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RSS, flickr and del.icio.us on a Mobile Phone

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the internet-tower-of-babel dept.

36

Roger Whittaker writes to tell us Engadget reports that Mobileglu is offering an interesting new service that gives users the ability to read RSS feeds, flickr, del.icio.us, and other sources of content in a mobile friendly format. Think this will lead to smarter content developers making their own sites more mobile friendly, or just a few lawsuits?

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Risk of living off others' content (4, Insightful)

biocute (936687) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763055)

Think this will lead to smarter content developers making their own sites more mobile friendly, or just a few lawsuits?

Most likely these content providers will sit and see what comes out of this.

If it isn't popular, MobileGLU will die out itself; If it's popular, these content providers will invite MobileGLU to pay up, or file an injunction to shut it down while they start providing the service themselves.

Not many company can manage to live off someone else's content for free, the one that stands out is obviously the Beast, which is also constantly under attack by content providers.

To be successful, MobileGLU really needs to hit the market hard and fast, that is to make sure these content providers need its service more than it needs their content.

Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763223)

My complaint about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org]
I have something important I need to tell you. I anticipate it will result in my receiving a barrage of angry e-mail from Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] accusing me of being lackluster, but Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] is an institutional leech dedicated to sucking the life out of our doomed corpses. To organize my discussion, I suggest that we take one step back in the causal chain and unmask Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] 's true face and intentions in regard to hooliganism. The central paradox of Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] 's sophistries, the twist that makes Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] 's sound bites so irresistible to reckless, contemptible pamphleteers, is that these people truly believe that we should avoid personal responsibility.
For one thing, if Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] opened up its callous mind just a teeny-weeny little bit, maybe it could understand that. But more important, some people think that before bothering us with its next batch of garrulous flimflams, Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] should review the rules of writing a persuasive essay, most notably the one about sticking to the topic the writer establishes. Others maintain that even the most aberrant turncoats you'll ever see would think twice before sitting next to someone whose sole dream is to bask in the insecure shine of statism. In the interest of clearing up the confusion, I'll make the following observation: If we're to effectively carry out our responsibilities and make a future for ourselves, we will first have to direct our efforts toward clearly defined goals and measure progress toward those goals as frequently and as objectively as possible. So that there may be no misunderstanding, let me make it clear that I, speaking as someone who is not a featherbrained, illaudable vagabond, do not propose a supernatural solution to the problems we're having with Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] . Instead, I propose a practical, realistic, down-to-earth approach that requires only that I overcome the obstacles that people like it establish.
Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] 's homilies promote a redistribution of wealth. This is always an appealing proposition for Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] 's supporters because much of the redistributed wealth will undoubtedly end up in the hands of the redistributors as a condign reward for their loyalty to Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] . We were put on this planet to be active, to struggle, and to analyze Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] 's treatises in the manner of sociological studies of mass communication and persuasion. We were not put here to shame my name, as Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] might aver. When one examines the ramifications of letting Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] open the floodgates of prætorianism, one finds a preponderance of evidence leading to the conclusion that its apple-polishers have been staggering around like punch-drunk fighters hit too many times -- stunned, confused, betrayed, and trying desperately to rationalize its lubricious off-the-cuff comments. It is not a pretty sight. As I gaze into my crystal ball, I see that Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] 's devotees will cause one-sided artifices to be entered into historical fact in a matter of days.
I may be questioning the regnant conventional wisdom by stating this, but maybe I have to wonder where Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] got the idea that it is my view that its calumnies enhance performance standards, productivity, and competitiveness. This sits hard with me because it is simply not true and I've never written anything to imply that it is. I wonder what would happen if Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] really did present a false image to the world by hiding unpleasant but vitally important realities about its maneuvers. There's a spooky thought.
