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MPAA Files Lawsuits Targeting Major Torrent Sites

CowboyNeal posted more than 8 years ago | from the not-so-fast dept.

579

diverge_s writes "Slyck news reports on a new wave of lawsuits the MPAA has filed against major Bit Torrent search sites including: Torrentspy, Isohunt, Torrentbox, Niteshadow and Bthub. From the article: '"Website operators who abuse technology to facilitate infringements of copyrighted works by millions of people are not anonymous - they can and will be stopped," said John G. Malcolm, Executive Vice President and Director of Worldwide Anti-Piracy Operations for the MPAA. "Disabling these powerful networks of illegal file distribution is a significant step in stemming the tide of piracy on the Internet."'"

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In other words (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791173)

You're either with us or you're with the terrorists

And we've seen what happens to the terrorists

Pick a side

Re:In other words (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791207)

And we've seen what happens to the terrorists

they get all bent out of shape and trample each other and loot and burn buildings over a picture a 7 year old could draw

Re:In other words (5, Funny)

darkain (749283) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791288)

i read that as "You're either with us or you're with the torrentists"

Shooting themselves in the foot (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791175)

I've bought about 200GBP of DVDs this year as a direct result of downloads from bittorrent. Just thought I'd mention.

Re:Shooting themselves in the foot (5, Funny)

PorkNutz (730601) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791357)

Blanks don't count!

Re:Shooting themselves in the foot (5, Interesting)

laughingcoyote (762272) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791405)

I know your comment was a joke, but actually in many countries there's a tax on blank media that goes to content providers. So...in many cases, blanks DO count.

But noone told the sites be sued? (4, Interesting)

sandstorming (850026) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791176)

From the article: The operators of these indexing sites appear surprised at the MPAA's decision to sue, as they have yet to receive any notification. "Funny, they didn't email me," Gary from ISOHunt said. "I'm not too concerned because we deal with copyright requests everyday, some of them from studios MPAA represents." "Justin" from TorrentSpy echoed Gary's skepticism. "I guess I will learn more when I see what they have filed exactly. [I'm] not sure why they are suing when we comply with DMCA requests but I guess we will learn more down the road."

Re:But noone told the sites be sued? (1)

Romancer (19668) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791280)

In other news, MPAA goes completely insane and sues Microsoft for supplying the OS to use Google.com to search for the movie "This film is not yet rated".

Re:But noone told the sites be sued? (1)

damsa (840364) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791421)

Under the Civil Rules of Procedure you have certain number of days after filing the complaint to give notice to the defendant about the suit. I think it might be 90 days. Not sure why the MPAA filed suit, it seems like they like to send a cease and desist first or try to settle before filing suit. Not a lawyer yadda yadda.

Because they have a hide like a rhino... (1)

leonbrooks (8043) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791446)

...and having a total ironyectomy seems to be a prerequisite for Board memership.

FYI (4, Informative)

Kawahee (901497) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791178)

A quick glance at TorrentSpy [torrentspy.com] shows that they haven't given up, they're still dishing out torrents. They have a news story about it, but they don't seem to be too concerned.

I remember when the MPAA did this last time and the torrent sites shut down completely because it was in their subpoena (sp?) thing, so does this mean that TorrentSpy is defying the MPAA and (potentially) putting themselves up for harsher penalties?

Re:FYI (3, Informative)

Kjella (173770) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791235)

I remember when the MPAA did this last time and the torrent sites shut down completely because it was in their subpoena (sp?) thing, so does this mean that TorrentSpy is defying the MPAA and (potentially) putting themselves up for harsher penalties?

Well, from the interview it seems they haven't recieved anything from the court, only been informed that a lawsuit has been filed. Once they do get a court order (I believe subpoenas are only request for information), and have something like 24-72 hours to comply (I don't remember exactly), we'll see if they're going to stick to their guns.

searching is not illegal (4, Insightful)

mrshowtime (562809) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791180)

Search engines are not illegal in the USA. You can use a search engine to search for anything. You can use a search engine to find a prostitute or drugs and other forms of illegal "entertainment" so why does copyright infringement the ipso-facto crime of the century? There are a lot of illegal bitorrent files and there are a lot of legal files. I hope someone challenges the MPAA on this.

Re:searching is not illegal (1)

black mariah (654971) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791204)

It's not the searching that's the problem. Providing the torrents is.

Re:searching is not illegal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791219)

Torrentspy is a search engine. It doesn't host binaries. It certainly doesn't do what the MPAA press release seems to state it does:

> The site offers over 160,000 content items including 27,182 movies,
> 21,130 TV shows and over 45,000 music items.

Re:searching is not illegal (1)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791265)

But the MPAA thinks that this text (BT-style SHA1 hash): da39a3ee5e6b4b0d3255bfef95601890afd80709 could describe an illegal file and is enough to be copyright infrigement if it does!! Or something like that...

