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Enzyme Computer Could Live Inside You

Zonk posted more than 8 years ago | from the sign-me-up-when-i-can-have-a-nanobot-swarm dept.

155

dylanduck writes "New Scientist reports the creation of an enzyme-based computer that performs AND and XOR calculations, and combinations of the two, based on the presence or absence of specific chemicals. If they can be engineered inside living cells, they could measure a patient's metabolism and deliver just the right amount of drug at just the right spot, the researchers reckon. I'm worried about the viruses." Ba-dump *chink*.

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Ha! (4, Funny)

qw(name) (718245) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793187)

I'm worried about the viruses." Ba-dump *chink*.
OMG, that was funny. It gives new meanign to "Safe Hex" from years gone by.

Re:Ha! (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793231)

I wouldn't be worried about the viruses... The time invested in developing a virus will be more than a few days hacking code in a computer. It will require a lab, thousands of dollars of reagents, an education, and more than likely a multidisciplinary team.

As opposed to a geeky 14 year old who is too scared to talk to girls.

Re:Ha! (1)

lanswitch (705539) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793555)

It will require a lab, thousands of dollars of reagents, an education, and more than likely a multidisciplinary team.

Something like a small but well-focused group of terrorists?

Re:Ha! (1)

c_forq (924234) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794003)

Rainbow Six anyone?

good ol' zonky (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793343)

Isn't it supposed to be the sound of a drum cymbal zonk? Like during standup comedy there is a guy from the band that just played, or is waiting to play, or is providing musical accompanyment that goes "badump *pisssh*" (kick, cymbal or something a drummer will inform us of, but that *pisssh* sound)

Seriously zonk, I don't want to make you feel bad, but there are like a zillion people more qualified than you that would happily do what you are doing for free. I don't know how you got there, but I suppose that's a special skill in itself that you must have (or someone you know or sucked up to).

Slashdot has gone downhill, I mean it's obvious why zonk was appointed, cause the other editors (as they have openly stated) don't give a damn about spelling, proof reading, checking links or anything. If they appointed someone with half a clue it would have made them look bad. Oh well.

I will await people pointing out my spelling mistakes and using the "don't come here if you don't like it" argument. Thank you for your time.

Re:good ol' zonky (1)

edittard (805475) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793404)

a special skill in itself that you must have (or someone you know or sucked up to).
I think you're right about the sucking, but wrong about the up.

Re:good ol' zonky (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14794022)

No. He was calling the submitter a 'Chink'. Zonk, you racist bastard, you!

Re:good ol' zonky (1)

c_forq (924234) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794071)

Google results:
ba dump chink: about 11,000 results. (Using ba-dump *chink* gets 242, putting quotes around it gets 39)
badump pisssh: No results. (Also no results for ba dump pisssh.)

I'm sorry, I think you lost this round. Better luck next time.

Enzymes are not alive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793518)

Therefore, an enzyme-based computer will not "live" inside you.

It will only "function" inside you.

Yes I know it is just a detail, but since we are all-grokking geeks we should hold ourselves to a higher standard.

Re:Enzymes are not alive (1)

wolff000 (447340) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793839)

"Yes I know it is just a detail, but since we are all-grokking geeks we should hold ourselves to a higher standard."

Fan of "Stranger In A Strange Land" by robert a heilein, me too. that book actually changed the way I look at a lot of things.

anyways I am not worried about terrorists messing with this kind of thing cause the equipment it would take would most likely be far beyond that of a terrorist. nuclear power on the other hand is something rather easily attainable and for a terrorist much better option. a dirty bomb is way easier to make with almost no skill. where as coding a biological computer takee a whoe lot of education and training, from what i understand of it anyway.

Re:Ha! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793763)

I'm worried about the viruses." Ba-dump *chink*.

Some slashdotters might think this was "funny", but well-informed people realize that it is actually a quite hurtful and insulting expression.

You wouldn't find it so amusing if Zonk went around writing Ba-dump *honkey* or Ba-dump *n----r*, now would you?

Actually, not so funny as you might think (1)

edraven (45764) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794274)

Many forms of virus do in fact reproduce themselves by hijacking enzymatic processes in living cells. The idea of a virus subverting one of these computing systems would be a very real concern. The terminology appears to have come full circle.

Logical sequencing? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793215)

If the "computer" can do more than simple combinatorial logic, what controls the flow of execution?