If the human race is to survive on this planet, we will have to explain a few facets of this confusing world around us. Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] says it's going to scrap the notion of national sovereignty by the next full moon. Is it out of its mind? The answer is fairly obvious when you consider that it has a knack for convincing patronizing dirtbags that a richly evocative description of a problem automatically implies the correct solution to that problem. That's called marketing. The underlying trick is to use sesquipedalian terms like "pancreaticoduodenostomy" and "anthropomorphization" to keep its sales pitch from sounding simple-minded. That's why you really have to look hard to see that perhaps one day we will live in a world where good people are not troubled by fear of churlish spielers. Until that day arrives, however, we must spread the word that Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] is fixated on post-structuralism. It will almost certainly tiptoe around that glaringly evident fact, because if it didn't, you might come to realize that even when the facts don't fit, it sometimes tries to use them anyway. It still maintains, for instance, that superstition is no less credible than proven scientific principles.
Sticks and stones may break my bones, but Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] always demands instant gratification. That's all that is of concern to it; nothing else matters -- except maybe to waste our time and money. I tell you this because Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] should learn to appreciate what it has instead of feeling so oppressed because it can't do everything it wants, every time it wants to. Though fork-tongued, wanton gangsterism is not discussed in this letter, much of what I've written applies to that, as well. For proof of this ongoing tragedy, one has only to realize that Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] has planted its accomplices everywhere. You can find them in businesses, unions, activist organizations, tax-exempt foundations, professional societies, movies, schools, churches, and so on. Not only does this subversive approach enhance Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] 's ability to twist the history, sociology, and anthropology disseminated by our mass media and in our children's textbooks but it also provides irrefutable evidence that I must admit that I've read only a small fraction of its writings. (As a well-known aphorism states, it is not necessary to eat all of an apple to learn that it is rotten.) Nevertheless, I've read enough of Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] 's writings to know that if you ever ask Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] to do something, you can bet that your request will get lost in the shuffle, unaddressed, ignored, and rebuffed. Cause this country to flounder on the shoals of self-interest, corruption, and chaos if you like, Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] , because I simply don't care. If it were up to Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] , schoolchildren would be taught reading, 'riting, and racism. Where do we go from here? The answer to that question has broad implications. For example, if Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] thinks that it can make me lose all self-control, then it's barking up the wrong tree.
This seems so obvious, I am amazed there is even any discussion about it. If someone were to create an atmosphere that may temporarily energize or exhilarate, but which, at the same time, will pose the gravest of human threats, I'd rather it be an army of presumptuous, unambitious demoniacs than Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] , because the latter is sententious, while the former are only pestilential. I call upon Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] to stop its oppression, lies, immorality, and debauchery. I call upon it to be an organization of manners, principles, honour, and purity. And finally, I call upon it to forgo its desire to prevent us from recognizing the vast and incomparable achievements, contributions, and discoveries that are the product of our culture.
Perhaps Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] 's use of muddleheaded slobs is pathetic, but remember that if it isn't pathetic, I don't know who is. Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] believes that it's the best thing to come along since the invention of sliced bread. The real damage that this belief causes actually has nothing to do with the belief itself, but with psychology, human nature, and the skillful psychological manipulation of that nature by Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] and its incomprehensible forces.
Mankind needs to do more to prescribe a course of action. Understand, I am not condemning mankind for not doing enough; I am merely stating that Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] 's desire to undermine the basic values of work, responsibility, and family is the chief sign that it's a subhuman mendicant. (The second sign is that Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] feels obliged to spit on sacred icons.) I find Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] 's offhand remarks rather dodgy, don't you? Although the themes in Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] 's announcements are limited, we must find the inner strength to listen to others if we are ever to pursue virtue and knowledge. Yes, this is a bold, audacious, even unprecedented undertaking. Yes, it lacks any realistic guarantee of success. However, it is an undertaking that we must certainly pursue because Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] says that granting it complete control over our lives is as important as breathing air. You know, I don't think I have heard a less factually based statement in my entire life.
Certain facts are clear. For instance, learning the truth can be a painful experience, especially for Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] , -- and Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] knows it. My goal is to turn random, senseless violence into meaningful action. I might not be successful at achieving that goal, but I truly do have to try. Although I have no interest in getting tangled in the rhetoric or dogma that Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] frequently pushes, we are here to gain our voice in this world, and whether or not Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator [pakin.org] approves, we will continue to be heard.