Same tired old argument (1)

Ogemaniac (841129) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791252)

I could use the banana I am going to eat for dinner to choke you. On the other hand, I could use a suit-case nuclear bomb as a doorstop.

Now given that both of these items have both legitimate and illegitimate uses, should they be treated the same under the law? Of course not, and the reason why should be obvious - the banana has few illegitimate or dangerous uses, and is overwhelmingly used legitimately. The nuclear bomb has few legitimate uses, while its illegitimate uses are many and extreme. Also, even when used legitimately it can generally be replaced by safe alternatives.

As illustrated in the above example, having some legitimate uses is not enough to avoid a ban, nor is having some illegitimate uses enough to justify one. Instead, we must weigh the legitimate and illegitimate uses against one another. The three primary factors in deciding whether legal restrictions would be useful are:

1: What is the ratio of legitimate to illegitimate uses?

2: What alternatives exist to the legitimate uses?

3: How effectively could a ban be enforced?

BitTorrent and the like score quite badly on the first two points - most BT traffic is illegitimate, and there are plenty of legal ways to distribute files. The only question is how effective would any sort of regulation of BT really be.

Re:Same tired old argument (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791275)

The parent is talking about search engines. these sites are search engines. are you implying there are no legitimate search engine sites ?

Re:Same tired old argument (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791325)

of course there isnt any [slashdot.org]

Re:Same tired old argument (3, Insightful)

Mr2001 (90979) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791290)

As illustrated in the above example, having some legitimate uses is not enough to avoid a ban, nor is having some illegitimate uses enough to justify one. Instead, we must weigh the legitimate and illegitimate uses against one another.

Of course, we must also consider what "illegitimate" means in context. A nuclear bomb has the potential to cause thousands, if not millions, of deaths, as well as render the land uninhabitable for decades to come. A BitTorrent site, on the other hand, merely has the potential to give thousands or millions of people access to free movies, music, TV shows, software, and porn, and the only threat it poses is to the business models that are founded on restricting free speech. Which one is the real threat?

Re:Same tired old argument (2, Insightful)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791386)

A BitTorrent site, on the other hand, merely has the potential to give thousands or millions of people access to free movies, music, TV shows, software, and porn, and the only threat it poses is to the business models that are founded on restricting free speech. Which one is the real threat?

If those business models that are 'founded on restricting free speech' stop paying for production of the content that goes to make up the main core of all these torrent sites, what will the sites offer? The content isnt free, you just arent paying the asking price for it. The real threat is that the content may stopped being produced because the people paying for the production arent seeing a return on investment.

You have no inherent entitlement to the content.

Re:Same tired old argument (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791426)

You have no inherent entitlement to the content.

So? Let's just take it anyway. It's not like it's real property. Movies are mostly fluff junk anyways -- a lot of people producing stuff that in the long run has little inherent value.

And the same old tired misnomers. (4, Insightful)

Rocketship Underpant (804162) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791366)

"most BT traffic is illegitimate"

Not all people consider sharing of information and media to be "illegitimate". The idea that culture can be controlled and bottled up by powerful media companies is a quaint 20th century notion.

You are quite correct in questioning the effect of any ban. Bit-torrent networks and other types of filesharing are rooted in basic human behaviour and desires. That's not going to change any time soon.

Re:Same tired old argument (1)

arachnoprobe (945081) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791371)

You are just wrong: The possession of a nuclear bomb is illegal under the law, not that of a banana. Comparison to search engines: They are not illegal.

Re:searching is not illegal (1)

khellendros1984 (792761) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791270)

I think the MPAA would have the same problem with torrent sites even if they provided lists without searches....they're still facilitating infringement of copyrighted works.

Re:searching is not illegal (1)

Jugalator (259273) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791279)

Yeah, like these EVIL Google guys!

Funny that with Google, if you download copyrighted stuff (and by far most is) found by using its search engine, you're the infringing entity, but if you download copyrighted stuff (and by far most is) found by using a BitTorrent site, the site is the infringing entity.

Re:searching is not illegal (1)

91degrees (207121) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791312)

The difference beeing that most of what Google indexes is prefectly legitimate, whereas most of what torrent search sites index are torrents for illegally distributed copyrighted works.

Re:searching is not illegal (1)

Disposable Rob (806435) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791365)

Search engine indexes from Google, Yahoo et al are neutral as to the legitimacy of a work. Do an image search for a celebrity and try to find what percentage of images come from the copyright owner or someone lawfully allowed to distribute those particular works.

The only difference is Google and Yahoo are opt-out indexers while torrent sites are opt-in.

