.

This type of thing has to be forced because Microsoft has forced us into the situation in which we currently find ourselves.

Re:Is that the way to go about it? (1)

Bert64 (520050) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741691)

Any organisation forces products upon it's staff, and there's no way to avoid that in this immature industry...

The larger vendors don't bother following standards, so your stuck with very limited (or no) choice, and can't easily have a diverse setup.

Consider in contrast to a company car, sometimes you get an allowance to obtain any car you can afford.. Your free to choose the car you want.

Once the IT industry matures, and protocols/formats become standardised, it will be a lot easier and there will no longer be any need to force people to use a particular product.

Re:Is that the way to go about it? (1)

timeOday (582209) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741721)

The "forced" argument is misplaced. If government can decide to use Windows, they can also change their minds and decide to use Linux. Switching govt. owned PCs from Windows to Linux is in no way some new act of coercion.

Re:Is that the way to go about it? (1)

js_sebastian (946118) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741736)

currently, choice of windows vs linux is biased in favour of windows by corporate mentality, advertisement and PR from microsoft, and general habit-driven lazyness from people who are used to having windows on their pcs and want more of the same.

So a little bit of bias in the other direction, here and there, certainly won't hurt.

Re:Is that the way to go about it? (5, Informative)

tmossman (901205) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741801)

Don't go reaching for your gun just yet. The summary was a bit misleading, choosing to quote parts with words like "required" and "have to". No one is being *forced* to do anything. The government decided to throw some money to a city and university if they were willing to make this change in infrastructure. From TFA:
`We will start to receive applications next week. After screening candidate cities and universities, the test beds are likely to be decided by late March,'' MIC director Lee Do-kyu said."
If a city or university doesn't want to have a chance to participate, they won't apply. It's not as though the gov't is just picking a town at random and saying, "YOU MUST USE LINUX!" Also from TFA:
Lee said that the project will be kick-started just after the decision of the city and university, toward which end the ministry earmarked 4.1 billion won for this year alone. ``Already many universities and local governments have shown interest in the project. We expect big-sized entities will join it,'' he added.
For reference, 4.1B won works out to just over $4.2M USD according to www.xe.com. Not a bad deal if you ask me.

Re:Is that the way to go about it? (1)

1u3hr (530656) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742068)

Since when is forcing adoption the right thing to do? Is this forced switch really in the best interest of the students?

RTFA. The cities and universities are applying for the program.

"We will start to receive applications next week. After screening candidate cities and universities, the test beds are likely to be decided by late March," MIC director Lee Do-kyu said.

Re:Is that the way to go about it? (1)

vertinox (846076) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742119)

Since when is forcing adoption the right thing to do? Is this forced switch really in the best interest of the students? What applications might they have to give up that don't have the equivelent in the open source world.

I dunno. What are the chances that they can get the equivalent application in Korean for Windows?

Also, Koreans tend to have a bit more nationalist spirit than most western nations (remember the whole cloning stem cell debacle). If your choices were a home grown option versus an American company, then I think it would be clear choice.

Right Tool for the Job? (3, Insightful)

mosel-saar-ruwer (732341) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741568)


The selected government and university will be required to install open-source software as a main operating infrastructure, for which the MIC will support with funds and technologies.

I thought the spirit of FOSS [or at least of /.] was supposed to be: USE THE RIGHT TOOL FOR THE JOB!!!

So what if M$FT Windows and M$FT Office ARE the right tools for the job? [Gasp! Horrors!! Oh the Humanity!!!]

How then would it be helping people to shove the wrong tool down their throats?

Yeah, yeah, bring it on: -1 Troll/Flamebait blah blah blah...

Re:Right Tool for the Job? (1)

DingerX (847589) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741646)

Bah. ACtually, the only way FOSS is gonna fly is by (forced) adoption by many large-scale consumers (aka Governments). Right now, you have a company that satisfies 50% of requirements (most of the time) selling to organizations around the world. Everybody puts their money in, and gets a tool that *sorta* works well enough. Only when large organizations start to see an advantage in having FOSS developers on the payroll -- to improve and to adopt what's already out there -- are you gonna see widescale adoption. FOSS can't be fueled for long by supermotivated hobbyists living in their parents' basement. At some point, you need professionals to work on it, and those shelling out the billions of dollars for software are more likely to pay their bills than those raking it in.

BTW, "the major operating system without any technical glitches and security issues" made me chuckle.