Re:Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter genera (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763261)

I have never aspired to become a speechwriter, politician, or mainstream political columnist. Nevertheless, if you can look beyond my pitiable writing style you'll surely see that I have something important to tell you about the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator. The nitty-gritty of what I'm about to write is this: Knowledge is the key that unlocks the shackles of bondage. That's why it's important for you to know that if the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator can't stand the heat, he should get out of the kitchen. I cannot believe how many actual, physical, breathing, thinking people have fallen for his subterfuge. I'm thoroughly stunned. The guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator's memoirs have caused widespread social alienation, and from this alienation a thousand social pathologies have sprung. Before I move on, I just want to state once more that the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator's most progressive idea is to replace law and order with anarchy and despotism. If that sounds progressive to you, you must be facing the wrong way. The guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator and his factotums are blossoms on the upas tree of paternalism. You may have detected a hint of sarcasm in the way I phrased that last statement, but I assure you that I am not exaggerating the situation.

It has been said that vexatious degenerates have traditionally tried to piggyback on substantive issues to gain legitimacy for themselves. I believe that to be true. I also believe that I can't follow his pretzel logic. I do, however, know that the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator has recently been going around claiming that his revenge fantasies are a breath of fresh air amid our modern culture's toxic cloud of chaos. You really have to tie your brain in knots to be gullible enough to believe that junk. What I find frightening is that some academics actually believe the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator's line that ethical responsibility is merely a trammel of earthbound mortals and should not be required of a demigod like him. In this case, "academics" refers to a stratum of the residual intelligentsia surviving the recession of its demotic base, not to those seekers of truth who understand that there's a time to keep silent and a time to speak. There's a time to love and a time to hate. There's a time for war and a time for peace. And, I claim, there's a time to put inexorable pressure on the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator to be a bit more careful about what he says and does. Or, to put it less poetically, I want my life to count. I want to be part of something significant and lasting. I want to shield people from the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator's insincere and infantile deceptions. Particularism has served as the justification for the butchering, torture, and enslavement of more people than any other "ism". That's why it's the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator's favorite; it makes it easy for him to grasp at straws, trying to find increasingly cold-blooded ways to ignite a maelstrom of prætorianism. I had a brief conversation recently with some frowzy mafia dons who were trying to advertise "magical" diets and bogus weight-loss pills. That conversation convinced me that implying that the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator should burn books because "it's the right thing to do" is no different from implying that he can override nature. Both statements are ludicrous.

It's irrelevant that my allegations are 100% true. The guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator distrusts my information and arguments and will forever maintain his current opinions. He is extraordinarily brazen. We've all known that for a long time. However, the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator's willingness to get on my nerves sets a new record for brazenness.

Some would say that this is a platitude. Would that it were! Rather, I wish that one of the innumerable busybodies who are forever making "statistical studies" about nonsense would instead make a statistical study that means something. For example, I'd like to see a statistical study of the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator's capacity to learn the obvious. Also worthwhile would be a statistical study of how many jackbooted, biased wackos realize that the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator dreams of a time when he'll be free to teach stroppy concepts to children. That's the way he's planned it, and that's the way it'll happen -- not may happen, but will happen -- if we don't interfere, if we don't stand as a witness in the divine court of the eternal judge and proclaim that neither he nor his bedfellows have dealt squarely or clearly with the fact that many of our present-day sufferings are the consequence of the unsavory relationship between him and hidebound, meretricious yutzes. Don't get me wrong; he neglects the impact that selfishness has on the soul. But you don't need to be a rocket scientist to detect the subtext of this letter. But just in case it's too subliminal for some, let me thrust it into your face right here: His representatives feel that "inerudite rotters aren't ever yellow-bellied." First off, that's a lousy sentence. If they had written that this is a classic example of a zero-sum game, then that quote would have had more validity. As it stands, if the people generally are relying on false information sown by primitive nonentities, then correcting that situation becomes a priority for the defense of our nation.