Re:searching is not illegal (1)

Shihar (153932) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791323)

Search engines are indeed a-okay in the US and are shielded for the most part for the content that they help you find. However, as the Supreme Court case against Gorkster showed, there it isn't an absolute protection. If it can be shown that piracy is a significant portion of the traffic, they can be shut down. Sure, these torrent sights might have legit torrents, but what portion of them are legit? I am not saying I have an opinion one way or the other, just that the law is almost certainly not on their side.

Re:searching is not illegal (1)

dnaumov (453672) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791355)

I think there is a reson to believe that more guns are used in robberies, murders and other unlawful cases compared to the gun usage for self-defense and shooting practice. Guns have legitimate uses, but most times they are used, the use is illegal. See a pattern here?

Re:searching is not illegal (2, Insightful)

Shihar (153932) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791390)

I think there is a reson to believe that more guns are used in robberies, murders and other unlawful cases compared to the gun usage for self-defense and shooting practice. Guns have legitimate uses, but most times they are used, the use is illegal. See a pattern here?

Uh, no, I don't see a pattern. No because what you said is completely and utterly untrue. The vast majority of guns used (at least in the US) are used legally. I am going to go ahead and go out on a limb here and guess that you have never lived in rural America. Hicks and red necks shoot off more ammunition for the purpose of killing innocent bottles and deer then the fucking army does. Hell, I bet the private populace of the US legally owns more guns then the army does.

Re:searching is not illegal (1)

Professor_UNIX (867045) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791391)

Search engines are not illegal in the USA. You can use a search engine to search for anything.

Napster was a search engine, it was shut down. There are tons more illegal BitTorrent files than there are legal files, and the sites mentioned in the articles concentrate on helping you find the illegal files. I don't see anything wrong with getting rid of the bad seeds (no pun intended) in order to promote the legal uses of BitTorrent for downloading your ISO image of Linux, for example. Pirates much of the services out there.. Napster was awesome for finding even legal music because at that time 95% of the people looking for MP3s used it.. now you've got people scattered onto different incompatible networks and need a client that will search all of them.

Re:searching is not illegal (1)

damsa (840364) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791429)

Napster was shut down because they indexed artists and song names thereby contributorily infringing or something like that.

Gracias (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791182)

Thank you MPAA, I didn't know about a couple of those!

just a thought (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791188)

bit torrent more like butt torrent
a place for slashdot fanboys to download anime/asian porn disguised as child porn
the flood of granny porn against 4chan's /s/ will never stop.

a worldwide pandemic is coming.
not aids.
not grids.
not even birdflu.
tacoflu is coming. guard your tacos.

Re:just a thought (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791234)

flood? more like the trickle of piss that comes out of your pathetic dick after you've stood there for 5 minutes because your prostate has swollen to the size of a grape fruit you fuck.

Re:just a thought (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791237)

Sounds like you're speaking from experience?

Re:just a thought (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791277)

if someone is going to hijack my thread its going to be myself you bunch of assclowns
i was going to flood them again but i got high, and i'm about to go to bed.
the non-asian revolution is slowly gaining strength.
asian porn is a backdoor to child porn.

PrivatePublic (-1, Troll)

sloths (909607) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791189)

You mean people actually use public BT sites?


oink oink.

do you think the private sites are any better? (1)

fredistheking (464407) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791294)

Did you forget about elitetorrents.org? The thing that makes private sites worse it that when they do get busted the probably have some sort of log that points back to you and exactly what you have uploaded. They have to enforce the ratios some way.

I Declare My Rebellion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791196)

Enough with the "what is piracy" debate, enough with talking about fair use, enough with all the liberal bullshit.

I declare my rebellion!

I will download whatever I want off the internet. If it is copyable, it should be free - music, movies, software.

Corporations like the MPAA and the RIAA need to be abolished. They are part of the corporate framework which is turning this world into a global police state.

I stand with the movement of people that wants to share. We do not strive for a gluttony of personal wealth. We stand for the common good, for communal wealth.

Enough with the greed, enough with laws that liken pirates to terrorists, enough with wealth concentrated in the hands of the few.

Rise Up! Rebellion! Revolution!

Re:I Declare My Rebellion (1)

kfg (145172) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791241)

. . .enough with laws that liken pirates to terrorists

Why on earth do you think they called him the Dread Pirate Roberts?

Among our tools are terror.

KFG

Re:I Declare My Rebellion (0, Flamebait)

cliffski (65094) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791268)

for someone hating the global police state, you sound awfully like a communist. If you dont want to pay for the fruits of other peoples labours, you are either a thief or a communist.
Choose one.

How about libertarian? (1)

Cybert14 (952427) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791289)

That is an apt label.

Re:I Declare My Rebellion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791310)

I'm an anarchist. And I would prefer communistic property relations.
The vision I have is a society where IP and copyright laws are abolished. People are free to sell their stuff, but if I can copy it, then it won't be against any rules to do so.
And of course, such a society will only exist with a mass movement to create it, meaning people are more interested in mutual aid than huge profits for themselves, because they will realize a healthy community is one that shares.
The piracy debate shouldn't be considered in isolation, it fits in with the whole system of exchange.
To put it in short, think Gift Economy.

