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A Look at GNOME 2.14

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the pretty-new-toys dept.

602

An anonymous reader writes "Gnome has a nice preview of their newest version 2.14 posted which should be hitting the streets around the 15th of March. From the article: "As well as new features and more polish, developers have been working around the clock to squeeze more performance out of the most commonly used applications and libraries. This is a review of some of the most shiny work that has gone into the upcoming GNOME release."

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Coral Cache Link (4, Informative)

Breaker_1 (688170) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763514)

Before they get slashdotted: http://www.gnome.org.nyud.net:8080/~davyd/gnome-2- 14/ [nyud.net]

Re:Coral Cache Link (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763539)

Do moderators not even read the summary nowadays?

Re:Coral Cache Link (5, Funny)

47F0 (523453) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763542)

Gnope. Gnot doing it. Gnot today, Gnot tomorrow.

Kall me krazy, or just konfused, but I kan't konceive klicking to another desktop. Kount me out.

KDE? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763522)

How does this compare to the latest KDE interfaces?

Re:KDE? (0, Flamebait)

Skiron (735617) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763555)

Well seeing as the site is Gnone, KDE 3.5.1 still works here...

Re:KDE? (1)

SQLz (564901) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763756)

There is no comparison.

Biggest change: (4, Funny)

Musteval (817324) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763549)

The "File" menu has been disabled in all programs. GNOME proponents stated that the change is to ensure that end users "aren't confused by all of the big words, like 'exit' and 'print.'" The Edit menu has been removed in most programs.

Re:Biggest change: (5, Interesting)

hackstraw (262471) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763577)

The "File" menu has been disabled in all programs. GNOME proponents stated that the change is to ensure that end users "aren't confused by all of the big words, like 'exit' and 'print.'" The Edit menu has been removed in most programs.

Yes, that is funny!

However, who in their right mind would put 'exit' under the "File" menu? 'print' and 'close' makes sense, but 'exit' is to exit a program, not do anything with a file.

Re:Biggest change: (3, Interesting)

modecx (130548) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763617)

It's clear that you've never encountered users who "Click out of a file", which seems to be most of them. I'm still not quite sure how that one is supposed to work, but I've also known my share of users who "Exit a file", which they apparently took from File->Exit. Anyway...

Re:Biggest change: (4, Interesting)

jacksonj04 (800021) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763729)

I've encountered users who have not realised that applications could be closed. They called site support saying their system was slow. I walked in, saw their taskbar full of apps and just hit the power button. I would have said that on their double-layer taskbar there was only 5 or 6 pixels per active task.

GNOME's audio backend GStreamer to use DRM (3, Informative)

billybob2 (755512) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763770)

GStreamer, the official audio backend for GNOME, will include DRM plugins [gnome.org] developed by a company called Fluendo, which hopes to make money by restricting the users' rights and turning GNOME/Linux/"the Free Desktop System" into a Vista-like nightmare [slashdot.org] controlled by the entertainment cartel [downhillbattle.org] . Why? Because Fluendo is on the GNOME Foundation's Advisory Board [gnome.org] . I can't believe I've been so stupid to actually give them money, so that they can turn around and stab Free Software in the back! Never again will I trust the GNOME Foundation after they sold out the community like this.

I hope KDE is smart enough [kde.org] to avoid DRM by choosing a multimedia backend that is GPL. This will ensure that users can change the code of any plugin, remove the DRM, and be left with a functional product. Xine [xinehq.de] would be an excellent choice for a multimedia backend, since it is light-weight, works with more codecs that Gstreamer (not to mention better) and can be included as a library in any program, like Kaffeine [sourceforge.net] and Amarok [kde.org] have already done.

Re:GNOME's audio backend GStreamer to use DRM (2, Insightful)

WeAreAllDoomed (943903) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763832)

This will ensure that users can change the code of any plugin, remove the DRM, and be left with a functional product.


when you remove the DRM from the code, you remove the ability to decode the DRM content.


how is this different from simply not installing the DRM-enabled plugins in the GNOME product, aside from being far more difficult and pointless?

Re:Biggest change: (1)

Millenniumman (924859) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763685)

That's why in Mac OS X 'quit' (=exit) is under the [nameoftheapplication] menu.