I, hardheaded cynic that I am, normally prefer to listen than to speak. I would, however, like to remind the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator that if he thinks that he can make me become clinically depressed, then he's barking up the wrong tree. This state of affairs demands the direct assault on those jejune utterances that seek to traduce and discredit everyone but disorganized slimeballs. When one examines the ramifications of letting the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator nourish warped ideologies, one finds a preponderance of evidence leading to the conclusion that he takes things out of context, twists them around, and then neglects to provide decent referencing so the reader can check up on him. The guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator also ignores all of the evidence that doesn't support (or in many cases directly contradicts) his position. That fact is simply inescapable to any thinking man or woman. "Thinking" is the key word in the previous sentence. If I weren't so forgiving, I'd have to say that the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator says that character development is not a matter of "strength through adversity" but rather, "entitlement through victimization". But then he turns around and says that he is a tireless protector of civil rights and civil liberties for all people. You know, you can't have it both ways, the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator. We can never return to the past. And if we are ever to move forward to the future, we have to act as a positive role model for younger people.

Although the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator was likely following the dictates of his conscience when he decided to cultivate an unhealthy sense of victimhood, the fact remains that if I had to choose the most randy specimen from his welter of anti-democratic gabble, it would have to be his claim that his decisions are based on reason. The absurdity of his sound bites requires no further comment. That being the case, we can infer that he teaches workshops on antinomianism. Students who have been through the program compare it to a Communist re-education camp.

By seeking to stir up trouble, the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator reveals his ignorance about sesquipedalianism's polyvocality. He probably also doesn't realize that militant, poxy drunks like the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator are not born -- they are excreted. However unsavory that metaphor may be, the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator's satraps say, "There is something intellectually provocative in the tired rehashing of wrongheaded stereotypes." Yes, I'm afraid they really do talk like that. It's the only way for them to conceal that the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator argues that he has achieved sainthood. To maintain this thesis, the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator naturally has had to shovel away a mountain of evidence, which he does by the desperate expedient of claiming that my bitterness at him is merely the latent projection of libidinal energy stemming from self-induced anguish. Aside from the fact that the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator's mind is hermetically sealed against fresh air from the real world, I certainly dislike the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator. Likes or dislikes, however, are irrelevant to observed facts, such as that the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator can't attack my ideas, so he attacks me. It could be worse, I suppose. He could support hostile governments known for human rights abuses, wrongful imprisonment, and slavery. Some reputed -- as opposed to reputable -- members of his band quite adamantly aver that the media should "create" news rather than report it. I find it rather astonishing that anyone could contend such a thing, but then again, the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator can't possibly believe that it's okay to put the gods of heaven into the corner as obsolete and outmoded and, in their stead, burn incense to the idol Mammon. He's imprudent, but he's not that imprudent.

Contrary to the impression that illiterate bums offer "new," "innovative," and "advanced" ideas, there is little new in their propositions. To oppose fogyism, we must oppose nativism. To oppose alarmism, we must oppose wowserism. And to oppose the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator, we must oppose loud parasites. I can repeat with undiminished conviction something I said eons ago: His belief systems are a cankered, morally crippled carnival of insurrectionism. The best example of this, culled from many, would have to be the time he tried to support those for whom hatred has become a way of life. He uses the word "literally" when he means "metaphorically". Let's remember that.

I can't stand the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator or his disciples. To top that off, the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator is an inspiration to cocky extremists everywhere. They panegyrize his crusade to consign most of us to the role of his servants or slaves and, more importantly, they don't realize that the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator's brown-nosing, logorrheic game of chess -- the lawless chess of mercantalism -- has continued for far too long. It's time to checkmate this contentious phony and show him that he claims that he is the ultimate authority on what's right and what's wrong. Well, I beg to differ. When the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator says that metagrobolism brings one closer to nirvana, that's just a load of spucatum tauri. His helots are blissfully ignorant of his power-hungry, ignominious Ponzi schemes. To be more pedantic about it, he and I disagree about our civic duties. I maintain that we must do our utmost to call for a return to the values that made this country great as expeditiously as possible. The guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator, on the other hand, believes that the worst types of ill-bred individuals there are are more deserving of honor than our nation's war heroes. I won't lie to you; if I were elected Ruler of the World, my first act of business would be to build an inclusive, nondiscriminatory movement for social and political change. I would further use my position to inform certain segments of the Earth's population that most people want to be nice; they want to be polite; they don't want to give offense. And because of this inherent politeness, they step aside and let the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator distort the facts.