Re:I Declare My Rebellion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791316)

You make communism sound like a bad thing. I'd take a really working communist country(note: there has never been one yet. Someone has always managed to fuck it up) over any capitalistic system.

Re:I Declare My Rebellion (1)

tgone (956916) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791394)

thief or communist? how about a capitalist? they like free stuff, too.

Re:I Declare My Rebellion (1)

trezor (555230) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791410)

A thief steals. Copyright infringement is not stealing. Communism is a political ideology. Calling people communists as an insult may work well in the US, but keep in mind the rest of the world sees the US as right-wing neonazis.

What you call "communism" is probably what most of the world calls "in between left and right". But I guess calling people names is the only form of "political discussion" you guys know.

Not saying that parent poster was particulary insightful or anything, but calling people "thiefs" and "communists" ain't particulary classy either.

A Message from the Internet to the MPAA (-1, Flamebait)

ZackSchil (560462) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791199)

Sorry if this sounds a little harsh, but would you folks just fuck off already? You make money hand over fist in the theaters and even moreso in DVD sales. It is clear that people still pay to see and own movies that they really like, even though they are available for free. Just because YOU would steal our money without providing us with a product if you thought you could get away with it doesn't mean that we'll do the same to you. Not that any of your actions really award you this sort of ethical treatment.

So in summary: please stop complaining. You make enough money already. Leave the torrent places alone, we like them for watching films we'd never pay to see or watching for a film we did pay to see second time before the DVD release.

Now I need to go finish watching ¥¥¥ Syriana DVDscr XViD DVDRip-MeeKRaB 2005.

Re:A Message from the Internet to the MPAA (1)

MaelstromX (739241) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791221)

WTF "you make enough money already" what business ever thinks they make enough money?

Re:A Message from the Internet to the MPAA (3, Interesting)

cliffski (65094) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791239)

An interesting but flawed philosophy. You seem to imply that if the IP holders were just scraping by and making ends meet, you would be happy for the torrent sites to be taken down?
Im just about making ends meet as a software develoepr, and one of my games is available as a torrent. No doubt this isnt exactly helping sales. So I suppose that the torrent sites you support check the financial data of each submitted torrent, will spot that I'm a solo developer who needs the cash, and decline to list torrents of my stuff right?
Bullshit. This is just freeloaders getting everything they can for free because they think they wont get caught. Dont insult everyones intelligence by dressing it up as some kind of robin hood tale.
Many things the **IA do is bullshit, but closing torrent sites that encourage illegal content is fine by me. Bittorrent is a superb system that works wonders for distributing game demos and movie trailers etc. By defending its usage to steal IP, your just going to bring the whole system down.

Re:A Message from the Internet to the MPAA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791282)

http://ts.searching.com/torrent/486089/Starship_Ty coon [searching.com]

That game? I think I'll try it when I get home. If anyone plays the full version beforehand tell me how it is.

You tend to stereotype a lot of the people that use torrent sites. Sure, they may be heartless self-centered assholes, but they are downloading your game for fun. Now, did you become a software developer because you wanted money or because you enjoyed doing it?

Re:A Message from the Internet to the MPAA (1)

ZackSchil (560462) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791286)

Is your apostrophe key broken?

Anyway, my point is that people will make the right decisions and purchase what they appreciate and can afford. If your game was really great, it would make people feel bad for stealing it. I think those who selfishly steal, enjoy AND would have otherwise purchased the game are by far in the minority.

Re:A Message from the Internet to the MPAA (1)

Romancer (19668) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791319)

This is why I applaud apple for itunes. They realize that an easy service + selection = profit. Same with Netflix. There are some smart people out there.

MPAA/RIAA on the other hand think that Threats + DRM + higher prices + mandatory multiple purchases on single items (mp3 for home PC, mp3 clip of same song for cellphone, CD of same song for car, etc) = profits

I really wanna hear their kids at school on "bring in your parent and have them explain their job" day.

"My daddy is a suit at MPAA, he... why are you all holding guns to my daddys head?"

 

Re:A Message from the Internet to the MPAA (1)

EzInKy (115248) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791291)


Bittorrent is a superb system that works wonders for distributing game demos and movie trailers etc. By defending its usage to steal IP, your just going to bring the whole system down.


Isn't bringing the IP system down the whole point behind this mass infringement movement?

Re:A Message from the Internet to the MPAA (1)

Richard_at_work (517087) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791411)

I hope you are being sarcastic, but incase you arent....

The whole point of this 'mass infringement movement' is to get stuff for free. You really think that even 1% of the people that use Bittorrent for acquiring illegal content even cares about the IP system in anyway? You think the majority would understand what you are talking about if you brought the matter of civil disobediance up with them? No, its about getting something for 'free', avoiding paying the costs, keeping up with their TV shows before they are broadcast in their country.