Re:Right Tool for the Job? (1)

Bert64 (520050) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741730)

Because they cause lock-in, and it's _NEVER_ desireable to get locked in to a single vendor under any circumstances.
This is a huge overriding factor for many people, and in any other industry would be a massive problem for businesses too and yet for some reason they overlook it when buying computers (?!?) or have already been screwed over by the lock-in and are now stuck.

I would _NEVER_ lock my business in to a single vendor, that would be a grossly negligent act.

And when a company's products lock users in, it gives that company far less incentive to improve product quality... Why invest money improving your products to make people *want* them, when you can force them to keep buying anyway?

So, when microsoft start supporting open standards i will evaluate their products alongside other vendors. Until then, lack of lockin isn't just desireable, its a REQUIREMENT.

Re:Right Tool for the Job? (1)

mwvdlee (775178) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741779)

It's not like the goverment is picking some random city and university and commanding them to install Linux.

Rather, cities and universities can (and do) apply for this project which gives them financial support required for their voluntary switch to linux.

Hollow Victory (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741573)

I'd always hoped linux would win the OS war by fielding better technology, not by government mandate.

Re:Hollow Victory (1)

Bert64 (520050) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742211)

And in a free market that could happen.
Unfortunately, microsoft has enough influence to destroy the concept of a free market, so government intervention is the only way to return to a free state.

Oh Hellz Yes! (3, Funny)

ThoreauHD (213527) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741591)

Asian girls and Linux? Where do I sign up? WHERE?!?

Re:Oh Hellz Yes! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741624)

Right here. [imdb.com] Korean girls rock.

Re:Oh Hellz Yes! (1, Funny)

Capt'n Hector (650760) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741714)

Ahh but in Korea, the guys are prettier.

Re:Oh Hellz Yes! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741812)

True, True...

If you want to fuck an asian, go Japanese.

Re:Oh Hellz Yes! (0)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741902)

Me eat kimchi
Me play joke
Me shove Linux down your throat

-Eric

No technical glitches! (3, Interesting)

daBass (56811) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741621)

showcasing of Linux as the major operating system without any technical glitches

Linux? No technical glitches? And he already proclaims this before the trial?

Boy, is he in for a shock...

Disclosure: I love Linux (for servers) and wouldn't choose anything else. But I sure have seen my share of "glitches"!

We live in different worlds (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741919)

We obviously live in different worlds.

My Linux boxes run continuously for unlimited periods, with only the occasional mains outage ending their uptimes. Their applications never fail. They do not succumb to viruses or spywhere.

In contrast, my Windows boxes (which exist only to run games that don't run natively under Linux or through Wine) live in a world where failure and downtime is the norm, and in which the cause of problems always remains a mystery even when the problem themselves are fixed or bypassed. Inevitably the problems re-occur, and reinstallation is the norm.

We clearly live in different worlds. Despite your disclaimer, the opaque world of failure as a natural occurrence that MS has created is not one that universities should endorse.

Not the right way... (3, Insightful)

winchester (265873) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741635)

It should be all about choice, about what tool is the best for the job. Not about mandatory use of certain operating systems for perhaps totally unsuitable tasks.

it is volontary! (2, Insightful)

js_sebastian (946118) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741769)

institutions volontarily sign up for this program, no one is forcing them (of course they do get a bunch of funding for it)

From TFA (yes, I actually read it!):

``We will start to receive applications next week. After screening candidate cities and universities, the test beds are likely to be decided by late March, MIC director Lee Do-kyu said.

Re:Not the right way... (3, Interesting)

ajs318 (655362) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742056)

That's what all the Microsoft paid shills are saying ..... "choice", "right tool for the job" and so forth. Conveniently ignoring the fact that most of the time there is no choice.
  • When did anyone ever have a choice of what OS comes on a new PC? For instance, have you ever tried to buy a GNU/Linux notebook?
  • How often is it in the interests of an employer to offer employees a choice of operating systems? Only in a few, very specialised cases.
Also, "the right tool for the job" may well be something beautiful but expensive that requires a great effort to make locally, if part of "the job" specifically includes keeping money in the local economy rather than sending it to a foreign corporation. Remember, no matter how much you have to pay them, local programmers pay local taxes, drink in local pubs, spend their money in local stores, take their friends and family to visit local tourist attractions, and generally benefit the local economy.

good move! (4, Interesting)

slackaddict (950042) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741647)

Think about it - what if suddenly Linux/Unix/BSD was the mandated operating system for an entire country? Drastically reduced costs not only for the operating system itself, but also for all of the extra crap you need to keep Windows limping along. Wow... Maybe more money for teachers, schools, computers(!!), roads, healthcare, etc...