Random chance encounters with the right substances??

Thanks - I'll wait until version 2.

Re:Logical sequencing? (1, Informative)

WhiplashII (542766) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793759)

Um, the basis of all computers is two gates that allow oposing actions. For example, a Not gate and an OR gate. (And=not(or(not(a),not(b)))) Everything else is built from these gates - so this is already more than enough to build a computer. (Not=xor(a,a)), (or=not(and(not(a),not(b))))

Re:Logical sequencing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14794013)

I think you'll find that you cannot get NOT(a) from XOR(a,a), given that XOR(a,a) will always give 0.

Re:Logical sequencing? (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793900)

What's wrong with a Turing machine [wikipedia.org] with a double-helix tape?

Re:Logical sequencing? (1)

EMeta (860558) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793909)

Yeah, how unstable would a system be that depended on random encouners with chemical substances? About as unstable, I imagine, as almost all life on Earth.

While in truth this isn't completely stable, it's still the best we're ever going to do in biological reprogramming, so we need to start the work sometime. Sure beats having to rely on EM sensitive devices all the time.

Re:Logical sequencing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14794097)

Hmmmm.....therapeutic treatments equated to the outcomes and same time scales as evolution of life on earth??

Why not dump a bunch of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen in your body and let the random interactions fix what ails you??

In Related News (2, Funny)

ReidMaynard (161608) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793218)

Core Dump takes on new meaning..

Re:In Related News (3, Funny)

EntropyEngine (890880) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794428)

Presumably then, when something goes badly wrong, you end up with the blue spleen of death...

In Soviet Russia... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793232)

enzyme computer live inside you!

Oh wait...

Yes, but ... (3, Funny)

nmccart (952969) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793234)

will it run Linux?

Re:Yes, but ... (3, Funny)

include($dysmas) (729935) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793277)

and, can you imagine a beowulf cluster of these things? oh wait....

Re:Yes, but ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793908)

No, it will run Linus.

Re:Yes, but ... (1)

coreyb (125522) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794433)

Well, in Cory Doctorow's 0wnz0red [craphound.com] , I think it did.

Re:Yes, but ... (2, Funny)

nganju (821034) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794438)

More like "Yes, but will it run Linus?".

I dunno (2, Insightful)

dtsazza (956120) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793239)

OK, so they've got a computer that works on enzymes, which is pretty clever. And from TFA:
"This is basically a computer that could be integrated with the human body," Willner told New Scientist. "We feel you could implant an enzyme computer into the body and use it to calculate an entire metabolic pathway."
But can't you do that already with standard computers (we can make them pretty small these days, so I'm told)?

My guess is that they instinctively think "Ooh, it's made of enzymes, instead of all that nasty enzymes and electricity, so it must be better to put in people." But then we've been putting pacemakers etc. in people for years without any problems. And if they're suggesting that these wouldn't be self-enclosed units and would actually interact with actual human enzymes that may come and go as they please... then they've got a lot of contingency planning and 'wiring' work to do...

I don't see this having any real impact for a long while yet.

Re:I dunno (2, Insightful)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793323)

And if they're suggesting that these wouldn't be self-enclosed units and would actually interact with actual human enzymes that may come and go as they please...

Well, otherwise, what good are they? But you're quite right that this is very far off. I can imagine the technology being used to putter around with animals for years before it's a good idea to start screwing around with humans. The fact is that we just don't understand all that much about the basic functioning of some of these systems - or basically any of them - and so anything we do now would be just groping in the dark. That can be fun, but it can also be dangerous :)

I'm more worried ... (5, Funny)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793244)

... that Microsoft might enter this business. Would give a whole new meaning to Blue Screen Of Death ...

Re:I'm more worried ... (4, Funny)

PFI_Optix (936301) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793318)

Just wait til Apple enters the market.

It'll cost twice as much, and only models will be able to install it.

(lol cliches)

BSOD jokes getting old (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793601)

Maybe you use crappy hardware .. I havent had a reboot worthy crash in XP in years. Actually I cant even remember ever having one. Apps may crash on occasion but never the whole OS. Maybe you are using old or non standard hardware with driver issues? My boxes have over 512 MB RAM etc. Plus an HD with gigs of free space for swap etc.

Re:I'm more worried ... (1)

geobeck (924637) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794375)

...and you won't be able to uninstall the bundled software like Alimentary Explorer and Windows Memory Player.