Re:A Message from the Internet to the MPAA (2, Interesting)

Kokuyo (549451) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791307)

Ever thought that perhaps your game just isn't good enough?

I'm not saying everyone out there downloading from BT is a saint who just wants to try before they buy. That would be bullshit. But there are enough people out there who doubled or even trippled the amount of money they spent on DVDs and/or CDs and/or games just because they found games they've never even heard about before.

I don't remember whether it was on heise.de or /. but there was an artivle that CD sales of the top 50 went down quite a bit while the studios still made more cash because people suddenly bought way more stuff that wasn't mainstream. So good music WILL sell. So will good movies and good games. Therefore I believe that if you're not happy with how much games you sell you might want to try and make a better one next time.

I know this might be moderated Flamebait, but you know what? I don't care... if people don't like my opinion, it's their problem entirely.

Re:A Message from the Internet to the MPAA (5, Informative)

rm69990 (885744) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791309)

Ummm, you do realize sites like isoHunt don't have torrents *submitted* to them, they index .torrent files available elsewhere on the internet, much the same way Google indexes websites available elsewhere on the internet. They remove torrent links upon request, have you actually bothered emailing any of these sites to ask them to remove your torrent?

Re:A Message from the Internet to the MPAA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791244)

That release has a bad aspect ratio. Get Syriana.2005.DVDSCR.PROPER.AC3.XViD-ShinBet instead.

- G.I Jew

Ahoy there (0, Redundant)

Anne Thwacks (531696) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791208)

We must sink all the ships and burn the sails to put an end to piracy on the high seas.

And hang everyone from the yard-arm.

And an extra ration of rum to all who agree with me.

Re:Ahoy there (1)

gnarlin (696263) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791285)

Humm, this really puts a new twist on the "talk like a pirate day". From their perspective.
Yarr, I'm gonna copy that bountifull chest 'O yourrsss young lass.... with all those movin' pictures in'em on silvery discs; and darrs no'thn yo 'cann do about it sweetie! Yarr, harr, harr!

Constantly talking about piracy evokes much stronger emotions in people than talking about copying. Since murderin' pillagin' and rapin' on the high seas inspired fear, hate and lothin', they (the evil ones of MPIAARIAA (second cousing of cthulhu) decided to just use that phrase instead.

I therefore ask *everyone* reading this to constantly correct anyone and everyone you hear talking about "piracy" and remind them that they are talking about copying, *not* the murdering and the pillaging and the violating of young virgins with heaving busoms. Humm, actually now that I think about it, becoming a pirate doesn't sound so bad after all!

Re:Ahoy there (1)

Rocketship Underpant (804162) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791383)

"I therefore ask *everyone* reading this to constantly correct anyone and everyone you hear talking about 'piracy' and remind them that they are talking about copying, *not* the murdering and the pillaging and the violating of young virgins with heaving busoms."

That's a terrific suggestion. I do this all the time in forum and blog discussions, actually. If the best arguments the anti-filesharing jackboots have against filesharing involve outrageous hyperbole and comparisons to murder, I think they've pretty much lost the debate. It's certainly difficult to discuss actual issues with such people.

Re:Ahoy there (1)

LurkerML (668881) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791415)

Skol, matey. Let's drink till we are conserved.

Misplaced effort (1)

Flounder (42112) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791213)

If they'd put half the effort into actually making quality films as they do with these worthless lawsuits, I'd gladly pay $30 for theatre admission and snacks for my girlfriend and I. Until then, I'm paying what it's worth to see these movies.

Without piracy, it's doubtful ANYBODY saw Stealth or The Island. Even for free, I couldn't sit through all of Stealth.

Thought process... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791293)

Even for free, I couldn't sit through all of Stealth.

First Thought: That's odd, I did.

Second Thought: Oh yeah, now I remember why! Jessica Biel was in it. Duh!

Third Thought: Wait... then whats wrong with this guy? Hullo! Jessica Biel! Fap fap fap?

...for my girlfriend and I.

Fourth Thought: Ooohh, I get it. You poor whipped SOB. :(

Fifth Thought: Hey! I have some pictures of Jessica Biel somewhere on my storage drive!

Re:Misplaced effort (5, Funny)

DeathToAllah (956853) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791328)

If they'd put half the effort into actually making quality films as they do with these worthless lawsuits, I'd gladly pay $30 for theatre admission and snacks for my girlfriend and I. Until then, I'm paying what it's worth to see these movies. Do they admit blow up dolls to movie theatres nowadays?

new addition to pirate bay legal threats page ? (4, Insightful)

TractorBarry (788340) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791215)

Ho ho ho. So can I look forward to an addition to the a href="http://thepiratebay.org/legal.php">Pirate Bays legal threats page ?.