Re:Biggest change: (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763752)

There's actually a very good reason for the wierd placement of the Exit option. When Apple designed the original Mac OS (way before it was even called Mac OS), they gave each application an application menu, and put the Exit option on that menu. It's still there in Mac OS X. When Microsoft ripped off Mac OS to make Windows, they didn't rip off the application menu. Since they had no logical place to put the Exit option, they just stuffed it in the File menu. Gnome just ripped off Windows, so they also got stuck with the Exit option being on the File menu.

Re:Biggest change: (2, Interesting)

dkf (304284) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763817)

I think you'll find it was IBM that did that particular bit of ripping off as part of their CUA effort (and that's what both Windows and Motif derived from, explaining why things looked that way on so many platforms).

So GNOME continues to try to break out of the mold cast for them a generation or so ago. Never mind that we were only just starting to get to the point where real know-nothing users actually expected things that way, it's important to know that the spirit of gratuitous difference lives on...

Re:Biggest change: (1)

marcello_dl (667940) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763771)

I guess exit is in the file menu for historical reasons. There used to be a quit command under file menu in virtually every old macOS app. With OSX apple correctly chose to move that command into the apple menu.

BTW i am actually using XFCE4 because of its old macos usability bonuses: 1) black cursor, easier to spot on mostly white windows 2) custom layout for the window buttons, the close button on the left, the others on the right.

Re:Biggest change: (3, Funny)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763602)

That NOT true!

The File menu has simply been integrated into the Edit menu. The Edit menu was then dropped.

Re:Biggest change: (5, Funny)

timster (32400) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763651)

Silly FUD. The Edit menu is still available if you edit your gnome.prefs to include the line "UseMenuThatShallNotBeNamedBecauseItHasBeenDeclare dBad=1" in the "StupidAnachronisms" section.

Re:Biggest change: (0, Redundant)

quantum bit (225091) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763696)

Silly FUD. The Edit menu is still available if you edit your gnome.prefs to include the line "UseMenuThatShallNotBeNamedBecauseItHasBeenDeclare dBad=1" in the "StupidAnachronisms" section.

Somebody mod +10 So True

Rootprompt (-1, Offtopic)

f0d0 (140677) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763556)

Please, give some credits to Rootprompt [rootprompt.org] . I saw this article there first and it's a nice site with some good articles showing up every now and then. Almost completely done by 1 person named Noel

Re:Rootprompt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763672)

Shut the fuck up Noel.

Impressive (4, Insightful)

the_rev_matt (239420) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763558)

Makes me want to fire up my linux box again. I particularly like the admin tools and the "save your search as a folder" feature. OS X admin tools are sometimes a little restricted for my taste.

Progress! (4, Interesting)

hackstraw (262471) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763564)


It looks like I'm going to have to admin a lab of Linux boxes soon, and I'm pleased with the progress that is coming on the nebulous "Linux desktop".

Although, both Gnome and KDE are still 90'ish, at least Gnome is now knocking off OS X instead of Windows.

Now, for the confusing part. Why was their previous allocator so lame compared to malloc()? Its worth a read to check out this [umass.edu] for an allocator. Being that multi-core/"threads"/CPUs are pretty common today, its worth using that to one's advantage.

Re:Progress! (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763615)

Gnome is now knocking off OS X

Why not call it collaboration instead. OS X is using like 50 GNU programs straight off, source and everything. Gnome (Which is part of GNU) is borrowing some ideas, but not code from OS X. "Knocking off" seams like a bad thing when both GNU and Apple are using eachohers ideas and it's probably benifitial for both projects.

Re:Progress! (1)

LeonGeeste (917243) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763634)

Exactly. A few more steps, and it will be as easy to use as Windows (and with better security!). Great work, I've always pushed for a better Gnome interface, and even submitted my own tinkerings. I wish they'd beef up the encryption some more so we don't have to struggle to keep up with the NSA.

Re:Progress! (4, Informative)

be-fan (61476) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763666)

Now, for the confusing part. Why was their previous allocator so lame compared to malloc()?

Because glibc's malloc() is actually a pretty fast and scalable piece of code for a general-purpose memory allocator. Even GNOME's new special-purpose allocator only gets about twice the performance of glibc's.

Re:Progress! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763675)

If GNOME is 90'ish then windows must be kinda 50'ish. Windows still lacks a lot of the interface features that have been standard on Linux since the late 90's.

Re:Progress! (1)

JFitzsimmons (764599) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763687)

Can you explain your comment about Gnome and KDE being "still 90'ish?"? I don't understand what you mean by that. I also really don't understand what you mean about knocking off OSX. Please provide examples!

