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AOL to Raise Dialup Prices

ScuttleMonkey posted more than 8 years ago | from the going-the-way-of-the-dodo dept.

272

United Bimmer writes "America Online has announced that it's going to raise the price on dialup users in an attempt to encourage them to upgrade to broadband. The new rates will near $26 a month, already drastically higher than the market norm for dialup access. This will bring the dialup prices to almost the exact same per month as broadband depending on your plan. However through this, they do still offer an unadvertised lower price for those who can't get or don't want broadband can request lower-priced plans, including an unadvertised offering of about $18 with a one-year commitment."

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272 comments

Ding! (5, Funny)

darth_MALL (657218) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780176)

You've Got Inflation!

Re:Ding! (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780420)

Your FP makes you the #1 comment. AND!
 
It's so stupid no wonder it makes me want to go #2.
 
#3: ??????
 
#4 PROFIT! (if in negatives...)

Re:Ding! (1)

HuckleCom (690630) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780457)

Maybe now it's a good idea to stop running end-of-the-world commercials that are ineffective and stop sending out CD's to everyone... cutting costs? naw... now they're in our grasp, so lets turn the fire up!

Re:Ding! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780607)

thankfully services such as NoCharge [nocharge.com] exist for our lesser bandwidth brothers.

I thought broadband was their enemy? (1)

Radres (776901) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780184)

I wasn't aware that AOL by itself provides broadband access. My only options appear to be DSL from the phone company or cable internet from the cable company.

Re:I thought broadband was their enemy? (2, Informative)

AnonymousPrick (956548) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780215)

My only options appear to be DSL from the phone company or cable internet from the cable company.

AOL is probably leasing bandwidth from your local telco. As far as I know, AOL doesn't have their own infrastructure.

Re:I thought broadband was their enemy? (1)

Radres (776901) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780252)

So, the phone company will by default always be cheaper. Great business model, AOL!

Fuck the "Slow Down Cowboy!" message.

Re:I thought broadband was their enemy? (2, Insightful)

jasonditz (597385) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780351)

they were always one of the more expensive dialup companies too and it hasn't hurt them any. People who want someone to hold their hand through the whole experience usually don't mind paying more for less.

Re:I thought broadband was their enemy? (1)

AnonymousPrick (956548) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780462)

So, the phone company will by default always be cheaper.

Not necessarily. AOL may come in and negotiate a "bulk" deal, so to say, and as a result, end up with a cheaper "per unit" price than your typical retail or even business customer. And by business customer, I mean your local firm who needs a DSL, T1, or whatever. So AOL comes in and says, "Hey local monopoly telco who's sitting on billions of invested infrastructure and trying to figure out how to get the best ROI, we'll lease [insert amount of badwidth], but we want to only pay [insert steaply discounted rate]. Now if the local telco says "go fuck yourself AOL!", I don't know. Maybe AOL, will just stiff their dial-ups in that area until they switch to someone else.

Re:I thought broadband was their enemy? (2, Informative)

ePhil_One (634771) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780541)

Now if the local telco says "go fuck yourself AOL!", I don't know

For now, the local Telco is forced to sell at a discount. This is the same way Speakweasy and other DSL ISP's work. Nobody runs copper to the home for DSL. Even Verizon is switching to Fiber for the last mile these days.

Re:I thought broadband was their enemy? (1)

budgenator (254554) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780588)

AOL all ready has bulk deals with the telco's because they provide dial-up service with local numbers. I wouldn't be surprised that with the federal state and local taxes involved with a pots circuit, that provideing a thousand DSL connections might be cheaper than providing a 100 POTS connections!

Re:I thought broadband was their enemy? (1)

reverend_rodger (879863) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780283)

Things may have changed since when I was in the loop (working as a salesman at CompUSA), but the way it worked was that you pay your local broadband provider for an account and THEN you pay AOL for a subscription on top of that so that you can still access AOL's crap (the same startup page and web browser you get when you use dial-up). Yeah, I thought that was an excellent idea and business model also.

Re:I thought broadband was their enemy? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780305)

Ever heard of AOL-Time Warner? One of the biggest cable companies in the US.