P2P, torrents etc. are simply like having the best radio station and film channel in the world. It lets me try out stuff without spending my hard earned cash (an ever decreasing amount of which I have to spend on "non essentials" such as entertainment) so I know that I like something before I buy it.

Oh how the *AA dinosaurs futiley roared as the small furry mamalls took over their world :)

Bizarre (1)

BJH (11355) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791393)

The Island: Got it off PirateBay, crap.
Stealth: Got it off PirateBay, awful crap.
Transporter 2: Got it off PirateBay, utter crap.
Star Wars III: Available off PirateBay, but bought it because I wanted to.
Diablo II: Got it off PirateBay, enjoyed it so much I went out and bought a 5-year-old game.

Moral? Provide good content, more people will fork over their cash for it.

Re:new addition to pirate bay legal threats page ? (1)

Baricom (763970) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791403)

Well, yes, except that you're stealing the music and films. Not to mention demonstrating why the movie and music industries need to implement DRM technologies that Slashdotters tend to loathe.

Major sites (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791217)

If you actually RTFA, the news server itself lists top 5 bittorent sites (mininova, piratebay ..) all of which are noticably missing from the sue list. I guess this is another 'we are suing 1 thief per year thus effectively stopping all criminality' article.

They're going after NZB sites too (3, Interesting)

grubbymitts (903312) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791228)

NZB-Zone has been targetted along with binnews and a couple of others. It is interesting to note that they have only gone for nzb sites and not the actual usenet providers - they appear to have the same rights as ISPs when it comes to common carrier status, but I'm no lawyer.

Survey: How Long Since You Bought A CD/DVD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791233)

1. How long has it been since you bought a physical music CD?
2. How long has it been since you were in an actual music store?
3. How long has it been since you bought a physical movie DVD?

1. I think I am at somewhere in the 3-4 years since I last bought a music CD

2. 3-4 year again - driving by a music store is like seeing a rotary phone - quaint and strange

3. I don't buy movies

The RIAA and their actions has moved me from a casual pirate who was happy to buy stuff I really liked to a hardcore pirate who is perfectly willing to screw my favorite artists out of my cash as long as it hurts the RIAA in even the smallest way.

Re:Survey: How Long Since You Bought A CD/DVD? (1)

mybadluck22 (750599) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791245)

1. 3-4 Years for me too.
2. A few weeks. I have been in music stores with friends while we were hanging out.
3. Hm, don't recall, but I've been recently (In the last two months) been given movies as gifts, so if that counts then two months.

Re:Survey: How Long Since You Bought A CD/DVD? (1)

rvalles (649635) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791315)

Here, I haven't bought a DVD ever. I do not support anti-user measures like CSS or zones, therefore I don't buy DVDs.

About CDs, it's been about 6 years, exactly the same amount of time since I have internet at home (before, it was just impossible to connect in Spain with a reasonable cost); like for most, p2p changed my musical preferences a lot; before, I listened to what I now think of as crap. Many authors of good music saw me on their concerts or buying their merchandise, which of course should have given them more money than buying zillions of those stupid CDs. Nowadays, I've heard, CDs even come with evil antiuser technology of them, what a shame.

Of course, I came to learn, with the years, that copyright and patents are bad [ucla.edu] .

Re:Survey: How Long Since You Bought A CD/DVD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791297)

1) Buy them all the time, from mailorder or local shops. All independant stuff though. The last RIAA-affiliated CD I got was Radiohead's Hail to the Thief when it came out, and that was the first in about a year or so.

2) Again local shops that stock hard-to-find music, at good prices too. And with a good used section.

3) I used to buy used movies from blockbuster for under $10. Haven't in awhile tho.

So yeah I support artists and I buy physical stuff. But the RIAA gets squat. I'm not even American and I hate them!

Re:Survey: How Long Since You Bought A CD/DVD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791301)

1. I haven't bought a CD for myself in over 10 years. I've bought a few as presents. I also don't download music. I almost never listen to music (except the incidental stuff I catch on the radio).

2. No idea - probably a couple of years since I was in a music store - when I last bought a CD for someone else.

3. I have approx 500 anime DVDs, and a much lower number of non-anime DVDs (but still a lot).

I download TV shows that either won't be shown here in Australia, or won't be shown for a *long* time, or where the TV channels have changed the time slots, etc umpteen times since the show started.

And although I haven't yet, I might download the first episode of an anime series that I think I want, and just want to see if it's as good as the reviews.

Freedom for the Culture! (5, Insightful)

rvalles (649635) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791236)

Millions of people, they say. Maybe it's time to start listening to the will of those millions instead of listening to just a few industry-paid lobbysts.

Freedom [wikipedia.org] for [gnu.org] the [ucla.edu] Culture [wikipedia.org] !!!