Re:Progress! (1)

pyros (61399) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763748)

I also really don't understand what you mean about knocking off OSX. Please provide examples!

Network Manager has an interface pretty much exactly like the wifi config app in OS X.

Re:Progress! (1)

JFitzsimmons (764599) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763805)

Outside of "both have tabs" and "both configure network hardware", I really don't see that much of a similarity.

SW Dualprocessing (2, Insightful)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763567)

I really hope they've got the xcompmgr debugged so it works without freezing on my Inspiron8000. Factoring all display rendering operations out of the CPU onto the GPU in OpenGL will really squeeze a lot more performance out of GNOME, across the board.

Re:SW Dualprocessing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763596)

Check out Xgl, it really rocks! http://en.opensuse.org/Xgl [opensuse.org]

Re:SW Dualprocessing (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763632)

How do I use that with Ubuntu instead of OpenSuSE?

Re:SW Dualprocessing (1)

JFitzsimmons (764599) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763731)

Wait until Dapper is released, then install it. (Or if you're feeling risky, install a prerelease of Dapper now, or do a dist-upgrade from Breezy.) The package is called xserver-xgl.

Re:SW Dualprocessing (1)

pyros (61399) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763765)

The package is called xserver-xgl.

AFAIK it will be in the universe repo (at least that's where it is now), and you will also need compiz and either compiz-gnome or compiz-kde (obviously to match which DE you're running).

Re:SW Dualprocessing (1)

Bloater (12932) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763754)

> How do I use that with Ubuntu instead of OpenSuSE?

Install Ubuntu Dapper (now in stabilisation to prepare for release in April). Xgl is in the "universe" repository, and instructions for enabling it are around somewhere.

Re:SW Dualprocessing (4, Informative)

tpgp (48001) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763778)

How do I use that with Ubuntu instead of OpenSuSE?

Downoad the latest ubuntu CD [ubuntu.com] , then:

1 .Enable the universe repository (see AddingRepositoriesHowto)
2. Make sure that you have the latest mesa, libglitz1 and libglitz-glx1, xserver-xgl

            sudo apt-get update
            sudo apt-get install libgl1-mesa libglitz1 libglitz-glx1 xserver-xgl

3. Install compiz-kde and/or compiz-gnome depending on your desktop

            sudo apt-get install compiz-gnome

4. Replace /etc/X11/X with a symlink to /usr/bin/Xgl

            sudo ln -sf /usr/bin/Xgl /etc/X11/X

5. Close all applications and restart gdm (This will log you out!)

            sudo /etc/init.d/gdm restart

6. Log in, then in a terminal start compiz and the Gnome window decorator (do NOT use sudo here)

            compiz --replace gconf decoration wobbly fade minimize move place resize scale switcher cube rotate zoom
            gnome-window-decorator

            Leave out the gconf plugin if you don't have compiz-gnome installed

7. Add these commands to ~/.gnomerc if you want this on every login (which you probably do)

Taken from the Ubuntu xgl howto wiki [ubuntu.com]

Re:SW Dualprocessing (1)

Lussarn (105276) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763655)

I tried Xgl, the effects was cool and all and very speedy. But standard stuff like resizing a window was even slower than normal XWin, which already is a fair bit slower than Windows. I hope there is some serious optimization taking place before this leaves beta. I don't mind the effects, they rock. But usability is more important. I used Nvidia closed source driver on Geforce 6800. Anybody had any more luck than me to get this flying?

Re:SW Dualprocessing (1)

endy64 (891510) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763759)

Works fine for me on a native AMD64 Ubuntu flight-4 install, admittedly I had to get some community debs from the Ubuntu forum [ubuntuforums.org] to get compiz to work on AMD64 but it should be easy x86 I hear [ubuntu.com] . Since I got it working it's fast and fun. It certainly rivals OS X in some ways and this is only the beginning ;)

Re:SW Dualprocessing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763683)

I think you're aiming for the new Xgl [opensuse.org] goodness.
But to squeeze the most out of gnome you can better forget using xcompmgr and start using Compiz [opensuse.org] .

Re:SW Dualprocessing (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763762)

With Ubuntu?

Re:SW Dualprocessing (1)

akheron01 (637033) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763736)

and when OS X did it you guys called it eye candy ;)

Re:SW Dualprocessing (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763838)

I dunno if I'm one of "those guys". When my team did it (second processor for all rendering) in the late 1980s, we called it "Genigraphics". When Atari did it with a separate processor for Display List processing in the early 1980s, they called it "ANTIC". I call it dual processing.