I say if Microsoft is the answer to the question, it must have been a stupid question. Go Linux!! :-)

Re:good move! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741823)

Holy fuck, bud -- you are truly deluded, even for a Slashdork.

.NET (1, Interesting)

edmicman (830206) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741654)

So there won't be much .NET development going on there, I presume? Or is there a good *reliable* way to do real .NET development on linux platforms? Whats the deal with that Mono project?

Re:.NET (1)

Dan Ost (415913) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742253)

From what little bit I've done, mono is pretty solid unless you need to use Windows Forms. If you don't use any MS-only libraries, mono will probably do what you want and be cross-platform at the same time.

Doesn't smell like freedom though (1, Insightful)

Doodens (955248) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741664)

"The selected government and university will be required to install open-source software" I think OSS world should make it's way by it's values, not by force. Rough approach. At least not for universities.

Re:Doesn't smell like freedom though (2, Insightful)

nursegirl (914509) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741800)

I know it's unfashionable to RTFA, but it says that they will be accepting applications from municipalities and universities that are interested in being the project test sites, and that a lot of people have shown interest. So, yes, if they put in an application to be the test site for open-source software, and are chosen, they will be forced to live up to their commitments. Actually, sounds pretty congruent with OSS values to me.

Thank god. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741674)

It's about time. Hopefully everyone else'll catch on and microsoft will be flattened. If only.......

Missing out on free software... (3, Funny)

coastin (780654) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741763)

Don't they know they will be missing out on all the free software you get when you plug a Win PC into the Net? ;-)

And the football mascot? (1)

stunt_penguin (906223) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741787)

Lemme guess, the mascot for the local football team....... a penguin?

Re:And the football mascot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741938)

that's not a funny joke.

Why universities and schools are not Linux (-1, Flamebait)

Simonetta (207550) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741807)

Why universities and schools are not Linux? Because Linux is extraordinarily difficult to use if you are not a trained computer professional. Granted it's better than it was thirty years ago (when it was called UNIX), but it is not yet good enough to compete with Windows on the user interface level. And in universities and schools (and nearly everywhere else), user interface is the computer.

    If Linux/UNIX users want the Windows people to switch, then make a version of Linux that looks like Windows and acts like Windows. Something that is so close to Windows that the average user doesn't know that it is not Windows.
    Is it illegal? So what. Do it anyway. Demand to be placed on juries that determine the fate of people who have been caught distributing Linux-as-Windows.

    And for God's sake, stop using acronymns for computer terms.

    For most people, the computer itself or the computer system under the interface is of little or no importance. They are using the PC as a tool to get other work done. Since Windows is so much more easier to use than Linux/UNIX (please don't tell me that they are different, because they're not) it is the system that will continue to be used by the vast majority of people that use computers. For the vast majority of people, the cost for switching from Windows to Linux is far, far greater in terms of time and energy (learning all the stupid little details of getting things done) than the monetary cost of buying Windows.

    If you make Linux look, feel, act, work, and program exactly like Windows and still be near free, then yes, everyone will switch to Linux. In the meantime, people will think that you're crazy for asking why they use Windows instead of Linux. It's obvious to them, it's because Windows is so much better and cheaper.

    For example:

    $> lms -x38i8 slsil334ss @@ $ (agl -fjldl.or)

    is an interesting puzzle to anyone with a Linux/UNIX orientation but scares the shit out of anyone who needs to use a PC to get work done NOW. Sooner or later, Linux dumps everyone onto the command line, because it has been designed that way. Windows never does. Linux people LOVE the command line; Windows people hate it.

    There are a million more things that make the user interface of Windows so much better. Nearly all are culturally invisible to Linux users.

    I do realize of course that Slashdot is the worse place in the world to point this out, but it is the truth and the truth sometimes hurts. So don't mod me to hell for saying this. Be civilized, and open-minded. Thank you.

Re:Why universities and schools are not Linux (1)

aug24 (38229) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741940)

Linux is extraordinarily difficult to use if you are not a trained computer professional.