While I don't know the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator's secret plans, I do know that our path is set. By this, I mean that in order to lift our nation from the quicksand of injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood, we must lead him out of a dream world and back to hard reality. I consider that requirement a small price to pay because inasmuch as I disagree with the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator's accusations and find his ad hominem attacks offensive, I am happy to meet the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator's speech with more speech and, if necessary, continue this discussion until the truth shines. Calling the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator's cringers inaniloquent, out-of-touch hostes generis humani may be accurate, but there are few certainties in life. I have counted only three: death, taxes, and the guy who complained about Scott Pakin's automatic complaint-letter generator doing some brutish thing every few weeks. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

worked for Google (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763264)

Not many company can manage to live off someone else's content for free

worked for Google news/images/web and for them its a billion dollar earner
he could argue that he is merely a search engine indexing and caching the content
after all thats what Google does so their arguments can be his

Re:worked for Google (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763290)

But Google moved past their initial "leecher" status and became profitable doing ads. Can this? That's the survivability test.

Re:worked for Google. Still leeching. (1)

gflammer (953827) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763575)

Google has never moved past the leech stage, they dice up content sucked from anywhere they can find it. Their ads are spam. The user did not ask for them; GOOG gets paid for them. The Anti-leech http://www.customizegoogle.com/ [customizegoogle.com]

Re:worked for Google. Still leeching. (1)

ceejayoz (567949) | more than 8 years ago | (#14765276)

Google has never moved past the leech stage, they dice up content sucked from anywhere they can find it. Their ads are spam. The user did not ask for them; GOOG gets paid for them. The Anti-leech http://www.customizegoogle.com/ [customizegoogle.com]

Slashdot has never moved past the leech stage, they dice up content sucked from anywhere they can find it. Their ads are spam. The user did not ask for them; Slashdot gets paid for them. The Anti-leech http://www.customizeslashdot.com/ [customizeslashdot.com]

Re:Risk of living off others' content (2, Informative)

darkworm (252052) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763643)

Hello there,

Justin from mobileGlu here. The idea behind mobileGlu is not to live off other people's content, we are just acting as a mobile aggregator for people's flickr, delicious, upcoming, RSS etc life online, and that relationship is one to many (i.e. one user many content), not many to many like public aggregators.

The main goal behind the project is not to leech people's content, but to act as a two-way hub between the user and the web service (e.g. allowing user's to post photos from their mobile to their Flickr account, and view those photos), and to help enable other web services to get mobilised as quickly as possible.

Hope that clear some things up?

Justin

Re:Risk of living off others' content (1)

MooUK (905450) | more than 8 years ago | (#14764690)

Technically, any ISP works because of content provided by others at no cost to the ISP, whether that content is paid or otherwise.

Re:Risk of living off others' content (1)

Frank T. Lofaro Jr. (142215) | more than 8 years ago | (#14770027)

You can't file an injuction, you need to sue and have a judge impose one. Most of the time they are temporary (and the content providers can't get anything going within the time frame covered by most temporary injuctions) - the permanent ones are only if you lose, and then the damages would likely wipe you out anyway.

That being said, the decision made in the Nevada District Court in Las Vegas regarding the Google cache sets a hopeful precedent.

Opera mobile (3, Informative)

dotpavan (829804) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763068)

Doesnt Opera Mobile [opera.com] do the same?

"Opera Mobile browser lets you surf the full Web on your mobile phone. And when we say "the full Web," we really mean the *full* Web. Equipped with Opera's Small-Screen Rendering technology, the Opera Mobile browser lets you access any site on the Internet, just like you do on your computer."