And I call it late to the party ;).

Will it be in FC5 or Ubuntu 6.next? (1)

TodLiebeck (633704) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763580)

Congrats to the developers, I'm really looking forward to trying it out when it goes stable!

Just curious if anyone might know if Gnome 2.14 is making the cut for Fedora Core 5 or the next Ubuntu?

Re:Will it be in FC5 or Ubuntu 6.next? (5, Informative)

Philodoxx (867034) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763597)

Every Ubuntu release is timed so that it arrives shortly after the release of gnome. This is done so that the Ubuntu release features the latest and greatest of what gnome has to offer.

Re:Will it be in FC5 or Ubuntu 6.next? (1)

msgyrd (891916) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763753)

Ubuntu doesn't follow Gnome's releases on purpose, it has a standard 6 month release cycle of updates.

Re:Will it be in FC5 or Ubuntu 6.next? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763835)

Ubuntu doesn't follow Gnome's releases on purpose, it has a standard 6 month release cycle of updates.

Yes, but the clever people at Ubuntu have managed to find a (patent-pending) way to keep their standard 6 month release cycle nicely in sync with the Gnome standard 6 month release cycle. I don't have time to explain to you how it works, though. Sorry.

Re:Will it be in FC5 or Ubuntu 6.next? (3, Informative)

Sodki (621717) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763605)

Yes, GNOME 2.14 will be in both Fedora Core 5 and Ubuntu 6.04 aka Dapper Drake.

Re:Will it be in FC5 or Ubuntu 6.next? (0)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763704)

Yes, GNOME 2.14 will be in both Fedora Core 5 and Ubuntu 6.04 aka Dapper Drake.

Fine. All I ask is that they don't try and force me into that wretched OSX two taskbar thing. One on the top?! What is this? Just buy the danm mac you hippies!!

Re:Will it be in FC5 or Ubuntu 6.next? (1)

JFitzsimmons (764599) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763755)

What exactly are you talking about?

I think... (5, Funny)

sheepoo (814409) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763592)

it's sexy

Re:I think... (5, Funny)

SpinJaunt (847897) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763626)

foot fetishist?

Re:I think... (1)

Queer Boy (451309) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763717)

yes, but is it lickable? [apple.com]

Good old Linux (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763603)

Great new features. Just a great shame that GNOME still has icons and window drawing technologies that look like they were developed on an Amiga in the late 80's.

Queue em up! (1)

Wylfing (144940) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763610)

Aaaaaaand queue the slew of posts about how Gnome is a giant step backward in computer usability.

Re:Queue em up! (1)

ezzzD55J (697465) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763718)

Not to spelling nitpick, but that would be cue. As it's the central theme of your post, I thought you'd want to know ;)

Re:Queue em up! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763821)

Not to spelling nitpick, but that would be cue.


I believe the OP meant to make them get in line (queue) not to signal their time to post is now (cue).

GNOME rocks (no offence to KDE) (4, Interesting)

stikves (127823) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763620)

GNOME has definately become a solid desktop with the recent releases (after 2.6 or 2.8). Now everything "works" perfectly (almost) out of the box. (USB sticks, iPods, DVD burners, all kinds of multimedia, SFTP/DAV/SMB/etc integration, openoffice, and many more).

It has replaced Windows XP as my current primary desktop, and I can finally recommend Linux to my friends without hesitation.

(btw You shouldn't have "DDOSed" the poor server. It contains really nice information.)

Re:GNOME rocks (no offence to KDE) (1)

ObsessiveMathsFreak (773371) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763721)

(btw You shouldn't have "DDOSed" the poor server. It contains really nice information.)

I tried not to, but the other Slashdotters pushed me into it. Honest!

Program Naming (4, Insightful)

caerwyn (38056) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763635)

Why do so many linux programmers insist on such crazy naming conventions. Sabayon? Changing a perfectly servicable and pragmagic GNOME Meeting to "Ekiga"?