Re:I thought broadband was their enemy? (2, Informative)

Pentavirate (867026) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780449)

I saw this article from msn [msn.com] earlier.

From that article: "We're doing this because a majority of AOL members will be able to get high-speed connections and access the AOL service for this new price," spokeswoman Anne Bentley said Tuesday. "Hopefully it's an encouragement for them to get high-speed connections."

Although AOL has been shifting its focus to providing free articles, video and other materials on its ad-supported Web sites, the company sees paid broadband accounts as key to making that strategy work.

AOL believes broadband will help boost usage and hence advertising. According to the Pew Internet and American Life Project, those with broadband at home are 52 percent more likely than dial-up subscribers to use the Internet on a given day, and the typical broadband user spends about 23 percent more time online daily.


They're basically trying to get more people using high speed connections to get more people online and using their services where they get more money for their services and for advertising. It's just a shift to more of an ad-based revenue stream. Makes sense.

Who's the customer? (1)

Valdrax (32670) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780537)

It's just a shift to more of an ad-based revenue stream.

That makes this another fine example of the customer not being the real customer. This is one of the reasons that I hate the word "consumer." It very accurately describes one's real relationship to companies that like to use it.

You are not the one that's always right. You are just the one that consumes the content, and you are a replaceable cog. If we can milk you for money too, then so much the better.

Well that's nice of them. (5, Funny)

andy753421 (850820) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780187)

Less AOL users and more boadband users.. how could it get any better?

AOL 11.0! Now with Spellcheck QXZ-3000! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780243)

They might give away a spell-checker so you can figure out how to spell "broadband".

Re:Well that's nice of them. (3, Funny)

phorm (591458) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780284)

Or the could use AOL broadband... which just makes them doubly scary (10x the bandwidth, 1/10 the brains!)

Re:Well that's nice of them. (1)

strabo (58457) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780316)

Less AOL users and more boadband users.. how could it get any better?

But, TFM says:

AOL said Tuesday that it would raise the price of its dial-up offering by $2 in an effort to encourage dial-up subscribers to sign up for broadband services provided by the company. Both its traditional service and its new broadband offering will now be priced at $25.90 USD per month.

Maybe I'm reading it wrong, but it sounds more like Less AOL users on dialup and more AOL users on broadband ... how could it get any worse?

Holy Crap (3, Insightful)

Matilda the Hun (861460) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780207)

1. Give crappy dial-up service
2. Give crappy broadband service
3. Increase the price of your crappy dial-up service
4. Profit!!!! Or go out of business.

Another failed attempt to fill in step 3.

Re:Holy Crap (1)

Radres (776901) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780228)

Except in the original South Park episode where they made this joke, there were only 3 steps with step 2 being the ?

Re:Holy Crap (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780264)

And because it was originally done that way, how dare anyone break the bounds and do something else with it!

Uhh... (1)

reverend_rodger (879863) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780219)

So... what happens when AOL's customers realize that if they can get broadband they don't have to pay the extra money to stick AOL's crap on top of an existing connection?

Re:Uhh... (4, Insightful)

XenoRyet (824514) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780455)

AOL's customers aren't capable of comprehending such a thing, that is why they are still AOL users.

All kidding aside, AOL completly relies on the fact that their customer doesn't know a thing about how computers or the internet actualy work. Just look at their commercials: (talking about their spyblocker or some such) "Because with high speed internet, the intruders come at you faster!" I don't even know where to begin with that statement. But the AOL users just nod knowingly and install more bloatware.

This is ludicrous (2, Insightful)

rehtonAesoohC (954490) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780221)

Raising the dialup rates for people by such a huge margin is absolutely asinine, honestly. Then think about the $18/month they would charge for people who cannot get broadband internet is at least 50% a month more expensive than other dial-up providers.

Who in their right mind would even consider paying for AOL dial-up?!

Re:This is ludicrous (1)

$RANDOMLUSER (804576) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780310)

> Who in their right mind would even consider paying for AOL dial-up?!