Isn't there already one in your body? (3, Funny)

LM741N (258038) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793246)

I think it is called the brain. Although it might work a little bit differently that what they are doing.

Re:Isn't there already one in your body? (1)

BecomingLumberg (949374) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793372)

How many /.'rs will start waddling like Tux after they install Linux on their brain.

Then again...

How many already waddle due to poor health choices?

::Run and hide from the flame!::

Re:Isn't there already one in your body? (1)

BewireNomali (618969) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793509)

what of the pregnant women on slashdot? *shrugs*

Re:Isn't there already one in your body? (1)

c_forq (924234) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794151)

Pregnant women on slashdot? Are you telling me there are women on slashdot? And are you telling me women don't have to leave their parents' basement to have sex?

Re:Isn't there already one in your body? (1)

penguinoid (724646) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793575)

I, for one, wouldn't mind having a digital computer interfaced with my brain, to help me with mathematical calculations. And it wouln't hurt to have digital memory, either, so I can remember things my brain thinks are unimportant. I suspect that if it could be connected properly to neurons, a brain will simply incorporate it as part of itself. As for problems, I think that powering and cooling a chip might be the worst problems, but maybe an enzine computer would be easier.

Re:Isn't there already one in your body? (1)

Luyseyal (3154) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793642)

No shit. I've wanted an FPU upgrade to my brain since high school. That would be my second cybermod after superhuman cyborg eyes.

-l

Re:Isn't there already one in your body? (1)

billcopc (196330) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793854)

I guess retards would pwn us all with their watercooling rig! *rimshot*

Thanks, I'll be here all week!

Re:Isn't there already one in your body? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14794291)

Assuming you had a digital computer interfaced with your brain, how would that be significantly faster than using a calculator? It's not like your nervous system has significant latency to your fingers...though such an interface might be of aid to the physically disabled.

A digital computer, unlike your brain, is a "dumb" device -- it doesn't have a subconcious to interface directly with yours, so it would just sit there idly and wait for explicit instructions, connected to your concious mind. Stick with the calculator for a while yet. ;)

Old News... (4, Insightful)

Ancil (622971) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793251)

If they can be engineered inside living cells, they could measure a patient's metabolism and deliver just the right amount of drug at just the right spot, the researchers reckon.
I already have one of these. It helps me to live, so I named it a "liver".

Re:Old News... (1)

Programmer_In_Traini (566499) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793460)

yes but as you know, not everyone's liver works properly, if at all, thus, the good news of finding something that can do it in its place.

Re:Old News... (1)

LnxAddct (679316) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793556)

That's the crazy thing about people, we all don't work the same, and we all don't work properly. I mean call me crazy but maybe, just maybe, some people need certain hormone, enzyme, and drug levels artificially maintained because their bodies have a deficiency of some sort that does not allow their bodies to properly regulate themselves.
Regards,
Steve

Re:Old News... (1)

gad_zuki! (70830) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794011)

>I already have one of these. It helps me to live, so I named it a "liver".

I have one of these too and live in a network. I often interface and exchange data with the one called "wife." Its like sneakernet, but you use something other than your feet.

Re:Old News... (1)

stunt_penguin (906223) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794143)

So, does that make you or your wife the server? I do hope she's a thin client.

I hope you both take adequate precautions before opening one of your ports.

Does your network require a username and password- I bet your username was 'marry_m3' and the password 'i_d0'

If you ever have trouble logging on, chocolate and flower patches tend to help ease network restrictions.

Also, if you're feeling adventurous, you may seek to interface with an alternative port, but you may be met with resistance.

Reckon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793288)

Are these researchers ranchers by any chance? When I hear the word reckon, I imagine some cowboy talking about herding cattle, not scientists creating wonder drugs and biological computers.

Anybody here read (1)

i_should_be_working (720372) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793290)

Blood Music [sfsite.com] by Greg Bear?

In it someone's "enzyme computers" got too smart.

Re:Anybody here read (1)

mfrank (649656) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794135)

Yeah, it got extremely weird at the end. Although Cory Doctorow's "Ownz0red" is more topical.

Er... (1)

AWhiteFlame (928642) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793311)

I'm not worried about viruses. I'm worried about hackers or these in the wrong hands. >.>

Re:Er... (1)

PFI_Optix (936301) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793361)

Simple solution: don't make them programmable, and don't network them. No communication + no writing = no virus risk.