Just nuke whole ISPs and be done with it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791253)

By the standards the MPAA is claiming for these suits, ANY ISP anywhere should be shut down because their internet connections are allowing the theft.

Shut them down, shut down the whole internet.

Hell, then go after Dell, Apple, HP, etc etc because the computers they make are used to steal movies and worse, as servers to distribute stolen movies.

Then go after CRT and LCD display makers, keyboard and mouse companies, speaker manufacturers, network card makers, router makers, and just wait until they start going after the electric utilities for providing the power used to steal movies.

And the thieves need places to live, food to eat, and possibly jobs to supply the money to buy the food, so go after their homes, their cupboards and their jobs too.

And eyeglass and contact lens companies for making it possible to see these movies. Heck, just fire off some nukes and blind everyone. That'll keep the movies safe.

Best anti-theft ever: just don't make the movies in the first place, then sue for lost profits and loss of business! Brilliant! I should trademark this one!

Re:Just nuke whole ISPs and be done with it (1)

spikestabber (644578) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791299)

Thats taken from the RIAA's favourite book. They been pumping out less releases, and pretty bad ones at that, then the previous years, now they are crying of lost sales. CD sales were at an all-time high when Napster was live and well.

Stemming the tide? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791266)

"Disabling these powerful networks of illegal file distribution is a significant step in stemming the tide of piracy on the Internet."

Interesting choice of metaphor. It brings to mind an image of a 5-year old kid at the beach building a wall out of sand to "hold back the tide."

Absurd (5, Insightful)

kumachan1983 (956909) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791269)

I had to make an account just to respond to this. Im a long time reader so it was about time anyway. Listen this is just history repeating itself. We saw it First with Napster and music. Then Kazaa came up and all of its clones. Then they attacked the few major torrent sites in existance with lawsuits. What happened everytime? Pirating evolved, its like the MPAA and other such organizations serve as nature in the darwinism that is file sharing. Every time they strike down one site or technology it just evolves and gets better. I remember the days before bittorrent and how much of a pain it could be to find a specific file, now because they have forced us to we have a much more efficiant and anonomous system to distribute illegal software. I say bring them on because I'm excited to see what new and improved ways will come forward to share files. Not to mention the fact that if they quit trying to stop it (amplifying the problem) and started trying to profit off of it they would be doing much better. Look at the advertising oppertunities....

Re:Absurd (1)

Spad (470073) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791382)

Necessity is the mother of invention, after all.

I'll get modded troll (-1, Troll)

RedHatLinux (453603) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791274)

, but I can't wait until they sue a "button-down, Oxford-cloth psycho" whos snaps and travels to the RIAA's headquarters and stalks "from office to office with an Armalite AR-10 carbine gas-powered semi-automatic weapon, pumping round after round into" these motherfuckers.

Because, if it happens often enough, a deterrent effect will be created.

Now before you lecture me on my "fight Club fantasies", how effective has peaceful methods like lawsuits, writing letters to politicians, who elections the RIAA helps finance, and boycotting been?

Yeah, exactly.

Apologies for the bad paraphrase, but it's late.

Re:I'll get modded troll (4, Insightful)

tekrat (242117) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791377)

I hate to agree with you, but I agree with you. Only the threat of real violence is ever going to stop anybody. Peaceful protest doesn't work.

Look at the success of the Muslims protesting the Cartoons of the profet Mohammad. USA Newspapers and TV are scared shitless to air the offending cartoons, in fact, you have to hunt real hard to find out what the hoopla is all about.

Imagine if every lawyer working for the RIAA suddenly had to fear for his life every time he issued a supeona against a website. Imagine if every spammer thought that his family could be in danger when he sends out the 6 billion emails for Penis Enlargement.

They'd think twice about doing such things if it meant their car would have flats, their house could be burnt and their family kidnapped and beheaded.

There's an old saying that freedom must be taken. If we want to be free of these gangsters, then we need to take action, and it's very likely going to have be violent action because these days nobody understands anything else.

The terrorists have won. They have taught us that terrorism can get people to change their ways. Look how much they have changed the USA. We need to take that lesson and apply it to other areas that need change.

So, yes, while I don't want to agree with you, I admit that that only way I see real change happening is after some people die. It's not a nice thing to say; but it's an awful reality that we may have to come to accept.

And please don't send the FBI to my house, I'm not a lunatic about to commit these crimes, I'm simply pointing out that this is likely to happen sooner or later.

Thanks!

Re:I'll get modded troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791397)

And you think terrorism has done a great deal better?

Stupid %&*^#

Re:I'll get modded troll (0, Troll)

bxbaser (252102) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791404)

"with an Armalite AR-10 carbine gas-powered semi-automatic weapon"

probably would happen if you could download an AR-10

Oh noze, teh cops! (2)

Groo Wanderer (180806) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791304)

Hmmm, lets see. The math says that there are several dozen solid BT sites out there, and 7 have been threatened. If they all go away today, there are only a few dozen left to choose from, and there are 20 or so added a week.