These guys? [amazon.com]

Re:This is ludicrous (2, Funny)

Karzz1 (306015) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780402)

It is a good thing that Amazon doesn't use Slashdot's moderation system. That book would have to get modded redunudant.

Smile people, it's a joke.

Re:This is ludicrous (1)

truthsearch (249536) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780338)

Who in their right mind would even consider paying for AOL dial-up?!

Those who already have an aol email address and don't want to change it. Many people are lazy enough to pay the extra price just to keep their email address and not have to research alternatives.

Re:This is ludicrous. Is it? (3, Insightful)

xeoron (639412) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780415)

I would bet that this is part of a larger plan, so people would be more willing to buy and download from the Net movies, music, games, etc. It is not just a push for high speed access, since TimeWarner has fingers into all kinds of media and entertainment .

Re:This is ludicrous (1)

aqfire (885545) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780557)

I think you just figured out their point. They don't WANT you using dial-up anymore. AOL probably has a lot more to gain by selling broadband than by selling dial-up service. I'm not sure how they do their broadband, but it must be much less expensive than maintaining massive analog dial-up pools.

The AOL community reacts: (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780222)

OMGWTF! TEH SUXS!!one!eleven!1

asdfasdasdfasdfsdfdfdas

Re:The AOL community reacts: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780261)

Me too!

downward spiral (2)

chrisjbuck (950790) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780224)

Let's see... 1. Drive away current users with high dial up prices 2. Watch them sign up with other competitive broadband providers 3. ... 4. Profit?

Re:downward spiral (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780504)

speaking of "downward" how about throwing in some line breaks so your comment at least looks as cliche as it should...

Re:downward spiral (2, Insightful)

LnxAddct (679316) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780575)

AOL offers its own broadband service, and they have for years now. They also offer a whole bunch of multimedia, streaming concerts, music, and access to a lot of news/financial resources that typically you'd have to pay for. I don't use AOL, but I can see why some people stick with it. You get a lot for your money, but you also get a bad rep. Most people on slashdot, though, speak ignorantly of what AOL has to offer. They really have not a clue, and its no better than when a company makes false claims against linux.
Regards,
Steve

What about those who can't get broadband (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780232)

This will certainly chase away many of their current customers. I am unable to get DSL or Cable and Sattelite is way too expensive. If dialup prices are raised by AOL, I'm sure that many will switch to a less expensive ISP.

Re:What about those who can't get broadband (1)

Cl1mh4224rd (265427) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780642)

If dialup prices are raised by AOL, I'm sure that many will switch to a less expensive ISP.
Cripes. At least try reading the whole summary...

I'm Worried... (5, Funny)

Your Anus (308149) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780237)

When I upgrade to broadband, and then cancel my service, will I continue to get billed for it anyway at the braodband rate or at the dial-up rate?

Re:I'm Worried... (0)

rovingeyes (575063) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780278)

When I upgrade to broadband, and then cancel my service, will I continue to get billed for it anyway at the braodband rate or at the dial-up rate?

May be no one told you, this is slashdot not AOL's customer service forum!

One more reason not to use AOL (3, Insightful)

dnamaners (770001) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780241)

As if the AOL customer service was reason enough to avoid it, now they add a whole new insult. Cell phone like plan gouging and hidden pricing with contractual commitments. Of course, on the upside, this will make people switch to a new provider via economic pressure. You have to love natural selection in progress.

Cool! (4, Insightful)

rob_squared (821479) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780242)

Wouldn't it be great if other companies did this?

Golf courses could make the hole smaller to encourage more people to buy Tiger Woods video games.

McDonalds could increase the amount of ice in drinks to make people buy bigger drinks.

Motion Picture creators could degrade the quality of videos to make people move to a new format.

Nike could make their shoes less comfortable and then sell replacement linings.

Is this funny or insightful?
It's probably both.

Re:Cool! (1)

Amouth (879122) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780506)

all but the golf one.. you have a good posiable point.. which is jsut a sad realization of the world around us

Re:Cool! (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780531)

"Is this funny or insightful?"