Re:Opera mobile (1)

op12 (830015) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763133)

Or even Opera Mini [opera.com] .

Opera Mini(TM) is a fast and easy alternative to Opera's mobile browser, allowing users to access the Web on mobile phones that would normally be incapable of running a Web browser. This includes the vast majority of today's WAP-enabled phones.

Instead of requiring the phone to process Web pages, it uses a remote server to pre-process the page before sending it to the phone. This makes Opera Mini(TM) perfect for phones with very low resources, or low bandwidth connections.

Opera Mini(TM) offers the same speed and usability as the renowned Opera mobile browser, and uses Opera's Small Screen Rendering(TM) technology to provide access to the Web. It has all the features expected of a browser, and more, such as bookmarks, browsing history, and ability to split large pages into smaller sections for faster browsing.

Re:Opera mobile (3, Informative)

JulesLt (909417) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763196)

I think the difference is that the Opera browser shows the whole web page (inc. the ads subsidising said page, etc) rather than accessing the underlying data.

MobileRSS (3, Informative)

brokencomputer (695672) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763086)

This is kind of like Mobile RSS [mobilerss.net] .

Re:MobileRSS (1)

turnstyle (588788) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763386)

You might also be interested in my app, Bitty Browser [bitty.com] -- for example, you can also use it the other way around (ie, to embed mobile content within regular Web pages). -Scott

Re:MobileRSS (1)

wanorris (473323) | more than 8 years ago | (#14764569)

There are a ton of RSS readers for various mobile platforms such as Pocket PC and Palm. The most useful ones also work offline, so you can read the feeds without having an open connection.

But I can't help thinking that while the proprietary approach of taking specific websites and ripping their content might work for a brief period, in the long run it is surely doomed.

The proper solution is websites that deploy CSS intelligently to produce pages formatted properly for small screens. That's what CSS and the whole separation of content from presentation is for: making sure the underlying content can be accessed through a variety of platforms in a manner appropriate to each one.

bloglines mobile is good enough (3, Interesting)

BlackShirt (690851) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763102)

frankly speaking, it is excellent. try to beat that.
1. create bloglines account, subscribe to couple of feeds.
2. swithch to mobile version
http://bloglines.com/mobile [bloglines.com]
3. read all your news in a friendly format (I mostly use it behind my PC as it is just so simple)
http://bloglines.com/myblogs_subs [bloglines.com]

flickr mobile is also good enough (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763784)

and then there is always flickr mobile:

http://www.flickr.com/mob [flickr.com]

WWW = Wirelessly Wank to Wenk (0)

thesandbender (911391) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763115)

Ahhh... Flikr on my mobile... I wonder if Tim Berners-Lee still weeps from time to time or he has just become so jaded he doesn't care.

/no pictures of wenk because this ain't fark.
//hey... no slashies either!!!
///darnit, where'd I put my owl?

Re:WWW = Wirelessly Wank to Wenk (1)

coolCoder (954135) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763141)

Try Novarra's nWeb, its better than all others in rendering mobile content on the cell phones www.novarra.com

Have u tried Novarra Inc's, mobile browser (0, Redundant)

coolCoder (954135) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763179)

Try Novarra's nWeb, its better than all others in rendering mobile content on the cell phones. http://www.novarra.com/ [novarra.com]

sixth post (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763180)

sixth post

Mobile RSS (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763185)

How exciting, whatever next a toaster with RSS feeds burnt into my toast?

Great (1)

sulli (195030) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763186)

Now we will have mobile 2.0 hype.

What about the cost? (1)

xoip (920266) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763255)

We just heard M$ tell us that Cell phones were too expensive and that they were going to save us with WiFi+Voip.
Now we have a service that will cost a fortune in many markets.
Which is it?...too expensive or attractively priced?

webapps and copyrights (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763726)

If you thought being able to easily copy and paste bits and pieces of other people's cool html presented a copyright conundrum, you ain't seen nothing yet. The about-to-explode web applications market will give copyright lawyers so much work to do that they might even forget about mp3's for a while.