I use linux both at home and at work, so I'm not some anti-linux zealot or something- I think it's a legitimate question to raise. On my mac laptop, I have a handy app for browsing mDNS networks called Rendezvous Browser (since mDNS was once called Rendezvous). The name is simple and describes perfectly what the program does. On the other hand, 90% of the linux applications available have names that look like they were chosen by picking random letters and squishing them together. I'm sure that the programmers think they've very clever by choosing a name that means something in some obscure language- or they just thing the name sounds cool- but that simple lack of meaningful names is detrimental. If I start up a GNOME session and want to use network meeting functionality, how is there any possible way that I could guess that "Ekiga" is the application I'm looking for?

Re:Program Naming (2, Insightful)

qbwiz (87077) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763725)

Rendezvous Browser
Yes that name makes perfect sense. What exactly is Rendezvous, again?

If I start up a GNOME session and want to use network meeting functionality, how is there any possible way that I could guess that "Ekiga" is the application I'm looking for?

The menu will probably say "Internet Telephony" next to it. GNOME is pretty good about labeling the programs.

Re:Program Naming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763733)

Actually, Ekiga shows as "Ekiga Softphone" in the Applications/Internet menu. If Softphone doesn't ring a bell then there's no way in hell that GNOME Meeting would be any better.

Re:Program Naming (1)

cloricus (691063) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763739)

As a long time GNOME user, I used KDE for the first few months of Linux and switched to try and never went back - some three years ago, I have to agree. Sure Windows has stupid names for programs but I'm really sick of this whole 'we must follow Gates' - I think Linux has come into its own and should work on its own style now - so that is no excuse...More so that Apple can pull off decent names. Case in point GNOME Meeting was a very descriptive term and really...Ekiga...What, how do I sell that to the family?

Luckily I'm very happy with how Ubuntu gets around this problem. For those unaware Ubuntu picks an application to do the major task and then names it descriptively; for example Firefox is called 'Internet' and Nautilus is called 'File Browser'. (Disclaimer: I'm a GNU\Debian user.)

Re:Program Naming (2, Informative)

soupdevil (587476) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763744)

Part of it is geek speak, but I think a large part of it is due to the cost and time involved in researching, registering and defending "traditional" names for companies and products. Odds are that no one will sue you for using the name "Ekiga," but it might take a large corporation to defend a sexy and often used word like "Rendezvous."

Re:Program Naming (1, Redundant)

Linker3000 (626634) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763751)

I am *so* with you on this:

"Also in the new Admin Suite is Sabayon. This powerful tool allows administrators to create profiles for groups of users"

Under W*nd*ws, this would be called the 'Group Profile Creator' and everyone would be happy AND would recognise what the tool did when they tripped over it.

Those at the core of the Linux development world need to recognize that the names they choose can actually hinder adoption of their creations. I'm still uncomfortable promoting 'Kubuntu' to the board and I do not look forward to the day someone needs a graphical editor (GIMP) - it was bad enough moving our Web site to Joomla!

Re:Program Naming (2, Funny)

fossa (212602) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763789)

That's why I don't push Ubuntu or Kubuntu; I use the specific releases like Warty Warthog, Hoary Hedgehog, Breezy Badger or Dapper Drake. Oops, that's The Dapper Drake.

Re:Program Naming (5, Insightful)

Yaztromo (655250) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763774)

While I don't disagree that a lot of OSS software uses poor naming onventions, as an OSS developer myself, I can understand the reasons behind it.

Let's face it -- the obvious descriptive names are typically already taken. OSS developers want to write software -- they don't want to have to spend a lot of time doing name searches in order to ensure they aren't infringing on a trademark used by some tiny software house out in BF Nowhere, and they typically don't have the resources to fend off a legal attack. Thus, the tendancy these days is to pick (or make up) some sort of really obscure name that hopefully isn't going to attract negative attention from litigation-happy corporate lawyers, and then hopefully make a name for yourself.

Naming is difficult, even within the corporate world. But at least within the corporate world you have people who can do research on existing trademarks, and will hopefully come up with a suitable name for your new product -- and then have the lawyers to fight it as necessary. OSS projects don't have such resources.

Just take a look at your own example -- "Rendevous". Apple was forced to change the name to "Bonjour" due to trademark infringement with another company.

If Apple, with its bevy of lawyers and billions of dollars, can run into such a problem, what is the poor OSS developer to do? Picking some obscure name that nobody is likely to call their product is a good (but hardly guaranteed) way to avoid the problem in the first place.

Yaz.

Re:Program Naming (1)

Orrin Bloquy (898571) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763776)

Except it's called Bonjour now for trademark reasons, and has been for nearly a year.