Moderation +3
    70% Insightful
    30% Funny

Heaven forbid I be labeled 'informative' for this.

1. Shoot self in foot. 2. ???. 3. Profit!!! (2, Interesting)

panaceaa (205396) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780272)

Time to add AOL to the list of great [wikipedia.org] moments [segway.com] in pricing [caldera.com] failures [neo-geo.com] .

Re:1. Shoot self in foot. 2. ???. 3. Profit!!! (2, Funny)

eosp (885380) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780550)

The difference being that Lisa, Segway, and Neo-Geo (not SCO, this applies there too) are all halfway decent products.

Dennis Miller (1)

MScrip (944281) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780285)

Now there will be more NetZero commercials with Dennis Miller. "Why pay $26 for AOL when you can get NetZero for less than $10?" Great comedian/writer turned NetZero ad-boy.

Its an outrage! (1)

scenestar (828656) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780294)

People still use dial-up!?

Re:Its an outrage! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780392)

Only old people in Korea still use dial up. /ducks

Re:Its an outrage! (1)

basic0 (182925) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780427)

I don't think the problem is that people *want* to use dial-up, it's just that broadband coverage isn't available in all areas. For example, I have a friend who is currently paying as much for his 56k access as others in this town pay for cable. The cost isn't the issue, it's that he lives in a somewhat rural area and the Cogeco cable line ends about 500 metres from his house.

If you're going to force people into using broadband for internet access, make sure they physically *have* that option first!

Re:Its an outrage! (1)

budgenator (254554) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780689)

In my area DSL just became available, 4 years after Comcast upgraded our area to fiber and made cable broadband available. Before that I was luckey to connect at 33.6K.

Re:Its an outrage! (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780510)

People still use dial-up!?

They're not people, they're caffeine-ingesting squirrels who get bored sitting in our attics, and decided to hack the Net - literally.

I saw it coming (2, Interesting)

spazoidspam (708589) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780295)

To be honest, I saw this coming. Not just at AOL, but it is very forseeable that dial-up prices will only go up, and broadband prices will go down, or it will get faster. Just think about it, doesnt dial-up require a dedicated connection? Just like making a phone call? Where adding additional users to a broadband system just eats up more bandwidth from the large and growing pool. AOL might be jumping the gun and doing it before dial-up costs actually rise, but as the telcos lose their traditional phone customers to VoIP, a normal phone line will just get more and more expensive.

Re:I saw it coming (1)

pla (258480) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780489)

as the telcos lose their traditional phone customers to VoIP, a normal phone line will just get more and more expensive.

+5 insightful!

I've heard you can still do better in some parts of the country, but in the NorthEastern US, basic land-line phone service (by which I mean the default "no frills but not crippled" service) will run you $35 to $60 per month, after fees and taxes and BS. Unlimited nationwide LD will run at least $70.

For comparison, my broadband costs me $45 and my nationwide 800-minute (? 1200? something like that - I took the lowest number of minutes they offered and never even get near half of it) cell service for two phones costs only $80 per month.

So yeah, POTS service has reached the end of its useful life. As a consequence of that, dialup internet access will start to cost more than broadband.

Now, as for AOL charging so much... The VAST majority of people still on dialup either: A) have no choice; B) care far more about cost than speed; or C) don't use the internet enough to justify paying more for broadband.

AOL's move might get some folks in group C to switch to broadband, but A and B and at least half of C will just go to a cheaper dialup ISP like NetZero. Granted, as I mentioned (and you already predicted), dialup might realistically cost more than broadband in the near future; but for now, AOL has AIMed the gun at their foot a tad prematurely.

You'd almost think TW wants an excuse to excise their very expensive but now worthless vestigial limb...

Re:Forgot Something? (1)

mpapet (761907) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780643)

but as the telcos lose their traditional phone customers to VoIP, a normal phone line will just get more and more expensive.

Last time I looked, it was telcos owning the wire to your, and millions of other homes.

Even if telcos have to invent reasons for you to keep your phone wires (and they will) they most certainly will not go quietly into the night.