Yup, this will show those little shits, they'll have to run to #8 on thier bookmark list now. Ha, take that.

YAWN. Stupid MPAA, no cookie. You are making the same mistake the US military is, fighting the wrong war, and losing both because of it.

            -Charlie

Thanks, didn't know half of these (5, Funny)

Werrismys (764601) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791306)

slashdot is educational.

Up-side-down People! (3, Insightful)

suv4x4 (956391) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791335)

Most companies try the best to look great to their customers, to appeal to young people. Microsoft is spending billions to make itself look smaller and more open.

MPAA and RIAA are spending billions to make headlines such as "MPAA sues grandpa without computer", "RIAA sues 13-year old girl for sharing mp3", "DRM technology in audio CD-s installs without a warning and opens your PC-s to hackers", "don't use the uninstaller, it leaves your PC even MORE open to hackers", "MPAA and RIAA join together to sue Earth and be done with it".

If I could separate myself from this twisted reality we live in, where this is supposed strategy to drive up sales, I'd say they are doing everything possible to make people hate them.

The Pirate Bay loves these guys (3, Informative)

feyhunde (700477) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791341)

Go read http://thepiratebay.org/legal.php [thepiratebay.org]

Most of these sites aren't hosted in the US, or in countries that recognize torrents as being pirated material.

So what did they think of this time? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14791350)

Reminds me of an article in a belgian newspaper recently, where our copyright organisation spoke the following words : "we know they're probably braking some law, but we don't know which yet"

If they're breaking the law, why is it taking so long to sue them? shouldn't it be obvious if someone is breaking the law? Also seeing the huge amount of money they'll probably be suing for shouldn't it be clearly said in a law what they're doing wrong, not some on the edge interpretation of some obscure law?

and probably somewhere in the future we'll probably end up with even stricter laws, making torrentsites etc... actually against the law thanks to the lobbying...

This is as much about law as a witchhunt... They either keep on looking until they find some weird interpretation of a law they can sue under, or they make sure new laws are made for what doesn't please them... How about just letting them build prisons and do the judging themselves? they'll end up being able to do whatever they want anyway, it'll just speed up the process...

Two Words. (1)

Captain Lou (904174) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791389)

Compulsory Licensing.

Please do! (3, Insightful)

Per Wigren (5315) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791395)

Please help boosting the development of the anonymous networks... Because that's what's going to happen if you keep on doing this.

You have stolen enough (5, Funny)

tcornelissen (897694) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791416)

More with your mouse over the bottom of each page in the press release: http://www.mpaa.org/press_releases/2006_02_21_raze r.pdf [mpaa.org]
You will vind a hidden registration link.
You guys have now stolen so much, the MPAA cannot afford anymore to pay a $30 registration fee to Iteksoft. http://www.iteksoft.com/modules.php?op=modload&nam e=Sections&file=index&req=viewarticle&artid=4 [iteksoft.com]

Dear MMPAA. (2, Interesting)

ekran (79740) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791423)

Dear MMPAA. It is time for you to sit down and chill a bit (grab a beer or something.) - you should know by now that stopping people from copying digital information is a futile effort. I know this is your job, and I know that you are working very hard on this, but it is not an effort that's going to lead to any regime where pirated movies does not exist. Just ask the guys working against music and software piracy.

So, while you sit there contemplating on the situation and what you do, you should ask yourself. Why is it that people are pirating movies? Let me give you two answers; well, the most obvious one, to save money. What can you do about this? Lower the price of theater tickts and DVDs? - Well, I don't know for anyone else, but I don't think my reason would be money.

Next one, the big one, availability, this is a major issue. You've become a lot better at distributing movies fast, atleast the movies that brings in a lot of money. But there are still people who prefer to watch their movies at home, and there are places that doesn't get the move at their theater until months after it has been shown and talked about elsewhere in the world.

Personally I think that if you provided an online service without your silly DRM, one which people could download your movies themselves and pay for it, people would. I know atleast I would. You have implemented means to stop people from doing this, like DVD zones, movies being released at different times in different parts of the world and you're releaseing the dvds a lot later than the theaters has shown the flick.

So, what I am suggesting is that you stop chasing kids downloading your materials off the net. You should still go after the profit makers, nobody likes them anyway, but above all, if you want to stop piracy, you gotta beat the pirates in terms of availability and quality of service.

You can transfer my consultant fee to my paypal account now.

MPAA supports terrism (0, Troll)

quokkapox (847798) | more than 8 years ago | (#14791432)

By motivating nefarious evildoing individuals to devise new, more secretive ways of furtively sharing information more anonymously, the MPAA is supporting terrorism. So I say, GO GET 'EM, DUBYA!
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