Expose some xml data, and I can get at it w/ some simple xpath/xsl/xquery voodoo, mix and match with other data, refactor into my thing, which is itself exposed, other people query it, mix it, ad infinitum. Here are some of CNN's current top story titles:

doc("http://rss.cnn.com/rss/cnn_topstories.rss")// title/text()

Where do I cross the line from 'fair use' to 'copyright infringement'? If I run a query that returns something like:

<value>1</value>

...I think it would be hard to argue that I've violated anyone's rights, no matter how widely I disseminate this information. If however I suck down an author's entire oeuvre and spit it out for anyone else to use, then I've probably stepped on somebody toes. So where do you draw the line? I really have no idea.

If there is a copyright notice associated with xml data, then at some point you may also very well be obligated to copy and redistribute the copyright notice along with the data. Should there be a standard way of associating xml copyrights with xml data, so that the copyright notice could be part of the standard xml query? Nothing complicated, something as simple as ... would suffice.

If you look at cnn's rss feed page summary [cnn.com] , you can see that they put their terms of use out-of-band on the webpage. Nothing in the xml data itself gives any indication about what the copyright terms are (the copyright holder is identified).

Of course, it would be nice if copyright authors could be really terse with such things, as it gets to be a little cumbersome to be transferring huge copyright notices along with little xml queries. Maybe copyrights should be uri's.

Anyway, the main point is that because xml queries span the gamut from atomic data points to petabytes of data, and because the whole point of xml is to simplify the copying and transmission of data, they make an interesting case study about how to define sensible boundary conditions for copyright application.

mo3 dOwn (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14764231)

YOU FAIL IT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14765514)

Good day, sir:

I'm from the RSS Weed 'n Feed, and I'm here to congratulate you on your COMPLETE FAILURE.

Have a remarkable day.

--RSS Weed 'n Feed

/. RSS (1)

SoulMaster (717007) | more than 8 years ago | (#14764379)

I'm using my Nokia 9300 and /. RSS right now and have been for at least a month. The simple way is to peronalize a Google Home page a add all your RSS feeds to it. Then, log in to your google account from any WEP browser and volia, google reformats your pages for you. Even forms and images come through just fine. This whole message was posted using it. -S

websites on mobile...so stupid (1)

abandonment (739466) | more than 8 years ago | (#14765461)

ok, i just signed up for the 'web access' on my new v3 razr phone through my local provider a few weeks ago.

this so called 'internet on phones' is even more ridiculous than the concept of playing games on celphones.

1) the web-browser is SOO slow - takes a LONG time to initialize...
2) they make you navigate through 3 or 4 screens before you can even type in an 'http://' address, each of which is hideously slow and probably costing me money because it's actually navigating some website on my providers network
3) viewing an image heavy site like flikr on a phone? you've GOT to be kidding me - let alone the fact that most celphone users are paying by the kb...

all adds up to 'yet more hype around celphones' that basically is a waste of time and money for the consumer.

no thanx

Re:websites on mobile...so stupid (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14765660)

Try a Sidekick. Full keyboard, the UI on the browser is very intuitive and websites load as quickly as about a 56k modem. I disable image loading from my settings to get things to load quicker and turn them back on if I actually want to see a photo or something. Oh, and it's all unlimited for an extra $20/mo.

There's an SSH app you can buy (yes, buy only, unfortunately) and I love that I can connect to websites to make minor fixes for clients and check my e-mail with pine. Unlimited AIM and YIM too, great for killing time chatting to friends while you're waiting for your takeout order at the local Chinese restaurant.

Can you tell I'm sold on this little device?

Battery life sucks, but...

Re:websites on mobile...so stupid (1)

john-da-luthrun (876866) | more than 8 years ago | (#14766182)

Try Opera Mini - a java-based browser that should work on any modern mobile phone. From your mobile phone browser - once it has finally booted up and you have made it to the address input page - go to mini.opera.com.