As someone that moonlights tech support for home users I had an especially bad experience in one home with two computers on AOL dsl. They called me because one machine was slow for a while then stopped getting on the Internet. After a wipe and reinstall the PC refused to get on AOL. Tech support hung up on me. I ended up using a miserable hack to get it all to work.

On the other end of the spectrum is my Dad who likes AOL(!) Thank god for penggy. I'm sure there are very many users like my Dad who find AOL quite satisfactory.

What I'd love to know:
Are the infrastructure costs of dialup higher than DSL for an ISP? I don't see the wisdom of driving everyone onto broadband.

"dial-up ... upgrade to broadband" (1)

g0at (135364) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780303)

Heh. Dial-up modems use broadband signalling. Compare with ethernet, for example. Sigh.

-b

AOL is circling the bowl . . . (1)

mmell (832646) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780308)

once all the technotards who use AOL see what they've been missing, AOL will go the way of SCO.

Which is sad, really.

AOL takes away all incentive to keep customers. (4, Insightful)

djkuhl (902899) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780320)

AOL seems to be too confident in their content value. If a user does not value the exclusive content, they've officially announced a way to encourage users to switch instead of moving to broadband. AOL just officially lost all customers who wanted an easy way to connect to the internet to read web sites and check their e-mail. AOL needs to realize that upgrades and spiked costs end up in permanent account loss.

A good case for my point would be Dish Network. As they've started updating their systems for HD, they have given current users free updates for satellite dishes. Without this option, the users could easily re-evaluate their options and check out DirecTV. When Dish finally has a complete HD solution to all their customers, they could very well up the cost of their service and customers would have to accept the fact that they can't afford the initial cost of a new satellite service. Dish Network understands that you have to upgrade some options for free or you lose a permanent revenue source.

Do AOL dialup users read slashdot? (1)

Proudrooster (580120) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780331)

Is it me or is this a strangle place for this advertisement, err I mean article. I'm thinking that the target audience for this post is all the slashdotter's who are forced to support family members and friends that use AOL dialup. I'm sure glad I'm clued into the $18/mo. plan :)

Actually, I got dear old Dad off of dialup and onto the low-end broadband years ago, but it makes support much easier now that I can share his screen.

Lifetime Internet Providers (1)

SlashdotOgre (739181) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780342)

Out of curiousity, did any of those ISP's back in the mid 90's that offered lifetime internet access for one large initial fee survive the dotcom era?

Re:Lifetime Internet Providers (1)

djkuhl (902899) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780366)

PeoplePC used to sell computers and give you an internet access account as part of the deal. They now only sell internet access.
NetZero used to be free with some sort of advertising program installed but they dropped that and now they're $10.

Re:Lifetime Internet Providers (1)

SlashdotOgre (739181) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780453)

I'm actually referring to the providers that offered lifetime access for a one time fee (usu. like $120), not providers who offered limited free access (like NetZero/Juno). I recall seeing ads up in the SF Bay Area back around 1996, but never bothered to try them (I was in an area fortunate enough to have DSL access from PacBell & cable access from TCI in 1997).

Re:Lifetime Internet Providers (1)

djkuhl (902899) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780690)

Ah, well PeoplePC was supposed to be free for life. Kind of like how .Mac was supposed to be free for life for all Mac purchases. Seems they can change the plan whenever new management wants to make a splash by cutting as many costs as possible.

Re:Lifetime Internet Providers (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780490)

Out of curiousity, did any of those ISP's back in the mid 90's that offered lifetime internet access for one large initial fee survive the dotcom era?

Yeah, Eskimo North [eskimo.com] is still around and doing well, and I think Drizzle [drizzle.com] is also doing well too.

$ Criminal (3, Insightful)

u16084 (832406) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780344)

Thats just criminal. AOL is no longer the premiere Content Provider. They will Join Qlink in the near future. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QLink [wikipedia.org]
Time Warner is now bundling AOL service with its High Speed service (to raise subscription rate for stock holders?) Everyone knows that you can get dial up as low as $9/month. Not to sound like a broken record, but BroadBand users tend to stear away from AOL - Cutting their own throat.