I'll agree with your point, though. There are two extremes: borrow a common word and risk infringing a trademark, or pretend you're as capable as the people who invented "Kodak," "Exxon" and "Xerox" and extrude a random 3 syllable name.

News flash: that works for branding *companies,* not products. Note also that those names max out at two syllables and five letters, and have virtually no ambiguity as to how they ought to be pronounced.

Coders are by and large not any better than the general populace at creating verbal aesthetics. It's a cruel irony that this has to happen to a Gnome (it's not an acronym, mmmkay?) release which prides itself on visual aesthetics.

Re:Program Naming (5, Insightful)

Coryoth (254751) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763795)

If I start up a GNOME session and want to use network meeting functionality, how is there any possible way that I could guess that "Ekiga" is the application I'm looking for?

Because if things have been installed and set up properly "Ekiga" will be under the "Internet" sub-menu of the "Applications" menu, and the entry itself will read something like "Ekiga video-conferencing" with a tooltip saying something like "Communicate with others using text, voice phone calls, or video conferencing". You hold up "Rendezvous Browser" as a well named application because it's clear what it does, but it really begs the question: what the hell is Rendezvous and what does it do? I think the GNOME approach - to choose a distinctive name and pair that with a concise description - is a very good one. You can't have everything named after what it does or else things quickly get pointlessly confused, so distinctive names are good - as long as you pair that with a description of what the app does so people can find it easily. You'll find GNOME conforms to that pretty well, and the result (always having descriptive menu entries and explanatory tooltips for those entries) actually makes for a system where it is easier to find what you want.

Jedidiah.

Re:Program Naming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763811)

I have a handy app for browsing mDNS networks called Rendezvous Browser

You're a fucking retard.

Re:Program Naming (2, Insightful)

banditski (163064) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763836)

I totally agree, but to be fair, how is a search engine called "Google" or an mp3 player called "iPod" any different??

A name should be descriptive, or a name should take on a life of its own. It's ones in between that cause the confusion, but very few products / apps are instantly successful to become their own identity.

Geeks like geek-speak. Urban kids like their slang. etc...

Ceasar Sez (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763636)

Beware the Ides of March!

open and save dialogs (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763637)

Untill they put a spot where you can type in a file path into the open and save dialogs, i wont go back to gnome.

The Linux desktop is finally coming into it's own (5, Insightful)

carlmenezes (204187) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763641)

You have Gnome and KDE - two very different approaches that manage to co-exist side by side. I'm a KDE guy myself, but I must say that Gnome's looking really polished and I can see Gnome and KDE standing beside, if not taller than Windows in the near future. I won't be switching because I like KDE's direction, but there are probbaly a lot of Gnome users who say the same and I can appreciate that.
We also do need to thank the artists that put in the time to create the icons and mouse cursors for us. You can put in all the anti-aliasing you want, but if something like the icons dont look good, people get put off. I'm just really happy for the Gnome guys and all I can say is, "keep it up, you're doing a great job!"
Linux is about choice. I wouldn't want either Gnome or KDE to wipe each other out. They need to co-exist simply to show Windows users that there is a choice available if not for anything else :)

Re:The Linux desktop is finally coming into it's o (1)

frankm_slashdot (614772) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763661)

Damn. That is probably the single most polite Gnome/KDE comment I've ever read on slashdot. I almost feel like I'm performing a disservice to this thread by replying to it without adding anything insightful. Good work. /me tips hat in your direction.

- Frank

Re:The Linux desktop is finally coming into it's o (1)

carlmenezes (204187) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763678)

Thanks :) It is always nice to be appreciated :) Was simply directing credit to where the credit was due :)

I wonder what features got removed! (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763642)

Ooo boy, a new version of Gnome! I wonder what options they removed this time! Because remember, seeing options makes users confused, so you should remove them!

Also bad are things like save dialogs with folder views, and open dialogs where you can type in file names!

Yes, I know, call me a troll. Point out that the save dialog has a button you can click on to display the folder list. Mention that there's some key combo you can press to show a text field on the open dialog.

I used to be a GNOME fan, but as time has gone on, I've just gotten more and more fed up with them simply removing existing options and making the thing - in my opinion, of course - harder to use, all in the name of "easier to use." I used to like GNOME, but Nautilus and the stupid decisions made in 2.x have convinced me that GNOME is never going to be the desktop environment it looked like it could have been in the 1.x days.