Re:Er... (1)

dtsazza (956120) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793443)

I can't imagine any possible reason to having external interfacing on these computers, so with any sense they'd be autonomous once built and released.

In theory someone could still change their program physically... but if someone you don't trust is up to their elbows in your kidneys, you've got more pressing concerns! :)

Re:Er... (1)

trparky (846769) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794370)

Yeah, I keep thinking about Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex and the case known as the "Laughing Man."

I wanted to write a sci-fi story on this... (1)

vertinox (846076) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793330)

I had a brain storm about an idea for a sci-fi short story in which a team of college grads figure out a way to turn their dna into computers. This would enable them to form huds in their mind and use their brains for neural computers instead of say... Cybernetic implants...

Then one student learns how to break the code and then start to modify all his DNA and becomes a superbeast consuming all life and then the good guy nerd transforms into some physic dragon ball-esque character (who can also modify his dna to turn into a female supermodel) and fights it out in an anti-clamtic battle and then my story goes down hill from there... So I sort of never bothered to even to try to start writing down the story.

Re:I wanted to write a sci-fi story on this... (1)

radarsat1 (786772) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793801)

Instead of giving away your story idea on slashdot, you should write it. ;-)
(I'm serious.) I know we all need a little push once in a while, but once you get started it'll roll..

Soylent PC (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793344)

The computers are made of people!

Re:Soylent PC (1)

natedubbya (645990) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793843)

Hey who modded this parent down? All Soylent Green references should be instantly modded up +5 without hesitation.

now if only it had a shifter... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793362)

If it had a shifter as well, it could do addition. (x + y = (x^y) + ((x&y)<<1), just repeat until the second term is 0)

Beer (5, Funny)

i_am_the_r00t (762212) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793405)

If Day=Friday AND time="5:30:00" then Deliver_Beer() Function Deliver_Beer() If Bank_Balance > $300.00 then Beer="Sam Adams Boston Lager" Else Beer = "Stroh's" Endif end Function

In Soviet Russia... (-1, Redundant)

rAiNsT0rm (877553) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793414)

Computer lives in.... oh, crap... never mind.

Forget viruses... (1)

aardwolf64 (160070) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793441)

Forget viruses... I'm more concerned with software bugs. You think the Pentium Pro floating point errors were bad? Try developing a nervous twitch or not being able to walk because of some software engineer's typo...

Re:Forget viruses... (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794383)

I'm not worried.

try
mainbiohandler;
except
on E: EBioError do
begin
DeliverTranks;
PhoneHome('We''re hosed man! '+E.Message);
end;
end;

I can't be worried.

Greatest advantage of human computers (1)

jack79 (792876) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793454)

"Hello world" program requires ZERO lines of code. Textbooks all one chapter shorter.

Cool ... (1)

kitzilla (266382) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793458)

... a cup of stain-fighting detergent [swbic.org] , and your Maytag is a supercomputer.

Don't tell Microsoft, or pretty soon we'll all be crashing the spin cycle.

Of course it runs NetBSD ;) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793480)

Of course it runs NetBSD ;) No hype required :D

Ob (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793483)

I, for one, welcome our new microscopic, drug-dispensing intralords.

Human upgrades, here we come! (4, Funny)

WidescreenFreak (830043) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793503)

This could lead to some great human programming! Think about it!

New GEEK YOGURT with Enzymatic-Action (TM)! Comes in new exciting arrangements!

Now you can become a Perl expert with our Perl Programming yogurt! Comes in the convenient beer flavor!

Our new BFG2000 yogurt with Hyper-Enzymatic-Action (TM) will help you to maintain focus and alertness during those long, overnight CS or BF2 sessions! Comes in Jolt and Penguin Mint flavors!

Our C++ yogurt doesn't come in one package but instead comes in several small packages that work together!

Our Increase Your Attractiveness To Girls yogurt is still in development, but we're working on it. It's not as easy as we thought.

We've given up on our .NET yogurt because it's too difficult to swallow.

Increase your memory with our RAM super-enzymatic yogurt! Just remember that you'll need to eat a good helping of this every year or so as life's base requirements keep increasing.

Finally, our Microsoft yogurt with BSOD enzymes with help you to learn to do new and amazing things that you've been able to do for a long time with competitors' yogurts, but now you won't have the extra expense of buying theirs! (Why, no, that's not anti-competitive. Why do you ask?)