Confession time (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780346)

I have a confession to make; I once tried the AOL free trial. The free trial wasn't woth the cost!

Re:Confession time or have you ever AOL'd (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780478)

I have a confession to make; I once tried the AOL free trial. The free trial wasn't woth the cost!

I find that it's hard to get the 1024 hours of free online time. After about the third day of mainlining caffeine, you start seeing things, and it's not your monitor reacting to the magnetic calendars you keep putting on it ...

Re:Confession time (1)

MrP-(at work) (839979) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780644)

Me too, twice.

Of course I never actually downloaded or installed the client, I just joined and then faxed a cancellation notice ~28 days later. Then a few weeks later I got a free ipod and mac mini =P

Good (1)

loraksus (171574) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780360)

Anything that pushes their customers to other ISPs is a good thing in my book. Although most will no doubt be pushed to the major providers, some will actually go with local companies and I think one of the best ways to keep customer hostile policies like "tiered internet", etc is to keep as many people as possible getting access through small companies and independents instead of large isps who have sociopathic beancounters that are given drugs to find new ways of screwing us, pissing us off and making an additional 12 cents a month for it. After all, those policies work best when there are no alternatives.

Then again, AOL has pretty awesome retention, years ago I used their service for free for well over a year by calling in every month and threatening to cancel. I suppose that may of have changed though.

DSL = DSlow (0)

StikyPad (445176) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780381)

Man.. I can remember the days when the current flamewars were over which was better: DSL with its unique connection per user, or cable with its shared bandwidth. Nowadays I don't think DSL should even be considered as broadband. Not that it's not a huge upgrade from dialup, but it should be an intrinsic part of landline service by now, rather than requiring a separate subscription. The only real difference between DSL and dialup is that it's using spectrum outside of the FCC's regulations for POTS. Sure, the modulation is different, but it's still just a signal traveling over copper wire.

Re:DSL = DSlow (1)

Average_Joe_Sixpack (534373) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780446)

Sure, the modulation is different, but it's still just a signal traveling over copper wire.

So is cable for that matter.

Re:DSL = DSlow (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780657)

And you might mention, so is a T1.

But then again, cable and dsl are completely and totally different kinds of signals on copper wire.

Re:DSL = DSlow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780474)

DSL gets contention ratios, same as cable does. The only difference is the line sharing is hidden behind the switches at the telco exchange, as opposed to the line you're plugged in to. The only way you're guaranteed a full speed DSL line is if you only connect to other IPs on your /24.

Re:DSL = DSlow (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780517)

Hey genius, You are aware that you can get 24 meg DSL right ?

Re:DSL = DSlow (2, Informative)

Gogogoch (663730) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780612)

Hmmm...let me see....I have a 3Mbit DSL connection giving me downloads at over 300 kb/sec. Err....yep, that's slow. Jeez, there's hardly any difference between this and the 3kb/sec speed I got with dial-up. You're right - let me cancel straight away - I'm being duped.

Dude - get this into your techno-head: the difference between dial-up and DSL can be huge to people interested in using the Internet. The physical reality, or layer, is irrelevent to the majority of these people. They got care a rat's ass about the FCC and spectrum usage.

"I dont think that DSL should even be considered as broadband". In your universe it probably isn't.

Oh, great, even worse life. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780387)

Promise not to laugh, ok?
I'm an ex-physicist, aerospace engineer, nuclear engineer, broadcast engineer, chemical engineer, computer engineer, and biophysicist. I live with my two ancient parents maintaining them in their home, which has no cable access and is hidden deep in trees away from any town. They refuse to give up their aol dialup, afraid of losing contact with their extensive email lists. We are spammed and telemarketed many times per day. Our phone line is not reliable, connecting often at 14.4. This is not a joke.

I'm thinking that if I ran a cable/made a wireless link to the corner of our property about 250m away, again, through trees, and put a used dish/pringles can upped-gain antenna up on a power pole I might just get line-of-sight to a wireless tower several km away, past the edge of a town full of rf crap, and get at least sometimes some actual link. Anybody want to make suggestions as to hardware or options? It's a battle to stay on long enough to do a google...