I'd also love to know why they decided that the proper order for buttons is "No/Yes". I just love how NO ONE ELSE ON THE PLANET orders things that way, but GNOME does, for "ease of use." Right.

No / Yes - NO! (1)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763702)

I'd also love to know why they decided that the proper order for buttons is "No/Yes"

I really hope they implement some way to switch that... I come from Windows and this is the most irritating "feature" of GNOME. It's even more irritating if you have a dual boot, since you can't readapt your brain to get a specific order of clicking a dialog.

Re:No / Yes - NO! (1)

DigitalGlass (513918) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763750)

usually people read the dialog before blindly clicking it :-)

Re:No / Yes - NO! (1)

Spy der Mann (805235) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763843)

usually people read the dialog before blindly clicking it :-)

And the BOFH linux-zealot award goes to... :-)

Re:I wonder what features got removed! (1)

Guy Harris (3803) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763828)

I'd also love to know why they decided that the proper order for buttons is "No/Yes". I just love how NO ONE ELSE ON THE PLANET orders things that way

Yeah, the desktop I use on my main UN*X machines has the buttons for the "Do you want to save changes to this document before closing?" dialog in the order "Don't Save", "Cancel", and "Save", rather than "Yes" and "No" or "No" and "Yes". Similarly, the buttons for "Are you sure you want to remove the items in the Trash permanently?" are in the order "Cancel" and "OK", rather than "Yes" and "No" or "No" and "Yes".

what different look? (1)

iamwhatiseem (554133) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763646)

I agree with the guy that is glad they are copying the OSX look rather than windows, but other than that..still looks like it is designed by a guy needing anti-depressants. Boooooorrriiiiiiiing...

New Gnome (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763669)

Still ugly after all these years.

Debian stable user here (1)

d.corri (952075) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763670)

GNOME 2.14?? I'm still using version 2.8!!

Re:Debian stable user here (1)

ivoras (455934) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763709)

Wait until 2.16 so you can actually see some changes when you upgrade :)
Point releases are hardly distinguishable from each other in the parts that matter.

So many choices... (1, Interesting)

B5_geek (638928) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763679)

Ok, I give up. You two (Gnome & KDE) can just stop fighting over me. You have won.

I started out (RedHat v5.2) hating Gnome with a passion. So I checked out what my choices were (thank-god for Linux) and moved on to KDE. I loved the options and the configurability. ...years later...

Ok I can't stand XP anymore. I'm "grown-up" enough to stop playing games and doing something constructive with my PC so let's give Debian a try for a desktop.

Well I see that Gnome is still spoon-feeding me, that took 10 minutes, so let's give KDE a whirl.
Love the tools hate the wrapper.
Hello IRC, can sombody suggest a different WM/DE?

Wow IceWM now you are talking!!!!
Cool XFce even better...

Geez I wish Debian would hurry up and update the kernel, I NEED THOSE PATCHES OR I CRASH!
Hello Ubuntu!
Well I know that I hate Gnome, KDE isn't installing right... Where is IceWM? Hey look XFce.

Shit not working right.
---format---reinstall---etc
lather-rise-repeat

3 attempts later.

Fine! I'll try this default stuff.
woah, it works.
I hate this thing.
Geez it is working though.,

My solution: I mostly run KDE-based apps in the Gnome DE. (While wishing XFCe would work 100%.)
Gnome has won the "It just works" contest for me.

Congrats on the release guys. Good Job.

Re:So many choices... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763767)

Try Mepis and update it with Sid. You'll never go back.

speed! (1, Informative)

bcrowell (177657) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763689)

I'm thrilled that they led off the article by talking about performance improvements. For the last 5 years or so, I've been staying away from Gnome because of its poor performance. I still remember the first time I tried it, ca. 2001 -- after clicking on a folder, I literally had time to get up and get a cup of coffee before it would open. Although I've been pretty happy with fluxbox recently, there are times now and then when it might be handy to have more of a full-featured desktop environment. I'll have to try Gnome again.

How do we make it look more compact? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763690)

Personally, I just love Gnome. But there is however one thing in Gnome that bothers me much and which KDE doesn't have.
Is there any way to make Gnome look a bit smaller and more compact? That is to say, to smallen the height of menus, the height of toolbars and so on. In my opinion, the only one annoying feature is that Gnome just takes too much space on the display.
Unfortunately, my laptop can't support higher than 1024x768 resolution so I lose lots of visible space. Any suggestions?