Hey, it's Friday. Gotta have some fun. :)

Re:Human upgrades, here we come! (3, Funny)

Dolly_Llama (267016) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793837)

This would kill Open Source.

Would you put the yogurt of some guy named Linus in your mouth?

Re:Human upgrades, here we come! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793889)

Ewww! I'd bet that it would sell really well in San Francisco, though!

Re:Human upgrades, here we come! (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794191)

Hey, it's Friday. Gotta have some fun. :)

      Perhaps I'm cynical, but:

      Marketroid #1: And the great thing is, because our clients are not able to synthesize these enzymes for themselves they will have to continually buy our yogurts to keep their skills honed since the enzymes denature and lose their ability over time.

      Marketroid #2: Wouldn't it be even better if one of the by-products of the enzyme degradation was in fact toxic, so they would have to keep buying the product one they've tried it, or die?

      Yeah ok too many big words for marketing people, but you get the idea ;)

overheating could be a problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793529)

i'd be worried about overheating, like the drummers in diamond age by neal stephenson

Kurzweil's vision (2, Interesting)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793549)

Raymond Wurzveil [wikipedia.org] has been writing for years now on the coming merger of man and machine (as in his highly recommended book The Age of Spiritual Machines [amazon.com] ). The general idea is that eventually our minds will be transferrable to silicon and external means of storage, but this idea of humans being augmented with biological computing is an interesting short-term solution. I wonder if he'll make some comment about it.

*blows the horn* (1)

PeterSomnium (954672) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793550)

Let's start the distro-wars!

Nano terrorism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793573)

Intelligent drug delivery? More like intelligent terrorism if it came into the wrong hands. Anyone remember this article circa 2000: http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/8.04/joy.html [wired.com]

Paging Steve Mann! (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793574)

Someone better tell Steve [wikipedia.org] that wearable computers are so passé.

Thanks Neal Stephenson (1)

MobyDisk (75490) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793577)

The computer will be called CryptNet [wikipedia.org] and will be used to calculate The Seed [wikipedia.org]

Re:Thanks Neal Stephenson (1)

X (1235) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794129)

HeHe. Kind of funny how the young 'uns quote Stephenson instead of his predecessors. Herbert's Lazarus Effect comes to mind immediately, but I'm pretty sure he wasn't the first to think along these lines.

Well, I see potential (1)

aphoenix (877085) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793581)

I'd say Willner's thinking small (if you don't know who Willner is, then RTFA). Why make cures for sick people, when there are rich people out there who want to get fixed, too? I mean, if you can make a computer that would make you thin, or muscular, or change your hair colour permanently, or stop hair production in your legs... then go for it and make a ton of money. Heck I'd pay for something so that I didn't have to wax my back...

Worrisome, though, is the computer that you accidentally ingest that has a real bug, like, say, a Y2K bug (if that had actually been a big deal).

Re:Well, I see potential (2, Interesting)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793748)

What they need is a protection system so that if the computer doesn't get regular external "handshakes", it'll shut itself down. (This is not for your safety, understand. This is so that the VIAA [Viagra Implant Association of America] can get its large licence fee.)

Re:Well, I see potential (1)

aphoenix (877085) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793788)

Wow, I hadn't even thought of the extort... I mean, uh, licence fees that could be had using this system...

Just think about it - you wouldn't want to miss your renewal costs on your "lungputer".

Re:Well, I see potential (1)

AndroidCat (229562) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793829)

Especially if you owe big weekly payments to your friendly lungshark.

Or a twist for tv show plots: "This man will die unless we can get him to an ATM!"

imagine... (1)

pulse2600 (625694) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793667)

a beowulf cluster of these!

YOU FaIL IT (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793675)

recent ar`ticle put development models comprehensive 486/66 with 8 liitle-known we get there with the accounting real problems that

Chink? This is offensive. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793696)

Slashdot editors should think before using words in the article.

talk about... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14793706)

...monitoring system resources

Omg.. (1)

DerCed (155038) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793722)

They are assaying some enzymes in vitro and are speaking of a "biological computer"? This is not really fascinating for a biology undergraduate like me.

"Protein engineering" is much more interesting! Customly made proteins which perform specific operations in the body of an organism.

fascinating (1)

SolemnDragon (593956) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793878)

in soviet russia... you assimilate the computer!