From the Article (1)

Orrin Bloquy (898571) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780399)

"...Chairman Steve Case confidently stated that this was as much a coup as their getting AOL CDs put around the necks of the Winter Olympic medalists, and he wanted to know if you were done with that sandwich."

What is this dial-up of which you speak? (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780465)

Everyone I know has gigapop Internet. Some of the local peons only have cable modem or DSL, but they're in the minority.

Is this some kind of red state thing like having landline phones like in the Dark Ages?

People can't let go of AOL (5, Interesting)

hirschma (187820) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780480)

AOL is actually being pretty crafty about this.

They know that there's a huge number of subscribers that are scared shitless about leaving the warm embrace of AOL, and they just won't leave. They figure that some folks will upgrade to AOL broadband, and AOL makes more money on this folks. Others will pay double, even triple for phone dial-up. Just to not lose that wonderful interface. They'll even suffer pain, case in point:

I'm seeing this girl that's just scared to death of computers. AOL auto updated to the new version, and just totally screwed her computer in the process. This is not enough to get her to quit AOL. I fix her computer, requiring a complete OS reinstall, and set it to an older less toxic version... her stupid brother pops in an AOL 9.0 CD to upgrade it. It upgrades to 9.0, and then the cheap ass CD shatters from the high rotation rate of her 56x CD-ROM drive immediately post-install - totally destroys it. Then the software again does a number on her computer... and she still will not quit AOL.

Hell, AOL is now learning what drug dealers have know for a while, and are going to make bucks on it.

Re:People can't let go of AOL (2, Funny)

Thurn und Taxis (411165) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780688)

You realize, of course, that you're going to have to marry this girl - she's never, ever going to get rid of you no matter how badly you behave.

AOL is free. (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780701)

1. Install AOL and use the free trial.
2. Call up and tell them you want to leave.
3. Get a few more months.
4. Goto 2.

AOL Comercials LIE then ;) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780491)

Not sure if any of you have seen the annyoing comercials for AOL where there is a group on tour to the AOL HQ, and one of the guys keeps asking questions, like "SPAM?" with the tour guide reponding "Blocked!", "Virus's?", "CURED!", etc...

you get the point. The funny thing the second to the last question is "Higher Prices?" and the tour guide reponds, "Never!"

So hopefully that fucking anyoing comercial will go the way of the albatros! and maybe AOL will eventually too!

Who needs AOL anyway? (2, Insightful)

dasunst3r (947970) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780523)

This is definitely not nice of AOL as this have rammifications such as:
  • Alienating users who simply can't afford broadband
  • Alienating users located in places where broadband just can't reach them
But then again, considering that CompUSA employees have loads of trouble getting people to sign up for AOL, that goes far to say just how inferior AOL is and how people using it deserve to pay for their stupidity. Looks like AOL is asking for an even smaller subscription base (or maybe even a death wish)...

In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14780529)

Linux is STILL for fags.

"Encourages" rural users to pay more, doesn't it? (1)

Dzimas (547818) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780563)

There are times when it makes sense to stay cheap & simple. For instance, many people who live in the countryside find dialup to be the only affordable option - they can't get cable or DSL broadband, and satellite is an expensive proposition for casual users. And lets not forget that people like my mom don't need rip-snorting broadband to check e-mail once a week. And in other news, bus drivers have announced a raise in fares to encourage people to buy cars. ;)

Right hand, meet left hand. (1)

JPriest (547211) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780597)

Why would they want to drive people away from dialup access? Dialup is their bread and butter, if they encourage people to dump dialup and move to broadband they will do just that, but I won't count on them keeping AOL when they do get broadband.

AOL Broadband Cheaper??? (1)

Jynx97 (834066) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780635)

Am I understanding this correctly? The AOL broadband is almost %50 cheaper than my current cable modem connection? Call me a noob, but....A/S/L??

Only in America (1)

stud9920 (236753) | more than 8 years ago | (#14780637)

What, there are actually people on dialup ? Paying for it ???? 26$ ????? Any of the three would get you in a museum in Western Europe
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