No, I can't accept that sweeping statement. It isn't any harder to use than Windows. Most WMs use the same structure anyway - start->menu->program for example. If you really think the setting panel (or whatever is called) is easy to use then I think you have been borged too long.

Anyway, I have no idea what your puzzle does and I use Linux lots. There's literally no need to ever use a command line with a modern distro. My g/f with no experience of computers whatsoever found using linux a doddle.

You might think it is a pain for an amateur to get a Linux box to see a printer... Well, I have news: it's difficult for an amateur on a Windows box too, yet alone, say, install a new driver.

I'm not trying to shout you down here, but I can't believe you've even tried a modern distro like, say Xandros (although there are plenty of novice-user-friendly ones now).

Justin.

Re:Why universities and schools are not Linux (2, Insightful)

cosmotron (900510) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742079)

Exactly, at my university, students who are Computer Science majors are taught how to use Linux in the first few weeks of our Introduction to Computer Science I course. It's not like Linux == Rocket Science...

1996 called (1)

nursegirl (914509) | more than 8 years ago | (#14741987)

1996 called, and promises that all sorts of things have changed in a decade.

I'm in the process of changing over a workplace where 5/14 are computer illiterate. We specifically are changing over the illiterates first (from Win98 to Ubuntu). These are people who have difficulty knowing the difference between click and double click, and they are so far finding Linux less confusing and than the Windows boxes that they had been using for about 7 years.

Yes, installing and setting up Linux isn't easy, but this project is for municipalities and universities with IT departments. If the typical use pattern is: check email, surf web, write papers, and use a few specialty software programs, then many modern Linux distributions are well up to the task.

Re:Why universities and schools are not Linux (1)

Salsaman (141471) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742008)

$> lms -x38i8 slsil334ss @@ $ (agl -fjldl.or)

What does that do then ?

Re:Why universities and schools are not Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14742089)

You are wrong of course, but you knew that before you posted.

http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Home [freedesktop.org]

Many of the Linux desktops are as usable if not more usable than M$ Windows. I have many non-computer literate users with Linux desktops happily operating.

Heck even my three year old can start the computer boot Linux, select the correct KDE menus and run Supertux, enter the game and start playing.

Are you really saying you are less able than a three year old to operate a computer running Linux?

http://www.novell.com/products/desktop/ [novell.com]

rgds

you Fai7 It.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741832)

of 7he warring butts are exposed

sex wIth a Bitch (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741950)

discussions on are looking very errors. Future i a fact: FreeBSD Those obligations.

Dear Microsoft... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741958)

...now would be a good time to send us lots of free copies of Windows and Office for our new university.

All our love,
The South Korean Government

But... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14741999)

how are penguins supposed to live in such a warm climate zone?

To Quote a Phrase (1)

berenixium (920883) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742058)

Well, it's about time, goddamnity!

The Matrix, er, M$ doesn't have Korea anymore!

Religious war (1)

justthinkit (954982) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742072)

When governments step in, OS wars become religious wars. And maybe this is what it will take to dethrone Windows. Apple has their fanatics and Linux needs them as well. What about creating a Linux country that geek crusaders move to? Or we could take over one of those small celebrity-owned islands in the South Pacific? I'm heading to the passport office just in case.

Whoa! (3, Insightful)

mkswap-notwar (764715) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742095)

The test beds will prompt other cities and universities to follow suit through the showcasing of Linux as the major operating system without any technical glitches and security issues.

Waaiiiit a minute. Be careful S. Korea. While some would say Linux is "better" than Windows, nobody said it was perfect. No techinical glitches and no security issues, IMPOSSIBLE.

That Windows program (2, Insightful)

Random BedHead Ed (602081) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742103)

they will have to migrate most of their desktop and notebook computers away from the Windows program of Microsoft, the world's biggest maker of software

Calling Windows a "program" is a bit of an understatement. Remind me again how many gigabytes a minimal install of that program requires, and what OS it runs on. :)

Any news on Largo? (1)

sootman (158191) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742171)

A few years ago, Slashdot did a couple [slashdot.org] stories [slashdot.org] on Largo, Florida's use of Linux for municipal systems. Anyone heard from them recently? Are they still using it? Does anyone know of any other cities that have followed suit?

MMORPG's (1)

Sporkinum (655143) | more than 8 years ago | (#14742214)

Getting linux to run the popular MMORPG's that Koreans play is probably the best way to get them to use linux.
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