Now, with that out of the way: i'm wondering whether this can be turned to practical application in the near future with cancer treatments. How far away is this?

And what happens if the markers used go awry? How easy would it be to end up with the wrong dose in the wrong place? I know if this were being used on me, i'd only agree to be an 'early adopter' in one of two circumstances- illness with a high risk of fatality, in which case the risks of treatment would outweigh the risk of dying without it, and very minor complaints with very safe remedies, because that way the risks even in the even of misfire are still low.

That leaves a lot of room for serious illnesses to go untreated in the middle, so i'm going to be very curious to watch this technology and see what happens with it.

Overclocking gone wrong.... (1)

Kn1nJa (878764) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793973)

If you overclock this computer, there's no reflashing the BIOS to recover.... Besides, LN2 isn't exactly good to be running though your cardiovascular system.

Need torrent! (1)

nblender (741424) | more than 8 years ago | (#14793989)

Torrent needed for Ebola vaccine! Please hurry!

And The Singularity Draws Ever More Near (1)

MCTFB (863774) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794012)

Just imagine if the average script kiddie could harness this technology with easily accessible tools to basically play god. Maybe that sounds cool to some people, but it sounds more like the potential death of mankind to me.

I mean, if you thought Spanish Fly and Roofies were a big deal on college campuses, just wait till you have people tailoring these substances to programmatically alter a woman's body chemistry in a way which makes the average Slashdot geek irresistable to all of the women on the planet.

Re:And The Singularity Draws Ever More Near (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14794259)

And of course, there are probably downsides to this, too!

Re:And The Singularity Draws Ever More Near (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14794464)

...the potential death of mankind ....

...makes the average Slashdot geek irresistable to all of the women on the planet.

So irresistable slashdot geeks will be the downfall of mankind? Makes sense to me.

Battlestar (1)

CMiYC (6473) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794036)

Did anyone else read this and think, "I could be a Cylon?" ...

Chemical DeCSS (1)

ion_ (176174) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794044)

If i make a body part of mine run DeCSS and the Motion Picture Assho^H^Hociation of America® hears about it, will DMCA allow them to amputate it?

OT, but it's "ba-dum ching", you nitwits. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14794062)

Take it from a musician: bass drums (or toms) don't go "dump", and cymbals certainly don't go "chink".

Re:OT, but it's "ba-dum ching", you nitwits. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14794090)

and cymbals certainly don't go "chink".

      They do in China...

Outside the body first... (1)

Necromancyr (602950) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794079)

I was looking into doing research into these and DNA computer systems when I first started looking into going to grad school a few years back. Essentially, things are still (after 5 years) only at the very basic levels. Work in vitro (outside the body, in a tube) isn't at the 'fully functional' level yet and until you can make a progammable style 'computer' that works in a tube...it's simply not ready to be put into a person where one error in genetic code could result in life threatening consequences.

And, once there...removal may be fairly difficult if something does go wrong. All in all...decades and decades away.

In Soviet Russia... (1)

Dutchmaan (442553) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794081)


***Runtime Error 200 - Division by Zero***

two words (1)

jonathan_95060 (69789) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794124)

hitchhiker's guide

Balance for human immune system! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 8 years ago | (#14794307)

This is great especially if it could potentially lead to letting people live normal lives such as SLE/Lupus victims. It could actually stop people's immune system from going haywire and tell the virus tagging proteins to stop targeting healthy tissues for white blood cells to destroy. My knowledge of lupus is limited to peer reviewed published research and 2 female friends. It's odd to know at least of 2 sufferers, because they so rarely acknowledge it to *anyone* especially at work or with relatives.

Enzyme systems to study cellular systems - Neat! (1)

bsw149 (794892) | more than 8 years ago | (#14794439)

This is potentially very cool.

The complexity of biochemical pathways has to do with differential concentrations of substrates and products. These enzyme logic systems sound like they have the potential to "light up" cascades of cellular "output". Very cool tools, from a research perspective.

Perhaps this technology could be used to examine some of these pathways in more detail: Cellular metabolism - gluconeogenesis [wikipedia.org] , citric acid cycle [wikipedia.org] , stuff going on in mitochondria and chloroplasts, diabetes [wikipedia.org] , etc.

Cancer - Pathways of loss/gain of function mutations which result in tumor formation [wikipedia.org]

Make no mistake - systems like these have the potential to "hack the cell" in a much more standardized fashion.

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