Re:How do we make it look more compact? (3, Informative)

UuCon (4853) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763831)

right-click on your menubar, select properties and then
change the number in the 'Size' box. Done! This feature
has been there since 1.x days.

Toolbar size depends on your font size. Go into your
Preferences->Font and change 'Application Font' to
something smaller.

Beware the Ides of March! (3, Funny)

dumbnose (190140) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763695)

Didn't anyone tell them that this is a dangerous day for this?

Et tu, Bill?

Yeah but... (0, Redundant)

Senzei (791599) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763707)

...it can't hold a candle to KDE for configuration. I mean, why would I want all these Gnome developers making choices for me? Seriously, they have a foot for their project icon, what kind of design sensibility comes up with that?

Dance my pretties, dance.

using 2.9.13.9x for a week in Ubuntu 6.10 betas (5, Interesting)

pyros (61399) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763711)

There are some nice improvements. Gnome-power-manager adds a slick interface to configuring stuff like hibernate on critically low battery, what actions are taken for closing your laptop lid, sleep/power buttons, and stuff like that.

NetworkManager is much improved, too. At least in Ubuntu 6.10 betas, you don't need bind do use it! Instead it finally uses the existing functionaly of the DHCP client to write /etc/resolv.conf. I don't think the VPN stuff from CVS is going to make it in though.

Rhythmbox 0.9.3.1 is pretty nice. It has [iTunes] playlist sharing built in (reportedly, don't anything to share with). I don't have an iPod but I think that should be supported practically out-of-box too. So you might wonder what improvements I actually do notice. You can finally specify a watch folder to sync your library with, import an audio cd, scan removable media, and queue songs from your current playlist. The queue is viewable as a sidebar pane like the cover art display in iTunes. No support for displaying the cover art yet, though.

Gstreamer 0.10 has cleaned up the plugin code, and reorganized their plugin classifications. Good plugins are open source and highly functional. Ugly plugins are legally questionable in some jurisdictions but are highly functional. Bad plugins are ones that may have bad implementations and I guess are more likely to not work. Unfortunately the faad/faac plugins are in the bad package, which currently has to built from source on Ubuntu 6.10. Hopefully that will be added to universe or multiverse by release. Everyone post from someone who has built it reports that AAC files play just fine (including me).

I am having some trouble with dbus/hald not showing desktop icons for hard drive partitions mounted under /media. I set the gconf key for volumes_visible, and that works for CDs and such. But I have to restart dbus/hald after logging in to get partitions to show a desktop icon.

Lastly, I haven't yet got xgl+compiz working yet. But compiz seems hard coded to use Mesa so far, so some people are reporting it's actually slower than plain old xorg with the Ati/Nvidia binary drivers.

Link KDE/GNOME applications w/ Motif library? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763712)

KDE, GNOME and Motif are all based on the same basic idea of widgets/gadgets. Most of the concepts and the widgets themselves are interchangable, except for the names and other minor differences. Personally I prefer the good old Motif style and like MWM (YTMV). I really do not want to install KDE or GNOME and then mix it with Motif. But I do like some of the KDE/GNOME applications, especially some KOffice applications. Is there any project to interface KDE/GNOME applications with the original Motif library instead of the KDE/GNOME libraries?

Xiaman it (1)

HotBBQ (714130) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763719)

Is there a Xiamanized version yet? I love the purdy colors.

Kudos to the sender (1)

Saiyine (689367) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763745)


Kudos to the submitter for using Coral Cache, but remember that those behind corporate firewalls won't be able to read the page.

Why (1)

Millenniumman (924859) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763757)

Why do the Linux GUIs always have the menu bar as part of the windows and the top 3 buttons on the right? Surely it makes more sense to only have one menu bar taking up space at a time, and the buttons near the menus where your mouse is.

Naming (3, Insightful)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 8 years ago | (#14763772)

Ekiga, formerly known as GNOME Meeting,

Oooh! Ekiga is a much more meaningful name than GNOME Meeting. GNOME naming just gets better and better. I know the last time I wanted to search for font information, overly sexually active monkey http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonobo [wikipedia.org] was the very first thing that popped into my head.

The most usable UI (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14763779)

On the principle that users hate choices, here's the new Gnome with the fewest options ever. The entire UI has been stripped except for two huge, beautifully rendered buttons in the middle of the screen. The red one says "on|off", and the green says "DWIM".

Unfortunately the half terabyte of AI this requires also makes this the fattest gnome ever.
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