Re:websites on mobile...so stupid (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14766273)

1) the web-browser is SOO slow - takes a LONG time to initialize...
If you don't like your phone, get another one. Mine initalizes just about as fast as the one on my PC.

2) they make you navigate through 3 or 4 screens before you can even type in an 'http://' address,
If you don't like...

each of which is hideously slow and probably costing me money because it's actually navigating some website on my providers network
...oh. Learn to use your current phone. It makes no sense to visit one website to find another, if theres no link there. Reminds me of a woman who would always go to Altavista to type in those 'http://'-addresses. Some of them didn't work, however. :-/

3) viewing an image heavy site like flikr on a phone? you've GOT to be kidding me - let alone the fact that most celphone users are paying by the kb...
You've got a point there. Of all the stuff you can do on the mobile, Flickr sounds like a bad idea.

all adds up to 'yet more hype around celphones' that basically is a waste of time and money for the consumer.
If you expect it to be like your desktop computer, then yes. If it's for when you can't use a desktop computer, it's a really nice tool for some people.

When I'm waiting for a train, I can check on my phone if it's delayed. Or even when the next one should come if I can't remember it.
When I'm in the car, I can check where I can get the cheapest diesel.
When I'm in bed but can't sleep there's hours of entertainment without getting out of bed.
Maybe I just need to look something up, but I'm all comfy in the couch with my laptop several meters away, then the phone is quite handy.

Maybe there's no point for you to use it, but I'm so tired of people saying that the entire idea is stupid. It's not. A hammer is a very usable tool itself, even if YOU don't have any nails.

Re:websites on mobile...so stupid (1)

abandonment (739466) | more than 8 years ago | (#14773962)

>> Learn to use your current phone. It makes no sense to visit one website to find another, if theres no link there.

thanx, but i DO know how to use my phone. it's not rocket science.

There are no options to set a home page, no options to customize the startup behavior.

I go to the 'web browser' on my phone, it doesn't give me any options but their default list of urls that I can choose - it doesn't give me an 'http://' prompt, it immediately thinks that I want one of their default pages...

Yes this is the providers page - they don't say that it is, but it's quite obviously their 'default start page'.

It says 'rogers 'navigate' on the page and the links are all obviously html links (wap versions)

my options are:

- hot picks (for what?)
- get music & tones
- get games
- get graphics
- get email / chat
- get tv / video (yeah right)
- my subscriptions
- get info
- search
- graphical view (as if the text version wasn't slow enough)

i have to click 'search', which takes me (eventually) to another page that gives me a search box, or i tab down to the next link which has

- go to http:/// [http]
- go to https:/// [https]
- Yellow Pages
- canada411.com
- takeataxi.com
- city info
- ibm (why would i want to go to IBM's site?)
- time zone
- mygasprices
- dictionary.com

so in order for me to get an 'http://' prompt, i have to:

- launch browser - takes approx 15 seconds to get to the first page
- navigate the crap-ass menus - navigation on the phone is SOO laggy it's ridiculous. each link you click takes about 10 seconds to load.

so after I spend approx 2 minutes of link navigation, i finally have an http:/// [http] prompt to actually type in the website.

Note that I'm getting billed for EVERY one of these pages that I have to navigate through prior to actually get said http:/// [http] prompt, which is something that they do NOT mention to you when you sign up - you think you're actually only paying for the 'real' internet pages that you visit, but NOOOO.

celphone providers need to realize that their crap-ass service is hindering more than helping the adoption of these devices as the 'end all be all' that they think they are.

With that said, I'm actually going to try out this opera mobile that some people have mentioned - i've heard good things about it, perhaps it will actually let me set how I want to surf the net instead of being told how I am by my provider.

News? (1)

Captain_Chaos (103843) | more than 8 years ago | (#14766248)

AvantGo [avantgo.com] has been doing this for many years! I remember using it when I bought my Palm V at JavaOne in 1998. It'll take any web page and let you read it on your PDA (or smart phone).

-1 stupid (1)

metamatic (202216) | more than 8 years ago | (#14768661)

Flickr already has a mobile phone interface [flickr.com] , what's the point of building another?
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